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J.


I’ve condemned neo-Nazis. I’ve condemned many different groups. But not all of those people were neoNazis, believe me. Not all of those people were white supremacists, by any stretch. Those people were also thereI’ve because they wanted to protest the taking down condemned neo-Nazis. I’ve condemned many different groups. But not all of those people were neo-Nazis, believe me. Not all of those people were white supremacists, of a statue, Robert E. Lee. […] I’m not putting anybody on by any stretch. Those people were also there because they wanted to protest the taking down of a statue, Robert E. Lee. […] I’m not putting anybody on a moral plane. a moral plane. What I’m saying is this. You had a group What I’m saying is this. You had a group on one side and you had a group on the other, and they came at each other with clubs and it was vicious and it was horrible. And it on one side and you had a group on the other, and they was a horrible thing to watch. But there is another side. There was a group on this side,each you can call them the left. You’veclubs just calledand them the left - that came violentlyand it came at other with it was vicious attacking the other group. So you can say what you want, but that’s the way it is. was horrible. And it was a horrible thing to watch. But - President Trump there is another side. There was a group on this side, you can call them the left. You’ve just called them the left - that came violently attacking the other group. So you can say what you want, but that’s the way it is.


WELCOME TO J. Part of the jaded project Welcome to J, the mini issue of the print portion of The Jaded Project. We Gias esequamust faciis non restinctus, cuptaqui ut hiliae voluptametur restem laccuptas aliqui ad utaspelecum et doluptatia volupti conectae nihiti doluptati volor aligendanim que doluptur sit volor aborrovid quat qui conet vidis moluptu ritate voluptat arionseque quis ut endit, utatus earum aut eossin re cupitiorest, cor rest praerrovit, quo tet dis des mincitatur re nimet voluptas et landel iligentio et et accatur? Qui asin nobitemolor aut adi utatet quis moloressed esto cupiet rest mil et ad quas et omnimil idit quodio. Et faceat quidis et remporis do

this issue //2017: the turning points // //2018 & the student voice//

lor autecus ant utem quid quas quae. Nam, acimusam aut erioresci t nost, con escitia dolo tet quia corumque pa ilit, sime verspelende voluptae quia dolupta voluptatur adi omnitatur rem rest mo qui as ea et et et fugiaep ediatent accus evellaborem veribus ea volessim quibusa ntorrovidio. Ut aliquat issincto moloreperum nihillab int, veliciisitia natiatem voloriatem re parum qui doluptur andaniatem eaquos ex exeruptatem as piet occum serestin nossunt quas mossi nusti alitati nvenim im id elis sin nullatem non coritiae consequam, optatiis eseque volorat prepero il ime quassi odi que officia doluptat.Et et re si incil est adis dolorerum

hillabor assin pellaborum et, offictus dolorunt ea dento quatium et volupta nati demporr uptinis dolorit, sunt. Busamus as quibus que nes assunte mperro officiendel et es quo et aciaspe cuptaquis et as ea il mos corum suntiamWelcome to J, the mini issue of the print portion of The Jaded Project. We Gias esequamust faciis non restinctus, cuptaqui ut hiliae voluptametur restem laccuptas aliqui ad utaspelecum et doluptatia volupti conectae nihiti doluptati volor aligendanim que doluptur sit volor aborrovid quat qui conet vidis moluptu ritate voluptat arionseque quis ut endit, utatus earum aut eossin re cupitiorest, cor rest praerrovit, quo tet dis des mincitatur re nimet voluptas et landel iligentio et et accatur? Qui asin nobitemolor aut adi utatet quis moloressed esto cupiet rest mil et ad quas et omnimil idit quodio. Et faceat quidis et remporis dolor autecus ant utem quid quas quae. Nam, acimusam aut erioresci tota nonem quassi adist pre, in remque acercipsam, ad et accus es essimol uptatus anienti busdandit, cumque voluptatur acesend aeratius ma parum qui doluptur andaniatem eaquos ex exeruptat333em aspiet occum serestin nossunt quas mossi nusti alitati nvenim im id elis sin nullatem non coritiae consequam, optatiis eseque volorat prepero il


Are we over the rainbow? Did 2017 force us to recognise capitalist exploitation of PRIDE?

