SRT2018 Horse, Rider, Saddlery interactions: Welfare and Performance

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Saddle Research Trust CONTENTS Welcome from the Director 5 Saddle Research Trust Aims, Trustees, and Committee 7 Saddle Research Trust 3rd International Conference Sponsors 9 Conference Programme 11 Saddle Research Trust Welfare and Performance Awards 13 Biographies Prof. René van Weeren 15 Dr. Anne Bondi 15 Russell MacKenchnie-Guire 15 Dr. Thilo Pfau 17 Dr Sue Dyson 17 Prof. Lars Roepstorff 17 Prof. Hilary Clayton 19 Prof. Pat Harris 19 Laura Quiney 19 Panel Biographies Prof. Heikki Handroos 21 Dr. David Marlin 21 Eleanor Jones 21 Jenny Hall 23 Sue Norton 23 Roly Owers 23 Reflections biography Richard Davison 24 Keynote Presentations Recognition of pain in the ridden horse ~ Dr. Sue Dyson 27 Structural and functional asymmetry of the equine athlete ~ Prof. Hilary Clayton 29 Abstracts Rider Asymmetry ~ Russell MacKechnie-Guire 25 Recent advances in inertial sensor based asymmetry assessment ~ Dr. Thilo Pfau 26 Rider locomotion patterns and possibilities for improving rider skills ~ Prof. Lars Roepstorff 28 The Rider Weight Study ~ Prof. Pat Harris, Dr. Sue Dyson, Laura Quiney, Dr. Anne Bondi 30 The Robbie Project ~ Prof. Heikki Handroos 31 Panel: Equine Industry, research and the future Challenges to equine welfare and performance ~ Dr. David Marlin 32 What welfare issues have received media focus? ~ Eleanor Jones 32 How will the sport’s governing body face the future challenges? ~ Jenny Hall 33 How the saddlery industry is addressing the need for change ~ Sue Norton 33 What is social licence?~ Roly Owers 34 Poster presentations 35

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Welcome from the Director Welcome to the 3rd Saddle Research Trust International Conference 2018 and the Nottingham University Conference Centre. Having moved from Anglia Ruskin University, where our first two conferences in 2012 and 2014 were held, Nottingham is our new venue. The move represented a huge gamble for the trust. Far larger and more costly to stage than our previous conferences, would we be able to attract sufficient sponsors, exhibitors and audience numbers to make it pay? Clearly, the answer was “Yes”, the gamble paid off and we were delighted when tickets sold out months in advance. This resounding success is due to the exceptionally high standard of scientific presentations that are the hallmark of the SRT conferences and attract presenters and delegates from around the world. I would like to take this opportunity to thank our presenters for their passion and dedication during a lifetime devoted to rigorous investigation and for their willingness to share their work with us. The success however, had a down side and there were many people left disappointed because they could not attend this year’s event. Another gamble then presented itself: should we risk even more expense by live streaming the event so that people around the world could join us? One of the trust’s aims is education and I believe passionately that the way forward in the wholesale improvement of welfare and performance of the ridden horse is through the education of all the stakeholders in the equine industry. Live streaming technology is a powerful new tool for education and the dissemination of key messages to a worldwide audience and we therefore felt that it represented a risk worth taking. By the end of today, we will know how many extra people have been able to join us and whether that extra financial risk has paid off! Running alongside the public conference day is a Research Workshop, at which researchers from around the world gather together with industry representatives to discuss the key issues faced by today’s stakeholders. Identifying priorities for future research, meeting the challenges of funding and controversial topics are all discussed and potential solutions to the complex problems are sought as outcomes from the meeting. The proceeds from the sale of tickets for the public conference help to fund the research workshop. The overall cost of staging this meeting is an eye-watering sum of money. Without our sponsors, most of whom have displays here in our exhibition spaces, we would not be able to hold such an ambitious event. I would like to take this opportunity to thank them for their generosity in supporting the 2018 conference. Please show your appreciation by visiting them during our breaks, chatting to them and finding out first hand why they want to be involved with the trust’s work . Finally, I would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to everyone who has helped to organise and run this meeting. There is a huge amount of work goes on behind the scenes and there are many dedicated people who have contributed to the successful outcome. I hope that you enjoy today’s proceedings, learn a lot from the results of the latest research in horse, rider and saddlery interactions and will leave inspired to spread the key messages that will help improve ridden horse welfare and performance worldwide. Dr. Anne Bondi BHSI Saddle Research Trust Director

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Saddle Research Trust THE AIMS OF THE SADDLE RESEARCH TRUST 2018 · To promote the welfare of the ridden horse · To raise awareness of the widely underestimated issues surrounding the interactions between horses, saddles and riders. · To educate and inform the stakeholders within the equine industry – Riders, coaches, horse owners, professional healthcare practitioners, saddle professionals and other welfare organisations. · To support humane scientific research, the translation of scientific research and the dissemination of information.

/

Dr Anne Bondi

Alex Jakob-Whitworth

Amanda Robson

Trust Director

Trustee

Trustee

PhD

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Dr. Sue Dyson

MA, PGCE

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Prof. Pat Harris

ITEC Dip BHSAI Int SM

Dr. Jan Birch

MA, VetMB, PhD, DEO, FRCVS

MA, PhD, DipECVCN, VetMB, MRCVS

Honorary Scientific Advisor

Honorary Education and Knowledge Transfer Advisor

Sarah Shepherd

Dr. David Bondi

Elizabeth Gandy

Honorary PR Advisor

Honorary Strategy Advisor

Honorary Research Coordinator

Honorary Veterinary Advisor

PhD

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MA, PhD, PGCHE, FHEA

MSc, MBCS


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Saddle Research Trust

SPONSORS The Saddle Research Trust 3rd International Conference is made possible by generous sponsorship. The Board of Trustees would like to extend thanks to the organisations and companies for their commitment to the welfare and performance of the ridden horse. World Horse Welfare Wow Saddles AlbionEngland Saddlers Company Deutches Institut fur Pferdosteopathie Schleese Saddlery Amerigo Solution Saddles IRVAP Prestige Italia Sue Carson Saddles Society of Master Saddlers Fascial Edge Ethical Horse Products Harper Adams Saddle Exchange McTimoney Animal Association Utopia Saddles ACPAT Neue Schule Rebel Of Sweden The Horse Trust HorseGent-Horseback Ridercise st 21 Century Rider Novel GMBH

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Saddle Research Trust

Conference Conference Programme Programme

Saddle Research Trust International Conference 2018 Generously sponsored by World Horse Welfare and Wow Saddles

Horse, rider, saddlery interactions : Welfare and Performance At Nottingham University De Vere Centre Saturday 8th December 2018

Conference chair Conference chair Welcome 8.30 Welcome 8.30

8.40 8.40 9.10 9.10 9.40 9.40 10.40 10.40 11.10 11.10 11.40 11.40 12.40 12.40 1.40 1.40 1.50 1.50 2.20 2.20 2.40 2.40 2.50 2.50 3.00 3.00 3.10 3.10 3.30 3.30 4.00 4.00

4.25 4.25 4.35 4.35 4.45 4.45 4.55

Rider asymmetry Rider asymmetry Recent advances in inertial sensor based asymmetry assessment Gait asymmetry Keynote presentation: Recognition of pain in the ridden horse Keynote presentation: Recognition of pain in the ridden horse Coffee Coffee Rider locomotion patterns and possibilities for improving rider skills Objective measurement of horse, saddle, rider interaction Keynote presentation: Structural and functional asymmetry of the equine athlete Keynote presentation: Structural and functional asymmetry of the equine athlete Lunch Lunch The rider weight study: Introduction The rider weight study: Introduction Study design Study design Physiological effects of loading Physiological effects of loading Effect of loading on behaviour and gait Effect of loading on behaviour and gait Observations: Saddle movement and rider posture Observations: Saddle movement and rider posture Summary Summary Questions and discussion: the rider weight study Questions and discussion: the rider weight study Tea Tea Towards a horseback riding simulator with realistic interactive riding sensation Towards a horseback riding simulator with realistic interactive riding sensation Panel: Equine industry, research and the future Panel: Equine industry, research and the future Challenges to equine welfare and performance Challenges to equine welfare and performance What welfare issues have received media focus? What welfare issues have received media focus? How will the sport’s governing body face the future challenges How will the sport’s governing body face the future challenges How the saddlery industry is addressing the need for change

How the saddlery industry is addressing the need for change 4.55 5.05 What is social licence? 5.05 Reflections 5.15 What is social licence?

5.15 Questions and discussion 5.25 Reflections 5.25 5.45 Questions and discussion 5.45

Prof. René van Weeren Prof. Rene van Weeren Dr. Anne Bondi Dr. Anne Bondi Russell MacKechnie-Guire Russell MacKechnie‐Guire Dr. Thilo Pfau Dr. Thilo Pfau Dr. Sue Dyson Dr. Sue Dyson

Prof. Lars Roepstorff Prof. Lars Roepstorff Prof. Hilary Clayton Prof. Hilary Clayton Prof. Pat Harris Prof. Pat Harris Dr. Sue Dyson Dr. Sue Dyson Laura Quiney Laura Quiney Dr. Sue Dyson Dr. Sue Dyson Dr. Anne Bondi Dr. Anne Bondi Prof. Pat Harris Prof. Pat Harris Harris, Dyson, Quiney, Bondi Harris, Dyson, Quiney, Bondi Prof. Heikki Handroos Prof. Heikki Handroos Dr. David Marlin Dr. David Marlin Eleanor Jones Eleanor Jones Jenny Hall Jenny Hall Sue Norton Sue Norton Roly Owers Roly Owers Richard Davison AllRichard Davison, Lucinda Green presenters

Finish Finish

All presenters

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Saddle Research Trust THE 2018 SADDLE RESEARCH TRUST WELFARE AND PERFORMANCE AWARDS Winners will be announced and Awards presented at the Gala Awards Dinner

The SRT Welfare and Performance Person Award sponsored by Ridercise Nominated and shortlisted are: John McEwan FEI

Hayley Moore

Mary Wanless

The SRT Welfare and Performance Practitioner sponsored by The Animal Production, Welfare & Veterinary Sciences Department, Harper Adams University . Nominated and shortlisted are: Sue Dyson

Sonya Nightingale

Thilo Pfau

The SRT Welfare and Performance Equine Award Nominated and shortlisted are: Teddy the Shetland

World Horse Welfare Rio

Valegro

The SRT Welfare and Performance App sponsored by 21st Century Rider Nominated and shortlisted are: Equibuddy

Equla Vert

Horsemonkey

The SRT Welfare and Performance Achievement sponsored by The Horse Trust Nominated and shortlisted are: Christopher Bartle

Carl Hester

Claire Lomas

The SRT Welfare and Performance Saddlery/Equipment sponsored by Novel GMBH Nominated and shortlisted are: Equiband

Micklem Bridle

SaddleAid Saddle

The SRT Welfare and Performance Organisation sponsored by HorseGent-Horseback, University College of Ghent Nominated and shortlisted are: The Brooke

Equitopia

Special Lifetime Awards will be presented at the Gala Awards Dinner

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Saddle Research Trust

Biographies PresenterBiographies Presenter Presenter Biographies Presenter Biographies

PROF RENÉ VAN WEEREN – CONFERENCE CHAIR AND PRESENTER

Prof René Van Weeren – Conference Chair and Presenter

Prof René Van Weeren – Conference and Presenter Graduated in 1983 from Utrecht University (TheChair Netherlands) René van Weeren be-

Prof René Weeren – Conference Chairand and Presenter came a staffVan member of the Department General Large Animal Surgery in athat Graduated in 1983 from Utrecht Universityof (The Netherlands) René van Weeren became

yearstaff and obtained PhD degreeofinGeneral 1989. From 1991-1993 he worked as a visiting of his the Department and Large Animal Surgery in that year and Graduated in member 1983 from Utrecht University (The Netherlands) René van Weeren became a professor at thefrom Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria of the Universidad Nacional Graduated in of 1983 Utrecht (The Netherlands) René van became obtained his degree inUniversity 1989. From 1991-1993 worked as aWeeren visiting professor at in theHestaff member thePhD Department of General and LargeheAnimal Surgery in that yeara and redia, Costade Rica. AfterVeterinaria becoming athe diplomate of the European College of Veterinary staff member of the Department of General and Large Animal Surgery in that year and Escuela Medicina of Universidad Nacional in Heredia, Costa Rica. After obtained his PhD in 1989. Fromshifted 1991-1993 he worked as a visiting professor at theas full Surgeons in degree 1994 he towards research and professor was appointed obtained his PhD in gradually 1989. 1991-1993 he of worked as a visiting becoming adegree diplomate of theFrom College Veterinary Surgeons in 1994 at hethe gradually Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria of European the Musculoskeletal Universidad Nacional in Heredia, Costa Rica. After professor to the Chair of Equine Biology in 2007. His main research Escuelashifted de Medicina Veterinaria thewas Universidad Heredia,toCosta towards research of and appointedNacional as full in professor the Rica. ChairAfter of Equine becoming a diplomate the European College of Veterinary Surgeons in 1994 he areas are articularof cartilage and biomechanics, including quantitative gaitgradually analysis. He becoming a diplomate ofBiology the European College Veterinary Surgeons in 1994 he gradually Musculoskeletal in 2007. His of main research areas are articular cartilage and became Head of the Department of Equine in January 2012 and shifted towards research and was appointed as Sciences full professor to the Chair ofinterim-head Equine shiftedbiomechanics, towards research and quantitative was appointed as full professor to Head the Chair ofDepartment Equine including gait analysis. He became of the of of the Department ofinClinical Care of Companion Animals inarticular September 2018. Musculoskeletal Biology 2007. His main research areas are cartilage and Musculoskeletal Biology in 2007. His main research areas are articular cartilage and Equine Sciences in January 2012 and interim-head of the Department of Clinical of René van Weeren has supervised 31 PhD students to date and is currentlyCare supervisbiomechanics, including quantitative gait analysis.He Hebecame became Head Department of biomechanics, quantitative gait Head of of thethe Department of external Companion Animals in September 2018. ing 10. He including is an associate editor ofanalysis. Equine Veterinary Journal and has been Equine Sciences in January 2012 and interim-head of the Department of Clinical Care of Equine Sciences in January and interim-head of the Clinical CareNorway of 10.and René van has2012 supervised 31 PhDthe students toDepartment date and is of currently supervising examiner for Weeren PhD students in Belgium, UK, France, Austria, Sweden, Companion ininSeptember 2018. Companion Animals September Finland. He is author or co-author more than 300and peer-reviewed scientific publicaHe isAnimals an associate editor of 2018. Equine of Veterinary Journal has been external examiner for René van Weeren 31 PhD PhD students and is textbooks. currently supervising tions and has has contributed totodate adate variety René van Weeren hasinsupervised supervised 31 students to and isof currently supervising 10. 10. PhD students Belgium,various the UK,chapters France, Austria, Sweden, Norway and Finland. He is associate editor of of Equine Equine Veterinary Journal and been external examiner for HeHe is isanan associate Veterinary Journal andhas has been external examiner author or editor co-author of more than 300 peer-reviewed scientific publications andforhas PhDstudents students Belgium, the UK, to France, Austria, Sweden, andand Finland. He is contributed various chapters a variety of textbooks. PhD ininBelgium, the France, Austria, Sweden,Norway Norway Finland. He is authorororco-author co-author of of more more than than 300 peer-reviewed scientific publications andand has has author 300 peer-reviewed scientific publications contributedvarious variouschapters chapters to to aa variety contributed varietyof oftextbooks. textbooks.

