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facilitator toolkits & implementation guide


CONTENTS 3

WH AT IS D3? Hello + D3 contacts 4 D3 Toolkits Intro, pdf 5 Process, pdf 6 Strategies, pdf 7

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D3 @ P S P Scripts 10 Operations + schedule 11 Teen programming policies 14 PSP culture + best practices 16 Feedback + reflection 18 Community partners 19 Project templates 21

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RES O U RC ES Icebreaker games 26 Inspiration + ideas 30 Vendors + purchases 32 Printables 34 Program materials Advertising Feedback Reflection PSP staff + intern manual

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A QUICK

O L L HE

WHAT IS D3?

Welcome to D3! This kit was curated over the course of a year by past D3 facilitators that had extensive hands-on experience in the program. Use this guide to lead yourself through the D3 toolkits, program basics, project planning and inspiration. Feel free to seek out any of the contacts or sites below for questions or help! D3 website  www.d3lab.org D3 blog thed3lab.wordpress.com D3 creators COMMONstudio, www.thecommonstudio.com Kim Karlsrud, kim@thecommonstudio.com Danny Phillips, danny@thecommonstudio.com

Past D3@PSP facilitators Emily Ronning, ronning.emily@gmail.com Beau Sinchai, beausinchai@gmail.com Funders New Learning Institute, www.newlearninginstitute.org Pearson Foundation, www.pearsonfoundation.org

People Serving People

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D 3 IN TRO D UCTION TOOL KIT

D3 PROCE SS T OOL KIT

Interactive PDF

Interactive PDF

CONTENTS

CONTENTS D3 Defined What is Design?

We live in a world where creative skills are sorely needed and handsomely rewarded, yet underemphasized in early education in America.

METHODOLOGY

ce lligen

inte y is

ivit reat

“C fun.�

g

havin

Discover

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Dig Deeper

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Brainstorm

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Define

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Plan it Out

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Get it Done

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Design is: Creative

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D3: AN INTRODUCTION

Design is: Collaboration

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Design is: Civically Charged

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D3 at a Glance

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Who Uses D3? D3 Toolkits

D3 Introduction

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SIX STEPS

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Design is: Collaborative

Design is: Critical Thinking

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PROJECT EXAMPLES Trashketball

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Nighthawks Nest

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Hallway Hieroglyphics

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METHODOLOGY D3: PROCES S TOOLKIT DESIGN CHALLENGE

D3 (Dream it, Design it, Do it) is a process for empowering young people through design. The purpose of this toolkit is to help Intro 21 educators gain a deep understanding of the D3 process by providing Dream it interactive challenges, and examples of D3 in 22 detailed walkthroughs, action. Design it 24

Do it

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Post Challenge Reflection

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LOOK OUT FOR: Bonus Activity Click on these icons to link to an additional resource within this toolkit!

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Focus on Process

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V1 V1 4

Overview

Stated in simple terms, D3 hopes to build creative confidence and critical thinking in young people by teaching them how to think like designers. The D3 process (Dream it, Design it, Do it) is a simple toolset that incorporates a variety of approaches to 21st century learning and instruction. D3 also tein Eins incorporates many of the same design ert thinking principles that are used in the -Alb creative professional world today. D3 programs and projects challenge young people to take their ideas seriously as they become problem solvers, innovators, risk-takers, and creators while developing projects that are meaningful to them. D3 started as a collaboration of the New Learning Institute, the Pearson Foundation, and COMMONstudio. The local success of our pilot programs in a variety of urban schools and non-profits inspired us to create a suite of toolkits designed to help others learn from our successes (and failures) in order to bring D3 into their classrooms without the need for one-on-one facilitation and training. The insights, tools and strategies offered in the D3 toolkits have been developed with feedback from, and in collaboration with educators,for andeducators have The D3 toolkits are a resource who are interested in incorporating been tested real-world classroom design into theirinclassroom. This introductory toolkit is intended to: settings. The D3 process offers a >> Provide a broad of what design is and why it matters. structured way to plan overview and facilitate >> Demonstrate thewith value of design thinking in an educational setting. project-based learning your >> Introduce the D3 design process. students. It canyou helpto you frame challenges, content, and concepts in a new way, tap into student interest, and create engaging experiences with relevant outcomes.

An Active Process Why Design?

V1

D3 DEFINED

Website Click on these icons to link to an online resource outside of this toolkit!

Video Click on these icons to link to a video tutorial on youtube!

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D 3 S TR ATEGIES TOOL KIT Interactive PDF

CONTENTS

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PROJECT PLANNING Planning a Project

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Planning Pathways

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Project Assessment

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Think Impact

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CREATIVE CONTEXT 9 Tips For a More Creative Space

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CULTURE-BUILDING Classroom Management and Beyond

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Embracing Failure

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Managing Frustration

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PLANNING D3: PROJECT STRATEGIES Getting and Giving Feedback

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Relationships Matter

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Spread the Word

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The purpose of this toolkit is to provide an overview of practical tips, insights, and best practices to help educators plan, facilitate, manage, and assess design-based projects with their students.

LOOK OUT FOR: Bonus Activity Click on these icons to link to an additional resource within this toolkit!

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Website Click on these icons to link to an online resource outside of this toolkit!

Video Click on these icons to link to a video tutorial on youtube!

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A FEW

S T P I R C S Use these scripts as a jumping off point to introduce D3 to new teens and families!

D3@PSP

TEENS D3 is a teen program for 12-17yo that meets Tuesday and Wednesday nights where you can become a certified design-thinker! We come together and dream big and do big. You’ll be taking your own ideas and through the D3 process, we’ll figure out a way to make them real. This is also a good way to leave your mark on PSP after you’re gone... your projects and solutions will be built to last! You will be in charge of the projects, we’re just here to help guide the process along.

Bait questions What kind of music do you like? What do you like or dislike about PSP? What’s a big strength of yours? Tell me about your weekend. Tell me about your favorite vacation.

PARE N T S D3 is a teen-only program for kids 12-17yo, run by ___name___ on Tuesday and Wednesday nights from 5:45p-7:45p in the 5th floor lounge. The program is meant for kids to take their own interests and design projects around them, creating a valuable learning experience. This process is designed to be a legacy for the teens, letting them leave their mark on PSP by creating new ideas or solving old ones. The teens will also be able to address the needs of PSP and will research, design and implement their own solutions. The teens will be in charge of the projects and legwork, we’re just here to help guide them along!

