Page 1

Lincoln S

qN

Pelham S t

reet

Barr reet y St

Lincoln S

qS

Victoria S

treet

Street Swanston

treet Bouverie S

Leicester

Street

Assessment 3 Individual Urban Design & Planning Report Queensb erry Stree Emma Kelly (950391) t


Lincoln S Pelham S t

CONTENT

qN

CONTEXT MAP 2

reet

INTRODUCTION 3

Barr

KEY DEFINITIONS 3

reet y St

Lincoln S

qS

ZONE AND OVERLAY MAP

4

GREEN SPACE AND VEGETATION MAP

5

SITE ANALYSIS 6 ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES

7

VISION 8

Queensb

N

t

Swanston Street

Street Bouverie

Leicester Street

erry Stree

LEGEND

OBJECTIVES & ACTIONS 9 OBJECTIVE 1 9 ACTION 1.1 ACTION 1.2 OBJECTIVE 2 11 ACTION 2.1 ACTION 2.2 IMPLEMENTATION 14

Site Area

CONCLUSION 15 REFLECTION 15

Road Casement

Victoria S t

reet

BASE MAP Site Area showing Road Casement, Street Names, Site Area

1


LEGEND

9 8

SUBURBS

10

3

1

1. Footscray 2. Port Melbourne 3. Flemingtion 4. Kensington 5. North Melbourne 6. Southbank 7. South Melbourne 8. Parkville 9. Princess Hill 10. Carlton North 11. Carlton 12. Melbourne CBD

4

11 5

SIGNIFICANT LANDMARKS Analysis Site Major waterways M1 Freeway and Westgate to Western

12

Flemington Racecourse Melbourne ShowDocklands Royal Park and Melbouirne Melbourne Central Business Disrict, Hoddle

2

N

6

Univervisty of Melbourne Study Area Melbourne Museum Complex and Carlton

7

Royal Botanic Gardens Major Railway Stations

CONTEXT MAP Study Area showing Road Casement, Surrounding Suburbs and Significant Landmark Areas

2


INTRODUCTION The Context Map shows the study area, which covers about 14 hectares in its local context within the Melbourne metropolitan area. The mentioned location is defined by Lincoln Square North, Pelham Street and Bouverie Street (north), Swanston Street (east), Victoria Street (south) and Leicester and Berry Street (west) as seen in the Base Map. It is located 3 blocks north from the Melbourne Central Business District, lies within the Melbourne University Study Area and belongs to the district of the City North. Therefore, the investigated space is part of an area that is identified as an urban renewal area, that will “accommodate significantly more residents and employment growth over the next 30 years” (City North Structure Plan, 2012). Currently there are four major zones applicable to the area: the Capital City, Comprehensive Development and the Public Park and Recreation Zone, as well as the Road Zone Category 1. Furthermore, it is affected by the Parking Overlay - Precinct 1 Schedule, the Design and Development Overlay Schedule 61 and 70 and some properties are also affected by the Heritage Overlay (see Zone and Overlay Map). The purpose of this report is to be easily comprehensible and provide a long-term vision for the allocated area to become a liveable and sustainable precinct. By doing so, the report shall display the development of a design strategy and planning proposal. Additionally, it shall recommend a strategy for their implementation, considering short-, medium- and longterm programs. These will be allocated in a timeframe of actions taken within 1 year (short-term), 3 (medium-term) and 10 (long-term) years from now on. The timeframe was chosen in order to prepare in a timely manner for the anticipated rapid growth of the population in the area. Within the framework of this paper, the issues related to the distribution and use of green space in the area will be analysed and examined, offering opportunities to enhance and further develop these structures. It will be discussed and displayed how an enhancement of liveability and sustainability can be achieved through the implementation of the developed objectives and actions.