Dr Anne Bondi – SaddleRESEARCH Research Trust and DR ANNE BONDI – SADDLE TRUSTDirector DIRECTOR Presenter AND DrDrPRESENTER Anne Bondi – –Saddle Research TrustTrust Director and and Anne Bondi Saddle Director Anne Bondi was a successful professional Research rider who competed at international advanced Presenter level both and dressage. As a trainer, shewho prepared pupils for at both competition Anne Bondi wasinaeventing successful professional rider competed internation-

Presenter

Anne Bondi competed at international advanced careerswas anda successful professional exams andrider was who adressage. Senior Examiner the British Horse Society. al advanced level both inprofessional eventing and As aoftrainer, she prepared Anne Bondi was a and successful professional rider who competed atboth international advanced level both incurrently eventing As young a trainer, she prepared for competition Anne ridesdressage. a verycareers nice event horse thatpupils is exams competing consistently well at pupils for both competition and professional and was a Senior levelamateur both in level eventing and dressage. As a trainer, she prepared pupils for both competition careers and exams andSociety. was a Senior Examiner of therides British Horse Society. and also owns an advanced horse that competes at a3* level with ayoung young Examiner of professional the British Horse Anne currently very nice careers and rides professional exams and washorse a Senior of the British Horse Anne currently a very nice young event that Examiner isatcompeting at Society. professional event horse that isrider. competing consistently well amateurconsistently level andwell also owns TMarange AnneIncurrently rides a very nice young event horse that is at competing consistently well level horse and also owns an advanced that competes 3* with youngof 2006, Anne founded Solution Saddles, manufactures thelevel SMART fully at an amateur advanced that competes athorse 3* which level with a young professional rider. amateur level and also owns an advanced horse that competes at 3* level with a young professional rider. saddles.Solution Anne’s unique designs,which which have been awardedthe five patents, have In 2006,flexible Annesports founded Saddles, manufactures SMARTTM TM range of fully In professional 2006, Anne founded Solution as which manufactures the SMART rider. the company a market leader in unique saddles that promote equinehave welfare and range ofestablished fully flexible sports Saddles, saddles. Anne’s designs, which been TM range flexible sports saddles. Anne’s unique Saddles, designs, which have been awarded five patents, have of fully performance. In 2006, Anne founded Solution which manufactures the SMART awarded five patents, have established the company as a market leader in established the Anne company as a market leader in saddles that promote equine the welfare and of the In 2009, founded theunique Saddle Research Trust (SRT) to promote welfare flexible sports saddles. Anne’s designs, which have been awarded five patents, have saddles that promote equine welfare and performance. performance. ridden horse, to educate and raise awareness of the widely underestimated issues established company a marketResearch leader in Trust saddles(SRT) that promote equine and In 2009, Anne the founded theasSaddle to promote thewelfare welfare In performance. 2009, Anne founded thewelfare Saddle and Research Trust (SRT) tosupport promote the welfare of important the surrounding saddles, performance and to research into this of the ridden horse, to educate and raise awareness of the widely underestiriddenfield. horse, to educate and raise awareness of for theits widely underestimated issues The SRTfounded is now internationally recognised ground-breaking In 2009, Anne thesaddles, Saddle Research to promotework. the welfare of the mated issues surrounding welfareTrust and(SRT) performance and to support surrounding saddles, welfare and performance and to support research into this important riddeninto horse, educate and raiseThe awareness of theinternationally widely underestimated issues research thistoimportant field. SRT is now recognised field. The now internationally recognised for its ground-breaking work. SRT is saddles, surrounding welfare for its ground-breaking work.and performance and to support research into this important

Russell MacKechnie-Guire - Presenterfield. The SRT is now internationally recognised for its ground-breaking work. Russell MacKechnie-Guire Presenter Centaur Biomechanics, founded by- Russell Guire (BSc Hons), is a company which specialises RUSSELL MACKECHNIE-GUIRE - PRESENTER

in horse and rider biomechanics. Russell’s research has extensively focused on the effect Russell MacKechnie-Guire Presenter Centaur Biomechanics, founded by Russell (BSc Hons), a company specialises that girths, bridles, saddles, rollers, Guire training aids and is the rider havewhich on the locomotion of

Centaur Biomechanics, founded by Russell Guire (BSc Hons), is a company in horse rider biomechanics. Russell’s research has extensively focused on the effect theand horse. which specialises in horse and rider biomechanics. has Centaur Biomechanics, founded by Russell Guire (BSc Hons), a company whichresearch specialises that girths, bridles, saddles, rollers, training aids and the riderishave onRussell’s the locomotion of extensively focused on the effect that girths, bridles, saddles, rollers, trainRussell is currently studying for his PhD at the Royal Veterinary College within the the horse. in horse and rider biomechanics. Russell’s research has extensively focused on the effect inggirths, aids and the riderrollers, have on the locomotion the horse. internationally renowned structure and motion lab.rider Heofishave focusing onlocomotion horse and rider that bridles, saddles, training aids and the on the of Russell is iscurrently forthehiseffect PhD his at within the interaction, in studying particular thatthe theRoyal saddle andRoyal riderCollege have on equine spinal Russell currently studying for PhD at Veterinary the Veterinary College the horse. internationally renowned structure and motionstructure lab. He is focusing on horse andHe rider kinematics and locomotion. within the internationally renowned and motion lab. is focusinteraction, in particular the effect that the in saddle and riderthe have on equine spinal ing on horse and rider interaction, particular effect that the Russell is currently studying for his PhD at the Royal Veterinary College within saddle the For over eleven years, Russell has worked with high performance athletes (Olympic and kinematics and locomotion. and rider have on equine kinematics locomotion. internationally renowned structurespinal and motion lab. Heand is focusing on horse and rider Paralympic level) in providing biomechanical/performance analysis to all disciplines in order For over in eleven years, hasthe worked highhave performance athletes interaction, particular the Russell effect that saddle with and rider on equine spinal For over eleven years, Russell hasRussell worked high performance athletes (Olympic and and to optimise marginal gains. haswith featured in many equestrian articles and books (Olympic and Paralympic level) in providing biomechanical/performance kinematics and locomotion. Paralympic level)speaks in providing biomechanical/performance analysis all disciplines inhis order regularly at international conferences throughout theto world presenting research. analysis to disciplines inhasorder toinoptimise marginal Russell has to optimise marginal gains. featured many equestrian articles gains. and books and Russell isall a keen rider,Russell competing in dressage at national level. For over eleven years, Russell has worked with high and at featured in many equestrian articles andperformance books andathletes regularly speaks regularly speaks at international conferences throughout the world presenting his(Olympic research. Paralympic providing biomechanical/performance analysis to all disciplines order international conferences thelevel. world presenting hisinresearch. Russell is alevel) keen in rider, competing in throughout dressage at national toRussell optimiseismarginal Russell has featured in many equestrian articleslevel. and books and a keengains. rider, competing in dressage at national regularly speaks at international conferences throughout the world presenting his research. Russell is a keen rider, competing in dressage at national level.

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Presenter Biographies

Saddle Research Trust

Dr Thilo Pfau - Presenter

Presenter Biographies

Presenter Biographies Presenter Biographies

Thilo is a computer scientist by training, having studied information technology at the Dr Thilo PfauMünchen - Presenter DR THILO PFAU - PRESENTER Technische Universität (TUM) in Germany. This was followed by a PhD in signal Dr Thilo Pfau - Presenter Thilo and is apattern computer scientist training, informationresearch technology at the processing recognition atbyTUM beforehaving takingstudied on a postdoctoral position at Thilois isa acomputer computerscientist scientist training, having studied information technology at the Thilo byby training, having studied information atinthe Technische Universität München (TUM) in(ICSI) Germany. This was followedtechnology by a PhD signal the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley, California. From there, Thilo Technische Universität München (TUM) in Germany. followed a PhD in signal Technische Universität München (TUM) in Germany. This This was was followed by a by PhD in signal andpostdoctoral pattern recognition TUM before taking on a postdoctoral research positionLab at movedprocessing to a processing further role at at the Royal Veterinary College’s and Motion processing pattern recognition TUM beforeon taking on Structure a postdoctoral research andand pattern recognition at TUMatbefore taking a postdoctoral research position at poScience Institute (ICSI) Institute in Berkeley, California. From there,byThilo sition at theComputer International Computer Science (ICSI) in Berkeley, California. From in the the areaInternational of biomechanics of quadrupedal movement associated with a project funded the the International Computer Science Institute (ICSI) in Berkeley, California. From there, Thilo there, Thilo moved to a further postdoctoral role at the Royal Veterinary College’s Structo a further postdoctoral role atat the Royal College’s Structure and Motion Lab moved tothe a Motion further postdoctoral role the Royal Veterinary Structure and Motion Lab BBSRC,moved DEFRA and HBLB. During this time (and inVeterinary particular through themovement exposure to clinical ture and Lab in the area of biomechanics of College’s quadrupedal associated in theinarea of biomechanics of quadrupedal movement associated with a project funded by the the area of biomechanics of movement associated with a During project funded by the with a project funded by the DEFRA and the HBLB. this time lameness assessments performed at quadrupedal the BBSRC, RVC Equine Referral Hospital) he developed a(and keenin BBSRC, DEFRA and the HBLB. During this time (and in particular through the exposure to clinical DEFRA and the the HBLB. During this time (andlameness in particular through the performed exposure to clinical particular through exposure clinical assessments at the interest in BBSRC, the quantitative assessment oftolameness in horses with techniques that can RVC be lameness assessments performed ReferralHospital) developed a keenof Equine Referral Hospital) he at developed aEquine keen Referral interest inHospital) the quantitative assessment lameness assessments performed atthe theRVC RVC Equine hehe developed a keen employed interest ‘in thein the field’, i.e. outside the confines of dedicated gait laboratories. lameness in horses with techniques that can be employed ‘in the field’, i.e. outside the quantitative assessmentofoflameness lameness in thatthat can can be be interest in the quantitative assessment in horses horseswith withtechniques techniques confines of dedicated gaiti.e. laboratories. Since having moved to the Department of Clinical Science and Services at the RVC, Thilo has employed ‘in the field’, outside the confines of dedicated gait laboratories. employed ‘in the field’, i.e. outside the confines of dedicated gait laboratories. Since having moved to the Department of Clinical Science and Services at the RVC, Thilo having moved to the Department ofClinical Clinical Science and Services at at theof RVC, Thilo has has intensified his research in this area resulting in a considerable number peer reviewed Since Since having moved tohis the Department Science Services the RVC, has intensified research in thisofarea resulting in and a considerable number ofThilo peer reintensified his research in this area resulting in asensor considerable numberassessing of peer reviewed publications, many conducted with the help of inertial technology upper body viewed conducted with help of inertial sensor of technology assessintensified his publications, research in many this area resulting in the a considerable number peer reviewed publications, many conducted with the help ofand inertial sensor technology assessing upper body Thilo ing upper body movement asymmetry more recently back ranges of motion. movement asymmetry and more recently back ranges of motion. Thilo enjoys supervising publications, many conducted with the help of inertial sensor technology assessing upper body movement asymmetry undergraduate and more recently ranges of motion. Thilo supervising enjoys supervising andback postgraduate students for enjoys the research compoundergraduate and postgraduate students for back the research their respective movement asymmetry and more recently ranges of components motion. Thiloofenjoys supervising undergraduate postgraduate students forstriving the research components respective nents of theirand respective degrees, always to produce resultsof of their publishable quality. undergraduate andto postgraduate students the research degrees, always striving produce results of publishable quality. degrees, always striving to produce results offor publishable quality.components of their respective

degrees, always striving to produce results of publishable quality.

