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EMIL Y

MOORE

DESIGN PORTFOLIO UNIVERSITY OF OREGON | UNDERGRAD


EMILY MOORE 2601 Lunada Lane, Alamo, 94507 (925) 286-9766 emily.moore218@gmail.com

EDUCATION University of Oregon, Class of 2014

Bachelor of Architecture Minor in Business Administration Carondelet High School, Class of 2009

RELEVANT SKILLS • Developed and honed crucial architectural skills during ten quarters of intensive design studios.

• Adept at using programs such as Revit, AutoCad, Rhino, Maxwell Render, Google SketchUp, and Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign software. • Created scale models and technical drawings for these projects, and gained knowledge of the concepts fundamental to the construction, structure, and enclosures of buildings.

WORK EXPERIENCE Dahlin Group Architecture and Planning

Pleasanton, CA June 2013 - September 2013 • Updated the Dahlin Group Autocad Detail Standards. • Picked up redlines for multifamily housing project in Autocad, ranging from construction details to floor plans and elevations. • Edited multifamily housing site plans in Photoshop, as well as calculate the correct number of parking stalls. • Built single family homes in Sketchup using floor plans and direction from a principle architect. TBG Architects and Planners Eugene, OR April 2013 - June 2013 • Participated in schematic design for multiple projects, including a warehouse renovation, retirement home, and tennis center. • Designed bathroom renovation to be concurrent with ADA standards. • Updated project enclosure details. Ware Malcomb Architects San Ramon, CA July 2011 - August 2011 • Assisted project managers with the organization of projects. • Maintained constant communication with clients. • Assisted architects with perspective renderings in Photoshop and with assembling construction documents. • Stayed in contact with cities for permit approval. Nordstrom Walnut Creek, CA June 2011 – August 2011 • Assisted customers over the phone and in person with their needs. Family Assistant; The Abbess Family Danville, CA August 2010 • Cared for two children, ages 7 and 10. • Organized and facilitated various activities during the day.

EXTRACURRICULAR Dance Marathon 2012, University of Oregon

• Served dinner to 600 people at a fundraising event. Hopes Conference 2012, University of Oregon • Set up dinner for 200 people. AIAS Student Mentoring Program 2012, University of Oregon • Mentored a first year architecture student.

AWARDS BIA Professional Women in Building Scholarship Award 2014


1. YMCA....................................4 Academic Project, 4th Year

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1

3. RUSSIAN ICON MUSEUM....12 Academic Project, 4th Year

4. DYNAMIC LIVING..................16 Academic Project, 5th Year

2 4

2. FURNITURE...........................8 Academic Project, 3rd Year

3 5

5. ARTWORK...........................30


SOUTH EUGENE YMCA Project Year: Fourth Year, 2012 Location: Eugene, Oregon

A4


(PL) Max Building Height: N/A

The Eugene Family YMCA is a local, community-based non-profit organization that encourages healthy living, and facilitates members to reach their wellness goals. It’s functions provide for a highly social and family oriented atmosphere. Zoning Requirements The existing Eugene YMCA is located along Patterson Street between 20th Ave and 22nd Ave. It currently consists of two buildings- the central building of activity as well as the tennis center. South Eugene High School sits across Patterson Street, in which allows the Y to offer facilities for the students to use, such as the pools and the cafe. The New YMCA will combine the tennis centerwith a parking facility. (PL-S1) Max Building Hight: 30’

(R-3) Max Building Hight: 50’ Max Outdoor Living Space: 20% of site

Circulation

Daylighting

Main Spaces

(PL) Max Building Height: N/A

(PL-S1) Max Building Hight: 30’

(R-3) Max Building Hight: 50’ Max Outdoor Living Space: 20% of site

Zoning Requirements

Daylighting

Circulatio

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EXERMULTIPURCISE POSE STUDIO ROOM

TENNIS SOCIAL TENNIS OFFICE

ESTCODE

YOGA STUDIO

ADMIN

TENNIS CENTER

LAUND RY/ JANITOR STORAGE

WOMEN’S LOCKER

RACQUETBALL COURTS ESTCODE

ESTCODE

GYMNASIUM 0’

0’

4’

CHILDCARE 8’

4’

WELLNESS CENTER

2’ 0’

NATATORIUM

8’

2’

1’

6

CAFE

ADMIN

8’ 4’

Floor Plan 0’ 4’

SAUNA/STEAM

MEN’S LOCKER

16’

2’

1’

ADMIN

8’

16’

32’

Yoga Studio

Entry Atrium


4’ 0’

0’

Elevation

0’

4’

1’

16’

2’

4’

8’

2’

0’

8’

0’

4’

8’

8’

16’ 0’ 32’

32’ 16’

64’

Section

0’

4’

1’

16’

2’

8’

2’

8’ 4’

8’

8’

16’ 0’ 32’

32’ 16’

64’

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FURNITURE STUDIO Project Year: Third Year, 2012

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My original idea for the Ikea Remix was to have a lounge chair for a child to read on. If a child has a chair they enjoy, they will be more inclined to sit down each day with a book. It is important that a chair is functional past the years of a child, and can grow with the person. Once the child outgrows the lounge position, it can transform into a day chair designed for casual reading, working, or socializing. It is adaptable in an eortless and practical way. It is a simple design with a simple construction and an oil finish.

