Page 1

affordable communal housing for young adults


emma r. silverman comprehensive project interior architecture program department of architecture university of oregon eugene, oregon


submitted for completion of a bachelor of interior architecture degree, june 2012 design studio professor alison snyder comprehensive project professor erin cunningham

emma rose silverman


comprehensive project

statement of intent abstract

6

statement summary

7-9

building conditions and codes building site quick info

10-15

site documentation

16-23

code issues

24-26


project program short program

27

graphic program

29

long program

30-32

user scenarios

33-35

reference archive interview list

36-37

bibliography

39

design case study research

40-49

design archive final presentation

52-75

charrette 1

77-81

charrette 2

82-83

process before midterm 1

84-89

midterm 1

90-93

process before midterm 2

94-95

midterm 2 compared to final

96-103


abstract My final interior architecture project is called Co-Habitat. For my thesis, I wanted to respond to the needs of recent graduates between the ages of 21-33 and the prevalence of independently rented apartments that do not enhance social interaction. Co-Habitat provides an affordable, semi-communal housing complex, with mixed commercial and retail amenities. I was attracted to a site that consists of two buildings. A three-story 1927 brick and heavy timber building and a 1935 gas station. My intention is to create a place that encourages communal and collaborative activities while also inviting the local public in for retail and other commercial reasons. In this project I investigate a range of topics including: economic sustainability, the changing lifestyles of an emerging group of young adults, “do it yourself� (diy) culture and the nature of collaboration, and the need for affordable housing within metropolitan cities. Overall, I am interested in how private residents share and collaborate, how the community comes together to share resources within one building, and how the residents and the community both coexist and collaborate within a mixed-use condition.

6


statement of intent

statement summary

young adults who fall within the “emerging adulthood”

“There are roughly two million Americans over twenty-

stage. It is an affordable housing complex for college

five who have at least a bachelor’s degree and are

graduates that is inspired by co-housing communities,

unemployed. Nationwide, the jobless rate for col-

a type of communal living, originating in Denmark in

lege graduates in that category is double what it was

the 1970’s. Typically, these communities are designed

before the recession” (Amanda M. Fairbanks, Good

and owned by residents, yet Co-Habitat offers rentable

Magazine). As Amanda Fairbanks points out, with the

units that address the need for temporary affordable

rise of unemployment, finding jobs for recent college

housing.

graduates has become an alarming issue in the United States. With the changing economy, young adults

Co-Habitat is a place designed for graduates who all

between the ages of twenty-one to thirty-three have

share a common interest in networking, forming rela-

altered their career goals, often moving home and set-

tionships, and discovering new places while searching

tling for jobs they are over qualified for, which harms

for professional jobs in a metropolitan environment. It

both personal and professional development.

is a place where people come together to live semicommunally while they volunteer in the community,

Moving into a new city for young adults was once

cook, play recreational sports, network, and above all

considered a rite of passage along with obtaining a

form meaningful relationships with relatable people

job, making new relationships, and eventually settling

outside of the college experience. This project ex-

down and starting a family. However, what was once

plores the possibilities of designing semi-communal

considered a rite of passage is no longer the case.

housing for a specific user group, one that depends

According to Professor Arnett, there is a new devel-

on age. Thus the design intentions for this project are

opmental stage among young adults called “emerging

geared toward the needs of this young clientele, creat-

adulthood”. During this time, Arnett’s study subjects

ing a place that considers trends related to thought-

divulged that they were optimistic about their futures

fully designed minimal dwellings. At the same time,

but “despite elements that are exciting, even exhila-

Co-Habitat promotes a mixed commercial program

rating, about being this age, there is a downside, too:

that attracts use from the surrounding community.

dread, frustration, uncertainty, a sense of not quite

This project, therefore addresses social, aesthetic,

understanding the rules of the game” (Arnett 2010).

and political issues associated with housing in the 21st century, stressing the idea of rentable communal

In his article “Emerging Adulthood,” Arnett stresses

housing as a contemporary housing type for those

that there is need to address this new life stage and

who believe in the power of sustainable, inter-personal

that systems of education, health care and social sup-

relationships.

ports need to be developed that take the stage into account. The philosophy behind Co-Habitat supports

In this project I investigate a range of topics includ-

those within the emerging adulthood stage through

ing: economic sustainability, the changing lifestyles

enhancing the idea of social support and interaction

of an emerging group of young adults, “do it yourself”

within the built environment. Co-Habitat is a mixed-

(diy) culture and the nature of collaboration, and the

use housing project that responds to the needs of

need for affordable housing within metropolitan cities. 7


Overall, I am interested in how private residents share

to singles.” The building is located in close proximity

and collaborate, how the community comes together

to residential neighborhoods but the site itself is more

to share resources within one building, and how the

urban; overall the site was chosen for its visibility po-

residents and the community both coexist and collabo-

tential. Unlike typical co-housing communities that are

rate within a mixed-use building. For this reason, I was

located in rural areas, this site is located in an urban

attracted to a site that consists of two highly eclectic

area where visibility and proximity to amenities are

buildings that are located in the newly revitalized area

strong and convenient.

of the Buckman district in SE Portland, Oregon. The building chosen for this program has a long hisBuildings in the Buckman district of Portland have

tory of providing residential and commercial use; since

been a part of the storefront improvement program, an

its inception in 1927 it has undergone a series of 3

urban revitalization project specifically geared toward

renovations, with commercial, shot-gun retail on the

revamping historic buildings within the area. Revitaliza-

first floor, and housing on the basement and second

tion efforts have attracted local businesses, including

floor levels. Originally the housing component within

very popular bars (Bunk Bar & Dig a Pony), shops,

the building was a private residence but through time

and restaurants that attract young professionals

the second floor was redeveloped into a series of 17

throughout the country. In terms of transportation, the

studio apartments, all equipped with their own kitchen-

site is connected to downtown and other neighboring

ettes and bathrooms. My intention is to create a place

districts by way of multiple bus stops, the max light rail,

that encourages communal and collaborative activities

and an interconnected bicycle transportation system

while also inviting the local public in for retail and other

that is connected to the widely acclaimed, Vera Katz

commercial reasons.

Esplanade, a multi-purpose recreational path that runs along the Willamette River and connects many active

The structural system is comprised of load bearing

transportation users to bridges that connect to down-

masonry exterior walls. The basement and first floors

town, the NW and SW side of the river.

are comprised of a wood column grid and beam construction. The first floor houses five shotgun shaped

During Mia Birk’s term as bicycle transportation coor-

retail spaces with an extensive staircase that connects

dinator for the City of Portland, this area was one of

the basement and upper floors. The second floor is

the first to utilize green bike boxes that were adopted

comprised of roughly seventeen 320 sq. ft. apart-

from Europe. Since its incorporation of bike infrastruc-

ments; all equipped with their own kitchenette and

ture, property values have increased and there has

bathroom. The second floor apartments are separated

been an influx of local business development (Birk).

by corridors and hallways, all laid out on a square grid

The site is also located within walking distance to

pattern.