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Bait questions Can you think of something off the top of your head that you think our teens could address? What types of things is your teen(s) interested in?

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Daily operations (continued) See D3 AGENDAS in D3 Google Drive for reference

S N O I T A

SCHEDULE AND

R E P O

Use this section to reference teen programming operations, session breakdowns and miscellaneous program information.

WEEKLY SCHEDUL E Garageband 5th floor lounge / rec room (TBD) Monday + Thursday nights Set-up 5:30p Session from 5:45p-7:45p

D3 5th floor lounge / rec room (TBD) Tuesday + Wednesday nights Prep/set-up 4:00p-5:45p Session from 5:45p-7:45p Both programs require 15-20 minutes of set up + tear down.

GARAGE BAN D Set-up + tear down 1. 5th floor storage closet (electrical room ___): black tool cart houses all Garageband supplies, wheel down to lounge 2. Use lounge tables to set up the two computers, iPads, keyboards, drum pads and headphones 3. Teens should be self-guiding themselves to a work station and begin the session 4. 5-10 minutes before the session ends, have teens help put things away in appropriate spot in the black cart, fold up lunch table and clear floor/put mats back 5. Wheel cart back to closet 6. In activities office, assign daily stars + update PSP staff of any restrictions/issues D3 Set-up + tear down 1. D3’s storage closet is within the 5th floor lounge along the wall, use little key on pink key chain to open the Master lock 2. Set up lounge tables and hang D3 plot and other relevant work on tracks or whiteboard 3. If appropriate music is queued up, begin playing at the beginning of the session 4. Set out or gather needed supplies for the day for easy access 5. Session runs from 5:45p-7:30p 6. At 7:30p, we clean up our supplies and two teens that performed well that day (chosen by the facilitator) are allowed to chose snack for the day. Snack from 7:30-7:45p 7. Clean tables and put supplies away 8. Lock storage closet 9. In activities office, assign daily stars + update PSP staff of any restrictions/issues PRIN T IN G + COPYIN G To print, you must either be connected to the printer network or Bailey can print. The printer is located on the 2nd floor by the advocate offices and technology center. The copy machine code is 2729. Please limit copies to necessary materials only.

KE YS The D3 keys are stored in the top drawer of the teen programming desk in the activities office and give you access to 8th floor closet (814), activity office, activity rooms/toddlers room, rec room, staff lounge and 5th floor lounge + electrical room. There is also a small key for the teen’s storage closet.

Programs are able to switch days if all staff (including Bailey/activities staff) agree and are able to notify families ahead of time.

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Daily operations (continued) V O LU N T E E R S Teen programming values consistent volunteers that have a design + music background. Anyone volunteering at either program need to complete PSP’s volunteering requirements: a background check and volunteer information sheet provided by Bailey in the Activities Office. Feel free to utilize any community partner as a resource for new volunteers, specifically Ange Wang. Contact information is located in Community Partners.

TEEN PROGRAM

S E I C I L O

P

Use this section to review routine program logistics + discipline guidelines.

S NA C K Snack is offered each session at 7:30p, one food item and one drink. Teens who have performed or participated well can help pick the daily snack. We try to cater to the teens snack requests if they fall under the umbrella of a “healthy” snack. We only purchase non-caffeinated beverages. D 3 W O R D P R E S S BLOG (NLI version) thed3lab.wordpress.com username: d3labnighthawks@gmail.com admin password: nightingale243 Sign on through www.wordpress.com 1-2 blog posts/month are expected, omitting all teen names and personal information

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Usual requests: Granola bars Fruit snacks Popcorn Chips/pretzels Salsa Pickles Fruit

Trail mix Veggies + ranch Juice Bottled water Iced tea Fanta/A&W root beer Water flavoring drops

For each blog post, please do the following: 1. Publish it to Twitter (right side) 2. Make it “sticky” so that it appears under 3. “Freshest and Latest” on the homepage (right side) 4. Add a few images and set a featured image so that a photo appears on the homepage

P HO T O S + S T O RAG E For documentation and blog posts, consistent photo taking should be a part of all teen programming. There are 3 digital cameras in the storage closet for this purpose. The photo release box should be initialed by parents upon check-in. If the box is not checked, the family has the right to withhold any use of images of their child. Photos should be uploaded to blog posts and organized by project on the teen programming computer.

SIGN - U P Sign-up operates through a lottery system -- names are chosen at random at 4pm each activity day. Parents may sign their teens up for activities in the activity hallway using the little slips of paper and the metal drop boxes on the wall. A list will be printed by 5pm and posted in the display window on the activities floor. Sign up slips and sheets are available in the Activities office. A posted teen programming policy write-up on the sign-up box is a great way to remind families and teens of program expectations. See teen policy write-up in Printables. WAIT L IST If we have met our quota of teens for the day (8 max.) or for teens who sign up after 4pm, a waitlist will be created and those teens can check back in at 6pm to see if there are open spots. Waitlisted teens will gain entry to programming if other sign-ups do not show prior to 6pm. DROP- OF F AN D PICK- U P Drop off time starts around 5:45p (can be a little earlier, but only if the facilitator allows) and closes at 6pm. Teens who show up beyond this time are subject to being denied entry to programming at the facilitators discretion. Pick-up time is 7:45p, however, if parents come early, they have the authority to take their teens out. If a teen is not picked up by 7:50pm, facilitators will contact a parent/guardian by phone. Teens will be sent to the security desk after 8pm. Make sure parents or guardians give photo release consent by initialing the sign-in sheet, however parents reserve the right to refuse photo release. Babysitters dropping off or picking up must have a babysitting form. You reserve the right to refuse any teen at drop-off who doesn’t have a legal guardian or a proper babysitter present. Babysitting forms can be obtained from the front desk. E QU IPME N T RE N TAL Some project work may exceed the nightly sessions, allowing Teen programming equipment is available for rent at the facilitators discretion. See equipment rental agreement in Printables.