Dr. Sue Sue Dyson –– SRT Honorary Veterinary AdvisorAdvisor - Presenter Dr. Dysonfrom SRT Honorary Veterinary - Presenter Sue Dyson graduated the University of Cambridge and completed an Internship in Large Dr. Sue Dyson – SRT Honorary Veterinary Advisor Presenter DR. SUE DYSON – SRT HONORARY VETERINARY ADVISue Dyson graduated from the University of Cambridge and completed an- Internship in Large Animal Medicine and Surgery at the University Pennsylvania. then spent a year in in Large Sue Dyson graduated from the University ofof Cambridge andShe completed an Internship Animal andinSurgery at the University She athen spent a year in SOR PRESENTER private- Medicine equine practice Pennsylvania, before returningof to Pennsylvania. Great Britain to take position Animal Medicine and Surgery at the University of Pennsylvania. She then spent a year in

Prof Lars Roepstorff - Presenter

private in Pennsylvania, before returningHead to Great BritainClinical to take a position at the equine Animal practice Health Trust, Newmarket. Sue is currently of Equine private practice in Pennsylvania, before returning to GreatanBritain to take a position Sue Dyson equine graduated from University of service Cambridge and completed running a the clinical referral forSue lameness and poorInternship performance, atOrthopaedics, the Animal Health Trust, Newmarket. is currently Head of inEquine Clinical Large Animal Medicine and Surgery atNewmarket. the UniversitySue of Pennsylvania. She then of spent a at the Animal Health Trust, is currently Head Equine Clinical attracting clientsrunning from all over the Unitedreferral Kingdom, service Ireland and Europe. Orthopaedics, aa in clinical forcontinental and poor year in private equine practice Pennsylvania, before returning tolameness Great Britain to take a performance, Orthopaedics, running clinical referral service for lameness and poor performance, Sue is ata the Royal College of Trust, Veterinary Surgeons Specialist in Head Equine Orthopaedics a position Animal Health Newmarket. is currently of Equine Clinicaland Orattracting clients all over the United UnitedSue Kingdom, Ireland and continental Europe. attractingrunning clientsafrom from allreferral over the Kingdom, Ireland and continental Europe. European Specialist in Veterinary Sports and and Rehabilitation. Althoughattracting Sue has a thopaedics, clinical serviceMedicine for lameness poor performance, Sue College of Veterinary Surgeons Specialist Equine Orthopaedics clients allRoyal over the United Ireland and continental Europe. Sueisfrom isa clinical aRoyal College ofKingdom, Veterinary Surgeons Specialist in in Equine Orthopaedics and and a a full-time post, she is passionate about improving the understanding and management Sue is a Royal College ofinVeterinary Surgeons Specialist in Equine Orthopaedics and Although a EuEuropean Specialist Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation. Sue has a of lameness Specialist and poor performance and Sports is actively involved and in clinically related research, with Sue has a European in Veterinary Medicine Rehabilitation. Although ropean Specialist in Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation. Although Sue has a fullthe aim of improving equine welfare. She has published more than 270 papers in peer full-time post, she aboutimproving improving the understanding management full-time clinical post, she is is passionate passionate about the understanding andand management time clinicalclinical post, she is passionate about improving the understanding and management journals concerning lameness diagnostic imaging andinhas lectured worldwide. of lameness and poor performance and and is actively involved in clinically relatedrelated research, of lameness and poor performance and isisactively involved clinically research, withwith ofreviewed lameness and poor performance and actively involved in clinically related research, with of improving equine welfare. She has published more than 270 papers in peer Shethe is aim co-editor, with Mike Ross, of Diagnosis and Management of Lameness in the Horse aim improving equine welfare. She more than 270 papers in peer thetheaim ofofimproving equine welfare. Shehas haspublished published more than 270 papers in peer reviewed journals concerning lameness and diagnostic imaging and has lectured worldand co-author of Clinical Radiology of the Horse and Equine Scintigraphy. wide. She isjournals co-editor, with Mike Ross, of Diagnosis and Management ofand Lameness in the worldwide. reviewed journalsconcerning concerning lameness and diagnostic imaging hashas lectured reviewed lameness and diagnostic imaging and lectured worldwide. Sue isand a former President of the British Equine She is also a rider, and Horse co-author of Clinical Radiology of theVeterinary Horse andAssociation. Equine Scintigraphy. Sheis isco-editor, co-editor, with Mike Ross, of and Management of Lameness in the Horse She with Mike Ross, ofinDiagnosis Diagnosis and Management Lameness has horses to of top national level both eventing and show She jumping. Sue is produced a former President the British Equine Veterinary Association. is alsoofa rider, and in the Horse and co-author of Clinical Radiology of the Horse and Equine Scintigraphy. has horses to top national levelof in the bothHorse eventing and show jumping. andproduced co-author of Clinical Radiology and Equine Scintigraphy. former President of the British Equine Veterinary Association. She is also a rider, and Sueis isa aformer Sue President of the British Equine Veterinary Association. She is also a rider, and has produced horses to top national level in both eventing and show jumping. has produced horses to top national level in both eventing and show jumping.

Lars Roepstorff graduated as a veterinary surgeon in 1985. He has practised as an equine clinician both in private practice at different clinics and at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU). PROF LARS ROEPSTORFF - PRESENTER He has worked closely with equestrian sports with, for example, appointment as National Lars Roepstorff graduated as ina Continuing veterinaryEducation surgeon of in Professional 1985. He has practised as headed an equine Team Vet and as Lecturer Trainers. He has Roepstorff as different aatveterinary surgeon in 1985. He hasfocused practised Lars Roepstorff graduated as graduated apractice veterinary surgeon in 1985. Heat has as an equine theLars Department of Equine Studies SLU. His scientific work has been on as clinician both in private at clinics and thepractised Swedish University of an equine clinician both in private practice different clinics and at the Swedish Unibiomechanical of equine locomotion withatthe overall aim to improve health and of clinician both in Sciences privatestudies practice at different clinics and at the Swedish University Agricultural (SLU). versity and of Agricultural Sciences (SLU). soundness it comprises more than 80 scientific papers. Lars has been or is involved as He hasSciences worked (SLU). closely with equestrian sports with, for example, appointment as National Agricultural He hasinworked closely more with equestrian sports with,theses for example, appointment as supervisor 11 PhD-projects, than 50 bachelor/master within the veterinary, Vet and as Lecturer inand Continuing Education of example, Professional Trainers. He as has headed He hasTeam worked closely with equine equestrian sports with, for appointment National Team Vet as Lecturer in Continuing Education of Professional Trainers. animal husbandry, studies and engineering programs and examined an National equal the and Department of Equine Studies at SLU. His scientific work has been focused onhas Team Vet as Lecturer in Continuing Education of Professional Trainers. He has He has headed the Department of Equine Studies at SLU. His scientificheaded work number of student theses.

Prof Lars Roepstorff - Presenter

Prof Lars Roepstorff - Presenter

biomechanical studies ofStudies equine locomotion overall aimhas to improve health and the Department Equineon at SLU.studies Hiswith scientific work been onaim beenoffocused biomechanical ofthe equine locomotion with focused the overall He wasand chairman of the international committee for ICEL 2012Lars (International Conference on as soundness it comprises more than 80 scientific papers. has been or is involved to improve health and soundness and it comprises more than 80 scientific papers. biomechanical studies of equine locomotion with the overall aim to improve health and Canineinand Locomotion) has 50 been presenter and invited on numerous supervisor 11 Equine PhD-projects, moreand than bachelor/master thesesspeaker within veterinary, has been or is involved asscientific supervisor in 11 PhD-projects, more 50 bachesoundness andLars it comprises more than 80 papers. hashebeen or the is than involved as well as sports conferences around the world. Lars In 2011 became Professor of as animalscientific husbandry, equinewithin studies and engineering programs andequine examined an and equal lor/master theses the veterinary, animal husbandry, studies engisupervisor in 11 PhD-projects, more and thanis 50 bachelor/master thesesbiomechanics within the veterinary, Equine Functional Anatomy today working with applied in three number neering of student theses. and examined an equal number of student theses. programs different areas; development of tools for objectiveprograms equine lameness diagnostics, an horseanimal husbandry, equine studies and engineering and examined equal Heinteraction was chairman of the international committee for ICEL 2012 (International Conrider and international equine footings. Heofwas chairman of the committee for ICELand 2012has (International Conference on number student theses. ference on Canine and Equine Locomotion) been presenter and invited Canine and Equine and has been presenter and invited speaker on the numerous speaker onLocomotion) numerous scientific as well as sports conferences around world. In

as of He wasscientific chairman theasinternational committee forthe ICEL 2012In(International Conference on sportsProfessor conferences around world. 2011 he became Professor 2011well he became of Equine Functional Anatomy and is today workingofwith CanineEquine and Equine Locomotion) and has been presenter and invited speaker on numerous Functional Anatomy and is today working with applied biomechanics in three applied biomechanics in three different areas; development of tools for objective scientific as well as sports conferences around the world. In 2011 heequine became Professor of different areas; development of tools for objective equine lameness diagnostics, horseequine lameness diagnostics, horse-rider interaction and footings. Equinerider Functional Anatomy andfootings. is today working with applied biomechanics in three interaction and equine different areas; development of tools for objective equine lameness diagnostics, horse rider interaction and equine footings.

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Saddle Research Trust

Presenter Biographies

Prof. Hilary Clayton -Presenter

Presenter Biographies Biographies Presenter

Presenter Biographies

BVMS, PhD, Dipl. ACVSMR, PROF. HILARY FRCVS CLAYTON -PRESENTER BVMS, PhD, Dipl. ACVSMR, FRCVS Professor and McPhail Dressage Chair Emerita, Michigan State University Professor and McPhail Dressage Chair Emerita, Michigan State University Visiting Professor, Nottingham Trent University Prof. Hilary Clayton -Presenter Visiting Professor, Nottingham Trent University President, Sport Horse Science, 3145 Sandhill Mason, MI 48854 Prof. Hilary Clayton -Presenter BVMS, PhD, Dipl. ACVSMR, FRCVS President, Sport Horse Science, 3145 SandhillRoad, Road, Mason, MI 48854 BVMS, PhD, FRCVS Dr. Hilary M. isACVSMR, a veterinarian, researcher and horsewoman. For over 40For years Professor and Dipl. McPhail Dressage Emerita, Michigan State Dr. Clayton Hilary M. Clayton is a Chair veterinarian, researcher andUniversity horsewoman. overshe 40has years Professor andperformed McPhail Dressage Chairthe Emerita, Michigan State University Visiting Professor, Nottingham Trent University performed research in areas biomechanics, lameness, sheinnovative has innovative research in of the locomotor areas of locomotor biomechanics, lameVisiting Nottingham Trent University President, Sport Horse Science, 3145for Sandhill Road, Mason, MI the 48854 rehabilitation, conditioning programs equine athletes, interaction between rider, ness,Professor, rehabilitation, conditioning programs for and equine athletes, and the interaction President, Sport Horse Science, 3145 Sandhill Road, Mason, MI 48854 For over 40 years she has Dr. Hilary M. Clayton is a veterinarian, researcher and between tack and horse. published 7 books and over 200 scientific artitack and horse. Sherider, has published 7 booksShe andhas over 200 horsewoman. scientific articles on these topics. Dr. Dr. Hilary M. Clayton is aresearch veterinarian, researcher andofhorsewoman. Forbiomechanics, over 40 years she has performed in Dressage the areas cles on these topics. Clayton served as the Mary Anne McPhail Dressage Chair in Clayton served asinnovative the Mary AnneDr. McPhail Chair inlocomotor Equine Sports Medicine at lameness, Michigan performed innovative research in the areas of locomotor biomechanics, lameness, conditioning programs for equine athletes, and she the retired interaction between rider, Equine College Sports Medicine at Michigan State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine State rehabilitation, University's of Veterinary Medicine from 1997 and until from academia rehabilitation, conditioning programs for equine athletes, the interaction between rider, in and horse. She has published 7 books and over 200 scientific articles ontothese topics. Dr. from 1997 until she retired from academia in 2014. She continues perform collabo2014.tack She continues to perform collaborative research with colleagues in universities around tack and horse. She has published 7 books and over 200 scientific articles on these topics. Dr. Clayton served asasthe Mary Anne McPhail Dressage Chair Equine Sports Medicine at Michigan rative research colleagues in Dressage universities around theSports world. Dr. Clayton is a charter Clayton served the Annediplomate McPhail Chair inin Equine at Michigan the world. Dr. Clayton is with aMary charter and past president of theMedicine American College of State University's College of Veterinary Medicine from1997 1997 until she retired from academia diplomate and past president the She American College of Veterinary Sports Medicine State University's College of VeterinaryofMedicine from until she retired from in in Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation. is an Honorary Fellow of theacademia International 2014.and She Rehabilitation. continues to research with colleagues in universities around She is collaborative an Honoraryresearch Fellowwith of the International Society for EquitacontinuesScience to perform perform collaborative colleagues universities around Society 2014. for She Equitation and has been inducted into the in International Equine thetheworld. Dr. charter diplomate and past president the American College of of tion Science and is has into the International Equine Veterinarians world. Dr.Clayton Clayton is aa been charterinducted diplomate and past president of of the American College ofHall Veterinarians Hall of Fame, the Midwest Dressage Association Hall of Fame and the Saskatoon Fame,Sports the Midwest Dressage Association of Fame and theofSaskatoon Sports Hall Veterinary Medicine and SheHall Honorary Fellow of the International Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation. Rehabilitation. She isisanan Honorary Fellow the International SportsSociety Hall Fame. She is is aa Science lifelong rider and many equestrian sports, most ofofFame. She lifelong andhas hascompeted competed in many equestrian sports, most for and has has been inductedin into International Equine Society for Equitation Equitation Science rider and been inducted into thetheInternational Equine recently focusing on dressage in which she trains through the Grand Prix level and has earned Veterinarians HallofofFame, Fame, the Midwest Midwest Dressage Association Hall of of Fame andand the Saskatoon recently Hall focusing on dressage in which she trains through the Grand Prix level and has Veterinarians the Dressage Association Hall Fame the Saskatoon US Dressage Federation bronze, andrider gold medals. Sports Hallofof Fame. She isis aFederation asilver lifelong and has competed in in many equestrian sports, mostmost earned US Dressage bronze, silver and gold medals. Sports Hall Fame. She lifelong rider and has competed many equestrian sports,

recentlyfocusing focusingon ondressage dressage in in which which she Grand PrixPrix level andand has has earned recently shetrains trainsthrough throughthe the Grand level earned DressageFederation Federationbronze, bronze, silver silver and USUS Dressage andgold goldmedals. medals.