Colonel Summers Park, Colonel Summers Community Garden, Buckman Pool, and the Buckman Commu-

The building was built in 1927 and incorporates many

nity Garden. As stated on the neighborhood website

charming architectural details, including an old adver-

“Buckman is a great place to raise a family, while also

tisement from a company in the 1930’s. The façade

maintaining edginess and excitement that will appeal

of the building incorporates five storefront openings

8


statement of intent

and an ornamental door that signifies the entrance

act as the main circulation connecting residents to

to the apartments on the second floor. The façade is

their individual apartments. This design move creates

rather symmetrical but the incorporation of a variety of

a large interior space with studios located around its

awnings and signage create a rhythmic, eclectic com-

periphery. The approximate amount of residents falls

position. The second floor has a series of windows that

between 15-35. The housing design experiments with

run along the entire perimeter, they are spaced about

two types of living units: studios and lofts. In some, I

2’-5” to 2’-9” apart. A simple hipped roof encloses the

respect and then add to the 1927 existing units, for

entire structure.

instance some of the larger studios were converted into two bed-room units in hopes of increasing hous-

I approached this project somewhat like a developer,

ing density on site. In others, I have designed a new

creating a cohesive design along with programmatic

kind of loft living space to fit into the existing building

elements that would attract use from not only resi-

boundary, these are newly constructed to allow for

dents but the surrounding community as well. My

shared exterior terraces between adjacent units.

design parti builds upon the three-story 1927 brick and heavy timber building, which houses all of the

All of the minimal units have similar elements making

residential and commercial program. The intention of

use of sustainable materials, custom modular furniture,

Co-Habitat is to strengthen the housing component

and color palettes that speak to the trends this age

within the Morrison Hotel building, better utilizing inte-

group is concerned with.

rior space to provide for a range of amenities for residents including a communal kitchen, various lounge

Throughout my design process I learned that design-

spaces, and ample storage and bike parking.

ing for a mixed-use condition is very difficult. However, this type of mixed-use housing can be used as a

The commercial realm of the project consists of a food

model, representing a new type of apartment rentals

market, communal work/office space, an existing bar,

in metropolitan cities. Overall, this project addresses

and a diner. I am re-purposing the adjacent 1935 gas

social, aesthetic, and political issues associated with

station as a diner that provides patio space for users

housing in the 21st century. Co-Habitat stresses the

above. One of the goals of this project is provide

idea of rentable communal housing as a contemporary

spaces that will foster more 24-hr use, with commu-

housing type for those who believe in the power of

nity members utilizing the commercial program during

sustainable, interpersonal relationships.

business hours, and an eclectic mix of young residents utilizing the redesigned studio apartments, communal spaces, bar and diner by night. In terms of the housing component, in order to provide an open, flexible environment where users might informally interact with each other, four apartments were eliminated on the second floor. This design approach ultimately eliminates the use of 4’ wide hallways that 9


building / site quick information

NE 20TH

Address: SE 7th and Morrison, Portland, Oregon Location Type: Urban Building Foot Print: 88x100 (Morrison Hotel) 73x30 (Jay’s) Structural Type: Brick masonry and heavy timber Gross Available Square Footage: 28, 200 Net Program Square Footage: 26, 349 Previous Use: Private residence/retail/studio apartments Year Built: 1935 (Morrison Hotel) 1935 (Jay’s) Architect: Bennes & Herzog

GST

D Y BLV AND NE S

NE DAVIS ST NE COUCHST

PORTLAND, OR.

The Buckman District covers a lot of residential area as well as employment opportunities. It is an eclectic neighborhood that has an overall younger demographic. According to the 2000 census data there are about 7,923 residents living in the district compared to the entire Portland population of about 529,121. Of the 7,923 residents, 52% are within the 22 to 39 year old age group. This young demographic primarily rents housing, in fact 84% of the residents are renters and most households consist of a single person. Less families with children live in this area compared to other neighborhoods in Portland. “

10


building conditions and codes

se alder st.

MIXED-USE/RETAIL

MIXED-USE/RETAIL

KRUEGER’S SUPPLY: WAREHOUSE

PARKING LOT

se 7th ave.

jay's garage

MIXED-USE/RETAIL

MIXED-USE/RETAIL

morrison hotel

se morrison st.

KEY BANK

OREGON BALLET THEATER

PARKING LOT MIXED-USE/RETAIL

site plan nts

11


d blv dy san se

eastb

ank es

plana

de

se martin luther king jr blvd se 7th

morrison bridge

se morrison st.

se belmont st

12


building conditions and codes se stark st.

lone fir pioneer cemetary se 28th

col. summers park

se 20th ave

ont st.

13


neighborhood buckman district The Central Eastside of Portland, where the Buckman

committees, a historic association and a sustainability

neighborhood resides, was selected for an urban

committee. The historic association is currently working

renewal project in 1986 and is still a work in progress

to create a National Register Historic District that

today. The initial strategy was started by a housing

highlights Buckman as the oldest neighborhood on the

strategy committee that included members who

east side. The Sustainability Committee “undertakes

represent employers/businesses, developers, service

projects to promote sustainable practices in the

providers, neighborhood associations, residents, and

neighborhood.” The committee maintains a community

property owners. One of the main goals for the project

composting site and is expanding its small community

consisted of a housing strategy that was “geared

garden plots. Additionally, the Hawthorne District, a

toward promoting a range of employment opportunities

widely popular SE district located on Hawthorne Blvd. is

and living environments for Portland residents in order

partially located in Buckman. This street is known for its

to attract and retain a stable and diversified population”

unique Portland culture that features restaurants, local

(Comprehensive Plan Goal 2.2). In 2003 the plan was

shops, and entertainment options. The eastern side of

adopted by the Portland Development Commission and

Buckman is a mix of residential and local businesses,

has completed some very interesting projects, including

the west blocks of the neighborhood are designated to

a storefront revival project that includes the site located

industrial and commercial businesses that provide over

on SE 7th and Morrison.

17,000 jobs. Additionally, the neighborhood features a number of classic Portland architectural styles including

The neighborhood has a very strong community

craftsman bungalow, Victorian, foursquare, courtyard

association that is made up of a group of board members

housing and historic mixed-use industrial buildings that

who hold monthly meetings and manages a thorough

house both retail and private dwelling space.

website with a range of information including capital improvement projects, crime statistics, park information, and zoning designations.

14

The association has two

WEST FACADE


building conditions and codes

street analysis se morrison

SOUTH EAST BOUND SIDEWALK TRAFFIC

WEST BOUND TRAFFIC

BUS/ BIKE LANE

NORTH SIDEWALK

solar orientation

JUNE 20: 8:50 AM

JUNE 20: 4:00 PM

DEC. 20: 8:50 AM

DEC. 20: 4:00 PM

15


south facade

east facade

16


building conditions and codes

existing drawings university of oregon special collections

south facade

original drawings 24x36 india ink on linen

east facade 17


longitudinal section

roof plan 18


second floor plan

19

building conditions and codes


existing site boards layout iterations

20


21

building conditions and codes


Co-Habitat:

EXISTING CONDITIONS: SITE INFORMATION

East Morrison Apartments: Mixed Use Address: East Morrison Apartments 717 - 735 SE Morrison St. Portland, OR 97214 Gross SQ FT: 21,199 L x W x H: 100’ x 88’ x 35’

FRONT FACADE

EAST FACADE

WEST FACADE

SE ALDER ST.

MIXED-USE/RETAIL

NE 20TH

MIXED-USE/RETAIL

GST

PARKING LOT

KRUGER’S SUPPLY: WAREHOUSE

SE 8TH AVE.

SE 7TH AVE.

BLVD NDY NE SA

JAY’S GARAGE

MIXED-USE/RETAIL

MIXED-USE/RETAIL

EAST MORRISON APARTMENTS

NE DAVIS ST NE COUCHST

PORTLAND, OR.

SE MORRISON ST.

KEY BANK

OREGON BALLET THEATER

CENTRAL EASTSIDE The Buckman District covers a lot of residential area as well as employment opportunities. It is an eclectic neighborhood that has an overall younger demographic. From the 2000 census data I gathered that there are about 7,923 residents living in the district compared to the entire Portland population of about 529,121. Of the 7,923 residents, 52% are within the 22 to 39 year old age group. This young demographic primarily rents housing, in fact 84% of the residents are renters and most households consist of a single person. Less families with children live in this area compared to other neighborhoods in Portland.

PARKING LOT MIXED-USE/RETAIL

MORR

ISON

BRID

0

GE

5 10

1

BUCKMAN DISTRICT

SITE PLAN 1/32”= 1’-0”

HAWT

HORN

E BR ID

GE

0

SE 8TH

SE 7TH

SE 6TH

SE ALDER ST.

2

SE MORRISON ST.

5

0 10

FRONT FACADE 1/16”= 1’-0”

3

5 10

EAST FACADE 1/16”= 1’-0”

SE BELMONT ST.

SE YAMHILL ST.