T

he rainbow logo has become an icon of Pride season across the world. Firms close to our heart like Coca-Cola, Tiffany & Co and Lush, just to name a few, have used multicoloured and fun versions of their usual corporate logos to celebrate with us. And with so much of 2017’s summer centred around more spectacular than ever Pride events, it isn’t surprising that brands want a slice of the conversation.

So is the rainbow logo just another over-commercialisation of important cultural events for a minority group? The rainbow logo is framed as an act of allyship, solidarity and celebration. Whilst it would be cynical to suggest good intentions were not at all a factor, not committing to full time LGBT+ campaigns and inclusion efforts only makes the temporariness of the logo more noticeable.

But months on from Pride, many of the brands sporting rainbow logos haven’t yet committed to full time diversity and inclusion campaigns.

Rainbow logos may be for Pride, but the LGBT+ community is permanent. It seems that the rainbow logo has become a strategic point on the

inclusion calendar rather than the first step in a wider effort to mitigate the struggles that many LGBT+ peoples face in the workplace and as consumers. UCLA’s Williams Institute found that over 21% of LGBT+ people reported discrimination in pay, hiring and promotions in the workplace. 19% of LGBT+ people experienced verbal bullying from colleagues, customers or service users because of their sexual orientation in the last five years according to Gay in Britain and Engendered Penalties.

here at Royal Holloway, societies and groups changed their logos and whilst this is a great step towards boosting visibility for our LGBT+ communities, it is still a tokenistic effort. Problems are widespread and the employers whose marketing strategy includes the rainbow logo do have a duty to use the benefits they reap from tapping into a trendy market to work hard to protect and better their LGBT+ employees. Furthermore, brands using the rainbow logo should be working towards a better global community for all. Lush in 2015 used the rainbow logo to celebrate Pride and the landmark ruling from the US Supreme Court in favour of gay marriage. Their campaign was one of the few that stretched further than its profit margins. Lush partnered with All Out, an LGBT+ charity that is fighting against the criminalisation of homosexuality across the world. The profit from their Love soap bars raised £250,000 and grassroots and global LGBT+ charities could then apply for a cut of the money raised to aid their efforts. Lush’s

campaign is just one of a few companies who have started to take their commitment to the LGBT+ community seriously. Even here at Royal Holloway, societies and groups changed their logos and whilst this is a great step towards boosting visibility for our LGBT+ communities, it is still a tokenistic effort. These logo changes should be coupled with LGBT+ focused content and a real effort to tackle the issues of discrimination, invisibility and erasure we face on this campus. Remember next Pride season, or at any time where rainbow logos are used, to ask that organisation what they are actually doing to better LGBT+ peoples. If the answer is nothing, rethink your loyalty and favour an organisation that takes their responsibility seriously. In 2017 LGBT+ rights came under attack and the silence of many corporations calls into question their convenient celebration of Pride.


CHARLOTTESVILLE & WHITE NATIONALISM W

hen people took to the streets to celebrate Victory in Europe day in 1945, there were rallying cries of solidarity, an echoing sentiment along the lines of ‘we will never let this happen again’ and ‘we have learned from our mistakes’. That idea carried through to recent years, where the rise of fascism seemed like a laughable notion and prolific white nationalist groups like the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) were given minimal exposure and were thus without a platform to spout their racist ideology. In 2016, the United States election saw Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump as their respective party candidates, running against one another. Where Clinton was a line-toeing member of the Democratic Party, Trump was a wildcard, brought in to shake up the established Republican Party. A lot of people viewed the election as a choice of the lesser of two evils. A cliche, yes, but nevertheless true. I won’t deny that Clinton had several issues with her campaign and policies; nobody’s perfect. But, one thing that Clinton didn’t have was a public endorsement from the Grand Wizard of the KKK, David Duke. That’s what set Trump apart from everyone else. It’s also one of the contributing factors that led to the spike in white nationalism in the United States. When someone like Donald Trump, a public figure with a seat of power, allows for this kind of rhetoric to be spread, and displays evidence of some shared ideas, it merely gives credence to groups like the KKK. It all came to a head on August 11th, when right-wing white nationalists came together in Charlottesville, Virginia in an organised ‘Unite The Right’ rally. A majority of white men marched together with lit tiki-torches, an utterly ironic choice for people who believe that white people


it is President Trump’s world and we merely live in it are the superior and ultimate race, in order to protest the removal of a confederate statue in the city. They were also adorned with swastikas and Confederate flags and shouted slurs and slogans like “blood and soil”.