Laura Quiney - Presenter

LauraLAURA Quiney QUINEY - Presenter- PRESENTER

PROF PATHarris HARRIS -SRT HONORARY SCIENTIFIC Prof Pat -SRT Honorary Scientific Advisor, ADVISOR, Presenter PRESENTER AND WORKSHOP FACILITATOR Prof Pat Harris -SRT Honorary Scientific Advisor, Presenter and Facilitator ProfWorkshop Pat Harris -SRT Honorary Scientific Advisor, Presenter and Workshop Facilitator

and Workshop After qualifying from the Facilitator University of Cambridge Veterinary School Dr. Pat Harris comAfter qualifying from University Cambridge Veterinary School Dr. Pat Harris completed pleted her PhD at thethe Animal HealthofTrust in Newmarket into the Equine RhabdomyAfterPhD qualifying from thejoined University Cambridge School Dr.Nutrition Pat completed her at the Animal Health Trust in Veterinary Newmarket into theHarris Equine Rhabdomyolysis olysis Syndrome. She theofWALTHAM Centre for Pet in 1995 and is After from the University ofinCentre Cambridge Veterinary Dr. Pat Harris completed for her PhDqualifying atfor the Animal Health Trust Newmarket the School Equine Rhabdomyolysis Syndrome. She joined the WALTHAM Petinto Nutrition in and is BUCKEYE responsible responsible the research which provides thefor science behind the1995 SPILLERS, her PhD at the Animal Health Trust in Newmarket into the Equine Rhabdomyolysis Syndrome. She joined the WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition in 1995 and is responsible for the research provides the This science behindout the BUCKEYE NUTRITION NUTRITION andwhich WINERGY brands. is carried bySPILLERS, the WALTHAM Equine Studies and Syndrome. She joined the WALTHAM Nutrition in 1995NUTRITION and is responsible the research which provides the science Centre behind for thePet SPILLERS, BUCKEYE group in collaboration with experts and universities around the world. Shefor WINERGY brands. This is carried outatbyinstitutes the WALTHAM Equine Studies group inand collaboration WINERGY brands. This is carried out by the WALTHAM Equine Studies group in collaboration thean research which provides the science behind the SPILLERS, BUCKEYE NUTRITION and is with also Adjunct Professor of Equine Studies at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State expertsatatinstitutes institutes and universities around the world. SheanisAdjunct also anProfessor Adjunct Professor with experts brands. and universities around the world. She is also WINERGY ThisResearch is carried out by the WALTHAM Equine Studies group in collaboration University, an Honorary Fellow at the University of University, Liverpool, aanVisiting Profesof Equine Studies at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Honorary Research ofwith Equine Studies Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, an Research experts atat institutes and universities around theSciences world. She is Honorary also an Adjunct Professor sor in theat of Animal and Environmental Nottingham Trent UniverFellow atSchool the University ofRural Liverpool, a Visiting Professor in the ofRural Animal Rural and Fellow the University of Liverpool, a Visiting Professor inState the School ofSchool Animal andResearch of Equine Studies at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and University, an Honorary sity and an Adjunct Professor at University of Queensland Australia. Pat an European Environmental Sciences Nottingham University anthe Adjunct Professor at University Environmental Sciences Nottingham TrentTrent University and an and Adjunct Professor atisUniversity Fellow at the University of Liverpool, a Visiting Professor in School of Animal Rural and Specialist in Veterinary Clinical and Comparative in addition to being a Past of Queensland Queensland Australia. PatPat is anisEuropean Specialist inNutrition, Veterinary Clinical and Comparative of Australia. an European Specialist in Veterinary Clinical and Comparative Environmental Sciences Nottingham Trent University and an Adjunct Professor atworld University President of the British Equine Veterinary Association. Pat lectures all over the on Nutrition, ininaddition to to being a Past President of the of British Veterinary Association. Nutrition, addition being aanPast President theinEquine British Equine Veterinary Association. of Queensland Australia. Pat iswelfare, European Specialist Veterinary Clinical Comparative nutrition as itall affects theworld health, performance theand horse. Pat lectures over the on nutrition behaviour as it affects and the health, welfare,of behaviour andShe is Pat lectures all over the world on nutrition as it affects the health, welfare, behaviour and Nutrition, in addition to being a Past President of the British Equine Veterinary Association. the author or co-author of numerous lay as well as over 500 scientific papers, abstracts performance of the horse. She is the author or co-author of numerous lay as well as over 500 performance of the horse. She is the author or co-author of numerous lay as well as over 500 Pat lectures all over the world on nutrition as it affects the health, welfare, behaviour and asscientific well as papers, book chapters . well as book chapters . abstracts as scientific papers, abstracts as author book chapters . performance of the horse. as Shewell is the or co-author of numerous lay as well as over 500 scientific papers, abstracts as well as book chapters .

Laura Quiney qualified from the University of Bristol and subsequently joined the Animal Laura Quiney - Presenter

Health Trust as an equine intern, focusing on orthopaedics and the poorly performing horse

Laura Quiney qualified from theand University ofjoined Bristol and subseLaura Quiney qualified from the University ofthis Bristol subsequently theand Animal under the direction of from Dr Suethe Dyson. With excellent foundation of knowledge Laura Quiney qualified University of Bristol and subsequently joined the Animal Health Trust as an equine intern, focusing on orthopaedics and the poorly performing horse foquently the Animal Health as equine experience shejoined worked in private equine practice inTrust theand south ofan England, focusingintern, on Health Trust as anthen equine intern, focusing on orthopaedics the poorly performing horse under the direction of Dr SueofDyson. With this excellent foundation of knowledge and lameness investigation the sport and pleasure horse. cusing on orthopaedics and poorly performing horse under the direction of Dr Sue Dyson. With thisthe excellent foundation of knowledge and under experience she then worked in private equine practice in the south of England, focusing on experience she then worked in private equine practice in this the south of England,foundation focusing on the ofsport Dr Sue Dyson. With excellent of In latedirection 2014 she returned to the Animal Healthhorse. Trust as Junior Clinician. Laura works lameness investigation of the and pleasure lameness investigation of the sport and pleasure horse. alongside senior clinicians all aspects of lameness poor worked performance in evaluation, knowledge and inexperience she and then private

oversees equine diagnostic imaging and is actively involved in clinical research. In lateIn2014 she returned to the Animal Trust as as Junior Clinician. works late 2014 shein returned to the Animal Health Trust Junior Clinician. Laura works practice the south ofHealth England, focusing onLaura lameness alongside senior clinicians in allinaspects of lameness andand poor performance evaluation, alongside senior clinicians all aspects of lameness poor performance evaluation, gation of the sport and pleasure horse. equine oversees diagnostic imaging andand is actively involved in in clinical oversees equine diagnostic imaging is actively involved clinicalresearch. research.

equine investi-

In late 2014 she returned to the Animal Health Trust as Junior Clinician. Laura works alongside senior clinicians in all aspects of lameness and poor performance evaluation, oversees equine diagnostic imaging and is actively involved in clinical research.

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Panel Biographies

Saddle Research Trust

of Heikki Handroos – Panel Presenter

Presenter Biographies Panel Biographies nt position: Prof. of Machine Automation and Head of LaboratoryPanel of Intelligent Machines in Biographies

eenranta University of Technology , Finland since 1993. Positions 1984-1992: Research Assistant, Researcher, Senior Assistant, Tampere Univ. of nology PROF HEIKKI HANDROOS – PANEL PRESENTER ation: M.Sc (Eng.), D.Sc (Tech.), Tampere University of Technology, Finland Prof Heikki Handroos – Panel Current position: Prof. of and Machine Automation and Head of Laboratory arch interests: range from modeling, simulation control ofPresenter mechatronic systems to robotics,of IntelProf Heikki Handroos – Panel Presenter ligentmachinery. Machines in Lappeenranta University of Technology , Finland since 1993. d transmission and mobile Positions 1984-1992: Research Assistant, Senior Assistant, position: Prof. of Machine Automation and Head ofinLaboratory Machines in as published aboutCurrent 240Past scientific journal and conference papers theResearcher, fieldofofIntelligent mechatronics, (130 TamCurrent position: Prof. ofofMachine Automation andsince Head1993. of Laboratory of Intelligent Machines in Lappeenranta University Technology , Finland pere Univ. of Technology PUS papers). Lappeenranta University of Technology , Finland since 1993.Senior Assistant, Tampere Univ. of Past Positions 1984-1992: Research Assistant, Researcher, Education: M.Sc (Eng.), D.Sc (Tech.), Tampere University of Technology, Finland Past Positions 1984-1992: Research Assistant, Researcher, Senior Assistant, Tampere Univ. of rvised 19 Doctoral Technology Dissertations Research interests: range from modeling, simulation and control of mechatronic Technology Education: M.Sc (Eng.), and D.Sc (Tech.), Tampere of (tot. Technology, Finland een responsible leader of academic industrial R&DUniversity projects > 15M€). systems to (Eng.), robotics, hybrid transmission mobile machinery. Education: M.Sc Tampere University ofand Technology, Finland Research interests: rangeD.Sc from(Tech.), modeling, simulation and control of mechatronic systems to robotics, under of MeVEA OyResearch and Haptronics Oy interests: range from modeling, andjournal control ofand mechatronic systems papers to robotics, Hetransmission has published about 240 simulation scientific conference in the field hybrid and mobile machinery. hybrid transmission and mobile machinery. ng Professor in University of Minnesota, National Defense Academypapers (Japan) of published mechatronics, (130 SCOPUS papers). He has about 240 scientific journal and conference in theand fieldSt of Petersburg mechatronics, (130 He has published about 240 scientific journal and conference papers in the field of mechatronics, (130 Supervised the Great Polytechnic Univ. SCOPUS papers). 19 Doctoral Dissertations SCOPUS papers). Supervised 19 Has been responsible leader of academic and industrial R&D projects (tot. > al Duties of Trust in ASME, IEEE and Dissertations GFPS Supervised 19Doctoral Doctoral Dissertations Has been responsible andindustrial industrialR&D R&Dprojects projects (tot. > 15M€). Has been responsibleleader leaderof of academic academic and (tot. > 15M€). 15M€). Co-founder ofofMeVEA Oy and Haptronics Oy Co-founder MeVEA Oy and Haptronics Oy Co-founder of MeVEA Oy and Haptronics Oy Visiting Professor NationalDefense Defense Academy (Japan) St Petersburg Visiting ProfessorininUniversity University of of Minnesota, Minnesota, National Academy (Japan) andand St Petersburg Visiting Professor inUniv. University of Minnesota, National Defense Academy (Japan) Peter the Great Peter the GreatPolytechnic PolytechnicUniv. andDuties St Petersburg Peter the Several Duties TrustininASME, ASME, IEEE and GFPS Several ofofTrust IEEE andGreat GFPS Polytechnic Univ. Several Duties of Trust in ASME, IEEE and GFPS