KEY DEFINITIONS For the purpose of this report and in alignment with the Brundtland Report sustainability is defined as a “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability for future generations to meet their own needs”. In this context liveability is defined as the sum of ecological, social and environmental factors that improve the quality of life of people interacting with the space. Sense of place refers to the unique characteristics – visual, cultural, social and environmental- that provide meaning to a location and that make the physical surroundings worth caring about (Edward T. McMahon, 2012). A healthy environment is to be defined as an environment in which a healthy community is fostered and emphasised, with the human well-being in the center of development. Active, activated or interactive and vibrant in this framework refer to the built and social environment as being inviting, encouraging and welcoming. In the context of this Urban Design and Planning Report, the definition of green space will solely be limited to the publicly accessible areas. In the designated area this is represented by the greenery of the streetscapes and the public park, Lincoln Square. In this report the focus will be on social interaction, outdoor activity and proximity to green space, all of which are known to improve physical and mental health of the inhabitants (Davern et. al., 2016), as well as generating wealth and being a positive economic influence (Beatly, 2016). Furthermore, the greenery is an aid in addressing climate change, as it provides shelter, cools the city and can contribute positively to noise control (Garvin, 2016).

3


Lincoln S Pelham S t

qN

reet

Barr reet y St

LEGEND Lincoln S

qS

Site Area Public Park and Recreation Zone

Queensb

Capital City Zone 5

N

ZONE AND OVERLAY MAP Map showing Zones and Planning Overlays

Victoria S t

reet

t

Comprehensive Development Zone 2

Swanston Street

Street Bouverie

Leicester Street

erry Stree

Road Zone Category 1 Heritage Overlay Design and Development Overlay 61 & 70 Parking Overlay 1

4


Lincoln S Pelham S t

qN

reet

ree y St Barr t

Lincoln S

qS

LEGEND Site Area

Key Green Space

N

Swanston Street

Street

erry Stree

Bouverie

Leicester St

reet

Queensb

t Street Island - Existing Vegetation Street Island - Early Stage Vegetation Trees

Victoria S t

reet

GREEN SPACE AND VEGETATION MAP Key Public Green Space, Street Island Vegetation Early Stage/Existing and Trees

5


SITE ANALYSIS The general existence of green space in the area is relatively low (see Green Space and Vegetation Map). The map shows the distribution of trees and street vegetation, in early and later stages of development. The shrubs only contribute to a minor degree to the street appearance. Negatively attracting attention especially is the corner of Swanston Street and Queensberry Street where there are few trees and street vegetation. To intervene with this lack of development, further tree plantings are planned on Victoria, Queensberry, Bouverie and Leicester Street (City of Melbourne, 2016), which is why the following plan will not focus on the issue of tree distribution. The existing trees however are mostly healthy and have a high life expectancy of often over 20 years (City of Melbourne 2016) providing for a sustainable future of the greenery already present. The old, over-towering trees in Lincoln Square can be considered to be a major contribution to the appearance of the area. The added plantings of trees and further greenery in and around the flowerbeds in the park are healthy and well maintained.

LEGEND Playground Benches Picnic Tables Trees Bali Memorial Paved Walkways Textured Pavement Pebble Stone Highly used paths Alternative frequent usage Location of main sitting areas N

Fig. 1 Schematic image of usage in Lincoln Square showing low interaction with space but high traffic through the area. Data collected on 3.,4.,5. October at 8am, 4pm and 9pm

LINCOLN SQUARE

key green space of the area, Lincoln Square, is located in between Swanston Street, Schematic Illustration The of Usage and Traffic Bouverie Street, Data collected on 4.,5.6. October 2016Lincoln 8am, 4Square pm andNorth, 9pm and Lincoln Square South. The main attributes

Legend Site Area Parks Busstop Tramstop Major Tramline to Melb Uni

N

Fig. 2 Lincoln Square in the public transport network. Only the stops closest to the surounding parks are shown.

of the park are the playground, placed at the bottom, the Bali Memorial, located at the top, and the walkways, enabling the people to pass and cut through the park. The facilities, rubbish bins and public toilets, are well distributed. As the demographics of the area show, the average age of the population is 25 years (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2011), the users of the space are therefore predominantly young people, who either study, live or work in the area. The square is mainly used for leisure, social activity, connection and as a through fare (City of Melbourne, 2017, p.11-13). The layout suits the area well, as it suits the general purposes of a green space whilst also catering for the connectedness of the surroundings. However, fig.1 shows that the people predominantly pass through the space without interacting with the actual surroundings. The park is well integrated into the public transport network of Melbourne. A tram stop is located at the top entrance of the park on Swanston Street, as well as a bus stop of the 401 line at the bottom. It is surrounded by a large number of parking spots. This shows the potential to become a social hub of the area, as it is easily accessible from the surroundings and is the only open space that is located in close proximity to a high use tramline (see fig. 2).

