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ALGORITHMIC SKETCHBOOK ARCHITECTURE DESIGN STUDIO: AIR

EMILY LUCCHESI _ 585234 SEMESTER 1 / 2014

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LOFTING IN RHINO COMPARED TO GRASSHOPPER

Lofting between curves on Rhino created the same outcome as lofting curves in Grasshopper, however when lofting in Rhino the surface created is not changed if you edit the original curves. In grasshopper this function was activated and edited the original curves allowed for the surface to then reshape according to the new curves. This creates a much easier work flow.

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Creating geometric shapes using grasshopper and transferring it back to Rhino was a simple task once understood. This form of Geometric shapes can be used in built form, and already one can see the relationship between this modeling and built examples.

Defines curved surface to box form

Defines the rectangular shape EMILY LUCCHESI _ 585234 SEMESTER 1 / 2014

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VECTORS AND MESHING IN GRASSHOPPER

A vector defines direction and magnitude, and is usually described in grasshopper using 3 coordinates. Vectors can be used for scaling/ratios and/or rotations along with other movements. Points are used to specify the position of something and Planes are used to describe orientation. This exercise demonstrated how to reference two vectors into grasshopper to then find the average vector motion, grasshopper does this by using basic trigonomic functions. (Displayed above). Displayed below is the same function however applying the functions manually rather than using the individual grasshopper tool to work it all out.

Lists display what is contained in the unit. (As above)

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CURVES IN GRASSHOPPER

This function uses two existing curves and from there creates points on the curved surfaces (can edit the number of points on these) and then create arcs from these points.

Adding onto the previous function, this allows you to add points onto the arcs, this is essentially dividing up the arc.

Function creating a grid like structure onto the arcs.

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GEODESIC CURVE IN GRASSHOPPER

From the curve exercise where arcs were created you could from there create a geodesic curve which give the arcs strange angles to work from creating interesting forms. Lofting those geodesic curves then creates an interesting loft.

DRIFTWOOD EXERCISE

Exercise to create a surface to be constructed of driftwood. Using a basic geometric form in rhino, you reference that into grasshopper and then create a closed curve on the inside of the shape, offsetting and extruding that curve and cutting off edges creates the form on the right.

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CREATING A GRID SHELL

From referencing a curve onto grasshopper you can begin to create shells and grids that define the shape. In these examples the curves have been referenced in, divided into individual points along the surface then exploded to allow an arc to go through those points. In order to loft that surface an extra calculation needs to be made (as in grasshopper diagram on above right).

After the loft has been created, you can create geodesic curves onto the surface, however due to the nature of the curve the geodesic curve will only work with certain inputs; start and ends points. By moving and adjusting the position of the points that is inputted to the geodesic curve it creates a different curve each time based on the input information.

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PATTERNING LISTS

Using a basic surface you can create interesting patterns through grasshopper. A ‘surface divider’ allows you to divide the surface into multiple points, these can be adjusted using the slider command. By then flattening these and using a voronoi component you can begin to create your own patterns. Using the extrude button you can define the boundary. However this function would not work on the model I was working off (unknown reason to date).

By using the ‘Cull Pattern’ command you can adjust the pattern of points in which the voronoi pattern follows. The cull pattern then allows you to attach a list to it defining your own individual pattern by either deleting or including the points to use. In order to create a more random based pattern, you can use a jitter component which then scrambles the list of points into a random assortment of numbers.

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EXPERIMENTING WITH PATTERNING LISTS I discovered that experimenting with the existing patterning lists was a simple task, however by changing the original surface shape it could create even more interesting shapes and patterns onto the surface. This however also limits the amount of variation between patterns. Below are three examples of my experimentation with a surface created from curves drawn in rhino. This was done so to see if the patterning was able to form on surfaces other than just a square or rectangle. Using this theory the patterning should be able to function on any surface on a three-dimensional form.

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EXPERIMENTING WITH PATTERNING LISTS

Beginning with a basic loft between curves and then referencing into grasshopper I was able to apply the patterning operations onto the surface. In addition to this I created my own personalized shape and then used that shape to form the pattern onto the surface.