4

0

5

CROSS SECTION: B 1/16”= 1’-0”

: STREET ANALYSIS

10

5

0

LONGITUDINAL SECTION: A 1/16”= 1’-0”

5 10

: NEIGHBORHOOD INFORMATION Architect: Bennes and Herzog Year Built: 1927 The Central Eastside of Portland, where the Buckman neighborhood resides, was selected for an urban renewal project in 1986 and is still a work in progress today. The initial strategy was started by a housing strategy committee that included members who represent employers/businesses, developers, service providers, neighborhood associations, residents, and property owners. One of the main goals for the project consisted of a housing strategy that was “geared toward promoting a range of employment opportunities and living environments for Portland residents in order to attract and retain a stable and diversified population” (Comprehensive Plan Goal 2.2). In 2003 the plan was adopted by the Portland Development Commission and has completed some very interesting projects, including a storefront revival project that includes the site located on SE 7th and Morrison.

SOUTH EAST BOUND SIDEWALK TRAFFIC

WEST BOUND TRAFFIC

BUS/ BIKE LANE

NORTH SIDEWALK

The neighborhood has a very strong community association that is made up of a group of board members who hold monthly meetings and manages a thorough website with a range of information including capital improvement projects, crime statistics, park information, and zoning designations. The association has two committees, a historic association and a sustainability committee. The historic association is currently working to create a National Register Historic District that highlights Buckman as the oldest neighborhood on the east side. The Sustainability Committee “undertakes projects to promote sustainable practices in the neighborhood.” The committee maintains a community composting site and is expanding its small community garden plots. Additionally, the Hawthorne District, a widely popular SE district located on Hawthorne Blvd. is partially located in Buckman. This street is known for its unique Portland culture that features restaurants, local shops, and entertainment options. The eastern side of Buckman is a mix of residential and local businesses, the west blocks of the neighborhood are designated to industrial and commercial businesses that provide over 17,000 jobs. Additionally, the neighborhood features a number of classic Portland architectural styles including craftsman bungalow, Victorian, foursquare, courtyard housing and historic mixed-use industrial buildings that house both retail and private dwelling space.

Emma Silverman

22

Comprehensive Project 2012

A. Snyder


Emma Silverman

final layout

EXISTING CONDITIONS: BUILDING DOCUMENTATION

WHAT: WHERE:

College graduates between the age of 21-33. Mixed use, office/retail space & affordable, rentable housing that is inspired by cohousing--a form of communal living that originated in Denmark in the 1970’s.

building conditions and codes

WHO:

Cities. For this project Portland, Oregon. The project responds to a need for affordable housing for college graduates who come to an urban area in search of building careers while maintaining a sustainable lifestyle.

: STRUCTURE DIAGRAM

0

5 10

SOLID REINFORCED CONCRETE SIDE WALL BRICK MASONRY BEARING WALL WITH FENESTRATIONS

SECOND FLOOR

4

ROOF PLAN 1/16”= 1’-0”

3” T & G WOOD FLOORING

32 RISERS DOWN

2”x12” WOOD JOISTS 16” O.C. A B

12” X18” WOOD BEAM 8”X18” WOOD BEAM C

8 1/2” X 24” CONCRETE BEAM

FIRST FLOOR

D

REINFORCED CONCRETE 10” X10” WOOD COLUMNS BRICK MASONRY SUPPORT COLUMNS 32 RISERS DOWN

E

F

8”X18” WOOD BEAM 12” X 18” WOOD BEAM 12”X12” WOOD COLUMN REINFORCED CONCRETE BASEMENT WALL

BASEMENT

0

5 10

3

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 1/16”= 1’-0”

KRUEGER’S SUPPLY: WAREHOUSE

PARKING LOT

: JAY’S GARAGE AUTO GAS STATION Address: 734 SE 7th Ave. Gross SQ FT: 7,000 L x W x H: 66’ x 30’ x 14’ Date: 1935

20 RISERS UP

32 RISERS DOWN

15 RISERS UP TO BALCONY

15 RISERS UP TO BALCONY

32 RISERS UP

0

5 10

5

FRONT EXTERIOR ELEVATION/ DASHED INTERIOR SECTION 1/8”= 1’-0”

0

5 10

2

FIRST FLOOR PLAN/ JAY’S GARAGE FLOOR PLAN 1/16”= 1’-0”

: SOLAR ORIENTATION

20 RISERS UP

JUNE 20: 8:50 AM

JUNE 20: 4:00 PM

DEC. 20: 8:50 AM

DEC. 20: 4:00 PM

0

10

1

STUDIO APARTMENT: A

Comprehensive Project 2012

A. Snyder

BATHROOM TILE: B

STUDIO APARTMENT: C

5

BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN 1/16”= 1’-0”

PRIVATE BATHROOM: D

ENTRY STAIR: E

Emma Silverman

HALLWAY: F

Comprehensive Project 2012

A. Snyder

23


zoning Both buildings are zoned as central employment.

design regulations / restrictions

zoning

The East Morrison Apartment building was part of the Central Eastside Urban Renewal Area. The facade of the building was part of the sStorefront Improvement Program, is an urban renewal site from 1986 to present. The urban development goals for the area are 1) to Maintain Portland’s role as the major regional employment, population, cultural center through public policies that encourage expanded opportunity for housing and jobs while retaining the character of established residential, neighborhood and business center, and 2) Urban Diversity: Promote a range of employment opportunities and living environments for Portland residents in order to attract and retain a stable and diversified population (Central Eastside Urban Renewal Area Housing Strategy Document, City of Portland).

Occupancies / Occupant Load and Construction East Morrison Apartment Building: Group R-2—Residential, R-B Residential, Apartment Buildings (Life and Safety Code), Group M—Mercantile, M-B (Life and Safety Code), Group B—Business, Separated Multiple Occupancy Jay’s Garage Building: Group M-- Mercantile, M-C, 1 story ≤ 3000 SF. (Life and Safety Code) (50 Sharon Koomen Harmon).

occupant loads for each occupancy group Maximum Floor Areas per Occupant: Dormitories: 60 sq ft. gross; Mercantile 60 sq. ft. gross, Residential 320 sq. ft gross (119 Materials Structures Standards, McMorrough) Total Occupant Load= 30-40 (residents/residential) Total Occupant Load= 20-30 (tenants/commerical lease)

Construction Type

egress and fire rating

Noncombustible materials—concrete and masonry. Type II or Type IV construction. “IIIA or IIIB, exterior walls must be of noncombustible materials and interior building elements may be of any material permitted by the code” (116 McMorrough).

maximum travel distance to an exit With a sprinkler system: 250 ft. Without a sprinkler system: 200 ft.

dead end corridor lengths limits The most common dead end length is a maximum of 20’

minimum egress width The width for stairways is .3” per occupant ~ 27” (without sprinkler system) The width for stairways is .2” per occupant ~ 18” (without sprinkler system)

24


code analysis minimum number of exits building conditions and codes

My building requires 2 exits because it has a 1-500 occupant load per story

minimum width requirement for egress doors

egress and fire rating

The minimum width is 32”. No part of an egress door can be more than 4’

minimum distance allowed between two exits Half diagonal rule-this rule requires that the distance between two exits be at least 1/2 of the longest diagonal distance within the building or the building area the exits are serving.

minimum stairway width “Stairways must be at least 44” wide, except when serving an occupant load of less than 50, they may be 36” wide.”

places of refuge The 2006 IBC code requires all buildings to have an accessible means of egress that usually includes an area of refuge. Commonly the requirement is one space for every 200 occupants.

enclosed stairs Two encolosed stairs are required for this project.

maximum rise / run Rise min. 4”- max. 7”/ Run: 11” (154).

stairs/ramps

handrail height for stairs Handrails are to between 34” and 38” (157). “Any single flight of stairs may not exceed 12’ in vertical rise between floors or landings (155)”

ramp rise to run ratio 1:12”

landings “Stairways must have landings at the top and bottom, and at changes in direction.” “Landings are to have a width no less than that of the stairway they s (155)

head height clearance for stairs 80”