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Teen policies (continued) FI ELDT R I P S Getting off-site whenever possible provides a break from their norms and holds huge value for PSP teens! All fieldtrips or visits to community partners will need to be approved by Bailey at least 1-week in advance. Facilitators may take up to 8 teens off site without a support staff, although an extra staff or volunteer is recommended for any fieldtrips. Snack is optional when on a fieldtrip -- use your best judgment depending on where you’re headed. Transportation options include traveling by foot, MetroTransit bus or lightrail or PSP van (see right for van guidelines). Click for daily MetroTransit schedules and routes. Please take the following with on all fieldtrips: 1. Attendance list + parent/guardian contact information 2. First-aid kit (stored in rec room closet) 3. Cell phone + list of emergency numbers including Bailey and PSP main line 4. Drivers license (if driving) or another form of ID

VAN GUIDEL INES The PSP van holds 1 driver (PSP employee) and 6 passengers, great for small group travel. With approval 1-week ahead of time, Bailey will be able to reserve the van through a shared van calendar in Outlook (PSP’s email system). Volunteers or interns are not allowed to drive the van due to insurance policies. STARS + PRIZES A teen earns one star per session if they display good behavior and participation. Cross out the appropriate amount of stars after prize is given to teen. Supervise any prizes being chosen or awarded. Do not give any star prize to anyone other than teens in the program. 10-stars: choose a prize from the top drawer in the teen closet 15-stars: choose a prize from the middle drawer in the teen closet 25-stars: choose a prize from the bottom drawer in the teen closet or teens can request a $5-10 item to be approved by Bailey

R E S T R I C T I O N P OLICY Restrictions are handled on a case-by-case basis, use your best judgment. Physical altercation restrictions start at 1-week. If a restriction occurs, please write a detailed description of the incident right away and contact Bailey as soon as possible so the restriction can be entered into the PDL. If a teen is removed from a session, a parent or guardian needs to be notified as soon as possible. At the facilitators discretion, we can recommend a restricted teen see an advocate or Maureen Daugherty before re-joining teen programming. Facilitators can also require a reflection activity to be completed before re-joining. See example in Printables. S NA C K All programming offers snack each night at 7:30p. Allergies to any foods can be listed on the sign-in sheet. If programming is off-site, snack is TBD by facilitators. Snack requests can be made through a supply request form, turned in 2 weeks prior to date needed. See form in Printables.

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BEST PRACTICES AND

E R U T L CU Use this section to review friendly advice from past experiences and how to retain program quality and integrity.

AT T E N DAN CE D3 has an 8-teen capacity due to the nature of the collaborative model. We’ve experimented with taking more than 8 teens and have had poor results and an increase in tough behavior. Keep in mind that teens’ participation is unpredictable. Always have a mini project/game in mind to use in case of low attendance or if new teens show up in the middle of a project. See games + icebreakers in Resources. Keeping your daily agendas flexible will go a long way with dealing with the inconsistency. ADVE RT ISIN G Bailey can provide a list of teens who are currently at PSP and their room numbers, allowing you to flyer mailboxes behind the front desk. Note: you are not allowed to advertise door to door. See mini flyers in Printables. If you are to hang posters, make sure you use the poster tracks provided on the walls. PSP doesn’t allow tape on any walls. See poster example in Printables. PROJ E CT L E N GT H + T YPE Keeping the project length around 4 weeks seems to be the best option, aligning with the average stay at PSP. Longer projects run into issues with turnover which can stall progress. Art-based projects like creating a poster or film have proved difficult to keep on track because of the tangible nature. Physical art is hard to push forward with different teens coming and going. Process-based projects work best! Be mindful that your role as a facilitator is to guide as part of the team; teens need to feel ownership and accountable for their progress and projects. Don’t forget the community component! How can we push this project outward? Is there a clear path to get the community involved? Can you visit or bring in a community partner? BRE AK BOX This box has specific tools to help a teen effectively take a break. See box in teen programming closet. Calm-down or reflection activities are included in this box. See behavior reflection in Printables. 16


Best practices + culture (continued) G R O U P M A N A G E MEN T STR ATEGIES Allow teens to be heard. Every voice is valuable! Take the extra minute or two to let teens express themselves or explain their ideas. Try to connect with each teen before beginning the session. This will allow you to get a sense of their mood and more effectively address behavior. Play games! If things are getting unfocused, rowdy or uninspiring, don’t hesitate to break for a game! See icebreaker section in Resources for ideas. Practice positivity. Avoid the words “no”, “can’t” or “won’t” and instead ask “What if...” or “Try again!”, encourage trying new things (that includes yourself!), use feedback mad libs for constructive conversations, frame projects and sessions with energy and excitement! See feedback mad libs in Printables. Rehash goals, guidelines or expectations each session, but keep them short and sweet. Try allowing a teen to run this with the group or present them in a fun way before each session. DURING

PRE-SESSION

POST-SESSION

Stick to your guns! The 3 strike rule and teen programming policies hold teens accountable throughout the session to maintain high expectations for behavior. Connect with parents before or after sessions. Supportive parents help pillar the program and help teens stay accountable for their behavior. Frame new ideas or prompts in the form of a question -- be specific! Teens aren’t always eager to be put on the spot to speak their mind or brainstorm new ideas, but when asked about something specific in the form of a question, there will be reponses-a-plenty. I.e. “Tell me what you think about Joey’s prototype.” vs. “Why do you think Joey put an umbrella on top of his design?” Stay flexible! Sessions should be planned, but should also have enough room for the unexpected or the inspired left turn. Don’t be afraid to ad-lib if things are on a roll! 17

FEEDBACK AND

N O I T C E L

REF

Use this section to become familiar with framing stems used for critiques, reflection or when talking about others’ work. F E E DBACK ST E MS See full lists in Printables. Warm feedback (to provide positive comments + helpful suggestions) A strength of _________ is _________! Something I liked is/was _________ because _________. I noticed _________, but what about _________? I appreciate this because it makes me feel _________. I think _________ because _________. Clarifying feedback (to better understand + ask questions) Can you please clarify _________? I wish I knew more about _________. I thought _________ needed more explanation. What’s the meaning of _________? I heard you say _________, why? Cool feedback (to disagree + ask challenging questions) I see your point, but what about _________? How does _________ explain _________? I politely disagree with _________ because _________. Another way of looking at it could be _________. What if _________? RE F L E CT ION ST E MS See full lists in Printables. Looking back This was a good learning experience because… My mistake was… My favorite part was… What surprised me about this was… What I knew before this was… The easiest part was… The hardest part was…

Looking forward This has inspired me to look into… I needed to understand this because… If I was doing this again, I would change… I need to practice to… I will work harder on… If I want to get better at this, I have to… I wonder...