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32”

7”

10

41”

22”


I first made a mold of the seat curve out of plywood. After gluing the 8 layers (six layers of 1/8� plywood between two layers of 1/16� douglas fir veneer), I placed the mold with layers into the vacuum bag. Overnight, the seat dried in place. After trimming and sanding the curve, I attached it to the legs using wooden dowels and wood glue. The legs were created out of 2x10s of CVG Douglas fir. Wooden dowels were also used to create the bridle joint of the legs. Once the legs were attached and dried, I sanded and oiled the chair as a finish. Midterm Mock-up

Vacuum bag

Vacuum bag

Morning after vacuum bag

Bridle Joint

Attaching the legs

Finished product

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RUSSIAN ICON MUSEUM Project Year: Fourth Year, 2013 Location: Portland, Oregon

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The site for the Russian Icon Museum is located in the Pearl District in the city of Portland, Oregon. The art of icon making is a meditation for many people, and there are few schools in the United States that teach the process. This museum provides 3 distinct functions relating to this art: a main viewing gallery of the icons, a library/resource center for the public, and a school to teach the distinct art of icon making. The visitors are welcomed to enter and view the main galleries, use the resources to look up specific icons and processes, or sign up at the school to learn and produce Russian icons. The entire experience of the museum should feel sacred and be a reective process, culminating to a viewing of the iconostatis, which is a wall of icons which often has an alter incorporated into it.

Degrees of Public Exposure

Central Circulation

Structure

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4’ 0’

0’

14

0’

4’

1’

4’

16’

2’

8’

2’

0’

8’

0’

4’

8’

Section16’ 0’

32’ 16’

64’

0’

4’

1’

16’

2’

8’

2’

8’ 4’

8’

Section16’ 0’

32’ 16’

64’


Major Gallery

Floor 3 Major Gallery ESTCODE

Reception

ESTCODE

FUIX_TWCHOATLSDE

Open Open Open Work Work Work Studio Studio Studio

Admin

Floor 2

Scholars of Residence

Mezzanine

Storage

Exhibit Workshop and Prep

Minor Gallery and Presentation Hall

4’ Mechanical 0’

Library 0’

2’

16’ 8’

2’

1’

4’ 2’

0’

1’

Bookstore/ Entry Cafe 8’ Reception/ Information 8’

4’

Floor 1

Floor Plan

0’ 4’

8’

16’

32’

15


DYNAMIC LIVING Flexible Units for Non-Family Households Project Year: Fifth Year, 2013-2014 Location: San Francisco, California

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The site is located on Market Street, an important thoroughfare in San Francisco. It is the boundary between two street grids, which gives this block its triangular shape. Along Market Street in close proximity to the site are bus and Muni stops, and near by are many amenities for local residents such as laundry mats, dry cleaners, grocery stores, restaurants, etc. The building mass is split in two, creating an opportunity for through traffic down the center of the site from Market Street to 15th Street, and providing a mutual space for the public visitors, the neighborhood residents, and the building residents to gather and connect. By creating this outlet, it facilitates neighborhood interaction between the three different groups of people. The first floor of mixed use, with a focus on restaurants, provides a destination for the crowds to gather.

17


Site

2254 Market Street (Block 3560), San Francisco, California .5 Acres 23,000 square feet Density: 90 DU/A

15th Street

Mixed Use

18

Noe S treet

Single Family Residential

M

et k r a

t

ee Str


New Multifamily Residential

Lodging

19


Upper Market/Castro Neighborhood Demographics Housing Stability: Housing Stability: Annual Residential Turnover Annual Residential Turnover 5+ Years in Residency 5+ Years in Residency Median Year in Residency Median Year in Residency

Households: Households: 21% 21% 29% 29% 2 2

Average San Francisco Unit Sizes: Average San Francisco Unit Sizes: Studio/ Efficiency Studio/ Efficiency One Bedroom One Bedroom Two Bedroom Two Bedroom Three Bedroom Three Bedroom

510 sf 510 sf 733 sf 733 sf 1,032 sf 1,032 sf 1,354 sf 1,354 sf

Non-Family Households Non-Family Households Family Households Family Households Households with Children Households with Children

79% 79% 21% 21% 9% 9%

Educational Attainment: Educational (Residents 25Attainment: years and older) (Residents 25 years and older) High School or less High School or less Some College/Associate Degree Some College/Associate Degree College Degree College Degree Graduate/Professional Degree Graduate/Professional Degree