25


bathroom fixture and drinking fountains

plumbing

Apartments: Water closets: 1/dwelling unit, Lavatories: 1/dwelling unit, Bathtub/shower: 1/dwelling unit, 1 Kitchen sink/dwelling unit, 1 clothes washer connection/dwelling unit. Mercantile: Water closets: 1/500, Lavatories: 1/750, Drinking Fountains: 1/1,000, 1 service sink/ unit Dormitories: Water closets: 1/10, Lavatories: 1/10, Bathtubs/showers: 1/8, Drinking Fountain: 1/100, I service sink

number of bathroom fixtures My building requires about 20 bathroom facilities (includes private apartments). Typically, all the fixtures used in a single toilet facility must be accessible.

clear floor space “Minimum unobstructed floor or ground space required to accommodate a single, stationary wheelchair and occupant” (121 McMorrough). For instance, a clear space of 30” by 48” is to be provided If the door swings into the room, clear of the door swing” (204).

clear floor space needed for door swings

accessibility

48” min.

front approaches-pull side & push side dimensions Pull- 18” min, Push- 12”

requirements for protruding objects “A drinking fountain or any other object cannot protrude anymore than 4” max into a corridor. The required height is 27-80 inches above the floor” (136 Harmon).

clear floor space for a lavatory 27” min, 34” max., 17” min 19” max. clearance below a lavatory (129 McMorrough).

water closet clear floor space 17”-19”—Height, The min. centerline dimension to a wall is 18” (282 Harmon).

26


1 *2-40

1-26 1-26 1-40 1-26

ADA Restroom (62) Assembly (80 gross)

Residential (15 net) Kitchen (200) Assembly (20 net, includes furniture) Residential (15 net)

Restrooms located in both Jay’s & Co-Habitat Public Areas

A small grocery store oriented toward community use Wine storage/display Storage of food stuffs

Terrace addition in lofted spaces Informal Cooking/lounge space

Dining/sitting space, during the day is available for tenant use Informal Gathering “Muck room” Additional storage

Public Restrooms

Food Market

Wine Cellar

Market Basement Storage

Studio Flat (Furnished)

Double Lofted (Furnished)

Shared Outdoor Terrace

Shared Lounge (Partially Furnished)

Shared Open Kitchen

Shared Dining (Furnished)

Mezzanine

Utilities/Laundry

Oversized Storage

*2-4

Residential (356-588) (incl. w.c./kitchenette)

2 Rentable private sleeping unit w/kitchenette, storage system, & W.C.

5x8

Elevator

‘Sleep Space’-- “Co-habitat”

Share-- “Co-mingle”

Merchant-- “Collaborate”

Layers of Zones:

See Calculation

1-26

Storage (50 gross)

1-10

1-26

Storage (50 gross)

1-6

*1-2

Residential (300-386) (incl. w.c./kitchenette)

Rentable private sleeping unit w/kitchenette, storage system, & W.C.

Residential (230-300)

*1-10

*2-10

Storage (50 gross)

Assembly (80 gross)

Egress

Mechanical

2-12

Merchant (60)

Rentable, communal office space for residents & community

CO-LAB ART STUDIO (Furnished)

*2-12

CO-LAB (Furnished) Merchant (60)

‘Morrison Hotel’ bar

Rentable, communal office space for residents & community

Existing Bar (Merchant)

*2-40

*2-20

Assembly (15 net)

Dining Area

Dining/informal lounge space

Jay’s Garage

Jay’s Rooftop Terrace Business (40 gross)

*2-30

Merchant (50 gross)

Diner: Kitchen

Jay’s Garage

1-6

Bike Storage/Mailroom

1-20

Secondary access for private residents

Utlity space/more formal resident entry

Existing Private Resident Entries Assembly (10, standing space)

NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS

FUNCTION OF SPACE + (IBC max. floor area allowances per occupant) Assembly (10, standing space)

ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION

NAME OF SPACE

short program Mixed-Use Program

27

1,020

21, 200 (East Morrison) + 7,000 (Jay’s) =28, 200 29, 755

GROSS AVAILABLE (with wall space subtracted) NET TOTAL PROGRAM

15 - 35

88x100 (East Morrison) + 73x30 (Jay’s) = 36, 939

TOTAL GROSS BUILDING (foot print + floors)

25 - 300

2, 349

TOTAL OCCUPANCY RANGE

6, 252

CIRCULATION

120

184

912

696

1,000

672

1,468

400

839

600

1,068

3,850

626

641

1,865

372

1,608

1,540

OUTDOOR SPACE

Basement

Basement

Basement

Mezzanine

Ground Floor

Ground Floor

Second Floor

Third Floor

Second Floor + Third Floor

Second Floor

Basement

Basement

Ground Floor

Ground Floor + Basment

Basement

Ground Floor

Ground Floor

1,000 1,827

Ground Floor

445

630

120

TOTAL (sq. ft.)

Second Floor

Ground Floor

Ground Floor

Ground Floor

LOCATION

TOTAL # OF PRIVATE RESIDENTS

program

3 (1 per floor)

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

3

11

1

1

1

6

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

NUMBER OF UNITS

Emma Silverman Co-Habitat 5.16.12


28


COMMERCIAL 500

630

STUDIO 350

DINER

MORRISON HOTEL BAR

COMMUNITY MARKET

BIKE STORAGE

SLEEP GREEN SPACE BICYCLE REPAIR STATIONS

PIC NIC EATING 500

ROOFTOP TERRACE

STORAGE

READING ROOM

500

672

SHARED LOUNGE

AMENITIES KITCHEN 400

2 BEDROOM TERRACE 300

580

FOOD MARKET

AMENITIES

LOBBY/LOUNGE 500

912

839

program

1,500

1,865

1,827

1,500 1,445

1,020

COMMUNAL OFFICE SPACE 1,540

graphic program

NET TOTAL PROGRAM: 23, 503

29


Entrance

occupancy: 1-4 square footage: 250 adjacency: communal kitchen, lounge, dining area, stairs/elevator daylight/electric: electric; unobtrusive with dimming capability main activities: meet and greet, place coats, take shoes off design mood: informal, inviting, natural feeling, like an extended vestibule furniture/fixture/equipment: storage for shoes and coats

bike storage

occupancy: 1-30 square footage: 600 adjacency: mailboxes, communal kitchen, lounge, dining area, stairs/elevator daylight/electric: electric; unobtrusive with dimming capability main activities: meet and greet, place coats, take shoes off design mood: informal, inviting, natural feeling, like an extended vestibule

communal kitchen

occupancy: 1-60 square footage: 1,460-2,000 adjacency: entry, lounge, outdoor space, stairs/elevator daylight/electric: daylight; indirect; electric; unobtrusive with dimming capability main activities: communal cooking and dining space (hostel like) design mood: clean lines, natural (country), inviting, young feeling, more of a permanent space furniture/fixture/equipment: tables and chairs, full kitchen, ample counter space, refrigerator, stove, microwave, misc. appliances, storage

studio apartment

occupancy: 1-2 square footage: 350 (10-12 units) adjacency: common house, lounge, dining area, stairs/elevator daylight/electric: daylight; indirect; electric; unobtrusive with dimming capability main activities: private dwelling space, small lounge and/or kitchenette, 1/2 bath design mood: clean lines, inviting, highly flexible, young feeling furniture/fixture/equipment: bed, lounge chairs, chalkboard, range top stove, counter space, desk, storage/builtin shelving, closet space

2 Bedroom Flat

occupancy: 2-4 square footage: 500 (about 10-12 units) adjacency: common house, lounge, dining area, stairs/elevator daylight/electric: daylight; indirect; electric; unobtrusive with dimming capability main activities: private dwelling space, small lounge and/or kitchenette, 1/2 bath design mood: clean lines, inviting, highly flexible, young feeling furniture/fixture/equipment: bed, lounge chairs, chalkboard, range top stove, counter space, desk, storage/builtin shelving, closet space