6


ISSUES & OPPORTUNITIES Having looked at the seemingly good conditions considering the visible facts, over the course of the visual study undertaken the actual patterns of usage became obvious. The pedestrians were cutting across the predetermined walkways, leaving visible paths on the grass, indicating that the pedestrian flow of the space does not go along with the paved areas (fig. 3). Furthermore, the walkways don’t reach the playground and the benches (fig 4 and 5), some of which are additionally located behind a sidewalk border (fig. 8), decreasing the accessibility of said objects for pram and wheelchair users. Adding to this decline of convenience is the use of pebble stones on the sides of the memorial (fig.7), which makes it less approachable for the mentioned groups. Also, the park can only be entered by avoiding the stairs, which can only be bypassed by detours around the top of the park (fig. 6).

Fig. 5 playground

Fig. 6 pebble stones and stairs accessing memorial

Concluding, the studied location has relatively little distributed green spaces that can be used as a foundation for further development and extensions. The trees, street vegetation and Lincoln Square are the only publicly accessible green space. They have the potential to be further developed as they display issues with space, quantity and quality (plantings and distribution) and accessibility, usage and acceptance (Lincoln Square). In order to cater for a future community, these issues shall be addressed in this Urban Design and Planning Report.

Fig. 7 access from Swanston Street

Fig. 8 park bench

OUTCOME

Fig. 3 alternative path

Little green space in the area to expand or develop due to high density of buildings with unaccommodating surfaces

Finding alternative ways to implement nature and green space in a high density building area

Accessibility of public green space is not ideal --> acceptance and therefore usage of said space is low especially after peak hours

Enhancements and further development of pre-existing structures and designs to increase inclusiveness ussage and acceptance

Outdoor activities are limited due to the lack of space and opportunities

Further development of interactive design structures in order to activate the space

Fig. 4 picnic tables

7


VISION

The Study Area as a Vibrant, Active and Healthy Environment The area within the City North precinct will be developed into a sustainable and liveable community, through the enhancement and further implementation of green space. The place will become a vibrant and activated space within a flourishing and dynamic environment. The comfort, interaction and sense of place of the community will be ensured and emphasized. The green space will add to the sustainability of the city by having positive environmental impacts for the future and will enhance the overall physical and mental health of the workers, students and inhabitants in the long run.

8


OBJECTIVE 1 & ACTIONS Objective 1: The goal is to improve the pre-existing structures of the key green space, Lincoln Square, and while doing so, activate the area though the people using the space. This shall result in the park being a well-used, accepted and constant element of every-day life of the people living, working and/or studying in the area.

Lincoln S

Barr

Action 1.1 The enhancement of existing walkways and access paths in Lincoln Square

reet y St

The accessibility to the park needs to be improved in order to include all people and make it possible for e.g. elderly, wheelchair users and prams to access the area without problems. Here for, the paved walkway network shall be improved and expanded towards the actual existing facilities such as the playground, the benches and future constructions. Additionally, the stairs and pebble-stone ground leading to the Bali Memorial shall be altered in order to simplify the access. A proposed network is shown in fig. 9. While heavy construction work in the area is prohibited due to the DDO70 overlay (Melbourne Metro Rail Project – Infrastructure Protection Areas), minor works, such as paving is allowed and can generally be undertaken, as indicated in the planning scheme outlines for the Public Park and Recreation Zone (Victoria State Government, 2017) that is affecting the location.

qS

LEGEND Queensb

erry Stree

t

Site Area

N

Swanston Street

Street

t

Bouverie

The installation of exercise equipment and other interactive designs is a further means to encourage people to actively participate and engage with the public space. The lower part of Lincoln Square would be ideal to implement such structures, as it is easily accessible from the parking areas around the park. People working, living or studying in the area would have the opportunity to be active in combination of being outside, which is beneficial for mental and physical health (Davern et al). Furthermore, the newly produced environment can lead to social interaction leading to a stronger sense of community (Victoria State Government, 2016). Fig. 9 shows a proposal of what type of structures and where these can be installed.