Dr.DR. David Marlin DAVID MARLIN––Panel PANEL Presenter PRESENTER

David Marlin studied physiology andPresenter computing at Stirling University in Scotland (UK) from 1978 to Dr. David Marlin – Panel Dr. David –andPanel Presenter David Marlin studied Marlin physiology computing at Stirling University in Scotland (UK)of from 1978 to 1981. He then trained with dressage rider coach JudyinHarvey the David Marlin studied physiology and computing and at Stirling University Scotland (Fellow (UK) from 1978 to British Horse Society 1981. He then trained withphysiology dressage rider and coach Judy Harvey (Fellow ofScotland the British Horse Society David Marlin studied and computing at Stirling University in (UK) from 1978 to 1981. He then trained with dressage rider and coach Judy (FEI) Harvey International (Fellow of the British Horse Society (FBHS) and Federation Equestre Internationale dressage judge. (FBHS) and Federation Equestre Internationale (FEI) International dressage judge. He obtained hisHe obtained his 1981. He then trained with dressage rider and coach Judy Harvey (Fellow of the British Horse (FBHS) and Federation Equestre Internationale (FEI) International dressage judge. He obtained his Society from Loughborough University inInternationale 1989 after 4after yearsInternational studying the responses ofresponses Thoroughbred PhDPhD from Loughborough University in 1989 4 years studying the of (FBHS) and Federation Equestre (FEI) dressage judge. He obtained hisThoroughbred PhD from Loughborough University in 1989 after 4 years studying the responses of Thoroughbred racehorses to exercise and training at the Animal Health Trust in Newmarket. He worked for 3 years PhDto from University inthe 1989 after Trust 4 Health years studying responses Thoroughbred racehorses exercise training atAnimal Animal Trust the in He racehorses to Loughborough exerciseand and training at the Health in Newmarket. HeNewmarket. worked for 3ofyears in worked for 3 years in in Newmarket as equine exercise physiologist for racehorse trainer Luca Cumani. From 1993–1996 racehorses exercise and training at the Health Trust in Newmarket. He1993–1996 worked for years in 1993–1996 he Newmarket asto equine exercise physiologist forAnimal racehorse trainer Luca Cumani. From he3 From Newmarket as equine exercise physiologist for racehorse Luca Cumani. he undertook studies on thermoregulation and transport of horsestrainer in the build-up to the 1996 Atundertook studies on thermoregulation and transport of horses in the build-up to the 1996 Newmarket as equine exercise physiologist for racehorse trainer Luca Cumani. FromAtlanta 1993–1996 he lanta Olympic Games in conjunction with theand FEI. transport He was alsoof involved in in advising The Beijing Orundertook studies on thermoregulation horses the build-up to the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games in conjunction with the FEI. He was also involved in advising The Beijingto Organizing undertook studies on thermoregulation and transport of horses in the build-up the 1996 Atlanta ganizing Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad (BOCOG), the Hong Kong Jockey Club, Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad (BOCOG), the Hong Kong Jockey Club, Olympic Games in conjunction with the FEI. He was also involved in advising The Beijing Organizing Olympic Olympic Games inCommittee conjunction(IOC) with the also involved in advising The for Beijing Organizing International andFEI. the He FEIwas on air-conditioning and cooling horses at the International Olympic Committee andXXIX the FEI on air-conditioning and the cooling for horses atJockey the for the Games of the the Olympiad Hong Kong Club, Jockey Club, Committee forOlympic the Games of(IOC) XXIX Olympiad Hong Kong 2008 Committee Beijing Games. From 1990 until 2005 David(BOCOG), held(BOCOG), the position of the Senior Scientist and 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. From 1990 until 2005 David held the position ofand Senior Scientist and at the Olympic Committee (IOC) and theholds FEI onthe air-conditioning for horses HeadInternational of Physiology at Committee the Animal Health Trust. He academic positioncooling of Professor in PhysiInternational (IOC) and the FEIthe on air-conditioning and cooling for horses at the Head of Olympic Physiology at the Animal Health Trust. He holds academic position of Professor in 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. From 1990 until 2005 David held the position of Senior Scientist and ology at Oklahoma State University. He is the author of over 200 scientific papers and book chapters. Physiology at Oklahoma State University. He is the author of over 200 scientific papers and book 2008David’s Beijing Olympic Games. From 1990 until 2005 David held the position of Senior Head of Physiology at the Animal Health Trust. He holds the academic position of Professor other affiliations and positions include past Chair of the International Conference on Equinein Scientist and chapters. David’s other affiliations and positions include past Chair of the International Conference on Physiology at Oklahoma State University. He Trust. is theExercise author of over the 200 scientific and book Exercise Physiology (ICEEP) editor ofHealth Comparative Physiology. He is thepapers founder of SciHead of Physiology at theand Animal He holds academic position of Professor in Equine Exercise Physiology (ICEEP) and editor of Comparative Exercise Physiology. He is the founder ence Supplements andother currently works as positions a consultant technology ininboth the human chapters. David’s affiliations and include past Chair ofcompanies International Conference on Physiology at Oklahoma State University. is to the ofthe over 200 scientific papers and book of Science Supplements and currently works as aHe consultant toauthor technology companies both the andhuman equine world whilst alsowhilst pursuing his editor own his research interestsinterests in nutrition, exercise Equine Exercise (ICEEP) and ofown Comparative Physiology. isphysiology, the founder and equinePhysiology also pursuing research Exercise in nutrition, He exercise chapters. David’s otherworld affiliations and positions include past Chair ofcompanies the International Conference on biomechanics, psychology and performance analysis. His current and recent projects involve climate of Science Supplements and currently works as a consultant to technology in both the physiology, biomechanics, psychology and performance analysis. His current and recent projects management atPhysiology the 2018 world World Equestrian Games, climate management for Tokyo 2020, testing of is the founder Equine Exercise (ICEEP) and editor of Exercise He human and equine also pursuing hisComparative own research in Physiology. nutrition, exercise involve climate management at whilst the 2018 World Equestrian Games, climate interests management for Tokyo protective boots, leg cooling methods and and research intoresearch function. physiology, psychology performance analysis. Histofunction. current and recent projects 2020, testing ofbiomechanics, protective boots, leg cooling methods and into saddle of Science Supplements and currently works as asaddle consultant technology companies in both the involve climate management at the 2018 World Equestrian Games, climate management for Tokyo human and equine world whilst also pursuing his own research interests in nutrition, exercise 2020, testing of protective boots, leg cooling methods and research intocurrently saddle function. Exercise Physiology. He is the founder of Science Supplements and works as a physiology, biomechanics, psychology and performance analysis. His current and recent projects consultant to technology companies in both the human and equine world whilst also Eleanor Jones – Panel Presenter involvepursuing climate management thefounder 2018 World Equestrian Games, climate management for Tokyo ELEANOR JONES – PANEL PRESENTER Exercisehis Physiology. He at isinterests the of Science Supplements andbiomechanics, currently works as a own research in nutrition, exercise physiology, 2020, testing of protective boots, leg cooling methods and research intoworld saddle function. consultant to performance technology companies both the and equine whilst also psychology and analysis. Hisincurrent and human recent projects involve climate Eleanor Jones – Panel Presenter Eleanor joined Horse & Hound as news editor in March 2016, having spent eight and a half years management at own the 2018 World Equestrian Games, climate management for biomechanics, Tokyo pursuing his research interests in nutrition, exercise physiology, Eleanor joined Horse & newspapers. Hound as During news her editor in March 2016,has having spent eight and a working for local and national time with H&H, Eleanor attended numerous 2020, of protective boots, study of His leg cooling research intoinvolve saddle climate psychology and performance analysis. current methods, and recent projects half years working and for local and national During her time with H&H, Eleanor industry conferences events, including the newspapers. FEI sport forum, the testing British Equine Veterinary Physiology. Hea half is the ofhorses Science Supplements and currently works as a Eleanor joined Horse & Hound as news editor in MarchExercise 2016, having spent eight and yearsfounder function, early respiratory disease in and research the psychology Association annualnumerous congress andindustry the National Equine Forum, and events, has reported on warning all at disciplines and management theofFEI 2018 World Equestrian Games, climateinto management for Tokyo has attended conferences and including the sport foworking for local and national newspapers. During her time with H&H, Eleanor has attended numerous of horse owners. aspects of the industry, from Brexit to veterinary research, and from dressage rules to dressage mules. consultant to technology companies in both the human and equine world whilst also rum, the British Equine Veterinary Association annual congress and the National Equine 2020, testing of protective boots, study of leg cooling methods, research into saddle industry conferences andacross events, including the Horse FEI sport forum, BritishtheEquine Veterinary She spent time travelling Europe with World Welfare to see the first-hand experience of Forum, and has reported on all disciplines and aspects of the industry, from Brexit to function, early of respiratory disease in horses andexercise research into the psychology pursuing his own research interests in nutrition, physiology, biomechanics, Association annual congress and the of National Forum, and has reported on warning all disciplines horses being transported thousands miles toEquine slaughter, producing reports for print, online and in and veterinary and from dressage rules toand dressage mules. She time travel national of horse owners. aspects the research, industry, Brexit toon veterinary research, from dressage rules to spent dressage mules. video of format, and has from also reported showjumping events from qualifiers to international psychology and performance analysis. His current and recent projects involve climate ling across Europe with World Horse Welfare toWelfare seespent first-hand theand experience of horses spent time travelling across Europe with 2016, World Horse to see first-hand the of grands prix. or joined Horse &She Hound as news editor in March having eight a experience half years management at the 2018 World Equestrian Games, climate management for Tokyo being transported miles slaughter, producing print, horses being transportedthousands thousands ofofmiles to to slaughter, producing reports reports for print,for online andonline in ng for local and national newspapers. During herseven, timehaving with H&H,years Eleanor has attended numerous national Eleanor been riding since she wasalso dreaming ofevents anything horse-related, video format, andformat, has also reported on showjumping events from qualifiers to international and in has video and has reportedspent on showjumping from national qual2020, testing of protective boots, study of leg cooling methods, research into saddle andevents, was first pony, athe £300 Welsh section Bforum, mare, at the age British of 12. She Equine has since never been ry conferences and including FEI sport the Veterinary grands prix.given her ifiers to international prix.have one, now has horseless meantgrands only ever two warmblood mares she competes function, early of respiratory disease in horses and research into the psychology iation annual congress andbut, thehaving National Equineto Forum, and has reported on warning allwho disciplines and Eleanor since she was seven, having spent dreaming anything at British Showjumping events. She made some exploratory intoyears dressage but horse-related, sinceofher Eleanor has has beenbeen ridingriding since she washas seven, having spent yearsforays dreaming of anything of horse owners. ts of the industry, from Brexit to veterinary research, and from dressage rules to dressage mules. mark contained such first as “unexpected manoeuvre C and M” and horse-related, and wasaphrases given her pony, a £300 Welsh B at“well thebeen age of and wassheets given have her first pony, £300 Welsh section B mare, at the agebetween ofsection 12. She hasmare, since never sat”, tendsEurope to stick towith the jumping. pent time travelling across World to see first-hand the experience of now 12. She has since never been horseless meant only everwho to she have one, horseless but, having meant only everHorse to haveWelfare one,but, now having has two warmblood mares competes British twoShowjumping warmblood mares who competes at reports British Showjumping events. at has events. has she made some exploratory forays intoprint, dressage but since her s being transported thousands of miles to She slaughter, producing for online andShe in has mark haveexploratory contained phrases asdressage “unexpected manoeuvre between C M” and “well made some forayssuch into since her mark sheets have contained sheets format, and has also reported on showjumping events from but national qualifiers toand international sat”, tends to stick as to the jumping. phrases such “unexpected manoeuvre between C and M” and “well sat”, tends to s prix. stick to the jumping.

anor Jones – Panel Presenter

or has been riding since she was seven, having spent years dreaming of anything horse-related, as given her first pony, a £300 Welsh section B mare, at the age of 12. She has since never been ess but, having meant only ever to have one, now has two warmblood mares who she competes 21 since her tish Showjumping events. She has made some exploratory forays into dressage but sheets have contained phrases such as “unexpected manoeuvre between C and M” and “well ends to stick to the jumping.


Home of Rest for Horses

The Horse Trust supports a number of wide-ranging projects that help improve horse health and wellbeing. We have invested £25m in research since 1965. We have funded projects looking into biosecurity, drug resistance, worm control, strangles, grass sickness, atypical myopathy, insect borne diseases, osteoarthritis, obesity, stress and sweet itch. We look forward to being involved with the follow up to the landmark pilot study carried out by Dr Sue Dyson at the Animal Health Trust to address the effects of rider weight on equine performance. Our focus is on human motivations and we develop practices to positively impact on owner behaviour as a result of the outcomes of the projects we have funded. www.horsetrust.org.uk

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Saddle Research Trust

Panel Biographies Panel Biographies

Presenter Biographies Panel Biographies

Jenny Hall – Panel Presenter Jenny Hall – HALL Panel –Presenter JENNY PANEL PRESENTER

Jenny Hall Panel Jenny qualified as – a vet from Presenter Liverpool University in 1985 and then worked in the United Jenny qualified as Liverpool a avet from Liverpool in 1985 and then Jenny for qualified asbefore a vet from University inpractice 1985University and then worked in the United States 5 years joining specialist equine in Lambourn, Berkshire. States worked for 5 yearsin before equine practice in Lambourn, Berkshire. the joining Uniteda specialist States for 5 years before joining a specialist Jenny qualified as a vet from Liverpool University in 1985 and then worked in the United

equine practice in Lambourn, Berkshire. In 1996 Jenny the practice is now Lambourn Equine Vets. She was team vet States for 5 started years before joining athat specialist equine practice in Lambourn, Berkshire. In the 1996 started practice that is now Lambourn Equine Vets. Olympics She was team vet to British Three Daythe event team forpractice the Sydney, Athens andLambourn Beijing and for InJenny 1996 Jenny started the that is now Equine Vets. to the British Three Day the event teamworked for the Sydney, Athens andcommittee Beijing Olympics and for InLondon 1996 Jenny started practice that is now Lambourn Equine Vets. She was team vet the 2012 Olympics Jenny for the organising as Veterinary She was team vet to the British Three Day event team for the SydthetoLondon 2012 Olympics Jenny for the Athens organising committee as Veterinary theManager. British Three Day event teamworked for the Sydney, and Beijing Olympics and for Services ney, Athens and Beijing Olympics and for the London 2012 Olympics Services Manager. the London 2012 Olympics Jenny worked for the organising committee as Veterinary

Jenny worked for the organising committee as Veterinary Services

Services Manager. Jenny was Chief Veterinary Officer of the British Horseracing Authority from 2013 until Jenny Manager. was 2016. Chief Since Veterinary the working British Horseracing from 2013 until December then Officer she hasofbeen part time inAuthority equine clinical practice Jenny was Chief Veterinary Officer of the British Horseracing AuthoriJenny was Chief Veterinary Officer ofbeen the British Horseracing Authority from 2013practice until December 2016. Since then she has working part time in equine clinical and spending more time with her family. 2016. Since thenDecember she family. has been2016. workingSince part time in she equine clinical practice ty from 2013 until then has been working andDecember spending more time with her andpart spending time withclinical her family. timemore in equine practice

family.