Age: Age: 25% 25% 20% 20%

9% 9% 17% 17% 42% 42% 32% 32%

15% 15%

Age:

10% 10%

25%

5% 5%

20%

10% 5% 5 r6 ve O 4 -6 55 4 -5 45 4 -4 35 4 -3 25 24 r

de

20

0 Years

Un

0

20 Years

40 Years

60 Years

80 Years

de de UnUn

0 0

15%


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2’ 0”

1’ 6” Commercial 1’ 0”

Public vs. Private Housing 0’ 6”

Public Private Housing

Electric Trash Water Heaters

0’ 0” 1

Commercial

Lobby

Commercial

Commercial

Connecting Public, Neighborhood Residents, and Tenants

Level 1 0’ 4’

8’

2

16’

32’

15th Street

Level 5 49’ - 0” Level 4 38’ - 3”

et

Level 3 27’ - 6”

e Str et k r a

M

Creating a link between two streets

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4’ 0’

0’

1 Southwest Section

0’

4’

1’

Level 2 16’ - 9”

16’

2’

8’

2’

8’ 4’

8’

16’ 0’

Level 1 0’ - 0”

32’ 16’

64’


Building

Building square feet: 57,000 Number of Units: 45

Trash

Trash/ Storage

Laundry

Laundry

1

1 Storage

2

Level 2

0’ 4’

Storage

16’

8’

2

Typical Level 3, 4 0’ 4’

32’

8’

16’

32’ Level 5 49’ - 0” Level 4 38’ - 3” Level 3 27’ - 6”

4’ 0’

0’

2 East Section

0’

4’

1’

Level 2 16’ - 9”

16’

2’

8’

2’

8’

Level 1 2’ - 0”

4’

8’

16’ 0’

32’ 16’

64’

23


24


Flexible Units Flexible housing changes as the inhabitants’ circumstances change. It allows the unit to grow and change with the user. The housing is comprised of flexible units geared towards recent college graduates and young professionals. Flexible units are best suited for this demographic because they typically have not settled down permanently yet, and can accomodate their constantly changing lifestyle. Often, they have to share a space with someone they don’t previously know- these adults can share a smaller space while maintaining the luxury of visual privacy. It allows a household to easily add or subtract a tenant, without having to search for new housing to accommodate their situation. Each unit is divided into a flexible zone and fixed zone. The fixed zone consists of the kitchen and bathroom, and the flexible zone consists of a 4’ x 4’ grid system in which panels can be inserted to configure the apartment to suit the tenants’ needs. The flexible grid system allows users to allocate their preferred square footage so the bedroom and communal spaced. Also, the rent is calculated per square foot of each unit. This means the tenants have the opportunity to lower the rent by adding tenants.

1

2

3

4

5

25


Unit Plans

0’

4’ 2’

8’

2’

0’

8’

1’

384 square feet Studio or 1 bed0’ 9 Units

4’ 2’ 1’

0’ 4’ 576 square feet 1 or 2 Bed 24 Units

26

768 square feet 1, 2 or 3 Bed 12 Units 4’

16’

16’

8’ 4’

8’

16’

32’


4’

Flexible Zone 4’

Fixed Zone

4’ 4’

Floor Track Grid

Ceiling Node Grid

27


Panel Configuration

Pin 1/16” Wood Veneer 3/4” Acoustic Panel Spring Loaded Ceiling Anchor

Metal Frame L- Frame U- Frame Floor Track

28


Exterior Wall

Party Wall Section and Plan Detail

Parapet Section

Exterior Wall Section

Party Wall Section and Plan Detail

Capping

Vent Strip

Walls, partitions, and floor/ceiling assemblies separating dwelling units from each other shall have a sound transmission class (STC) of not less than 50.

Flashing Water Barrier

Hardie Reveal Panel Vertical Siding

Wood stud walls- 1 Hour fire rating when covered on both sides with 5/8“ Type X gypsum wallboard or its equivalent

Window Flashing

3/4” Furring

Drip cap trim

Roof Membrane

Water Barrier 5/8” Sheathing

Window Frame

9” Concrete Slab

Pan Head Screw

2 Layers 5/8” Type X Gypsum Board, on each side

2 Layers 5/8” Type X Gyp Board

2x4 Stud

Window Frame

Hardie Reveal Panel Vertical Siding 3/4” Furring Water Barrier 5/8 “Sheathing

Pan Head Screw 2x6 Stud Horizantal trim

3 1/2” Thick Spray Foam Insulation

Rigid Insulation 8”

Vapor Barrier 2 Layers 5/8” Type X Gyp Board

2x6 Sill Plate Anchor Bolt to Slab

Anchor Bolt to Slab 2x6 Floor Plate

9” Concrete Slab 8”

16”

8”

16”

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ARTWORK

30


31


32


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