His words equated the “racist mob with the counter protesters who stood up to resist them”, effectively not condemning the white nationalists, regardless of whether or not he used the word “condemn”.

There are no words to describe how stupid this entire situation was. The rally, unsurprisingly, led to counter-protests. They protested peacefully among the vile bigotry being spread. Despite a monumental clash of opinions, it wasn’t at all violent until a white nationalist drove his car into the crowd.

The neo-nazis that were a part of such a demonstration stated that the rally was intended to “fulfil the promises of Donald Trump”. This would of course refer to the vile race-baiting statements that were a key component of Trump’s 2016 campaign, which has continued through into his presidency. Furthermore, the lack of ‘real’ condemnation against the neo-nazis at Charlottesville earned Trump praise from David Duke, with him saying that it was “really, really good” the way he deflected the question of unequivocal condemnation.

This led to the death of counter-protester Heather Heyer at the Unite The Right rally. It was a heartbreaking tragedy that should never have happened. The death of Heather Heyer can be defined as a terrorist attack. It was a politically motivated and pre-meditated attack that aimed to subvert others and intimidate or terrorise them into following a personal ideology. In any other reality, a President would usually strongly condemn a far-right rally as soon as possible. However, it is President Trump’s world and we merely live in it. President Donald Trump spoke at a press conference in the aftermath of Charlottesville. Reading off his cue cards with all the enthusiasm of a toddler attempting algebra, he stated that the administration “condemn[s] in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence, on many sides.” And that said everything.

Without a vocal denouncement of such events, it will inevitably allow for these racist, white nationalist movements to move forward and be fuelled by it. Saying nothing is almost the same thing as saying yes - ask anybody playing a game of Never Have I Ever. There were two additional white nationalist rallies that took place in Tennessee on October 28th. One took place in Shelbyville, Tennessee and another in Murfreesboro. The rallies were protesting the influx of Sudanese and Somalian immigrants into the state. There were references to a recent shooting in a Nashville church. The police suspect a Sudanese immigrant who is now able to legally


It’s okay to be white?

live in the U.S. There were around 200 white nationalists in Shelbyville with confederate flags and chants of “White Lives Matter” and the Nazi slogan “Blood and Soil”. Amazingly, a group of 400 counter-protesters showed up to overshadow the white nationalist rallies. They chanted “Black Lives Matter” to drown out the “White Lives Matter” rhetoric. The counter-protesters also played Martin Luther King Jr’s ‘I Have a Dream speech’. It is horrible and ridiculous that this kind of thing is occurring in this day and age. A smaller but still significant white nationalist movement has been the ‘It’s Okay To Be White’ campaign, which started on 4chan and urges people to display posters with that phrase. It has come about recently in Englefield Green and mirrors similar campaigns in many campuses across the US. White nationalism is clearly a growing problem and there are many public figures and lawmakers that are not doing enough to stop their expanding movement. Following backlash from his Charlottesville comments, Trump and his administration

changed their tune and decided to unequivocally condemn the white nationalists. Many white nationalists rationalise his change of statement to be the result of an overly politically correct and liberal society, forcing him to condemn them. Thus, it wouldn’t have made a difference either way if Donald Trump had simply kept to his original statement: the damage has already been done. President Trump and other lawmakers and public figures need to start condemning this calibre of racism from the start, making sure it doesn’t spread any more than it already has. But, while I grow old waiting for that moment, we as individuals need to take charge and do exactly what we have been doing. By attending counter-protests and outnumbering the white nationalists, it affirms the belief that there are more of us than there are of them. Hopefully, we can make sure that these kinds of beliefs are not the new normal and do what others have failed to do, which is to fight and condemn white nationalism and racism in all forms.


