Issuu on Google+

/ / 0 1 AGE OF INTELLEGENCE?

//02 VISIBLY, INVISIBLE

/ / 0 3 I M I T AT E T H E S T A R S

//04 BEHIND THE SCENES…

//05 WHITE NOISE

//06 FORGOTTEN, NOT GONE


eVo by Luke Addison CC BY - http://www.flickr.com/photos/1uk3/4808286056

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words emma haller p h o t o g r a p h y luke addison

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ricardo diaz

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paul underhill

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m a r t i n f isch

A major part of today’s society is music; the music industry is a huge part of all our lives. The music we listen to, the iconic images and celebrity culture that surrounds us, the music videos and fashion that we’re constantly bombarded with in day-to-day life. We are immersed in this culture from birth, yet no one really questions what the negative effects the industry has on society today.

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thomas galvez


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OU GET IT BITCH, CAN HEAR YOU? UT THE FUCK UP GET WHAT’S MIN TO YOU

A large portion of popular music has always involved pushing the boundaries of artistic expression. In the music industry today, artists are constantly pushing the limits of what is acceptable. While we can argue that artists are just doing this to drive record sales through sparking controversy, we’re asking what this type of music is doing to today’s culture? Music plays an important role in the socialization of children. Pop music is present almost everywhere and its easily available to listen to. Research on pop music has explored its effects on schoolwork, social interactions, mood and affect, and particularly behaviour. Society should be concerned with the effect that pop music has on children’s behaviour and emotions; lyrics have become more explicit in their references to drugs, sex, and violence over the years, particularly in certain genres. Studies show that the average teenager listens to approximately 40 hours of music in a given week and we can assume that somewhere in the mix a child is going to hear something derogatory or objectionable, as it has become the norm in today’s society. In most music today the lyrics contain references to violence, sex and drugs. While many argue that this is dangerous for children to hear, we also know that modern day teenagers often face violence, drugs, suicide, pregnancy and many other aspects of this music that they’re listening to.

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photo by Ricardo Diaz CC BY - http://www.flickr.com/photos/ricardodiaz/8286982146

DON’T YOU GET NO ONE CAN H NOW SHUT THE AND GET W COMIN TO 82 83


photo by Paul Underhill CC BY - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Main_stage_crowd_shot.jpg

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// Modern society is ever evolving, faster now than ever before.

You could argue that this is just the next step in music’s evolution and that throughout the years music has been constantly pushing boundaries. Ever since Elvis Presley first shamelessly thrust his hips in the face of shocked housewives around the world, attempts have been made to censor or destroy music that has upset the moral majority. When Elvis first came onto our screens he wasn’t alowed to be shown from the waist down but in todays culture we have Miley Cyrus and twerking shamelessly on live tv, this alone shows us how much society has changed due to artists constantly pushing the boundaries of what is acceptable. Which in turn influences the youth of today, by simply seeing their favourite artist dressed sparsely singing about sex and drugs they could in turn see it as acceptable to do themselves. Of course as the years have gone on what we deem as explicit has changed, modern society is ever evolving, faster now than ever before and with the introduction of new technologies we’re progressing at a rapidly increasing rate. Looking back at songs that have been banned or heavily censored we can gain an understanding of what the nation thought of as controversial at the time. 84 85


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#1. ANTI NOWHERE LEAGUE / SO WHAT? #2. FRANKIE GOES TO HOLLYWOOD / RELAX #3. PRINCE / DARLING NIKKI #4. WASP / ANIMAL (FUCK LIKE A BEAST) #5. MADONNA / JUSTIFY MY LOVE #6. RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE / KILLING IN THE NAME #7. BODY COUNT / COP KILLER #8. THE SEX PISTOLS / GOD SAVE THE QUEEN #9. EMINEM / KIM #10. KHIA / MY NECK, MY BACK

// A list of songs that appear again and again on lists for being the most controversial songs of all time, while many are no longer seen as scandalous they were at the time of release. Showing us that as time goes on we’re becoming more desensitised to what is seen as morally wrong.

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SHE KNOW WHERE I GET MINE FROM AND THE SEASON NOW SHE WANNA LICK MY PLUM IN THE EVENIN’ AND FIT THAT TONGUE TONGUE D-DEEP IN


ISSU E N0 .1 / V ISIB L Y, INV ISIB L E

I GUESS THAT CUNT GETTIN’ EATEN


photo by Martin Fisch CC BY - http://www.flickr.com/photos/marfis75/9391593778

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BEAT DA PUSSY UP, BEAT DA PUSSY UP, BEAT DA PUSSY UP, BEAT DA PUSSY UP, BEAT DA PUSSY UP, BEAT DA PUSSY UP, BEAT DA PUSSY UP, BEAT DA PUSSY UP Looking back we can clearly see the topics that have been seen as controversial, sex, drugs, violence, throughout time have rarely changed, only how far that topic has been pushed. Every so often an artist will go too far for the norm of the times and the song will consequently be banned or so heavily censored that the songs meaning get’s lost anywa; And with each song that pushes boundaries and fails (or gets band) another one is always waiting to be released. In todays fast paced culture what is seen as controversial might only earn itself a spot in a few news articles meaning more exposure, meaning more people hear or see about it. The latest in a long list of topics to come up is Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s new song ‘Drunk in Love’ the questions surrounding it ‘Does the raunchy ode to drunken sex make light of - or even go so far as to endorse - domestic abuse?’ the song features the line ‘Eat the cake, Anna Mae.’ Which comes from the scene in the 1993 Tina Turner biopic What’s Love Got to Do with It, referencing the violent relationship between Ike and Tina Turner; Ike famously beat and abused his superstar wife throughout their relationship. Beyoncé has been seen as a brilliant role model to teens, especially girls everywhere; her latest Album simply titled Beyoncé sold a record breaking 823,773 copies in the first 3 days alone. We have to ask ourselves if this is a message we want young girls to be hearing from one of their role models?

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Robin Thicke’s ‘Blurred Lines’ is another example of the kind of music that has sparked controversy as of late; it was a distasteful mix of misogyny and a catchy tune that dominated the summer charts of 2013 for far too long. With lines such as ‘I know you want it’ being constantly repeated throughout the song it has been called ‘the rape song’ by many feminist bloggers and was actually banned by many university student unions around the UK and even managed to cause so much outrage that a parody called ‘Defined Lines’ was created as a feminist rebuttal to the song.

We have to ask ourselves if these are the types of messages we want the youth of today hearing, is censorship on radio stations enough when the explicit versions of songs are so easy to find. Should we be doing more to stop explicit lyrics from being used in the music industry especially in regard to condoning acts of violence or sexual assaults, boundaries are constantly being pushed within the music industry but should we sit back and let the declining moral standards slip even more?

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insert advert for generic boy band


Feign.