30


lofted unit

occupancy: 2-4 square footage: 500 (2-4) adjacency: entry, lounge, other dwelling spaces, stairs/elevator daylight/electric: daylight; indirect; electric; unobtrusive with dimming capability main activities: private dwelling/shared dwelling, short stays design mood: clean lines, inviting, young feeling, flexible furniture/fixture/equipment: bed, lounge chairs, storage

long residential program

film lounge

program

occupancy: 1-60 square footage: 2,500 adjacency: entry, lounge, dining area, stairs/elevator daylight/electric: daylight; indirect; electric; unobtrusive with dimming capability main activities: communal space; includes lounge, offices, workshops, TV room, library, etc. design mood: clean lines, inviting, young feeling, more of a permanent space furniture/fixture/equipment: tables and chairs, desks, ample counter space, chalkboards, built-in shelving, flex seating for 20-40, TV/entertainment system

mezzanine lounge

occupancy: 1-60 square footage: 1,000 adjacency: stairs/elevator daylight/electric: electric main activities: lounge, reading, computer work, socializing design mood: industrial furniture/fixture/equipment: tables and chairs

gym

occupancy: 1-60 square footage: 1,300 adjacency: stairs/elevator daylight/electric: electric main activities: working out design mood: industrial furniture/fixture/equipment: workout equipment

rooftop terrace

occupancy: 1-60 square footage: TBD adjacency: stairs/elevator daylight/electric: daylight main activities: special events, lounge, hangout space design mood: natural furniture/fixture/equipment: tables and chairs

31


long commercial program

diner

occupancy: 2-45 square footage: 2,500 adjacency: parking lot daylight/electric: daylight; indirect; electric; unobtrusive with dimming capability main activities: dining, socializing design mood: edgy furniture/fixture/equipment: tables, chairs, stools, custom bar

rooftop terrace

occupancy: 1-60 square footage: 1,500 adjacency: stairs daylight/electric: daylight main activities: special events, lounge, hangout space design mood: natural furniture/fixture/equipment: tables and chairs

co lab

occupancy: 1-45 square footage: 2,500 adjacency: entry daylight/electric: daylight; indirect; electric; unobtrusive with dimming capability main activities: communal space; work; conference room design mood: clean lines, edgy furniture/fixture/equipment: tables and chairs, desks, ample counter space, lockers

grocery store

occupancy: 1-60 square footage: 3,000 adjacency: stairs/elevator daylight/electric: electric and daylight main activities: retail design mood: industrial furniture/fixture/equipment: tables and chairs

morrison hotel bar

occupancy: 1-60 square footage: 1,300 adjacency: stairs/elevator daylight/electric: electric main activities: eating, socializing design mood: industrial furniture/fixture/equipment: tables and chairs

32


user scenarios

THE RESIDENTS

“BUILDING’S NOT ONLY DOES A AESTHETIC

“SCHOOL THE FIRST COUPLE YEARS OUT OF CAN REALLY BE A LONELY

QUALITY EFFECT THE OVERALL EXPERIENCE ONE HAS IN A LIVING ENVIRONMENT SO DO ONE’S RELATIONSHIPS. AND THE FUSION OF THOSE TWO IDEAS WOULD INSPIRE [FILMIC] CREATIVITY AS WELL AS PROVIDE A NURTURING PHYSICAL LIVING SPACE.”

WILL FENG-MING DAI FROM: CHINA STUDY: FINE ARTS AGE: 23 JOB: GRAPHIC DESIGNER

“COLLABORATIVE I’M A

PERSON, THAT’S WHY I CHOOSE COLLABORATIVE LIVING”

BREA OBENDORF FROM: OREGON STUDY: INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AGE: 22 JOB: STUDENT

TIME. YOU ARE SEARCHING FOR COMMUNITY, BUT ALSO LOOKING TO TRANSITION TOWARDS FAMILY LIFE. THE ABILITY TO HAVE A LIVING SITUATION THAT UNDERSTANDS THIS UNIQUE DEVELOPMENTAL STAGE OF LIFE WOULD BE GREAT.”

program

UROOJ MUGHAL FROM: VIRGINIA STUDY: AGE: 25 JOB: MASTERS STUDENT

BRYN SILVERMAN FROM: OREGON STUDY: FILM AGE: 22 JOB: FILM MAKER

NATHAN REED FROM: KENTUCKY STUDY: ARCHITECTURE AGE: 31 JOB: ARCHITECT

“LIVING I ENJOY COMMUNITY BECAUSE IT HAS

ALLOWED ME TO MEET PEOPLE WITH A VARIETY OF BACKGROUNDS AND EXPERIENCES AND TO MAKE WONDERFUL FRIENDSHIPS. IT ALSO ALLOWS ALL OF US TO GET MORE BANG FOR THE BUCK--I COULD NOT AFFORD THE GREAT RESOURCES OF COMMUNITY LIVING ON MY OWN.” KIRSTEN HARRIS FROM: ILLINOIS STUDY: ARCHITECTURE AGE: 23 JOB: UNEMPLOYED

“NO COMMENT.”

“IN IAENJOY THE IDEA OF LIVING PARTLY SHARED SPACE. ONE OF MY FAVORITE PARTS OF BACKPACKING AROUND THE WORLD IS LIVING IN HOSTELS, THE SENSE OF COMMUNITY IS KEY.”

NAVEEN CHAUBAL

DAVID LOITZ

FROM: INDIANA STUDY: FILM AGE: 22 JOB: FILM MAKER

FROM: OREGON STUDY: EDUCATION AGE: 31 JOB: TEACHING COMMUNITY ORGANIZER

“KINDTHISOFISPLACE EXACTLY THE I’VE BEEN TRYING TO FIND IN LA BUT HAVEN’T. COHABITAT SEEMS LIKE A RESIDENCE WHERE YOU CAN FORM A COMMUNITY OF LIKE-MINDED PEOPLE.”

“COMMUNITY AS WE MOVE TOWARD MORE LOCAL, BASED LIFE, MORE HUMAN

SCALE LIVING ARRANGEMENTS WILL BECOME THE NORM. PEOPLE WILL LOOK TO SHARE MORE THAN OWN, THEY WILL LOOK TO LIFE STYLE THAT MAKE CONSUMING LESS MORE ATTRACTIVE AND EASY. BRING COMMUNITY AND COMMUNAL LIVING TO URBAN CENTERS AND PROVIDING A NEW ALTERNATIVE TO ISOLATION OF THE CITY AND THE SPRAWL OF THE SUBURB. ”

33


BRYN SILVERMAN

OCCUPATION RECENT GRADUATE FROM USC SCHOOL OF CINEMATIC ARTS; WORKS FOR A FILM NON-PROFIT SEX FEMALE AGE 22 TITLE CO-HABITAT RESIDENT; APPLICANT FOR A TWO-BEDROOM STUDIO APARTMENT WITH HER FRIEND NAVEEN.

PERSONAL STATEMENT I recently graduated from college and decided to move back to Oregon to save money. My goal is to eventually move back to L. A. for its strong film network, a profession I would like to pursue. Since I left Oregon to attend school in California, I have lost touch with many people who live in the area, my main motivation for applying to live at Co-Habitat was to meet new friends who also graduated from college and are in a similar state of transition in life. Since my main goal right now is to save money, I spent a long time searching for an apartment that was affordable; luckily my income level qualified me to apply for a room with my friend Ivy. We both have a lot of belongings and are willing to down grade the amount of stuff we own. That being said, we are looking forward to sharing some of our belongings such as dishes, silverware, camping gear, DVD’s and the like with other residents. Living communally would be ideal for us as we are trying to meet new friends, network, and explore Portland with other people our age. We also very much enjoy cooking and believe in the power of connecting with people through communal meals, an activity that we grew fond of in college. What we both admire about Co-Habitat is that we have our own private space including, two bedrooms, personal storage, our own bathroom and small kitchenette. This flexible space is great because we can part take in communal activity as often as we want to and feel no pressure to always engage with others. Communal spaces such as a lounge, kitchen, dining area, and outdoor space would be fun to share with others, as well as serve as great spaces to meet new friends. WILL FENG-MING DAI

OCCUPATION GRAPHIC DESIGNER SEX MALE AGE 22 TITLE CO-HABITAT RESIDENT; STUDIO FLAT PERSONAL STATEMENT I have a taste for design but strongly believe in sustainability. I landed a job with NIKE and wanted to live in a place where I could make new friends. I also wanted to down grade the amount of stuff I own. Luckily, I found Co-Habitat. What I love about living here is that we share everything from outdoor gear to utensils. This was awesome because I moved from Chicago and didn’t want to ship my stuff here; so I ended up selling a lot of it. I feel like I now live a more sustainable lifestyle and that makes me feel like I’m contributing in a small way to the world at large.