and spending more time with her

SUE NORTON – PANEL PRESENTER

Sue Norton – Panel Presenter Sue Norton – Panel Presenter

Sue Norton – Panel Presenter Sue Sue has served on the Society of Master Saddlers executive board of directors forfor 10 has served on the Society of Master Saddlers executive board of directors Suehas has served Society of Master Saddlers of directors 10 years and has completed an extended period asexecutive President. Her family busiSue served onon thethe Society of Master Saddlers executive boardboard of directors for 10 for years and hasjust just completed extended period as President. Her family business has10 nessevolved has over the years toan meet changing customer needs. As family Registered yearsevolved and hasjust just completed extended period as President. Her business has years and has completed an extended period as President. Her business has over the years to meet changing customer needs. Asfamily Registered Qualified Qualified Saddle Fitters and Saddlers with excellent bench skills, they evolved over toMaster meet changing customer needs. As they Registered Qualified evolved overthe theyears years to meet changing customer needs. As Registered Saddle Fitters and Master Saddlers with excellent bench skills, provide aprofullQualified range videof aSaddle full range of services, including all repairs andbench saddle adjustments. During Saddle Fitters and Master with excellent bench skills,skills, they provide a45years full range Fitters and Master Saddlers with excellent theyher provide a full services, including all Saddlers repairs and saddle adjustments. During in range the her 45years in the business Sue has been closely involved with horses and riders. of services, including all repairs and saddle adjustments. During her 45years in the in the of services, including all repairs and saddle adjustments. During her 45years business Sue has been closely involved with horses and riders. Having enjoyed hacking, Having enjoyed hacking, hunting and competing in all disciplines with herhacking, own business Sue been closely withwith horses Having enjoyed business Suehas has been closely involved horses and riders. Having enjoyed hacking, hunting and competing in allinvolved disciplines herand ownriders. horses, Sue’s daughters followed horses, Sue’s daughters followed suit at an early age. Through Pony Club days Sue hunting and competing in all disciplines with her own horses, Sue’s daughters followed hunting competing in all Pony disciplines with her horses, suit at anand early age. Through Club days Sue own served on a Sue’s local daughters committee followed for 18 served forPony 18 years, fourSue of which suiton at a anlocal earlycommittee age. Through Club days servedas onDistrict a local Commissioner, committee for 18 suit atfour an of early age.asThrough Pony Club days Suebecoming served ona aRiding local and committee for 18 years, which District Commissioner, later Road Safety lateryears, becoming Riding Road Safety trainer examiner for the four ofawhich as and District Commissioner, laterand becoming a Riding andBHS. RoadSince Safety years, and fourexaminer of which for as District Commissioner, a Riding Road Safety trainer the BHS. Since the earlylater daysbecoming of the SMS Saddleand fitting courses the early of the SMS Saddle courses andofqualification assessments in trainerdays and examiner for the BHS. fitting Since the early days the SMS Saddle fitting courses trainer and examiner for the BHS. Since the early days of the SMSlecturer Saddle and fitting courses and qualification assessments in the mid 90’s, Sue has been a key assessor the mid 90’s, Sue has been a key and Sue assessor for the Society, of and qualification assessments in lecturer the mid 90’s, has been a key lecturerand and part assessor andthe qualification assessments the mid 90’s, Sue has been a the keythe lecturer andasof assessor for the Society, and and part thein team responsible advancement of the team responsible for promoting the advancement ofpromoting knowledge required for Society, part ofofthe team responsible for for promoting advancement for the changes. Society, and of the team responsible for promoting the knowledge required theindustry industry changes. The British manufacturers inadvancement the industry The British manufacturers inBritish Walsall, have been inkey toWalsall, many knowledge required asaspart the changes. The manufacturers Walsall, have haveof knowledge required as the industry changes. The British manufacturers Walsall, been key to toto many improvements saddle design made with reference toinexperienced improvements saddle design made with reference towith experienced qualified fit- have been key many improvements toto saddle design made reference to experienced been key to many improvements to saddle design made with reference to experienced fitters and also to technology and scientific studies that are part of life ters qualified and also to technology and scientific studies that are part of life now and qualified fitters and also to technology and scientific studies that are part of life now now and and important tothe the welfare and demands the modern horse. qualified fitters and also to technology and scientific studies that are part of life now and important to the welfare and demands ofof the modern horse. important to welfare and demands the modern horse.

important to the welfare and demands of the modern horse.

ROLY OWERS – PANEL PRESENTER Roly Owers PanelPresenter Presenter Roly Owers – –Panel Roly Owers – Panel veterinary Presentersurgeon and has been Chief ExecuRoly is a qualified tive of the charity World Horse Welfare since 2008. He graduat-

Roly is a qualified veterinary surgeon and has been Chief Executive of the charity

Roly ed is a from qualified veterinary surgeon and hasinbeen Chief of the Cambridge University 1992 andExecutive acquired hischarity Master’s World Horse Welfare since 2008. He graduated from Cambridge University in 1992 World Welfare since 2008. He graduated from Cambridge University 1992 Roly degree isHorse a qualified veterinary surgeon and has been Chief Executive of thein charity in Nutrition from the London School of Hygiene and acquired his Master’s degree in Nutrition from the London School of Hygiene and and acquired his Master’s degree in Nutrition from theCambridge London School of Hygiene World Horse Welfare since 2008. He graduated from University in 1992 and Tropical Medicine in 1997. His previous veterinary rolesveterinary included the Blue Cross Tropical Medicine inHis 1997. His previous roles includand Tropical Medicine in 1997. previous veterinary roles included the Blue Cross andand acquired his Master’s degree in Nutrition from the London School of Hygiene Royal Army Veterinary Corps. ed the Blue Cross and Army Veterinary Corps. and Army Veterinary Corps. and Royal Tropical Medicine in 1997. HisRoyal previous veterinary roles included the Blue Cross

andRoly Royal Veterinary Corps. is Army currently Treasurer of the British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA), RolyChairman is currently of the Coalition, British Equine Veterinary Association Roly isofcurrently Treasurer of the British Veterinary the Treasurer UK Equine Disease a member ofEquine the Steering Group(BEVA), of theAssoChairman of theCouncil, UKTreasurer Equine Disease Coalition, athe member of the Steering Group (BEVA), of the Roly is currently of the British Equine Veterinary Association British Horse and a Board member of European Horse Network. ciation (BEVA), Chairman of the UK Equine Disease Coalition, a British Council, and a Board member of the European Network. Horse Chairman of the UK Equine Disease Coalition, a member of Horse the Steering Group of the

member of the Steering Group of the British Horse Council, British Horse Council, and a Board member of the European Horse Network.

a Board member of the European Horse Network.

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Reflections Biography

Presenter Biographies

Richard Davison – Reflections Presenter PRESENTER RICHARD DAVISON – REFLECTIONS Richard is a four-time OlympianOlympian (including the 2012 London OlympicLondon Games) Olymand Richard is a four-time (including the 2012 European medalist and has been at the fore-front of the international dressage world for pic Games) and European medalist and has been at the fore-front four decades.

of the international dressage world for four decades. As well as being among world’s most experienced international riders he As well as being amongthe the world’s most experienced international riders he is in demand for his other attributes. He many has been the British World Class is many in demand for his other attributes. HePerformance has beenManager the Britand former BritishClass Dressage Olympic Team Manager Captain. ish World Performance and former British Dressage Olympic Team Captain. Among other awards he was awarded an Among other awards he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Science by Nottingham Honorary Doctorate of Science by Nottingham Trent University and Trent University and the Fellowship of the British Horse Society. He is currently a trustee the Fellowship theserves British Horse Society. He isfor currently a trustee for World Horse Welfareofand on advisory working groups the International for World Horse Welfare and serves on advisory working groups Equestrian Federation the world governing body for equestrian sport. He is a former member theInternational boards of the British EquestrianFederation Federation, British and the for of the Equestrian the Dressage world governing British Horsefor Society. body equestrian sport. He is a former member of the boards of the British Equestrian Federation, British Dressage and the British Horse Society.

The Worshipful Company of Saddlers (The Saddlers’ Company) is one of the ancient Livery Companies of the City of London established by Charter of King Richard II in 1395. Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II graciously granted a Supplemental Charter in 1995 which confirmed the Company’s Objects and The Worshipful Company of Saddlers (The Saddlers’ Purposes by Act of Parliament. Chief among these is the furtherance Company) is one of the ancient Livery Companies of the City of the craft of saddlery andestablished activities by related to of both saddlery of London Charter King Richardand II in 1395. equestrianism. Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II graciously granted a Supple-

mental Charter in 1995 which confirmed the Company’s Oband Purposes by Act ofinvested Parliament. The Company, jects mindful of the powers in Chief it andamong its these is the furtherance of the craft of saddlery and activities responsibilities to the trade, is pleased to support the objectives of related to both saddlery and equestrianism. the International Conference on Horse, Rider, Saddlery Interactions: The Company, mindful of the powers invested in it and its reWelfare and Performance. sponsibilities to the trade, is pleased to support the objectives of the International Conference on Horse, Rider, Saddlery InThe Saddlers’ Company seeks to encourage collaboration between teractions: Welfare and Performance. academic researchers, saddlery Company manufacturers, saddle & bridle The Saddlers’ seeks and to encourage collaboration fitting practitioners. It is the Company’s view that horse between welfare academic and performance is best served through and researchers, saddlery manufacturers, positivist dialogue involving all three. This will encourage innovation and investment in the saddlery and view saddle & bridle fitting practitioners. It is the trade Company’s that horse welfare and performance is best served through assure its continued success. positivist dialogue involving all three. This will encourage and investment in the saddlery trade and its The Company currently chairs The Saddle Fitting (Traininginnovation & Qualifications) Steering Group on behalf of assure a continued success. wide range of stakeholders and is confident that the legacy of this Steering Group and the deliberations of this The Company currently chairs The Saddle Fitting (Training Conference will together inform and motivate all those who work with, treat or simply enjoy horses. & Qualifications) Steering Group on behalf of a wide range of stakeholders and is confident that the legacy of this Steering Group and the deliberations of this Conference will together inform and motivate all those who work with, treat or simply enjoy horses.

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Saddle Research Trust

Abstract

Russell Mackechnie-Guire

Rider Asymmetry

8:40 – 9:10

In the horse, back pain and dysfunction are common causes of poor performance and. horse owners, therapists and veterinarians are working together to prevent this. The development of back pathology and dysfunction is multifactorial, with one contributing factor being the interaction between the saddle, the horse and the rider. Hence, correct saddle fit is essential for providing unhindered back function. The effect that the saddle has on the horse has received some scientific attention. However, there is a paucity of evidence on the effect of tree width on whole horse locomotion, spinal, limb kinematics and saddle pressures. A recent study (1, 2), investigated the effect of tree width on spinal kinematics, limb kinematics and saddle pressure in the ridden horse: tree width had a significant effect on thoracolumbar range of motion, movement symmetry and saddle pressures. This presentation will provide an overview of the findings with emphasis on providing objective evidence in relation to the need for correct saddle fitting. The effect that the rider has on the horse has received some scientific attention. However, despite this, many riders persist in equestrian activity with little consideration to the effect that their position and asymmetries have on the horse. A recent study (3), investigated the effect that rider asymmetry has on spinal and limb kinematics as well as rider position. This presentation will present the changes reported with respect to spinal and limb kinematics as a function of induced rider asymmetry. 1. R. Guire E. Mackechnie, R. Bush, A. Lawson, V. Fairfax, D. Fisher, M. Fisher, R. Weller, T. Pfau. Effect of tree width on kinematics of the thirteenth thoracic vertebra, thoracolumbar dimensions, saddle pressures and limb kinematics, BEVA Congress 2018, https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/evj.30_13008 2. R. Mackechnie-Guire, E Mackechnie-Guire, R. Bush, V. Fairfax, A. Lawson, D. Fisher, M.Fisher, S. Hargreaves and T.Pfau.. The effect of saddle width on thoracolumbar range of motion, ICEEP 2018, https://www.wageningenacademic.com/doi/pdf/10.3920/cep2018.s1

3. R. Mackechnie-Guire, E Mackechnie-Guire, R. Bush, A. Lawson, S. Hargreaves , S. Assirelli, V. Fairfax, D. Fisher, M. Fisher and T. Pfau. Induced rider asymmetry and its effects on equine limb kinematics and thoracolumbar range of motion, ICEEP 2018, https://www.wageningenacademic.com/doi/pdf/10.3920/cep2018.s1