Grasshopper definition for personalised pattern to surface

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A.6 APPENDIX

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Parametric modeling is essentially using the computer to design objects by modeling their components with real-world behaviors and attributes. In using grasshopper and Rhinoceros it was much easier to understand the algorithmic and parametric modeling concepts that the readings and further research were discussing. I found that not only was I able to generate forms by placing the components correctly but also the generation of form when placing something incorrectly. These mistakes eventually turned to designs (tweaking it so the model would work). Throughout my explorations in parametric modeling I noticed that most of the form work I had been creating in the software was similar to some projects I had seen in real life and precedents that I had researched.


The limitations in such programs seem endless. However with extraordinary designs using such programs comes great knowledge in the way in which the program is used. These were my major limitations. I was able to create forms and designs however I was limited to what I knew, for example below I created an archway with a circular pattern on it. This could have been created much more elaborately however as my knowledge of the program is limited, the design too, is limited.

A.6 APPENDIX - ALGORITHMIC SKETCH EMILY LUCCHESI _ 585234 SEMESTER 1 / 2014

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FIELD FUNDAMENTALS - EXPRESSIONS

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The expressions fundamentals indicate the level of strength and forms coming from the vortex’s This can be useful as the strength of projection of the vortex can be mapped out in different ways. These ways create beautiful forms and visual representations.

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FIELD FUNDAMENTALS - EXPRESSIONS These expression, complex as they may seem, can be useful in creating a very curved geometry, one that you are able to control completely. Simply drawing in rhino will take a long time to create such a form however grasshopper has created a definition that simplifies the process down, making the ability to create controlled curves a much easier function.

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FRACTAL TETRAHEDRA

From the simplest of shapes the fractal component in grasshopper is able to create interesting and intricate forms by simply repeating cutting processes over and over again. This definition can be used in forming any design and could be developed further

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ORIGINAL IMAGE

SLIDER MANIPULATION

1. Set boolean to true - creates closed curves

3. Slider change from 102 to 200

2. Slider changed from 24 to 64

4. Slider change from 5 to 12

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SLIDER MANIPULATION

8. Slider change from 5 to 1.

5. Slider change from 5 to 33 - increasing slider change increases density.

9. Slider change from 100 to 50

6. Slider changed from 5 to 2.

10. Slider movement from 24 to 8

7. Slider change from -1.9 to -7

Moving the slider either increases of decreases the amount of lines, density and height off base level.

10. slider movement from 0.050 to 0.001

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ADJUSTING WITH COMPONENTS

12. graph movement - creates a greater tip at point of intersection of curves

15. ‘M’ function on component changed

13. Decay of charge set from 2 to 5

16. Boolean set from false to true

14. Accuracy change from 0.1 to 0.1, 0.2

17. Range re-set

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ADDITION OF EXPRESSION COMPONENT

18. Expression component added - cosh(x) as expression - this seems to inverse the curves

19 Expression changed to sinh(x)

20. Expression changed to fix(x)

22. Added variable y to expression, y=5

23. Boolean set to true

24. sqrt(chrod) spacing selected

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ADDITION AND MANIPULATION OF SPIN FORCES

25. Spin force added - radius of 3

26 Strength of charge adjusted from 1.0 to 3.0

27. Strength of charge changed to 7.0 - this change creates a tighter loop in which the curves circle.

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28. Decay changed from 2.0 to 1.0

29. Accuracy changed from 0.1 to 0.2

30. Boolean set to true


FURTHER EXPLORATION OF DEFINITION - MANIPULATION OF DEFINITION AND CHANGE OF DEFINITION

1. Addition of kaleidoscope component at end of original deifition

2. Addition of kaleidoscope component after divide component also addition of interpolate curve component

3. Boolean of interpolated curve component set to true 4. Lofted form

4. Kaleidoscope component added between curve and divide components.

5. Deleted kaleidoscope component and replaced point charges with spin forces.

6. Set component from Runge-kutter second order to ‘Euler’

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FURTHER EXPLORATION OF DEFINITION - MANIPULATION OF DEFINITION AND CHANGE OF DEFINITION

7. Decay of spin charge set to 7

8. Accuracy set to 0.4

9. Slider set from 5 to 37

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10. Radius of spin charge from 4 to 12.