34


ELI SPEVAK

user scenarios

OCCUPATION Developer for Orange Spot LLC SEX Male, 45 TITLE The founder and developer of Co-Habitat Residence; owns five cohousing properties in Portland

PERSONAL STATEMENT I initially became interested in cohousing communities at Portland State where I studied urban planning and sustainable development. My children are my main motivation for planning cohousing communities. I wanted a sustainable, healthy environment for them to grow up and found that other people in the Portland community wanted the same thing. Communal living is ideal in a neighborhood setting because it creates a strong bond families and are intended for first time homebuyers. They cost around $150,000 $200,000, all amenities such as electricity, garbage service, internet, and laundry is split amongst families, keeping expenses at a low price. Together we planned a community house that we use communally. It includes a large kitchen, dining area, activity room, resource station, workshop, TV lounge, and garage. This space is ideal for group meals and for our kids to intermingle. All of my properties have proved to be very successful but I realized that most communities attracted young families and a mix generational crowd. A younger demographic was missing, specifically between the age of 20-30. I designed Co-Habitat for this missing demographic. It is a place where young adults can create their own community; it’s a transitional place, a continuation of the college experience. My role is their landlord, their rent comes to me and in return I pay for the expense of complex. I visit the property rarely, as the residents are in charge of maintaining the property and cooking their own meals. However, I am greatly involved in the application process, I hand picked the first round of tenants and from there help the board of tenants select new residents. Each resident goes through an extensive application process, they have to prove that they graduated from college, are strong members in the community and are willing to partake in living communally.

35

program

between individuals, allowing for strong relationships between neighbors. Private residences are owned by


interview list eli spevak ELI SPEVAK Developer of Orange Spot LLC Date of Interview: February 8, 2012 DAVID LOITZ david loitz

Teaching Community Organizer Date of Interview: May 27, 2012 BRYNsilverman SILVERMAN bryn

Freelance Filmmaker Date of Interview: June 2, 2012

transcribed interview with eli spevak Q: Do you think co-housing can be translated into a rentable situation? Rather than having individuals purchase/ or buy into their living units? A: “There is somewhat of a formula for designing co-housing. There can be a model but it can be reinterpretted in any way. The design is flexible and community oriented--some shared, some cultured sharing. People know each other in co-housing developments, they know their neighbors.” Q: What does the word “communal” mean to you? A: “A high level of sharing, community oriented housing.” Q: What is important to remember when designing for a communal condition? A: “Design natural places to cross paths. Location matters. Price matters. Amenities matter.” Q: What is the best aspect of communal living? A: “Impromptu fun! I love having my own space but if I want to do something, I have a bunch of friends within close proximity of me and my family.” Q: Do you think communal living inspires people to own less “stuff”? A: “Smaller spaces do inspire owning less. Also, in co-housing people share. They share cars, barbeques, canoes, bikes, tools, the list goes on and on. But in your case, you are designing for young people who will most likely not have a lot of stuff to begin with.”

36


reference archive

“LONELY THE FIRST COUPLE YEARS OUT OF SCHOOL CAN REALLY BE A TIME. YOU ARE SEARCHING FOR COMMUNITY, BUT ALSO LOOKING TO TRANSITION TOWARDS FAMILY LIFE. THE ABILITY TO HAVE A LIVING SITUATION THAT UNDERSTANDS THIS UNIQUE DEVELOPMENTAL STAGE OF LIFE WOULD BE GREAT. AS WE MOVE TOWARD MORE LOCAL, COMMUNITY BASED LIFE, MORE HUMAN SCALE LIVING ARRANGEMENTS WILL BECOME THE NORM. PEOPLE WILL LOOK TO SHARE MORE THAN OWN, THEY WILL LOOK TO LIFE STYLE THAT MAKE CONSUMING LESS MORE ATTRACTIVE AND EASY. BRING COMMUNITY AND COMMUNAL LIVING TO URBAN CENTERS AND PROVIDING A NEW ALTERNATIVE TO ISOLATION OF THE CITY AND THE SPRAWL OF THE SUBURB. ”

37


38


communal living

bibliography

Wildman, Sarah. “A Showpiece of Communal Living in Berlin.” New York Times. 9 Nov. 2011. Web. 16 Nov. 2011. <http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/10/greathomesanddestina tions/on-location-in-berlin-a-showpiece-of-communal-living.html>. MacCamant, Kathryn, and Charles Durrett. Cohousing a Contemporary Approach to Housing Ourselves. Berkeley, CA: Habitat, 1991. Print.

bicycle transportation “Bicycle Transportation Alliance Oregon | Projects Archive.” Bicycle Transportation Alliance Oregon | Roll On Future City. Web. 16 Nov. 2011. <http://btaoregon.org/get-involved/>. Birk, Mia Layne., and Joe Kurmaskie. Joyride: Pedaling toward a Healthier Planet. Portland, Or.: Cadence, 2010. Print.

housing Brand, Stewart. How Buildings Learn: What Happens After They’re Built, New York: Viking, 1994. Print. Chiara, Joseph De. Time-saver Standards for Residential Development. New York [etc.: McGraw-Hill, 1984. Print. Johns, Anna. “City Bets on Courtyards.” Portland Tribune & Community Newspapers | Pamplin Media Group. 31 July 2007. Web. 16 Nov. 2011. <http://www.portlandtribune.com/news/story. php?story_id=118582942332189500>.

design case study research Jergarden, Cohousing Community located in Aahus, Denmark. 8 unit complex located in an urban setting. “Trans formed an inner city junk yard and eight deteriorated row houses to an urban paradise.” Emeryville, CA; Condominium Cohousing, Doyle Street Cohousing Community, 1992. (similar foot print to East Morrison Apartment building). MacCamant, Kathryn, and Charles Durrett. Cohousing a Contemporary Approach to Housing Ourselves. Berke ley, CA: Habitat [u.a., 1991. Print. Daybreak Cohousing, Portland, Oregon. Roedig, Christoph & Schop, Uli. Communal Duplex located in Berlin’s Mitte neighborhood. Urban location, mod ern facility.

apartment housing Sir John Soane’s house. 13 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London. And adaptive reuse project that connects three urban private residences together.

parks/bike Design Thoth, Modern Park Design: Recent Trends, 1995.--Book Moreno, Shonquis, Velo: bicycle culture and design. , Berlin: Gestalten, 2010. TL410.M665 2010.