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Community partners (continued)

COMMUNITY

S R TNE

PAR

Use this section to look up contact information, read a general overview of each community partner and suggestions for collaboration!

MIAMI AD SCH OOL MIN N E APOL IS The school of pop culture engineering www.miamiadschool.com/advertising-school/minneapolis 25 N 4th Street, Ste. 201, Minneapolis, MN 55401 Main contact Kristen McCune, director, kristen@miamiadschool.com Amenities Creative work space, classrooms with computer/TV/HDMI hook ups for full screen viewing, photography studio with lights/diffusers/props/mounts, kitchenette Usage Miami Ad is great for non-guided use. We do not have any direct contact on site with staff or students, but have free, semi-supervised range over their space. The photo studio is huge and is well stocked with things that help support a photo/video project. Note that cameras are NOT provided. Please contact Kristen via email and provide detailed notes about which parts of the space you’d like to use and why.

JO Y C E A creative workshop that specializes in creating culture, branding and advertising www.joyce.is 114 N 3rd St, Minneapolis, MN 55401 Main contacts Lindsay Wenner, account manager, lindsay@joyce.is Adam Puncochar, designer, adam@joyce.is Jordan Hadler, designer, jordan@joyce.is Nichol Hadler, copywriter, nichol@joyce.is Amenities Creative work space, 1-on-1 guides to graphic design, strategy and ideation help, conference table, 4 mac setups with current Adobe Creative Suite Usage We have used Joyce mainly for graphic design work and have free access to their space, computers and expertise. Joyce also loves to be a part of the planning process for projects that will involve them. Do not hesitate to email Lindsay and ask for advice or guidance through a design component of a project, they will likely want to help out!

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U N IVE RSIT Y OF MIN N E SOTA - COL L E GE OF DE SIGN Via Ange Wang, professor + designer www.tankoutsidethebox.com, dha.design.umn.edu/faculty/AngeWang.htm 240 McNeal Hall, 1985 Buford Ave. St. Paul, MN 55108 Contact info angetank@gmail.com Amenities College classroom space, Mac computers, graphic design software, college students (huge asset!), presentation/critique materials + set-up Class schedule January 21st - March 10th (2014), Tuesday + Thursday nights, 6:15-9:15pm. Classes are located on the St. Paul campus with access to a paid parking lot. Contact for current class times. Usage Ange is very open to collaboration and classroom sharing. Her students are well-versed in design and process, giving way for great resources for feedback and knowledge - and vis versa - Ange may invite D3 students to come serve as guest judges or on a teen panel for feedback. Ange would also be a great resource for helping field new PSP interns or volunteers for D3.

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Program templates (continued)

PROGRAM

S E T PLA

TEM

Use this section to view templates used for day-to-day program and session organization.

PROJ E CT T E MPL AT E S Templates serves as your project overview and allows you to scope out the length of a project while taking a lot of the legwork out of planning individual sessions. Once a new template is filled out, add it to a new project folder in the Google Drive.

D3 PROJECT RUBRIC (AFP) Adult Facilitated Project Submitted by:

Kim + Danny

Project title: PSPieces

Project summary:

AGENDAS Creating an agenda holds major value in keeping yourself as well as the teens on track. It allows you to set a session goal and map out the steps to get there. Programming at PSP can become chaotic very easily without a bit of structure. See D3 AGENDAS in D3 Google Drive for further reference. Please describe how the D3 methodology will be used:

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Example agenda TUESDAY MAR 5TH // BRAINSTORM GOAL: To continue to explore and test out designs of paper art specific for our three spaces. PREP: Gather white paper, origami paper, scissors, tape, FlipCam, snacks and beverages. ICEBREAKERS // 15 MINUTES PAPER TOWER CHALLENGE Need: Paper, tape and timer Play: give each student 3 sheets of paper, 3 pieces of tape and 3 minutes to build the tallest tower! Discuss the process and why they chose to do it that certain way. D3 HANDSHAKE TUTORIAL (VIDEO) Need: Video camera Play: Allow teens to create a simple tutorial of the D3 handshake for the blog! RE-HASH // 5-10 MINUTES 1. Catch up new teens and review last week’s progress 2. Talk about the email Roniesha wrote, quickly finalize it and send it to Janine, if possible BRAINSTORMING // 15 MINUTES Discuss paper art and it’s versatility, strength, beauty-- show images DESIGNS // 30-45 MINUTES 1. Allow kids to draw upon the mood boards and pictures (on computers) and the examples we showed them to create an original shape or form (or whatever they want to create) for one of the spaces 2. Note how time consuming/challenging/labor intensive they are up on the ‘big ideas’ paper 3. Share ideas as a group CLEAN UP & SNACK // 10 MINUTES

Dream it:

Design it:

Do it: Plan: Create a prototype and consider installation details. Get it done: Fold, build, aggregate, install, share!

Materials, technology needed: Multi-colored paper Pens Structure of mobile (TBD by placement, installation) Origami paper

Potential impact or outcome examples: -Cathartic activity for residents -Great ice breaker project with PSP community -Reinforces hand/making skills -Adds visual interest to PSP building -Potential to scale or replicate concept in partnership with other local organizations, galleries, etc.

Please continue to page 2---------------->

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Program templates (continued) See templates in D3 Google Drive for further reference

D3 PROJECT RUBRIC (AFP) Adult Facilitated Project Facilitator preparation summary/checklist:

Schedule, milestones:

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S R E EAK

GAMES AND

R B E IC

Use this section for team building, to take a break, to curb energy and to get teens creativity flowing! 10-15 minute maximum. L IST OF GAME S See icebreaker games in D3 Google Drive for further reference.