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Abstract Recent Advances in Inertial Sensor Based Asymmetry Assessment Dr.-Ing. Thilo Pfau 9.10-9.40 Inertial measurement units (IMUs) are now commonly used during the equine lameness exam. Quantitative changes in upper body movement asymmetry are documented alongside the veterinary expert assessment of any accompanying signs of lameness. It is important to differentiate between measurement of movement asymmetry and the expert judgement about existence and degree of lameness [1]. In general, upper body movement asymmetry measurements of IMUs document the cardinal visual lameness signs of head nod [2] and hip hike [3] based on accurate and precise measurements of vertical displacement [4,5]. The accompanying asymmetry parameters – typically differences between displacement minima and/ or maxima reached during the two halves of a stride – are closely related to asymmetries in force production with the left and right limbs [6,7] and hence provide insight into the causes of the measured and visually observed movement abnormalities. Recent research has provided further insights into the mechanics of lameness. First, withers movement asymmetry – which is inherently more challenging to assess visually from the front or from behind – has been identified as a useful pointer towards the origin of a movement asymmetry [8]; agreement in terms of the direction (sign) of head and withers asymmetry parameters appears to be related to force asymmetries between the two forelimbs; head and withers movement asymmetries of opposite signs indicate a force asymmetry between the two hind limbs. Second, the thoracolumbar region shows increased flexion-extension, axial rotation and latero-lateral range of motion when lameness has been reduced through diagnostic analgesia [9]. This is interesting for lameness diagnostics by providing additional evidence for a successful removal of limb related pain. In addition, it is possible that an inverse process exists – reduced ranges of motion of the back – and this may contribute to the concurrence of lameness and back problems [10].Third, an experimental study investigating the effect of ‘artificially induced’ hind limb length discrepancies [11] showing pelvic movement asymmetries of similar magnitudes to what is measurable in some clinically lame horses, highlights the importance of considering sources other than pain causing mild pelvic movement asymmetries. Interestingly, while eliciting significant effects at the level of the tuber sacrale (midline of the pelvis), the hip hike difference based on tuber coxae movement appears less affected by changes in hind limb length. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Weeren, P.R. van, Pfau, T., Rhodin, M., Roepstorff, L., Serra Braganca, F. and Weishaupt, M. (2018) What is lameness and what ( or who ) is the gold standard to detect it ? Equine Vet. J., 50, 549-551. Buchner, H.H., Savelberg, H.H., Schamhardt, H.C. and Barneveld, A. (1996) Head and trunk movement adaptations in horses with experimentally induced fore- or hindlimb lameness. Equine Vet. J. 28, 71–76. May, S.A. and Wyn-Jones, G. (1987) Identification of hindleg lameness. Equine Vet. J. 19, 185–188. Pfau, T., Witte, T.H. and Wilson, A.M. (2005) A method for deriving displacement data during cyclical movement using an inertial sensor. J. Exp. Biol. 208. 2503-2514. Warner, S.M., Koch, T.O. and Pfau, T. (2010) Inertial sensors for assessment of back movement in horses during locomotion over ground. Equine Vet. J. 42. 417-424. Keegan, K.G., MacAllister, C.G., Wilson, D.A., Gedon, C.A., Kramer, J., Yonezawa, Y., Maki, H. and Pai, P.F. (2012) Comparison of an inertial sensor system with a stationary force plate for evaluation of horses with bilateral forelimb lameness. Am. J. Vet. Res. 73, 368–374. Bell, R.P., Reed, S.K., Schoonover, M.J., Whitfield, C.T., Yonezawa, Y., Maki, H., Pai, P.F. and Keegan, K.G. (2016) Associations of force plate and body-mounted inertial sensor measurements for identification of hind limb lameness in horses. Am. J. Vet. Res. 77, 337–345. Persson-sjodin, E., Hernlund, E., Pfau, T., Andersen, P.H. and Rhodin, M. (2018) Influence of seating styles on head and pelvic vertical movement symmetry in horses ridden at trot. PLoS One 13:e0195341. Greve, L., Dyson, S. and Pfau, T. (2017) Alterations in thoracolumbosacral movement when pain causing lameness has been improved by diagnostic analgesia. Vet. J. 224. 55-63 Landman, M.A.A.M., Blaauw, J.A. de, Weeren, P.R. van and Hofland, L.J. (2004) Field study of the prevalence of lameness in horses with back problems. Vet. Rec. 155, 165–168. Vertz, J., Deblanc, D., Rhodin, M. and Pfau, T. (2018) Effect of a unilateral hind limb orthotic lift on upper body movement symmetry in the trotting horse. PLoS One, 13:e0199447.

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Keynote Presentation Recognition of behavioural signs of musculoskeletal pain in ridden horses Dr. Sue Dyson

9.40-10.40

It has been observed that owners, riders and trainers appear to have a poor ability to recognise signs of pain manifest when horses are ridden. As a result, problems are labelled as training-related, rider-related, or behavioural, or ‘that is just how the horse has always gone’. Consequently pain-related problems often get progressively worse and, if ultimately presented for investigation, the problems may be too chronic to manage satisfactorily. In a study of 506 sports horses in normal work and presumed to be sound, 47% were overtly lame, or had other pain-related gait abnormalities (e.g., stiff, stilted canter), highlighting the size of the problem. By comparison of clinically sound horses and those with musculoskeletal pain, and horses with musculoskeletal pain before and after diagnostic analgesia has improved lameness, we have recognised that certain signs may reflect pain when horses are ridden e.g., unwillingness to go, spookiness, tail swishing, ears back, mouth opening, change in eye posture and expression, flaring nostrils, leaning on the bit, tenseness, crookedness, bucking, going above the bit, being behind the bit, head tossing, resisting, bolting, rearing, and sweating disproportionately to the amount of work done. However, this requires evidence-based validation. We developed an ethogram for equine facial expression and applied it to photographs of ridden horses. We showed that it was possible to differentiate non-lame and lame horses based on assessment of facial expression and that there were differences in facial expression in lame horses before and after abolition of lameness by diagnostic analgesia (nerve blocks). A whole ridden horse ethogram was developed by the comparison of non-lame and lame horses based on video recordings. From an initial 117 behavioural markers we showed good repeatability when the ethogram was applied by a trained analyst. By selection of those markers which occurred most frequently in lame horses, an ethogram of 24 behaviours was developed. Through the application of this ethogram to lame and non-lame horses we demonstrated that the presence of ≥8/24 behavioural markers was likely to reflect musculoskeletal pain, although a minority of lame horses showed < 8 behavioural markers. We subsequently showed significant reductions in behaviour scores when the ethogram was applied to video recordings by a trained assessor before and after substantial improvement in musculoskeletal pain by diagnostic analgesia (n=10 horses), providing further evidence of a causal relationship between pain and abnormal behaviours. This ridden horse ethogram was then applied to video recordings of lame horses before and after diagnostic analgesia (n=21 horses) by a different trained analyst (n=1) and untrained (n=10) assessors (2 recent veterinary graduates, an equine veterinarian graduated 5 years, 2 equine veterinary nurses, 5 equine technicians). We verified that the cut off value of ≥8 behaviours was likely to reflect musculoskeletal pain, although some lame horses scored <8. There was a significant reduction in behaviour scores after diagnostic analgesia for all assessors. The non-trained assessors over scored horses based on failure to accurately interpret the ethogram (failure to comply with the definitions of specific behaviours). This study highlighted key areas for future training. Ten volunteer veterinarians underwent some on-line training about application of the ethogram. They then assessed test videos of 6 lame and non-lame horses and their scoring was compared with an experienced analyst. Feedback on performance was provided. Twenty horse-rider combinations in regular work and presumed by their owners to be nonlame performed a purpose designed dressage test of 8.5 minutes’ duration. The horses were assessed in real-time by a trained analyst and the 10 veterinarians from the same vantage point. Video recordings were also acquired from the same perspective, so that comparison could be made between application of the ethogram in real-time versus evaluation of video recordings. Fourteen horses had back muscle tension or pain which was considered could influence performance, but this did not significantly influence behaviour scores. Eleven horses had an ill-fitting saddle which was considered could influence performance, but this did not influence behaviour scores. Rider skill scores ranged from 3 to 8/10, but there was no correlation between rider skill scores and behaviour scores. There was good agreement between live horse assessment and retrospective analysis of video recordings by the trained analyst for both lame (n=16) and non-lame horses (n=4). For the live horse assessment agreement for total behaviour scores assigned by the experienced assessor and the 10 veterinarians ranged from 68% to 98%. There were significant differences in behaviour scores between lame and nonlame horses for both the trained analyst and the veterinarians. We believe that with appropriate training the ridden horse ethogram is a valuable tool for recognition of musculoskeletal pain in ridden horses.

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Abstract Rider locomotion patterns and possibilities for improving rider skills Prof. Lars Roepstorff 11.10-11.40 For optimal horse-rider communication, high-levels of technical riding-skills are needed which requires both self-coordination of the rider and coordination with the body of the horse. The scientific documentation of the optimal postural position and the technical skills for a rider is limited. It is generally agreed that good riders should be highly symmetric and must continue to develop symmetry in themselves and their horses for optimal performance in riding. On the other hand, asymmetry in riders is recognized as a negative trait. To improve the technical skills needed to develop high-level performance, the kinematics of the core segments of the rider’s body must be understood and objectively characterized. The aim of this study was to target the intersegmental postural strategies of the foot, pelvis, trunk and head in skilled riders under three conditions: riding, walking and rocking a balance chair. 3D high-speed motion capture and inertial measurement unit techniques were used. The individual studies acquired and analysed data from 7 to 20 high-skilled riders. Sagittal-plane rider kinematics was compared between passive and active riding situations; three different intersegmental strategies were found in active riding. Most of the riders applied increased pressure on the withers area during active riding and with increased collection of the horse. Furthermore, associations were found between intersegmental postural strategies while riding, sitting on a balance chair, and walking. During walking the foot with the higher degree of eversion/pronation was associated with greater contralateral pelvic drop in early stance. Skilled riders analysed while seated and while riding showed a higher degree of trunk movement compared to pelvic movement. The results suggested high degrees of asymmetry in these skilled riders, when comparing the individual segmental strategies on left versus right directions both during seated unmounted and during riding. It is well accepted in the equestrian community that skilled riders should communicate with the horse through pelvic movements. The ability to characterize the intersegmental postural strategies of the rider´s seat may enhance the possibilities to train body awareness and improve equestrian performance in the future. The long-term goal should be to produce healthier individuals and better performance and the results from this thesis may promote this development.

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Keynote Presentation Structural and Functional Asymmetry of the Equine Athlete Prof Hilary Clayton

11.40-12.40

Structural and functional asymmetries are a common finding in people and animals. In horses, some of the body organs, including the heart, caecum and colon, are asymmetrically arranged within the body. In the left and right limbs, the long bones may be unequal in length and the fore hooves are often asymmetrical in shape. During locomotion, limb movements and coordination patterns may show subtle differences between the left and right sides even in sound horses. This talk will describe the sources of asymmetries and will explore current knowledge of sidedness patterns in horses. The rhythmic movements of the limbs that characterize and distinguish the different gaits are generated by clusters of nerve cells called central pattern generators in the spinal cord. They drive the rhythmical patterns of flexion and extension of the joints and may give rise to slight asymmetries between movements of the left and right limbs. These are somewhat random and do not have a have a consistent pattern or side preference. The resulting functional asymmetries are regarded as a normal feature of locomotion in able-bodied people and sound animals. They are distinct from the effects of sidedness (handedness or leggedness) which is associated with a specific pattern of preferential use of the left and right limbs. Sidedness is present in a wide variety of species of animals, birds, lizards, fish, and even insects. About 80% of the human population are right leg dominant which means the right leg is more dexterous and is preferred for tasks such as kicking a ball or picking something up with the toes, while the left leg is preferred for support. Horses also have a preferred leg that provides support while stepping into or out of a halt with the other leg. Sidedness in horses is well-recognized by trainers; horses have a preferred canter lead, they turn more easily in one direction, they take more contact on one rein, and so on. Asymmetries in the horse’s movement due to sidedness must be distinguished from those arising from the trainer’s side preference or as a consequence of mild lameness. Research is beginning to unravel equine sidedness patterns and to reveal which asymmetries are present consistently in horses that exhibit a preference for the left or right side [1]. In a group of seven highly-trained dressage horses that met the criteria for soundness at trot, only one moved symmetrically at walk. Five of the seven horses showed asymmetry in the same direction and one horse was asymmetrical in the opposite direction. The five horses with the same asymmetry pattern consistently took a longer step from right fore to left fore, the withers sunk lower during the weight shift from right to left fore and the haunches tracked to the right of the shoulders putting the left hind closer to the midline of the body. Interestingly, almost all the asymmetries were exaggerated by the weight of the rider rather than being improved in response to the rider’s aids. Reference [1] Byström, A., Egenvall, A., Roepstorff, L., Rhodin, M., Bragançança, F.S., Hernlund, E., van Weeren, R., Weishaupt, M.A., and Clayton, H.M. 2018. Biomechanical findings in horses showing asymmetrical vertical excursions of the withers at walk. Plos One (accepted)

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Abstract

The Rider Weight Study Prof Pat Harris, Dr. Sue Dyson, Laura Quiney, Dr. Anne Bondi

1.40-3.30

There is limited scientific evidence concerning the effect of rider weight on equine welfare and performance. The objectives therefore were to assess gait, behaviour, signs of stress, forces under the saddle, and responses to thoracolumbar palpation and changes in back dimensions in horses ridden by four riders of similar ability, but different bodyweights. This was a prospective, cross-over, randomised trial. Six horses in regular work, 500-600 kg bodyweight, were ridden by four riders of similar skill-level (rider bodyweight:horse bodyweight percentage 10-12 [L=Light], >12≤15 [M=Moderate], >15<18 [H=Heavy], >20 [VH=VeryHeavy]), performing a standardised dressage test (30 minutes). Video recordings of predefined parts of the test, of similar duration, were evaluated by a trained assessor for the presence of 24 previously validated behavioural markers which may reflect musculoskeletal pain. Grading was binary (yes/no) and applied to trot and canter. The test was abandoned for ≥grade 3 lameness or ≥10 behavioural markers (assessed in real-time). Thoracolumbar dimensions were measured using a flexible curve ruler at three sites (18th thoracic vertebra [T18], T13 and T8) before and immediately after exercise and the presence of epaxial muscle tension or pain was graded yes/no. All 13 H and VH rider tests were abandoned (lameness, n=12; behaviour, n=1), as was one of 12 M rider tests (lameness). The mean time for abandonment was 16.6 minutes (range 9.0-25.5) for rider H and 8.3 minutes (range 6.0-19.0) for rider VH. There was a significant difference in total sum of behavioural markers according to riders for trot (M to H P<0.01; L and M to VH, P<0.001; H to VH, P<0.05), with markers correlating to rider weight (R=0.4, P<0.01). Markers reflecting head position and facial expression significantly increased with the heavier riders. There were no differences in salivary cortisol concentrations among riders. Post exercise spontaneous blink rate was elevated compared with pre-exercise values for rider H (p<0.05), with a trend for rider M (p=0.08). The seat of rider VH extended beyond the caudal aspect of the saddle; rider H sat on the caudal aspect of the saddle. Pressures were significantly higher under the caudal aspect of the saddle compared with cranially for rider VH in walk (P<0.05). At rising trot pressures were higher cranially for riders L, M and H (P<0.05), but were similar cranially and caudally for rider VH. The highest maximum peak pressure was recorded for rider VH in canter. Muscle tension scores increased significantly for riders M and H (P<0.05); there was a trend for increased pain score for rider VH (P=0.08). The mean change in thoracolumbar width after exercise was significantly different between rider L and riders H and VH (P=0.02). Mean thoracolumbar width increased with riders L and M (3.9% and 1.9%, respectively) and decreased with riders H and VH (-3.4% and -2.8%, respectively). Saddle-fit was not ideal for riders H and VH, which influenced force distribution and magnitude, a commonly observed clinical scenario. Riders M and H had a similar body mass index (overweight), but only one of rider M’s tests was abandoned, suggesting that the transient induction of lameness was related to rider bodyweight, compounded by the rider’s position in the saddle. The results do not mean that heavy riders should not ride, but suggest that if they do they should ride a horse of appropriate size and fitness, with a saddle that is correctly fitted for both horse and rider.