39

reference archive

Kimmelman, Michael. “Pleasures of Life in the Slow Lane.” New York Times. 7 Nov. 2011. Web. 16 Nov. 2011. <http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/08/arts/design/a-bike-lane- perch-for-the-urban-show.html>.


housing Cooperative berlin, Germany: arhitects: Christoph roedig: 6 story apartment: 10 apartments with shared facilities “BERLIN — One day in 2002, the architect Christoph Roedig and his partner in business and life Uli Schop were biking through what was then an ungentrified corner of Berlin’s Mitte neighborhood, on a street not far from where the Berlin Wall once divided the city. World War II-era bombings had knocked down 19th- and early-20th-century housing developments in that part of the former East Germany. Though the former East German government had cleared away the rubble, they had never rebuilt.” “That day the couple came upon a plot and hatched a plan. They were determined to find a project that would become a showpiece for their newly formed architecture firm and they needed a place to live. They also knew that many of their friends, almost all, at the time, in their 30s, were searching for homes. Mr. Roedig, now 45, and Mr. Schop, 46, gathered a group of nearly 10 potential buyers to discuss creating a co-op building. The plot’s price — 250,000 euros, or about $360,000, at the time — put the project within reach. The idea was 10 apartments, designed and built to each buyer’s specification, with communal areas and shared costs. Mr. Roedig recalls plying the prospective buyers with questions. “We asked them ‘How do you imagine living? What are your plans for the future? Is there going to be a child that will move in to your place? Or moves out? Or a mother that will move in?’ So we dealt with all these concepts then we made a scheme for the whole house.” Some wanted lofts, some wanted rooms, he said. Then he added, laughing, “For ourselves we didn’t know what we wanted.” Construction began in 2004 and was completed a year later for an additional 850,000 euros, or just over $1.1 million, a fee shared between all the owners. The result is an elegant, six-story apartment house with 10 units. The light gray structure is sheathed in fiber concrete, a material that impressed Mr. Roedig. “It is very light and strong,” he said, “When the sun is shining on it and it is very reflective and glossy and shiny. But when it’s wet it is a bit darker.” The couple’s duplex apartment is on the first floor; it is made up of what would have been two apartments. The long rectangular apartment has the look and feel of a loft, with its polished concrete walls and open plan layout.”

40


reference archive

case studies

41


60 Richmond Housing Cooperative Mixed Use Coop, Restaurant and Training Facility Teeple Architects Toronto 99,565 sq. ft. 2010 â&#x20AC;&#x153;60 Richmond is an iconic design that showcases an innovative approach to urban infill.â&#x20AC;? Morrish, William R., Susanne Schindler, and Katie Swenson. Growing Urban Habitats: Seeking a New Housing Development Model. San Francisco: William Stout, 2009. Print.

42


43

reference archive


Silver house A new build house in a complex infill site in Maida Vale, London. The site had been left derelict for decades because there were no obvious ways to develop it. Wedged between two imposing Victorian end of terrace buildings with a street frontage of less than three metres, the site is eleven metres deep and 7.5 metres wide at the rear of the property. Each plan, therefore, took a different form resulting in a stacked configuration. The guiding principles behind the project were to introduce as much light as possible throughout the building whilst retaining privacy from the many neighbouring windows.

Glass addition, london Glass extension overlooking a beautiful garden with a curved plan form that creates a facetted, crystal-like transition from house to garden.

44


45

reference archive


Sunrise Park Boyarsky Murphy Architects London, Interesting Graphics

46


reference archive

El Mirador de Sanchinaro

Social Housing Madrid, Spain Architect MVRDV Architect Blanca Lleó asociados 2005 This 22 level building, called Mirador, is located in Sanchinarro, a residential suburb on the north east edge of Madrid surrounded by highways and with views towards the Guadarrama Mountains. The most impressive element of the building is the incredible gap of it shape, which acts as a frame for the distant landscape. The large communal plaza and lookout at 40 m above the ground is meant to be used by the neighborhood as a meeting area and playground. The Mirador contains a wide variety of compact housing types, in total 156 units. The architects created a distinctive silhouette by grouping nine blocks. The articulation of these blocks is apparent in the exterior palette, equal parts stone, concrete and tile. The strips of red indicate the corridors. The way the nine blocks are stacked and glued together, they make up a new towering impressive ‘superblock’ (MVRDV). Blanca Lleó asociados from Madrid were responsible for directing the works.

47


Vallecas 51 Social Housing Madrid, Spain Somos Arquitectos 1125 sq. m.: 2009 This social housing project in Madrid has an original faรงade design with polycarbonate panels in three hues of green. In fact, it is one of the first residential projects which features plastic materials as a skin. The programme, including 123 social housing apartments, is called to be one of the new urban icons on the outskirts of Madrid.

48


49

reference archive


all of this

lawrence 435

50


for this

design

final presentation june 7 2012

51


final presentation june seventh, 2012

52


53

design


blv d dy san se

eastb

ank es planad e

se martin luther king jr blvd

se stark st.

se 7th

lone fir pioneer cemetary se 28th

rentable, communal housing for young adults

project by emma r. silverman

morrison bridge

se morrison st.

a. snyder comprehensive studio spring 2012

col. summers park

SITE: SE 7TH & MORRISON PORTLAND, OREGON

se 20th ave

se belmont st.

roof plan diagram co habitat

existing

My final interior architecture project is called Co-Habitat. For my thesis, I wanted to respond to the needs of recent graduates between the ages of 21-33 and the prevalence of independently rented apartments that do not enhance social interaction. Co-Habitat promotes an affordable, semi-communal housing complex with a mixed commercial program. I was attracted to a site that consists of two buildings. Most of the commercial and residential spaces are placed within a three-story 1927 brick and heavy timber building. I am re-purposing the adjacent 1935 gas station as a diner that provides patio space for users above. My intention is to create a place that encourages communal and collaborative activities while also inviting the local public in for mart and other commercial reasons. In addition to personal dwelling space, Co-Habitat offers a range of shared living choices and additional tenant spaces that are geared toward attracting use from the surrounding community. In this project I investigate a range of topics including: economic sustainability, the changing lifestyles of an emerging group of young adults, “do it yourself” (diy) culture and the nature of collaboration, and the need for affordable housing within metropolitan cities. Overall, I am interested in how private residents share and collaborate, how the community comes together to share resources within one building, and how the residents and the community both coexist and collaborate within a mixed-use building.

1,500

5’

second floor rcp 1/ 16" = 1’-0”

3

0'

2

0'

g

0'

B

0'

5’

10’

5’

10’

5’

10’

5’

10’

third floor plan 1/ 8" = 1’-0”

PIC NIC EATING 500

STORAGE

ROOFTOP TERRACE

500

10’

BICYCLE REPAIR STATIONS

839

912

0'

672

READING ROOM

SHARED LOUNGE

580 2 BEDROOM 300

TERRACE

STUDIO 350

630

COMMERCIAL

AMENITIES KITCHEN 400

1,020

1,445

DINER

500

FOOD MARKET

MORRISON HOTEL BAR

LOBBY/LOUNGE 500

AMENITIES

COMMUNITY MARKET

BIKE STORAGE

COMMUNAL OFFICE SPACE 1,540

1,500

1,827

1,865

PROGRAM

SLEEP GREEN SPACE NET TOTAL PROGRAM: 23, 503

THE RESIDENTS UROOJ MUGHAL FROM: VIRGINIA STUDY: AGE: 25 JOB: MASTERS STUDENT

BRYN SILVERMAN FROM: OREGON STUDY: FILM AGE: 22 JOB: FILM MAKER

“AESTHETIC NOT ONLY DOES A BUILDING’S QUALITY EFFECT

“SCHOOL THE FIRST COUPLE YEARS OUT OF CAN REALLY BE A LONELY

TIME. YOU ARE SEARCHING FOR COMMUNITY, BUT ALSO LOOKING

TO TRANSITION TOWARDS FAMILY LIFE. THE ABILITY TO HAVE A LIVING SITUATION THAT UNDERSTANDS THIS UNIQUE DEVELOPMENTAL STAGE OF LIFE WOULD BE GREAT.”

THE OVERALL EXPERIENCE ONE HAS IN A LIVING ENVIRONMENT SO DO ONE’S RELATIONSHIPS. AND THE FUSION OF THOSE TWO IDEAS WOULD INSPIRE [FILMIC] CREATIVITY AS WELL AS PROVIDE A NURTURING PHYSICAL LIVING SPACE.”

WILL FENG-MING DAI FROM: CHINA STUDY: FINE ARTS AGE: 23 JOB: GRAPHIC DESIGNER

I’M A COLLABORATIVE PERSON, THAT’S WHY I CHOOSE COLLABORATIVE LIVING”

NATHAN REED FROM: KENTUCKY STUDY: ARCHITECTURE AGE: 31 JOB: ARCHITECT

I ENJOY COMMUNITY LIVING BECAUSE IT HAS

ALLOWED ME TO MEET PEOPLE WITH A VARIETY OF BACKGROUNDS AND EXPERIENCES AND TO MAKE WONDERFUL FRIENDSHIPS. IT ALSO ALLOWS ALL OF US TO GET MORE BANG FOR THE BUCK--I COULD NOT AFFORD THE GREAT RESOURCES OF COMMUNITY LIVING ON MY OWN.”