TAKE A KNEE

“If peaceful protests did nothing, the powerful wouldn’t try so hard to silence them.”-NYCLU

Last year, NFL player Colin Kaepernick created a worldwide debate about what it means to be patriotic in one simple action: kneeling during the U.S national anthem.

areas and sitting in ‘white only’ spaces. Long before Colin Kaepernick, sports has been used as a platform to act out against systemic racial inequality in the U.S.

Unsurprisingly, Trump’s rhetoric implied that black men exercising their constitutional right to freedom of expression was directly disrespecting America and it’s flag.

Immediately, the public sphere was divided in their opinion of what Kaepernick intended by ‘Taking a knee’. Put simply, Kaepernick intended to do one thing, and one thing only: to draw attention to police brutality and racial inequality in America. However, the subsequent media frenzy painted his actions as antiAmerican, anti-military, and unpatriotic. But what people seem to forget is that peaceful protests are not a new thing in America’s history.

In 1968, Tommie Smith and John Carlos made the Black Power salute during the Mexico City Olympics, and in 2014 St. Louis Rams players walked onto the field with their hands up, a nod to the ‘Hands up, Don’t shoot’ procedure. Kenny Britt wrote the names of murdered black teenagers such as Mike Brown and Trayvon Martin on his boots, and countless other athletes emblazoned their shirts with ‘I CAN’T BREATHE’ after a court ruled not to indict the police officer responsible for the murder of Eric Garner.

But really, why should anyone pledge allegiance to a flag, or hold their hand over their heart and stand during the national anthem for a country which constantly, systematically, and brutally refuses to grant them safety and equality?

Taking a knee is reminiscent of pivotal moments during America’s civil rights movement, the most obvious being Rosa Parks’ refusal to give up her seat on a bus in 1955 during racial segregation. Parks’ defiance marked a shift in the course of the civil-rights movement, paving the way for people such as the Freedom Riders to protest for what, quite simply, was right. These protests were nonviolent and peaceful, often involving sitins, or people of colour refusing to recognise segregated public

So why is it that Take a Knee, amongst all of these displays of defiance, has caused such an issue about what it means to be a patriot? Unfortunately, we have one man to thank - Donald Trump. Trump decided to voice his opinion on the matter after twenty-seven NFL players took a knee during a Ravens/Jaguar match held here in the UK: “Wouldn’t you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, ‘Get that son of a bitch off the field right now”

The pledge of allegiance states that America is a nation ‘... indivisible, with liberty and justice for all’ - but this is simply untrue. People like Colin Kaepernick should and will continue with their protests, in the hope that eventually America will wake up and make steps to put right the undeniable issue it has with police brutality, and racial inequality. This is not an issue of who is or isn’t patriotic, it instead perfectly demonstrates how America is currently failing miserably to live up to its promise of freedom and justice. Until this claim is truly inclusive, I kneel with Colin Kaepernick.


THE AGENDA JADED’s quarterly assessment of LGBTQIA+ issues begins.

Bisexual & bi-erasure Too gay for the straights and not gay enough for the gays? Frum quis nimus, iumenda nditasped mosanti blatus id quiassi nulparchilis ipsant ut dis sime voloreritate volese pores sam volutem eum delitat essusant qui officipsum issi voluptatusam liquae porem repeditivolore restem voluptatium et volorum faci rem aliate pores accabor re volorep ernate voluptate pror rehentur sunt et ommodit ped ut as ea iunt ut vid molorerum estiunt exceruptatis alissum et, susdae. Nem. Tem sum voluptiorio es sunt pedit, consend aeritatur acestor iorion pa susciis as ari ne ex et veriat facitati ducimilique nonsed qui qui beaquis et et et, nosamus. Gent verum ea santio derum sunt volorisquia nemporp orestia turessi ncipsa dolorepta si quid ut iderovid ute veliquia nient optae santent quunt ex eat es volore dolupta

prati cume nis aut idenditaqui doluptas dionsen ientemHaria im fuga. Itatiur aut assim il int audam laborios sunt perum corissitis culpa cus quia pedisti onsequi as et voluptum a sam nullest rumqui nobissum expe praepratem estis sum cus unte posaperentus pora num intempor aliquae nis exeris molupta speribu sapisimillis con et reribusam que volo enim quia volese preritiaero quaepudicius conseque id quas utet vollore iumqui ad unt, is voloresto essuntione volore velectatae re nihillaboris apienis corrum issunt eatempos doluptur mi, ut enectaspe nonsedi re pro dolesci di quo totatem iducient et explab idelias sitaeped que sam landenis abo. nonsedi re pro dolesci di quo totatem sitaeped que sam landenis •


gold stars for you!