Lincoln S

Leicester Stree

Action 1.2. Introduce attractive features to activate the space trough the people using it

qN

Implementation area Act. 1.1 - 1.3

Victoria S t

reet

IMPLEMENTATION MAP 1 Map showing locations for proposed implementations

9


OBJECTIVE 1 & ACTIONS LEGEND Playground Benches Picnic Tables Trees Bali Memorial Paved Walkways Textured Pavement Pebble Stone Altered access path Proposed pavement Possible extension and location of future construction Altered benches N

LINCOLN SQUARE Schematic Illustration of Usage and Traffic Data collected on 4.,5.6. October 2016 8am, 4 pm and 9pm

Fig. 9 Proposed Improvements for Lincoln Square with location and type of structures suggested

10


OBJECTIVE 2 & ACTIONS Objective 2: The aim is to create a vibrant, activated and welcoming neighbourhood, whilst integrating nature in publicly accessible space.

Action 2.1 Create streetscapes that generate social interaction and improve green space distribution

Lincoln S

According to Plan Melbourne Outcome 5 (2017) implementing community gardens is a means to encourage people to interact with each other, as well as with the surroundings for greater health and liveability in a certain area. Furthermore, this increases the production of publicly accessible food, which among other things caters for the encouragement of healthier eating promoted by the government. The fact that the area lacks developable open space, leads to the necessity to introduce miniature versions of mentioned community gardens. This can be done by planting vegetable beds within the street aisles that are found throughout the area. By solely adding to the pre-existing street vegetation, the beds will be in alignment with the parking overlay affecting the area, as this project will not influence the available parking spots (see Action 2.1 Impressions on page 12).

qN

B y Barr

c

t

e Stre

A

Lincoln S

3

4

qS

2

Action 2.2 Repurposing existing buildings in order to incorporate green space

N

Queensb

t

Site Area

Swanston Street

Street

erry Stree

Bouverie

1 Leicester Street

Due to the lack of open and green space on ground level the higher horizontal levels can be used to integrate green space in the public realm. Here the incorporation of community centres and green space is a way of combining two of the major goals imposed by this report. The users of the space get to engage with the greenery as well as socially interact. Firstly, inspired by a pilot project in Hamburg, Germany (Caroline Menge, 2016), where a World War 2 bunker is currently being redeveloped to have a social and green hub added on top of the existing structure, the principle can be transferred to the study area. Secondly inspired by the public library in Vancouver, which will add additional public space in form of a public roof top park (Kenneth Chan, 2017), the concepsts may be transferred in a smaller scale in order to be coherent with the Melbourne Planning Scheme - Urban Design within the CCZ and Heritage Overlay regulations affecting the area (Victoria State Government, 2017). The addition of public rooftop space in the area contributes amongst others to the architectural quality of roof profiles and caters for a pleasant view from higher levels. The addition to the heritage buildings and inclusion in the fabric of the city ensures their survival and adds to the character of the heritage buildings. An example on how this may be implemented is shown on page 13. Serving these purposes emphasised by the Melbourne Planning Schemes would also be the installation of vertical city “forests”. Activating streetscapes through the planting of facades is a effective means to include natural aspects in a physically unaccommodating environment. The example of the two residential towers in Milan, Italy, not only show the successful improvement of environmental aspects such as reducing greenhouse emissions and the natural filtering of air in proximity to the microclimate. It also displays the effective activation of the city view, as the façade is ever evolving and offers an interesting change of aesthetics responding to the seasons (ArchDaily, 2015).

LEGEND

Implementation area Act. 2.1

Implementation area Act. 2.2

Victoria S t

reet

IMPLEMENTATION MAP 2 Map showing locations for proposed implementations

11


ACTION 2.1 IMPRESSIONS Proposed beds

Sidewalk

Road

Parking

Fig. 10 Schematic view of proposed vegetable gardens for location B (Pelham Street) Fig. 12 Parking aisle on Pelham Street (B)

Fig. 15 Vegetable gardens in Docklands, Melbourne

Proposed beds

Sidewalk

Road

Parking

Fig. 11 Schematic view of proposed vegetable gardens for location A (corner Barry and Leicester Street) and C (Bouverie Street) Fig. 13 Parking aisle on Bouverie Street (C)