RESOURCES

TELEPHONE PICTIONARY stimulates imagination and out-of-the-box logic NEED: Chairs and table, pens, white paper cut into 4x4’’ squares PLAY: Each person is given a pen and a piece of paper for every participating kid, i.e. 7 players = 7 pieces of paper per each kid. Sitting in a circle within reach of one another, have kids begin writing a statement, i.e. ‘Emily takes her cat on a walk to McDonald’s.’ Once everyone has finished writing their statement, they pass their entire stack of paper with their statement on the top to the left. Everyone reads their statement and tucks the statement to the back of the pile and draws the statement. Then they pass the stack of paper to the next person and that person writes what they think the drawing is depicting. Kids go back and forth, drawing and writing, until they get back to their original statement. Share the progression with the group! ALLITERATION CIRCLE learning names and successfully recalling them No supplies needed PLAY: One person begins by stating their name to the whole group, using a word beginning with the same letter of their name to describe how they feel, i.e. I’m John and I’m feeling jumbled. The person seated to the left will go next and will repeat what the first person said and then add their own. Continue around the circle until everyone has gone and repeated the previous names and feelings. The last person has to try and repeat back everyone’s name and feeling and then add their own. “A WHAT?!” simple reiteration game that boosts morale NEED: A few random objects, i.e. stapler, shoe, apple, headband PLAY: Sitting in a circle, someone, Person A, starts with an object. They turn to Person B, to their right, and shows them the object, saying “This is a STAPLER.” Person B responds by saying “A WHAT?!”, and Person A responds with “This is a STAPLER!”. Person B takes the object and says to Person C “This is a STAPLER”. Person C responds to Person B asking, “A WHAT?!”, Person B turns to Person A and says “A WHAT?!”, Person A responds saying “This is a STAPLER!”. Person B turns to Person C and passes on “This is a STAPLER!”, so on and so forth. With a large group, they will be asking “A WHAT?!” over and over, which is usually where the hilarity ensues.

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Icebreaker games (continued) SQUIGGLES highlights ‘view’ and the differences of perspective NEED: Worksheet copies of a squiggle PLAY: Hand out a squiggle sheet to each kid. Allow them 5-10 minutes to draw something around/with that squiggle involved and have them present and explain their drawing to the group. LOADED QUESTIONS learning facts and humor styles about one another NEED: Pre-written appropriate questions, bowl, pens, paper cut into 4x4’’ squares PLAY: One kid takes a question out of the bowl, asks it and the rest of the kids write their answers down. The person to the guesser’s right collects the answers once everyone has finished. S/he reads them aloud and the guesser has to try to figure out who wrote what. Only one guess per person! Have teens take turns being the guesser. YOUR OREO COOKIE utilizes critical thinking to explain unconscious movements and choices NEED: One pack of Oreo’s PLAY: **Do not announce this is a game** Have students take Oreo’s as they come in the door, as many as they want. Have a casual conversation as they kids eat them. Once they are finished, ask each kid very detailed questions about their Oreo and how they ate it. How many did you take? Why? Did you eat them all at once? How did you eat your Oreo? Why? Answers are usually rooted in their feelings or “who” they are. I.e. (When I played this, I had no idea it was a game and ate my Oreo as I usually do, one even bite down the middle so it cracks in half, then I eat the other half. When asked why I eat Oreo’s like that, I told them I like when things are uniform and balanced, which then led to conversations about my personal aesthetic and how I like simple, clean design.) FAMOUS PEOPLE developing social skills/forging conversations with new faces NEED: Pre-made index cards with famous people’s names on them, tape PLAY: Have cards face down with a tape bubble facing upward when kids arrive. When all have arrived, have them grab a card and place it on their forehead. Without saying the name or spouse of the person, kids can help each other by solving who’s on their head. CANDY FACTS revealing deeper facts, values or dreams about yourself to the group NEED: A variety pack of fun-size candy bars or Skittles/Starburst, correlating questions PLAY: When students arrive, have them choose four pieces of candy and reserve eating them. Once everyone has arrived and chosen their candy, have them answer the correlating questions. I.e. Twix bar: What is your biggest fear?, Starburst: Who inspires you?, etc. JEDI NUMBERS spontaneous teambuilding through intuition and luck No supplies needed PLAY: Gather kids and stand in a circle with heads down toward the floor. The object is to audibly say numbers 1 through 10 without knowing who will say which number. If you interrupt someone or say the same number, the group must start over from 1. For harder a harder challenge, try 1 to 20. MONSTER highlights collaboration within art NEED: plain paper and markers PLAY: Each participant starts with a simple shape-like drawing on their sheet of paper. Have teens pass their papers clockwise, teens will have one minute to add onto the drawing before passing it along to the next person. Once your paper gets back to you, share the monsters!

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Icebreaker games (continued) MINUTE-TO-WIN-IT CHALLENGES socially utilizing math and logical reasoning NEED: Popsicle sticks, dice, package of cookies/crackers, pencils PLAY: Round 1; Pass out one popsicle stick and 6 dice per kid. Once the timer starts, have kids put the popsicle stick in their mouth and try to stack all 6 dice (one on top of the other) and hold it for 5 seconds. Round 2; Pass out one cookie/cracker per kid. Once the timer starts, have kids start with the cookie/cracker on their forehead and try to get it into their mouth without using their hands. Only face movements! Round 3; Pass out 10 pencils per kid and have them spread out. Have kids start with one pencil across the backs of their hands. If they can flip it up into the air and catch it, they move onto 2 pencils and so on. ALIEN COMING TO EARTH fostering literal thinking and simplifying systems + structures NEED: Pencils and paper PLAY: Depending on how many people are in the group, divide into small groups of 3. Pose the situation: A group of friendly aliens have landed on earth. They are without any knowledge of the human race or our planet. You must explain the following to them with what, who, when, how and most importantly, why? Examples of questions... Group A: What is democracy and why doesn’t every country have one? Group B: What is baseball and why is it only played by men? Group C: What is snow? What purpose does it serve? Give kids 10-15 minutes to discuss and write their answers, then share with the group! RORY’S STORY CUBES collaboration through creative storytelling NEED: Rory’s Story Cubes PLAY: Create a story with Rory’s Story Cubes. Alternatively, play this without the cubes as an add-on game, allowing one kid to start with a sentence and the next kid has to add on a new sentence. Write them down for a funny mad-lib type story that’s bound to make little sense! NINJA physical strategy NEED: No supplies needed PLAY: Stand in a circle and choose one person to start as the ninja. The ninja begins by saying “ninja” and everyone jumps into a ninja-like position and the ninja has one movement to hit the hand of the person to his/her right or left. The person on his/her right or left has one movement to move out of the way of the hit. After every move, they are frozen for the entire round, until it is their turn to move again. If they hit, that person loses their hand and has to continue with one. If you lose both hands, you’re out! MASTER DESIGNER uses your mind’s eye to create an outcome NEED: Envelopes + Geometric shapes (laminated or sturdy paper) PLAY: Think the game can be a bit simplified from the link. The main gist is that one person is the “master designer” they privately use the geometric shapes to create a design. They then instruct the rest of the group to individually replicate the design they’ve created. Everyone should not be able to see the master designers or anyone else’s shapes. The master designer has to be as descriptive as possible while the other players can ask the design master questions. Then they all share. WHAT DO WE HAVE IN COMMON? learning new facts about one another NEED: Starter questions for kids who get stuck PLAY: Split the students into pairs. Each pair will have 30 seconds - 1 minute to find four things they have in common. At the end of the minute, put two pairs together and give the foursome 1 1.5 minutes to find 4 more things they have in common. Finally, each foursome can present the list of things they have in common with the group. If kids are feeling stuck, shy or uncomfortable, allow them to use the starter questions to help spark conversation. 28