11. Input voronoi function, baked into rhino and then referenced in as multiple curves into the original definition


12. Slider change from 5 to 100 and input curves changed

13. Voronoi component added

15.

16.

14.

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EVALUATING FIELDS

Creates a set of points along the curves

Adding a spin force to charges creates a spinning form.

This component creates a circle of points around the set point

Connecting component up allows the field line component to generate curves from those radius points with the point charges guiding their movement

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Changing the strength for spin charge to -5.

Deleting point charges and setting radius of spin forces to 2.


GRAPHING SECTION PROFILES

Component creates a list of points along curves

Adding a graph mapper creates the ability to change the way the point movement will work.

By changing the graph mapper to different types or graphs or by simply moving the points creates different curves in the design.

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GRAPH CONTROLLERS

Using the graph mapper allows the control of lines and spread. Curve divide, divides points along curve

Changing graph mapper around and the input into cull component.

Culling the points and then adding a voronoi components allows for a random pattern.

Changing graph type

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IMAGE SAMPLERS

Using an image to create pattern on a surface.

Creating another set of circles fro indentation.

Creating an overlapping pattern

Grapht two components and then lotf together to create surface.

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THE KLUPA 1000 CM BENCH DESIGN - REVERSE ENGINEER

The base shape of either end of the bench were drawn into rhino, lofted and then referenced as a surface into grasshopper.

The surface was divided up into points and then lines were fit through it. However the lines would run the opposite way of which the slats ran in the real bench design. This method proved to be a dead end, as due to our lack of skill we were unable to create lines that ran the opposite direction, to mimic the form of the bench.

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We began this definition by creating two points, moving them along the z-axis and creating a line between the two points. Once this was established we created two polygon forms using the points we created to define their position. Using a twist function we were able to twist one of the polygon shapes around.

From this twisted form we created a loft to form the boundary of lines.

After lofting the form, we then created divided the points along the line we created before using a number slider to determine the difference between points, referencing this onto the XY plane we then set it to the bounding surface and were able to create lines running across the form.

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TREE STATISTICS AND VISUALISATION Text tag creates a list of numeric value into rhino to navigate the points and their location.

Placing a simplify tree structure component before grafting gets rid of the two numeric values of 0,0. Only have information that is specific to each branch.

Tree stats shows you the list of lists that come out of the original components, but when adding a graft component it then shows the long list of the data trees.

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TREE DIMENSIONS

First component of numeric value displaced the path in which it lies. The second part of the numeric value represents which index in the list it is stored within.

Grafting moved component allows for a three-dimensional display of the location of the points.

To create three-dimensional data structure, move along a list.

Flip matrix re-organises the location of points.

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TREE MENU

Referencing a surface into grasshopper and then dividing the surface up into points, to then panel those points in a pattern to allow for polylines to connect in a certain way.

B placing a surface boundary to the polylines a surface is created forming interesting patterns.

The component ‘shift paths’ allows you to find the average of points on each individual surface of a multiple selection whereas with this component the overall average of all surface points would be found instead.

Changing the panel pattern changes the connection between points on the surface therefore creating a different planar surface

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PATH MAPPER

Path mapper component is extremely similar to grafting, where the list that comes out displays one component rather that all of them individually.

This function within the path mapper simply offsets all components by 1.

This function flattens the data.

Adding different functions into the path mapper allows for different pattern along the three-dimensional points. (rhino image on left).

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AA DRIFTWOOD FRAMES

Baking the previous tutorial for the AA pavilion, into rhino for the base surfaces, and then creating interior and exterior curves. Dividing up the exterior curve points evenly and then finding the closest points to the interior curve. This creates the base for the frames.

Creating a planar surface to cut into the surface and plane points made will create the outline for the frames.

Creating a plane along the interior curve along unit z, vertical direction, facing the exterior points.

By grafting the vector points we are equalizing the number of curve points and sections so they can then be moved along to create the frame that will support.

Finding end points of all lines, then to create into one points parameter, by placing in order (start to end to end to start) to create a rectangle. Shift paths to union all curves at once, as all on individual branch. And then region union to create shape.

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ARANDA LASCH - CONTINUOS PATTERNING

Explode the brep component to be able to retrieve the midpoints of the edges. Using unroll brep script, and grafting of the origional brep components grasshopper is able to unroll the surfaces as in rhino, however unrolling them so that they are not laid out on top of each other.