12

Fig. 14 Unused street corner on Leicester and Barry Street (C)


ACTION 2.2 IMPRESSIONS

Fig. 16 Image of proposed Bunker extension in Hamburg

Fig. 19 Implementation location 2 on Leicester Street and Barry Street (location 2)

Fig. 20 Envisioned green space in location 3 on Bouverie Street (location 3)

Fig. 17 Image of proposed library roof top park in Vancouver

Fig. 21 Schematic green space addition in location 1 on Leicester Street (location 1)

Fig. 18 Image of the Bosco Verticale in Milan, impression of how green facades look in summer

Fig. 22 Envisioned green space in location 4 on Lincoln Square South (location 4)

13


IMPLEMENTATION PLAN Short-

Medium-

Long-term

Objective 1: Improvements of pre-existing structures Action 1.1 Improvement of existing structures Action 1.2: Introduction of attractive features to activate the space trough the people using it

• • • •

Detailed Designs and plans Community involvement through surveys and feedback Find funding and sponsors (e.g. Universities or neighbouring childcare or community centres)

• •

Construction of pavement and redesign of access paths Deconstruction of sidewalk edges Construction of interactive areas such as a climbing wall (stone), chessboard, exercise material or other examples evaluated in the surveys and feedback

Outcome: A sustainable investment in the wellbeing of future generations to use and interact in the space

Objective 2: Create a vibrant, activated and welcoming neighbourhood, whilst integrating nature Action 2.1: Create streetscapes that generate social interaction and improve green space distribution

• • •

Action 2.2: Repurposing existing buildings in order to incorporate green space

• •

Detailed proposals of design, plant types and location of vegetable- and plant-beds Community involvement through surveys and feedback Organise groups or individuals willing to take on the responsibility for the beds (e.g. community groups, private people, university activity groups)

• •

`Detailed designs and plans, plus studies on environmental impacts, such as wind channels, air quality, heatislands Community involvement through surveys and feedback Set-up of a community planning bureau, where proposals can be actively discussed

Construction of beds and installation Further development of the distribution of responsibilities to ensure a sustainable engagement with the installations Consolidate maintenance

Evaluate costs and identify programs, stakeholders and institutions willing to fund and participate in the project Negotiate with all participants if there have been objections (community, planners, developers and council)

• •

Ensure the continuity of the project by keeping the space interesting, constantly updating the structures and maintaining a high level of aesthetic value. Ensuring that, through the continuity of the project, the greenery on ground level stays an important addition to the urban forest

Construction of the final design Use the project as a pilot for other similar projects across the country if successful Tailor facilities in the “city garden” to the needs of the community, maintaining flexibility and encouraging further development by keeping the planning hub active

14


CONCLUSION The aim of the objectives and actions overall is to improve the environmental, social and economic aspects in the area. The improvement of the already existing structures intents to enhance the social environment of the neighbourhood. The activated localities provide basic facilities in order to enable and encourage outdoor interaction between the people using the spaces. Furthermore, the additional implementation of vegetable gardens in the streetscapes ideally lead to the public realm becoming a space of social interaction and engagement with one another and the natural environment. In the long run, this is supposed to lead to a positive sense of belonging which is found to be linked to accessibility, the physical appearance and opportunities provided by open space (Emily Talen, 2000). The nature of the proposed actions can be developed in a timely manner and allows a shortto medium-term plan to be executed, which aims at showing quick result while being sustainable for future communities. The implementation of green space in general across the studied area, which is currently underdeveloped aims to improve the environmental conditions. The vegetable bed program is a fast means to plant large amounts of greenery, as they don’t need to develop as long as a tree. The results will be visible in a short period of time. Additionally, urban agriculture has positive effects on the environment as it can reduce the urban heat island effect, reduce air pollution and green-house emissions in the transportation line of food (Knizhnik Heather, 2012). The further plantings on community roof tops also enhance mentioned aspects, as any additional planting adds to the overall plant distribution and density in the area. The overall outcome of social and environmental improvements will aim to be visible in the mental and physical health of the inhabitants, as Davern et. al (2016) have linked it to the distribution of green space and how this is used. Not only does the development of green public roof tops aim at improving the green aesthetics and natural environment of the neighbourhood but it also aims at enhancing the economic aspects with attracting and encouraging investments in the area. All actions proposed also intent to drive businesses into the area. With property values increasing if greenery is proximate to the place (Beatley, 2016), the aim is to create a neighbourhood, that is highly sought after. The proximity to the Hoddle grid, major universities and employment areas, lay a good ground for these intentions. In addition to this, a vibrant and activated area in general provides for a healthy population in a sought-after neighbourhood which again attracts investments, businesses and increases property values.