Icebreaker games (continued) CARD BLOCKS fine motor engineering and highlights simple architecture NEED: 2-3 decks of cards PLAY: Split teens into groups of 2-3. Give each team a deck of cards. Each team has ten minutes to design and construct a tower of cards. The team with the highest tower wins the game. Discuss design, construction and ways to edit. BRAIN COOKER / D3 DICE GAME cognitive learning game for making fast connections NEED: Baggies full of random supplies: paper clips, pipe cleaners, tin foil, post-it’s or origami paper, pennies or dimes, mini zip ties, bendy straws, popsicle sticks, small cardboard pieces (fill the baggies with whatever!), D3 dice (2 different versions) and word cards PLAY: Word version - Each person or team is given a turn to roll the dice and has 10 minutes to master the challenge! PLAY: Physical version - Each person or team is given a baggie of supplies (each bag has the same contents) and rolls the dice for their challenge! Give teens 10-15 minutes to design their piece and share out! BARN YARD physical guessing game NEED: big space for moving around PLAY: Have everyone spread out and pick a spot in the area, tell them to close their eyes and raise their hands. Facilitator(s) come up with 3-4 different animals (DO NOT TELL THE PLAYERS WHAT THOSE ARE), then facilitator will assign an animal to each person. After the player has been assigned an animal, they can put their hand down, but keep still eyes closed. Once everyone got their assign animal, the facilitator will allow them to find their own kind using only voices; eyes must be closed the entire time. It gets super fun when the animals are crazy things like unicorn, mermaid, T-rex, etc. SIGNS physically face-paced memory game NEED: No supplies needed PLAY: Stand in a circle. One by one, have everyone choose a physical “sign”, i.e. a peace sign, wink, pulling on your ear, etc. Everyone’s signs should be different. Chose one person to be “it” and stand in the center. The person in the center closes their eyes and counts to 10. The players in the circle begin to “pass” their sign (only one at a time!) to another person by silently getting another players attention and flashing their sign. The other player will flash their sign back and get another player’s attention and flash their sign. The object is to not let the person in the middle see any signs pass, if the person in the middle sees someone flash a sign, they’re it! HOUSE OF CHIPBOARDS use engineering skills to highlight structure aesthetic NEED: slated chipboard cards PLAY: Design your ‘dream house’ or structure using only the slated cardboard cards. This could be structured or unstructured, depending on how you frame it. Great for productive breaks! SHRINKING ISLAND understanding “usable” space by way of physical gameplay NEED: No supplies needed PLAY: Have teens pair up with someone they are comfortable having physical contact with (i.e. hugging or holding hands). Set down a large piece of paper (the “island”) on the floor for each pair (11x17’’ minimum) and have the pair stand on it with both pairs of feet comfortably on it. The object of this game is to configure a way to have both partners stand on the island without any feet touching the “water” (the floor). This means that people can be held on by partners, can have one foot on the island and one in the air, etc, but one foot from each person has to be touching the island to count. The island will shrink each round to half its previous size. Last team standing, wins! 29

IDEAS AND

N O I T A R I

P S IN

Use this section to catalog project ideas, project inspiration or existing external projects happening somewhere else! FACIL ITAT OR IDE AS D3 ideas 1. 5-minute film, create a 5-minute documentary of their daily life/interests. Alternatively, create a documentary on a subject of their choice (potentially partner with GarageBand)... a longer length project. 2. Personal branding, create a personal brand and website, identifying strengths and talents (potential community partner with JOYCE) 3. Minneapolis/PSP through their lens, a photography project. Intended for summer months. 4. Green the outdoor space at PSP, gardening and landscape study through usable space (tie in seed bombing) 5. Resident/family of the week, teens conduct interviews in consenting residents to highlight them and their family on the LCD screens. Results in a sense of community and transparency. 6. ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ 7. ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ 8. ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ 9. ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ 10. ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ 11. ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ 12. ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________

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Ideas + inspiration (continued) Garageband ideas 1. Create a mixtape consisting of 1-3 songs. Learn how to blend beats or songs together 2. Contact KMOJ radio station for pushing teens music out 3. Comedy routine and recording session 4. Circuit bending with old/outdated electronics, i.e. Nintendo or tape player 5. PSP listening station 6. Highlight teens music during dinner or family fun night 7. Music installations at PSP 8. Spoken word poetry slam 9. ______________________________________________________________________________ 10. _____________________________________________________________________________ 11. _____________________________________________________________________________ 12. _____________________________________________________________________________ D3 x GarageBand collaboration 1. 5SecondFilm, create a 5 second story and film (potentially partner with GarageBand) 2. Time capsule: teens could create and curate content for a PSP time capsule, get other guests/ staff involved! Huge community outreach potential here 3. Physically reverse engineer an outdated music electronic and put it back together. Could get two of the same electronic and take apart one and leave the other one in tact and use as a display on the design process. 4. ______________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ 5. ______________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ 6. ______________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ 7. ______________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ 8. ______________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ 9. ______________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ 10. _____________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ 11. _____________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ 12. _____________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________