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The Robbie Project Towards a horseback riding simulator with a realistic interactive riding sensation

Prof. Heikki Handroos

4.00-4.25

simulator research in Laboratory of Intelligent Machines in Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) started in The horse 2008. Several versions of the Robbie-simulator have been created (Eskola, 2009, 2013). The presentation describes the initiation and motivation for starting the Robbie-project and then describes its development phase. The idea of the project was initiated when Professor Handroos bought a Haflinger horse to his daughter. Already at that point Professor Handroos’ research group had developed modelling and simulation technology for R&D of heavy mobile working machines for more than a decade. One important component in those simulators was the motion base that provided the simulated seat motions to the driver of the simulator. The simulator technology was commercialized by establishing a start up company Mevea Ltd. Mevea (www.meavea.com) provides real-time R&D and user training simulators for mobile machine industry. After taking the first basic course in horseback riding in local stables (http://www.ratsastuskouluhubertus.com), professor Handroos understood its difficulty and time required for learning the basic skills. While sitting in the saddle he started to think about the possibilities to mimic the saddle motions in a similar way it was done with a seat in a machine simulator. Of course, he also understood the challenges in mimicking horse-rider interaction in a simulator environment. Robbie simulator consists of a horse-like body, motion platform and control unit. The project was started by measuring the dynamics of the saddle of a real Haflinger horse during riding. A six axis motion sensor (IMU) was used to gather the raw data during walk, trot and canter. The measured accelerations and angular velocities were then integrated and filtered to make them suitable to be used as motion simulator platform inputs. This data was used as control reference for a hydraulic Stewart platform (Eskola, 2013). An artificial horse body made of fiber glass was mounted of the top of the motion base. The hollow structure of the body was filled with polyurethane to increase its stiffness. The simulator realizes three basic gaits: walk, trot and canter. An interactive interface was constructed to make the horse rider interaction possible. The rider can control the simulator by sensors of the interactive interface. The aids in the current setup, by means of which the rider can interact with the simulator are the reins tension, calf pressure and stirrup angle. The rider’s pressure distribution on the saddle might easily to be added. By comparing the measured and simulated motions of the horse, it was concluded that the prototype can mimic horse walk quite accurately, but the speed limits of hydraulic actuators make the motion platform unable to repeat faster gaits i.e. trot and gallop as well as show jumping. For achieving a larger speed amplitudes the hydraulic motion platform was later replaced by an electrical one. Laboratory of Intelligent Machines, LUT has modern, low cost VR-laboratory, equipped with four 3-D projected screens, latest version of a real-time multi-body simulation software, two 6-DOF motion platforms and several motion tracking systems for carrying out the research successfully. The software (see www.mevea.com) provides VRPN and Matlab/Simulink interfaces for easy connection of custom made feedback devices. The laboratory has high-end facilities for building various kinds of simulators and considerable number of in-house devices and software for special purposes. In addition to horseback riding simulation the laboratory has equipment such as IMU suit, magnetometer, camera tracking system, EEG-helmet etc. for studying riders responses to the simulator motions. The most important steps of Robbie-project are presented and limitations and future possibilities are discussed. References: www.ratsastuskouluhubertus.com www.mevea.com Eskola, R., Handroos, H., Sallinen, J. (2009). Advanced Horseback Riding Simulator with Hydraulic Motion Base, The 11th Scandinavian International Conference on Fluid Power, SICFP’09, June 2-4, 2009, Linköping, Sweden Eskola, R., Handroos, H., (2013) Novel Horseback Riding Simulator Based on 6-DOF Motion Measurement, Motion Base and Interactive Control of Gaits, Advanced Robotics, Volume 27, Issue 16, 2013

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Panel: Equine industry, research and the future

Challenges to equine welfare and performance

Dr. David Marlin

4.25-4.35

a hundred years ago horse sport was very different. Horse sport, or at least owning or competing horses Around in racing or polo or was primarily for the rich or those in the military. Horses were still the primary means of energy for transport, agriculture and war. People in rural locations might take part in hunting or point to point race, but it was unlikely they would compete in dressage or jumping competitions. Since these times horse sport has evolved rapidly. Horse ownership has become more accessible, horse sport has become more global with large numbers of horses travelling long distance internationally to compete in Olympic, World Equestrian Games and World Championships in disciplines as diverse as Polo, Endurance, Vaulting, Dressage, Eventing and Reining, to name a few. The demands of many equestrian sports have increased, both for horses and riders. In endurance, professionalisation of the sport resulted in the world record speed for 160km (100 mile) races doubling. In eventing, the cross-country course has evolved from a speed and endurance test to a faster and more technical jumping test with increasingly complex obstacles required to filter out the better combinations. Prize money has also increased significantly as well as the emergence in the Internet age of celebrity riders. The opportunity to watch horse sport has also increased by many orders or magnitude. Finally, we are all aware of the opportunity to obtain “expert” advice online at the click of a keyboard. Thus, whilst the competitive challenge for horses and riders has increased in many equestrian disciplines and the incentive for riders, trainers and owners to win in order to gain prestige or benefit financially has increased substantially, the incentive for the horse to take part has remained unchanged. Whilst by far the majority involved in equestrian competition behave with the horses’ interests at a very high level, there are those that do not. On the one side there are scientists, vets, researchers, regulators who’s role is to protect the horse. There are those that cause suffering through ignorance and those that intentionally strive to win at any cost through whatever means is available and usually at the expense of the horse. We should remember that today we look back on barbaric sports such as bear-baiting, bull-baiting, cock-fighting and dog-fighting with disgust but it’s conceivable that we will be similarly judged by future generations for some of the ways in which use, or permit the use of, horses in some sports. Education and regulation are the best approaches to achieving high standards of equine welfare, particularly so in equestrian sport.

What welfare issues have received media focus? Eleanor Jones

4.35-4.45

Eleanor will talk about the welfare issues as reported recently by H&H, considering the trend almost for two types of concern: issues such as abandonment and neglect on the one hand, and on the other, the owners who believe they are doing everything right by their horses, but may not be. Eleanor will discuss the role of the media in promoting better equine welfare; in spreading the right message, trying to bust the myths and getting the right advice out there.

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Panel: Equine industry, research and the future

How equestrian sport's governing body will face future challenges Jenny Hall

4:45 – 4:55

The principles of continuity, unity, respect, innovation and development are enshrined in the FEI Vision to grow the unique and mutually beneficial bond between horse and human in sport globally. A key future challenge for the FEI is to ensure the new sport formats in place for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics are a success. These formats must be thoroughly tested prior to the Games so there are no glitches as we cannot take for granted that Equestrian is an Olympic Sport. Methods of communication and broadcast and digital media are evolving continuously. FEI already has a successful broadcast and media strategy but it needs to further identify how the fans and the larger audience will consume sport in the future. Identifying how equestrian sports fans access the sport, particularly the youth, is crucial to ongoing growth and sustainability in a cluttered sporting landscape. The youth are the future so their involvement in equestrian sport is not only essential for its ongoing success in terms of participation; it also helps in adapting the sport to universal trends. The FEI President’s programme for 2018-2022 is to continue to engage with youth, listen to them, put a youth development programme in place and grow the fan base amongst a younger audience. There will be a continued focus on good governance and a targeted effort to achieve a more representative gender balance throughout the organisation particularly as 60% of the athletes registered to participate in international events are women. In the field of international development the FEI President has identified a need for independent experts that are prepared to share and transfer their knowledge and expertise. For this reason the FEI Solidarity Committee has started working on a programme to make this possible and is identifying experts in the areas of development that will contribute to the this programme funded by the FEI. To meet integrity challenges FEI will continue investing in research and new methodologies to continue the fight against practices designed to unfairly enhance performance. The number one FEI Value is Horse First: The welfare of the horse is our top priority

How the saddlery industry is addressing the need for change Sue Norton

4:55 – 5:05

A huge change 25 years ago was for crafts people to become skilled at fitting to individual horses and riders, not only repairing and flocking on the bench.

Although ideal for many, apprenticeships are difficult to secure for Trainee Saddle Fitters, because most Saddle Fitters are sole traders or small businesses. The SMS mentor scheme was developed in response to the need for consistent learning support, and has been running for several years.

Experienced fitters continually work with manufacturers in the production of new trees and saddle design to meet the challenge of the conformation of riding horses, which result from modern breeding trends. Manufacturer research and the use of modern technology in saddle design have resulted in new features that benefit horse and rider.

We are sponges to listen and learn from other professional practitioners. It is true that you never stop learning as a Saddle Fitter.

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Panel: Equine industry, research and the future

Roly Owers

What is social licence?

5.05 – 5.15

Social licence (or social licence to operate (SLO)) refers to the ongoing acceptance by specific stakeholders and wider society of an activity, project, company or industry. The concept is rooted in beliefs, perceptions and opinions, with the license first needing to be earned and then maintained. It was initially coined in the early 19th century but the contemporary use dates back to the mid-1990s in the mining industry, and we all likely remember the damage to BP’s social license in the wake of the devastating oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. Since 2010 social licence has been used in greyhound racing in Australia, in the wake of the industry effectively losing its license, in large part because of welfare issues perceived by the public that the industry ignored. More recently it has been referred to with the future of Australian jump racing – which has already been banned in some states there – very much for the same reason. So what does this mean for wider equine sport? Quite simply it has to earn and maintain a social license to survive. Public opinion is increasingly concerned about horse welfare in sport, and as new research highlights the effects of poor and good practice, the sport must strive to be ahead of the curve of public expectation. For instance, a growing minority of people believe that any use of horses is abuse, whether this is racing or leisure riding. Attitudes to use of the whip have changed, with many calling for it to be banned in racing, especially when it is used to ask a horse to run faster. The need for spurs and even bits is being questioned, as some see them as cruel and unnecessary. To flourish, it is incumbent on equestrian sport to keep on top of the evidence base and make appropriate changes to existing practices. Similarly, as a sector we must consider the welfare impact of rider weight, specifically riders who are mismatched to their mounts. Common sense tells us that if a rider looks too big for their horse, they probably are. The ongoing research at the Animal Health Trust, supported the British Equestrian Federation, World Horse Welfare and others, has demonstrated that riders too large for their horse or with poorly fitting saddles can cause temporary lameness. Saddle size, fit and position are essential factors in protecting equine welfare. Some of these factors still do not get the consideration they need and this places the social licence of equestrian sport at risk. Above all, equine sport needs to bring their key stakeholders (including riders, owners, trainers and carers) and the wider public with them by being transparent in their rules and practices, accountable in tackling breaches or poor horsemanship and proactive in showing the welfare of the horse is always put first, above all other considerations. Staying true to our ethics and the ethics of society will protect the social licence of equestrian sport and help secure its future.

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Poster Presentations Using surface EMG to compare muscle activity of the vastus lateralis and biceps femoris muscles during rehabilitation exercises commonly used in horses with intermittent upward fixation of the patella C.V. Blyth and C.M. Brizuela Harper Adams University, Newport, Shropshire, TF10 8NB, United Kingdom. An investigation into the knowledge and practices of UK horse owners surrounding equine musculoskeletal therapy and practitioners A. Holwell, S. Lacy, R. Brassington and T. Bye Bishop Burton College University Centre, Beverley, East Yorkshire, United Kingdom. Can horse-owners be trained to evaluate facial expressions in photographs of ridden horses? R. Price1, S.J. Dyson2, D.S.Gardner1, J.H. Kydd1 1 School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, United Kingdom. 2 Centre for Equine Studies, Animal Health Trust, Lanwades Park, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 7UU, United Kingdom. The importance of the twist in the context of proper saddle fit S.N. Latif, S. Arpagaus, M.T. Dittmann, S. Gunst, V. Hungerbühler and M.A. Weishaupt Equine Department, Sports Medicine Section, Vetsuisse Faculty University of Zurich, Switzerland. Investigation of the reliability of saddle fitters to determine the position of the last thoracic vertebra of horses using palpation techniques: a pilot study K.J. Nankervis1, F. Bradley1, K. Kosek1 and S.J. Dyson2 1 Equestrian Performance Research and Knowledge Exchange Arena, University Centre Hartpury, Hartpury House, Gloucestershire, GL19 3BE, United Kingdom. 2 Centre for Equine Studies, Animal Health Trust, Lanwades Park, Kentford, Newmarket, Suffolk, CB8 7UU, United Kingdom. Rider stability in a flapless saddle versus a conventional saddle H. M. Clayton1, A. Hampson2, P. Fraser3, A. White4 and A. Egenvall5 1 Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, United States. 2 Happy Athlete Sport Therapy, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. 3 Pete Fraser Consulting, Oakland, California, United States. 4 Animal Rehab Institute, Loxahatchee, Florida, United States. 5 Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. A preliminary study of the effect of manual chiropractic treatment on laterality of mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MNTS) in thoroughbred racehorses L. Goodright1, S. Charlton2, S. Trott1, and A. Hunnisett1 1 McTimoney College of Chiropractic, Abingdon, Oxford, United Kingdom. 2 McTimoney Animal Association/Private practice, Staffordshire, United Kingdom.

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