REFLECTION Most of the report focuses on the fast and uncomplicated implementation of green space to activate and to prepare the localities for the anticipated impact of the population growth. The facilities available to the community are supposed to cater for the development of a healthy neighbourhood. However, most of the projects depend on the community’s feedback and adaptivity. The proposed plans and outcomes can only be successful if the community approves and actually uses the area as anticipated. Nevertheless, the key findings of the area, being the lack of open and developable green space, the lack of social outdoor interaction and the not ideal accessibility of existing structures, indicate the potential to enhance the neighbourhood with focus on these issues. If the community is involved and actively participates in the development of key designs and structures, the vision of the area becoming a healthy, vibrant and activated environment is likely to be achieved and is worth striving for. With the help of this Urban Design and Planning Proposal the objective is to enable long lasting and sustainable effects on the area regarding social, environmental and economic benefits.

15


REFERENCES

Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2011). 2011 Census Quick Stats. Retrieved from http://www.censusdata.abs.gov.au/census_services/getproduct/census/2011/quickstat/206041117. Beatley, Timothy (2016). Handbook of Biophilic City Planning & Design. Washington: Island Press. Chan, K. (2017, March 31). Construction begins on Vancouver Public Library’s expansion and public rooftop garden. Buzz Connected Media Inc. Retrieved from: http://dailyhive.com/vancouver/vancouver-public-library-square-rooftop-garden City of Melbourne. (2017). Lincoln Square Concept Plan Phase one Community Engagement Summary April-May 2017. Retrieved from https://participate.melbourne.vic.gov.au/application/files/9214/9801/6164/Lincoln_Square_-_Phase_1_ Engagement_Summary.pdf City of Melbourne. (2016) Urban Forest Visual. Retrieved from http://melbourneurbanforestvisual.com.au/ City of Melbourne. (2012) City North Structure Plan. Retrieved from http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/SiteCollectionDocuments/city-north-structure-plan-2012.pdf Davern, M., Farrar, A., Kendal, D. & Giles-Corti, B. (2016). Quality Green Public Open Space Supporting Health, Wellbeing and Biodiversity: A Literature Review. Retrieved from: https://www.healthybydesignsa.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Green-Spaces-Evidence-Review-FINAL_website.pdf Garvin, A. (2016). What makes a great city. https://doi-org.ezp.lib.unimelb.edu.au/10.5822/978-1-61091-759-9 Heather, Knizhnik L. (2012). The Environmental Benefits of Urban Agriculture on Unused, Impermeable and Semi-Permeable Spaces in Major Cities With a Focus on Philadelphia, PA. Master of Environmental Studies Capstone Projects. 46. Retrieved from: http://repository.upenn.edu/mes_capstones/46 McMahon, E. (2012, April 4). The Distinctive City. Urban Land Institute. Retrieved from: https://urbanland.uli.org/development-business/the-distinctive-city/ Menge, C. (2016). Planungsbuero Bunker – St. Pauli, Stadtgarten auf dem Bunker. Retrieved from: http://planungsbuero-bunker.info/ N/A (2015, November 23). Bosco Verticale / Boeri Studio. ArchDaily. Retrieved from: https://www.archdaily.com/777498/ bosco-verticale-stefano-boeri-architetti Plan Melbourne (2017). Plan Melbourne – Outcome 5. Retrieved from: http://www.planmelbourne.vic.gov.au/__data/ assets/pdf_file/0008/377117/Plan_Melbourne_2017_Outcome_5_PDF.pdf Talen, E. (2000). Measuring the public realm: A preliminary assessment of the link between public space and sense of community. Journal of Architectural and Planning Research, 17(4), 344-360. Retrieved from: http://www.jstor.org.ezp.lib. unimelb.edu.au/stable/pdf/43030552.pdf?refreqid=excelsior:bf41c67928477b12768589e0a6b4de01 Victoria State Government (2017). Melbourne Planning Scheme - Schedule 70 to Clause 43.02 Design and Development Overlay. Retrieved from: http://planning-schemes.delwp.vic.gov.au/schemes/melbourne/ordinance/43_02s70_melb.pdf Victoria State Government (2017). Melbourne Planning Scheme - Schedule 01 to the Parking Overlay. Retrieved from: http://planningschemes.dpcd.vic.gov.au/schemes/melbourne/ordinance/45_09s01_melb.pdf Victoria State Government (2017). Melbourne Planning Scheme – Urban Design Within the Capital City Zone. Retrieved from: http://planningschemes.dpcd.vic.gov.au/schemes/melbourne/ordinance/22_lpp01_melb.pdf Victoria State Government (2017). Public Park and Recreation Zone. Retrieved from: http://planning-schemes.delwp.vic. gov.au/schemes/vpps/36_02.pdf Victoria State Government (2016). Urban Design Guidelines for Victoria- Public spaces. Retrieved from: http://www. urban-design-guidelines.planning.vic.gov.au/guidelines/public-spaces