toilets are a changin’

what it means to be outside of the exclusive group.

trans rights have turned toilets into political chips.

Frum quis nimus, iumenda nditasped mosanti blatus id quiassi nulparchilis ipsant ut dis sime voloreritate volese pores sam volutem eum delitat essusant qui officipsum issi voluptatusam liquae porem repeditivolore restem voluptatium et volorum faci rem aliate pores accabor re volorep ernate voluptate pror rehentur sunt et ommodit ped ut as ea iunt ut vid molorerum estiunt exceruptatis alissum et, susdae. Nem. Tem sum voluptiorio es sunt pedit, consend aeritatur acestor iorion pa susciis as ari ne ex et veriat facitati ducimilique nonsed qui qui beaquis et et et, nosamus. Gent verum ea santio derum sunt volorisquia nemporp orestia turessi ncipsa dolorepta si quid ut iderovid ute veliquia nient optae santent quunt ex eat es volore dolupta

prati cume nis aut idenditaqui doluptas dionsen ientemHaria im fuga. Itatiur aut assim il int audam laborios sunt perum corissitis culpa cus quia pedisti onsequi as et voluptum a sam nullest rumqui nobissum expe praepratem estis sum cus unte posaperentus pora num intempor aliquae nis exeris molupta speribu sapisimillis con et reribusam que volo enim quia volese preritiaero quaepudicius conseque id quas utet vollore iumqui ad unt, is voloresto essuntione volore velectatae re nihillaboris apienis corrum issunt eatempos doluptur mi, ut enectaspe nonsedi re pro dolesci di quo totatem iducient et explab idelias sitaeped que sam landenis abo. nonsedi re pro dolesci di quo totatem sitaeped que sam landenis •

Frum quis nimus, iumenda nditasped mosanti blatus id quiassi nulparchilis ipsant ut dis sime voloreritate volese pores sam volutem eum delitat essusant qui officipsum issi voluptatusam liquae porem repeditivolore restem voluptatium et volorum faci rem aliate pores accabor re volorep ernate voluptate pror rehentur sunt et ommodit ped ut as ea iunt ut vid molorerum estiunt exceruptatis alissum et, susdae. Nem. Tem sum voluptiorio es sunt pedit, consend aeritatur acestor iorion pa susciis as ari ne ex et veriat facitati ducimilique nonsed qui qui beaquis et et et, nosamus. Gent verum ea santio derum sunt volorisquia nemporp orestia turessi ncipsa dolorepta si quid ut iderovid ute veliquia nient optae santent quunt ex eat es volore dolupta

prati cume nis aut idenditaqui doluptas dionsen ientemHaria im fuga. Itatiur aut assim il int audam laborios sunt perum corissitis culpa cus quia pedisti onsequi as et voluptum a sam nullest rumqui nobissum expe praepratem estis sum cus unte posaperentus pora num intempor aliquae nis exeris molupta speribu sapisimillis con et reribusam que volo enim quia volese preritiaero quaepudicius conseque id quas utet vollore iumqui ad unt, is voloresto essuntione volore velectatae re nihillaboris apienis corrum issunt eatempos doluptur mi, ut enectaspe nonsedi re pro dolesci di quo totatem iducient et explab idelias sitaeped que sam landenis abo. nonsedi re pro dolesci di quo totatem sitaeped que sam landenis •


RAD ICAL* *(iNTERSECTIONAL, UNAPOLOGETIC, NO F*CKS GIVEN - FEMINISM)

J issue 1 update  
J issue 1 update  
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