Jitter components therefore creating different edge points for a continous, but different pattern along faces.

Python script component allows you to run the rhino commands in grasshopper by typing the scripted command into it.

If python was not readily available this would be the method in which you would have to go through.

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THE KLUPA 1000 CM BENCH DESIGN - MATRIX

1. Original reverse engineering result.

3. Distance between points alteration from 1.014 to 0.245

2. Changing segments number from 3 to 5 and 5 to 4.

4. Variable x changed from 100 to 144

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5. Radius change from 4 to 7

7. z coordinate change from 35 to 10

6. z coordinate change from 50 to 35

8. z coordinate change from 10 to 45, distance changed to 0.5 and variable x to 100.

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MATRIX - EXPERIMENTATION WITH SPIN CHARGE

9. Addition of spin charges to alter what shape looks like

11. field merger and filed line compnenets added to allow for other lines to follow spin pattern.

10. Spin charge added

12. divide curve component added

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13. move component added, this shuffles the points around on the curve

15. Plugged the twisted loft into the spin field line component.

14. circle component and divide circle component added to create the curves which the filed charge will follow.

16. Radius of 2 added to spin charge.

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MATRIX - EXPERIMENTATION WITH SPIN CHARGE

17. Slider added to filed line component, running 12 steps of component.

19. Radius change to 5, steps change to 30.

18. Distance change from 0.5 to 1.298

20. Decay charge changed to 10

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21. Strength of spin charge to 60, radius to 4.

22. Boolean set to true

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MATRIX - EXPERIMENTATION WITH SPIN CHARGE

23. Tween curve component added.

25. Nurbs curve created,

24. Divide curve component connect to move component as opposed to ‘sec’ component

26. Integer for degree set for 8, 1.

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MATRIX - EXPERIMENTATION WITH SPIN CHARGE

27. Kaledescope component added

29. Integer set to 2

28. Integer set to 5

30. Radius change of initial twisted shapes, segment change of those shapes also.

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MATRIX - EXPERIMENTATION WITH SPIN CHARGE

31. Split list component added, to add points.

33. Frame component added. Realisation the point parameters were not needed.

32. Slider change from 28 to 5.

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MATRIX - EXPERIMENTATION WITH SPIN CHARGE

35. Rectangle component created from the framed component, (plane construction needed)

37. Addition of orate plane component before rectangle component.

36. Extrusion of that rectangular form created

38. Extrusion of the rotated rectangular plane component.

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MATRIX - COLLABORATION WITH GROUP MEMBERS

Extrusion 90 degrees right

Extrude and remove

Loft Offset, loft, create external intersections skin

Height change Pipes onto form in z and x direction.

Profiled loft

deleunay on populated loft

Lofted curves

Close loft

Additional Polygon - adding/ extending form

Extending form changing radius of polygon

Loose loft

Uniform loft

Smooth mesh Voronoi on surface component on lofted form, showing internal cells.

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on

Poly-arc

Poly-arc tangent - 45 degrees.

Shift list 5.

Closed loft.

Initial dimension change.

Loose unclosed loft.

Shifted list further.

Lines along lofted edges.

3D Proximity Found Between Points populated on Lofted Surface

Metaball applied to points

Metaball component adjustment

Kaleidoscope following planes of individual loft surfaces

Changed orientation (as if in water) and lofted surfaces

Loft edges pipes.

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AA DRIFTWOOD UNROLLING

Referenced driftwood surface into rhino from previous tutorials. Want to organise it into surfaces with lists of intersection curves

Using the python component and by inputting a script component that mimics that of the unrolling function in rhino allows for the driftwood structure to be unrolled.

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GRADIENT DESCENT

Referencing a surface into grasshopper to line the surface with gradient lines.

Below: same definition, applied to different surface

Create cluster with component variables, thus creating an easier way to multiply them.

Edit component variables within cluster (edit cluster) to then edit all other copies of same repeated cluster, rather than doing so individually.

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ENCAPSULATING ALGORITHMS: FRACTAL PATTERNS

Creating these planes uses the start and end points of the lines to connect up and thus create a pattern

Cluster these pattern commands into one cluster so that it becomes a more simple process when repeating pattern over.