BREA OBENDORF FROM: OREGON STUDY: INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AGE: 22 JOB: STUDENT

KIRSTEN HARRIS FROM: ILLINOIS STUDY: ARCHITECTURE AGE: 23 JOB: UNEMPLOYED

0' 5’

10’

ground floor rcp 1/ 16" = 1’-0”

“NO COMMENT.”

second floor plan 1/ 8" = 1’-0”

“IN IAENJOY THE IDEA OF LIVING PARTLY SHARED SPACE. ONE OF MY FAVORITE PARTS OF BACKPACKING AROUND THE WORLD IS LIVING IN HOSTELS, THE SENSE OF COMMUNITY IS KEY.”

NAVEEN CHAUBAL

DAVID LOITZ

FROM: INDIANA STUDY: FILM AGE: 22 JOB: FILM MAKER

FROM: OREGON STUDY: EDUCATION AGE: 31 JOB: TEACHING COMMUNITY ORGANIZER

“KINDTHISOFISPLACE EXACTLY THE I’VE BEEN

AS WE MOVE TOWARD MORE LOCAL, COMMUNITY BASED LIFE, MORE HUMAN SCALE LIVING ARRANGEMENTS WILL BECOME THE NORM. PEOPLE WILL LOOK TO SHARE MORE THAN OWN, THEY WILL LOOK TO LIFE STYLE THAT MAKE CONSUMING LESS MORE ATTRACTIVE AND EASY. BRING COMMUNITY AND COMMUNAL LIVING TO URBAN CENTERS AND PROVIDING A NEW ALTERNATIVE TO ISOLATION OF THE CITY AND THE SPRAWL OF THE

TRYING TO FIND IN LA BUT HAVEN’T. COHABITAT SEEMS LIKE A RESIDENCE WHERE YOU CAN FORM A COMMUNITY OF LIKE-MINDED PEOPLE.”

SUBURB. ”

ZONING AXON

3

2

g

ground floor plan 1/ 8" = 1’-0”

existing vs new construction ground floor

b

diner concept perspective

54

basement floor plan 1/ 8" = 1’-0”


studio unit 31

studio unit 27

wardrobe furniture detail 1”= 1’-0"

wardrobe color options

existing vs new construction

This sketch led to the development of that furniture piece

wardrobe furniture exploded axon

new bedroom unit

existing bedroom unit

380 SQ. FT.

311 SQ. FT.

longitudinal section b 1/ 8" = 1’-0”

0' 5’

10’

cross section a 1/ 8" = 1’-0”

0' 5’

10’

new tile intervention

film lounge modular bench study existing conditions

co-lab modular furniture study

communal kitchen

bench detail 1”= 1’-0"

lofted unit exploded axon

wardrobe detail 1”= 1’-0"

co-lab detail axon nts

55

design

# of existing units: 17 # of new units: 16


final drawings

3

2

g

b ZONING AXON 56


3 EXISTING VS. NEW CONSTRUCTON

# of existing units: 17 # of new units: 16

design

2

G

b

57


jays garage diner

58


design

cross section

co-habitat

59


longitudinal section

NEW: LOFTED UNITS EXISTING UNITS

60

FILM LOUNGE


co-lab section perspective

design

NEW: LOFTED UNITS

CO-LAB: COMMUNAL OFFICE WORK SPACE

COMMUNAL KITCHEN

61


bedroom options lofted unit / studio apartment

62


existing bedroom unit

380 SQ. FT.

311 SQ. FT.

design

new bedroom unit

new tile intervention

existing conditions

63


wardrobe exploded axon

64


design

studio 31 wardrobe color options

65


wardrobe section

wardrobe color options 66


design

studio 27

wardrobe plan 67


film lounge modular bench scenarios

68


design

film lounge

bench detail

69


70


design

bike storage

71


communal kitchen

72


design

diner

73


74


design

co-lab

75


76


PROCESS WORK design

SEPTEMBER 2011 - JUNE 2012

77


PROCESS MODELS

78


design

CHARRETTE

79


AMENITY POD: informal, bright, non-gendered, casual, clean but not ordered

MAIN ENTRY: transparency, concrete, brick, contrast between rustic and contemporary/existing/new materials 80


design

material charrette

SECONDARY PRIVATE ENTRY: intimate, soft, informal, a place for happy accidents, brick 81


82


design

process charrette 2

83


SCHEME 1: LOCALIZED LIVE + WORK: ZONING DIAGRAM

# OF SLEEP SPACE: 16

“SLEEP+WORK” THIS IS WHERE RESIDENTS CO-HABIT

4TH FLOOR ADDITION

3RD FLOOR

“WORK” THIS IS WHERE TENANTS + COMMUNITY CO-LLABORATE

2ND FLOOR ADDITION

“WORK” THIS IS WHERE TENANTS +COMMUNITY + RESIDENTS CO-MINGLE

GROUND FLOOR

“ADDITIONAL COMMERCIAL + STORAGE” THIS IS WHERE TENANTS +COMMUNITY + RESIDENTS CO-MINGLE

84 BASEMENT


SCHEME 2: NETWORK OF LIVE + WORK: ZONING DIAGRAM

first midterm two schemes

# OF SLEEP SPACE: 34

“SLEEP” THIS IS WHERE RESIDENTS CO-HABIT

4TH FLOOR ADDITION “LOFTS”

3RD FLOOR

design

“INFORMAL LIVING” THIS IS WHERE RESIDENTS CO-LLABORATE

2ND FLOOR ADDITION

“WORK” THIS IS WHERE TENANTS +COMMUNITY + RESIDENTS CO-MINGLE

GROUND FLOOR

“STORAGE” THIS IS WHERE TENANTS +COMMUNITY + RESIDENTS CO-MINGLE

BASEMENT

85


SCHEME 1 : HIERARCHY DIAGRAM

SCHEME 1: UNIT DIAGRAM 3 BEDROOM FLAT 3 BEDROOM FLAT

LIVE/WORK STUDIO

86

STUDIO


design

SCHEME 2 : HIERARCHY DIAGRAM

SCHEME 2: UNIT DIAGRAM

2 LOFTS: 2 BEDROOMS BELOW: 1 UNIT

2 LOFTS: 2 BEDROOMS BELOW: 1 UNIT

1 LOFT: 1 BEDROOM BELOW: 1 UNIT 4TH FLOOR ADDITION “LOFTS”

2 BEDROOMS: 2 LOFTS ABOVE: 1 UNIT

2 BEDROOMS: 2 LOFTS ABOVE: 1 UNIT

1 BEDROOM: 1 LOFT ABOVE: 1 UNIT TOTAL # OF SLEEPING UNITS: 34

3RD FLOOR

87


88

2ND FLOOR

3RD FLOOR ADDITION


design

EXISTING SECOND FLOOR

89


scheme 1

90

scheme 2


design

first midterm presentation

91


92


design

first midterm perspectives

93


process after midterm 1 reschemeing ground floor CO-LAB WORK SURFACE SKETCH

PLAYING WITH CONNECTIONS

STAIR SKETCHES CO-LAB: PLAYING WITH COMMUNAL “PODS”

94


THIS SKETCH INSPIRED CREATING “FURNITURE AS WALLS”

process after midterm 1 reschemeing second floor

design

SKETCHING THE “WARDROBE” CONCEPT

PLAYIING WITH COMMUNAL PODS AND MAIN DIAGONAL AXIS

STAIRS: HOW SHOULD THEY BE?

IN THE PROCESS OF CREATING A MORE DYNAMIC INTERIOR SPACE

95


midterm 2

96


design

final

97


98


design

midterm 2

final

99


midterm 2

100


design

final

101


midterm 2

102


design

final

103


Thesis Project  

This is a compilation of the research and design work that I completed for my thesis interior architecture project, Co-Habitat: an affordabl...

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