FIGURES Fig.1 Map created by author, with data collected by author on 3.4.5. October 2017 in Lincoln Square Fig 2 Map altered by author with data retrieved from https://www.google.com.au/maps/@37.8021609,144.962349,16.85z Fig 3 - 8 Images photographed by Winnie An (2017) Fig 9 Map created by author, online images retrieved from: Stairs: https://www.diephaus.de/media/image/allegra-kinderwagenstufen-gross.jpg Stair- ramp- combination: https://pbs.twimg.com/media/BmPoKIFIIAAJL-N.jpg Benchdesign:https://participate.melbourne.vic.gov.au/application/files/4415/0328/6226/Macarthur_ Square_Concept_Plan.pdf Jewel of Brunswick: https://www.pps.org/places/jewell-of-brunswick/#jp-carousel-1602 Chess board: https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/06/70/c0/dd/giant-chess-game.jpg Exercise equipment: https://www.weekendnotes.com/im/002/08/health-and-fitness-personal-development-self-help-61.JPG Fig 10 Schematic illustration made by author with sketch retrieved from: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/8127B%2BznxkL.jpg Fig 11 Schematic illustration made by author with sketch retrieved from: https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ff/ e0/b4/ffe0b45ab5bbf4c97c1dcc19cd22cb9c.jpg Fig 12 – 14 Images Photographed by author (2017) Fig 15 Docklands community gardens, online image (2017).Retrieved from: https://www.weekendnotes. com/docklands-community-garden/ Fig 16 Envisioned Bunker, online image (2014). Retrieved from: http://planungsbuero-bunker.info/ Fig 17 Envisioned library extension, Vancouver, online image (2017) retrieved from: http://dailyhive.com/ vancouver/vancouver-public-library-square-rooftop-garden Fig 18 Bosco Vericale Balkony, online image (2015). Retreived from: https://www.archdaily.com/777498/ bosco-verticale-stefano-boeri-architetti/564e7b90e58ece4d730003a1-bosco-verticale-stefano-boeri-architetti-photo Fig 19 Photographed by author (2017) altered with online image retrieved from: http://pictures.dfic.cn/ thumbs/yay/8dyimgs/2011/1004/965156.jpg Fig 20 Photographed by author (2017) altered with online image retrieved from: http://planungsbuero-bunker.info/ Fig 21 Photographed by author (2017) altered with online image retrieved from: http://planungsbuero-bunker.info/ Fig 22 Photographed by author (2017) altered with online image retrieved from: http://environmentalprofessionalsnetwork.com/ MAPS Maps altered with data from Victoria State Government, as retreived from: http://mapshare.maps.vic.gov.au/vicplan/ City Melbourne, as retrieved from: http://melbourneurbanforestvisual.com.au/ or by author

16

Profile for Emma Kelly

Urban Design and Planning Report - Carlton  

Urban Design and Planning Report - Carlton  

Advertisement