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PURCHASES AND

S R NDO

VE

Use this section to reference our most commonly used vendors and purchasing policies. PRIN T IN G University of Minnesota Printing Services http://www.printing.umn.edu/copycenters/index.html GopherGold card works here, or any other types payment will be accepted Lamination available up to 27” wide Rapson Hall: 89 Church St SE, Minneapolis, 55455 For large format printing (42” wide maximum, any length) Cheapest place to print! 3 options glossy: $3 per linear foot (poster-like quality) matte: $3 per linear foot (thicker art print-like finish) bond: $1 per linear foot (thin paper) Only GopherGold card will be accepted. GopherGold card is within the physical D3 toolkit. You must have cash available to load up the card. There is a Gold Card machine down in the basement of Rapson Hall where you can add cash to the card’s balance. Ask for a receipt every time for reimbursement purposes (it may be emailed to you) L AMIN AT ION FedEx Kinkos This is the best option for any lamination larger than 27” Pricing 18” x 24” - $39.99 24” x 36” - $84.99 22” x 28” - $69.99 36” x 48” - $129.99 Locations Washington Avenue FedEx location on U of M campus: can mention it will be for U of M or a student rate. They may ask for an ID, but this will lower the cost significantly. FexEx downtown location: closest proximity to PSP and reasonable 3-4 hour turn around time 32


Purchases + vendors (continued) P U R C H A S E S + R EIMB U RS EMEN T See supply request form in Printables. Teen programming monthly budget $200 for D3 $50 for Garageband Snacks usually run $75-80/month Reimbursement Always keep receipts! They are necessary for reimbursement You can either fill out a supply request and PSP purchases supplies using their credit card (still counting toward the teen programming budget) You may also purchase your own supplies and fill out a PO form that the activities office would turn in to management for a reimbursement. Turn around time is roughly 1-2 weeks R EC O M M E N D E D STO R ES Michael’s, art supply store Recommended location: 1620 New Brighton Boulevard, Minneapolis, MN 55413 Tax-exempt card is within the physical D3 toolkit. Please present this card during checkout 10% educator discount if you show your PSP badge and tell them you’re a teacher ArtScraps, art scrap store 1459 St. Clair Ave., St. Paul, MN 55105 Great for random art supplies or free-art projects Bulk options Accepts usable scraps donations Snack supply stores See snack lists in Daily Operations. Cub Foods, various locations, organic + bulk options available, $ Rainbow Foods, various locations, bulk options available, $ Target, downtown location: 900 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, mostly packaged-food, $ The Wedge Co-op, 2105 Lyndale Avenue South, Minneapolis, $$ Seward Co-op, 2823 East Franklin Avenue, Minneapolis, $$ Whole Foods, downtown location: 222 Hennepin Ave, Minneapolis, $$$

PROGRAM

S E L TAB

N I R P

Use this section to reference and house program materials that can be used over and over! T E E N PROGRAMMIN G MAT E RIAL S Programming policies writeup Post on teen sign-up box when necessary, see Printable 1 Rental agreement and log Post in teen storage closet for easy access to supplies, see Printable 2 Supply request form Fill out at least 1-week in advance of activity date, see Printable 3 Teen snack request form Teens or facilitator may fill out at least 1-week in advance, see Printable 4 ADVE RT ISIN G D3 Mini flyers: designed 2-up in full color, see Printable 5 Full page poster: designed in full color, see Printable 6 GarageBand Mini flyers: designed 2-up in full color, see Printable 7 F E E DBACK + RE F L E CT ION Feedback stems Reflection 3-up design, see Printable 8 2-up design, see Printable 12 Warm feedback, see Printable 9 Looking forward, see Printable 13 Clarifying feedback, see Printable 10 Looking back, see Printable 14 Cool feedback, see Printable 11 Behavior reflection write-up, see Printable 15 PSP STAF F + IN T E RN MAN U AL Email Bailey Erickson at berickson@peopleservingpeople.org for the latest version

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Printable 1

Printable 2

T E E N P R O G R A M M IN G P O LICIES By attending D3 or Garageband, teens and families agree to the following policies.

E QU IPME N T RE N TAL L OG Rental agreement I agree to proper care and use of all D3/Garageband equipment. I withhold liability if equipment is returned late, lost, stolen or returned damaged or broken.

Sign-up + timing Signing your teen up allows us to plan for the day and create a wait list. Please sign your teen up ahead of time using the drop-box system on the 2nd floor. We will always pull teens off the wait list before taking walk-ins. Please show up on time! Staff reserve the right to deny attendance if teens show up later than 6pm, even if your teen was signed up.

N AME

E QU IPME N T

CH E CK OUT D UE D AT E DAT E

C HE C K I N D AT E

Behavior Teens are fully responsible for their own behavior. We will not tolerate disrespect toward staff or others, swearing or derogatory slang, bullying, put downs, fighting or excessive negativity. If a teen is feeling overwhelmed, they are allowed one 5-10 minute break each session to take a breather. If teens are not able to successfully rejoin the group or get back on track after their break, they will lose their star. Teens reserve the right to call a parent or guardian at any time if they feel like leaving programming. Discipline policy We use a three-strike rule for discipline 1. verbal warning 2. loss of star 3. restriction Any questions or concerns regarding any policies, feel free to contact program staff before or after a session or contact Bailey in room 206.

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Printable 3

Printable 4

S UP P LY R E Q U E ST FO R M Reminders Monthly budget: D3 $200, GarageBand $50 Turn supply requests into Bailey Erickson in activities office

SN ACK RE QU E ST F ORM Reminders Keep D3 + Garageband budget in mind! Healthy requests only Turn supply requests into Bailey Erickson in activities office

NA M E O F I T E M

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DESCRIPTION

QUANT IT Y

N AME

E QU IPME N T

CH E CK O UT D UE D AT E DAT E

C HE C K I N D AT E

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39 WHAT IS D3? Design is all around you, from this building to your sneakers to the way you think. Use design thinking to turn your interests into projects that benefit PSP and our community!

D3 PROGRAMMING FOR TEENS 12-17 TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY NIGHTS 5:45-7:45P, 5TH FLOOR LOUNGE SIGN UP ON THE 2ND FLOOR ANYTIME DROP OFF/PICK UP AT THE 5TH FLOOR LOUNGE

WHAT IS D3? Design is all around you, from this building to your sneakers to the way you think. Use design thinking to turn your interests into projects that benefit PSP and our community!

D3 PROGRAMMING FOR TEENS 12-17 TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY NIGHTS 5:45-7:45P, 5TH FLOOR LOUNGE SIGN UP ON THE 2ND FLOOR ANYTIME DROP OFF/PICK UP AT THE 5TH FLOOR LOUNGE

Printable 5 Printable 6

BORED?

TIRED? UNINSP IRED?

OT G Y D O B O N T ' #AIN ! T A H T R O F E TI M

PROGRAMMING FOR TEENS 12-17 TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY NIGHTS, 5:45-7:45P SIGN UP ON 2ND FLOOR, DROP OFF + PICK UP AT 5TH FLOOR LOUNGE 40


Printable 7

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SIGN UP ON THE 2ND FLOOR ANYTIME DROP OFF/PICK UP AT THE 5TH FLOOR LOUNGE SIGN UP ON THE 2ND FLOOR ANYTIME DROP OFF/PICK UP AT THE 5TH FLOOR LOUNGE

MONDAY & THURSDAY NIGHTS 5:45-7:45P, 5TH FLOOR LOUNGE

GARAGEBAND PROGRAMMING FOR TEENS 12-17 GARAGEBAND PROGRAMMING FOR TEENS 12-17

MONDAY & THURSDAY NIGHTS 5:45-7:45P, 5TH FLOOR LOUNGE

WHAT IS GARAGEBAND? Garageband is a music software program on the computer that allows you to make your own music. Come learn to make your own beats and music from veteran DJ’s! WHAT IS GARAGEBAND? Garageband is a music software program on the computer that allows you to make your own music. Come learn to make your own beats and music from veteran DJ’s!

Printable 8

WARM + F E E DBACK to provide positive comments + helpful suggestions A strength of __________ is __________! Something I liked is/was ___________ because ___________. I noticed ___________, but what about ___________? I appreciate this because it makes me feel ___________. I think ___________ because ___________.

CL ARIF YIN G ? F E E DBACK to better understand + ask questions Can you please explain ____________? I wish I knew more about ____________. I thought ____________ needed more explanation. What’s the meaning of ____________? I heard you say ____________, why?

COOL - F E E DBACK to disagree + ask challenging questions I see your point, but what about ____________? How does ____________ explain ____________? I politely disagree with ____________ because ____________. Another way of looking at it could be ____________. What if ____________?

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Printable 9

Printable 10

WAR M + FEEDB A CK to provide positive comments + helpful suggestions A strength of __________ is __________! Something I liked is/was ___________ because ___________. I noticed ___________, but what about ___________? I appreciate this because it makes me feel ___________. I think ___________ because ___________. Add your own feedback frames below! _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________

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CL ARIF YIN G ? F E E DBACK to better understand + ask questions Can you please explain ____________? I wish I knew more about ____________. I thought ____________ needed more explanation. What’s the meaning of ____________? I heard you say ____________, why? Add your own feedback frames below! _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________

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_________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________

_________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________

45 _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________

This has inspired me to look into… I needed to understand this because… If I was doing this again, I would change… I need to practice to… I will work harder on… If I want to get better at this, I have to… I wonder… I think my results were good/bad because… To understand this, I need to… In the future, I will make sure… If I could improve on one thing, it would be… This project will affect others by… Next time, I will ask for help from...

to think back on a project or experience

L OOKIN G BACK This was a good learning experience because… My mistake was… My favorite part was… What surprised me about this was… I enjoyed this because… What I knew before this was… The easiest part was… The hardest part was… I forgot to… The importance of learning/doing this is… I have proved that… Before this, I didn’t know… I could have… One thing I didn’t expect was… What surprised me about this was…

Add your own feedback frames below! _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________

to identify things you’d do differently for next time

L OO KIN G A HE AD

I see your point, but what about ____________? How does ____________ explain ____________? I politely disagree with ____________ because ____________. Another way of looking at it could be ____________. What if ____________? RE F L E CT ION

C O O L - FEED B A C K to disagree + ask challenging questions

RE F L ECT I ON

Printable 11 Printable 12

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Printable 13

Printable 14

REF L ECTION L OOKING BACK to think back on a project or experience This was a good learning experience because… My mistake was… My favorite part was… What surprised me about this was… I enjoyed this because… What I knew before this was… The easiest part was… The hardest part was… I forgot to… The importance of learning/doing this is… I have proved that… Before this, I didn’t know… I could have… One thing I didn’t expect was… What surprised me about this was…

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RE F L E CT ION L OOKIN G AH E AD to identify things you’d do differently for next time This has inspired me to look into… I needed to understand this because… If I was doing this again, I would change… I need to practice to… I will work harder on… If I want to get better at this, I have to… I wonder… I think my results were good/bad because… To understand this, I need to… In the future, I will make sure… If I could improve on one thing, it would be… This project will affect others by… Next time, I will ask for help from...

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Printable 15 R E FLE C T I O N W R ITE-U P To regain entry to D3 or GarageBand, you must complete the following write-up and return it to the teen programming sign-up box or the Activities Office at any time. This helps us understand w  hat happened, your point of view and a reflection on what you could have done differently. Alternatively, if you would like to schedule a meeting with teen programming staff, Maureen Daugherty or Bailey Erickson to discuss your reflection, they will notify us upon completion. Name: ________________________________________________ Date: ________________________ What happened? Why was I involved? _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ What rules or agreements did I break? _____________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ Things that help me calm down are... 1. ____________________________________________________________________________________ 2. ____________________________________________________________________________________ 3. ____________________________________________________________________________________ I can avoid this next time by... / How can others help? _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________

For an interactive PDF download of this exit kit, click below.

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What is D3? Hello + D3 contacts D3 Toolkits Intro Process Strategies

facilitator toolkits & implementation guide

D3@PSP Scripts Operations + schedule Teen programming policies PSP culture + best practices Feedback + reflection Community partners Project templates

3 5 19 65

98 99 102 104 106 107 109

WHAT IS D3? 112

Resources Icebreaker games Inspiration + ideas Vendors + purchases Printables Program materials Advertising Feedback Reflection PSP staff + intern manual

113 118 121 123

DE SIGN E D IN 2014 BY Emily Ronning emilyronning.com

Teen signature: _______________________________________________________________ Parent/guardian signature: _____________________________________________________ 49

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D3@PSP facilitators guide  
D3@PSP facilitators guide  

An all-in-one program toolkit for D3 facilitators and staff!

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