Rotating and scaling the patterned plane allows for a more variable pattern. Copying and scaling the curve each time to create a pattern. The repetition of the pattern should work for more than one set of base lines and create different patterns based off them.

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Using variables

Grafting the points means each point will be on its own branch which means that the data structure that comes out of it will be a set of lists with a closest points for each curve in the list. Multiple values per list.

Clustered component

Edit component variables within cluster (edit cluster) to then edit all other copies of same repeated cluster, rather than doing so individually. This then can be repeted to create patter.

Cluster is repeated to create patterned form.

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VOUSSOIR CLOUD INPUT

Creating the voronoi cells, and using region intersection component to fit the voronoi cells to the boundary. Outputs of cells are grafted so that the loft between curves do not attempt to create messy form. Each graft output containing many lists of 2 curves, base of column and perimeter ridge.

Using weld mesh component to then allow for the mesh to not have the same line or vertices repeated. Finding the closest point for the bottom of the structure and the top of the structure.

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VOUSSOIR FORM FINDING Kangaroo Plugin Using kangaroo as an add-on. Kangaroo is a particle physics simulator and works using points and springs which are relationships between points.

Reference the edges as springs for simulation. Using line component so that kangaroo knows it’s a line.

Internal points need to coincide with the edge points or the simulation will no work.

Using a timer will allow for the physic component to run faster or slower, with the addition of a toggle component. Shifting the vault values will also shift the shape and movent of the structure.

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Attempt 1.

Attempt 3.

Placing kaleidoscope component before definition of rectangle component Nurbs curve from Kaleidoscope component Attempt 2.

Attempt 4.

Placing kaleidoscope component after definition of rectangle component

Simplify tree. Creates interesting forms at different points along ‘bench’

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As combining the two definitions led me to a dead end (due to limited time to learn more of the program) I have started a new definition that combines the two main features of these definitions but relating it more to the site itself. An attempt to also incorporate the Biothing pavilion will be made. In doing the the design should flow with the movement of water vortex’s and be representational of this. create a set of curves in rhino to then reference into grasshopper to then divide and place points charge on

At each point charge put a spin charge in place (representative of how water would avoid an obstacle) Place a field in between spin charges to represent form.

Extrusion of form on z axis, leaning towards y axis slightly. This creates a maze-like form that could be used as a design for the site. It represents the way in which the water would move through the vortex and therefore it also influences the way people move through the site. Materiality of this could also impact what the design can look like.

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FURTHER DEVELOPMENT

Kaleidoscope function added to incorporate the combination of design.

Reverse plane direction

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Extrude the reverse kaleidoscope form.

Extrude form along a curve

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FURTHERING DESIGN

To create a representational form of stronger to weaker vortices gradually across the site, the original curves were divided into three segments and each of those segments containing different sized radii of the spin circles.

A field line component was added to draw the patterned lines to represent the water moving through objects.

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Culling the pattern allows for the structure to be more open and allows for the movement of visitors

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FURTHERING DESIGN - PIPING

In order to create these pipes, I first moved each line in the z direction to create three layers as to mimic a wall. From this I then baked those lines into rhino and referenced them back into grasshopper as curves, then added the piping component. If I didn’t not bake the lines back into rhino, grasshopper would not function (perhaps the capacity of my computer) and it would crash, so therefore by baking and referencing as curves separate from a definition grasshopper was able to convert the lines to pipes.

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FURTHERING DESIGN - WALL COMPONENT

Adjusting the wall elements - individually as to not overload the program.

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FURTHERING DESIGN

Attempting to create a surface along the lines as to mimic a stripping technique

Using a similar algorithm to that of the seroussi pavilion I am able to experiment with height differences in design

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FURTHERING DESIGN

Changing the graph type and the expression changes the curvature

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ALGORITHMIC SKETCHBOOK APPENDIX COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN

due to the fact that I am still learning how to use grasshopper for rhino. This limitation to my knowledge of the program (even Computational design can be taught. One of the brilliant though learning is undergoing at the moment) limits my ability things about this form of design. However in teaching one to to design as effectively as I would like to. design using computation there are limitations like their previous knowledge of such programs or ideas of design. In understanding I however am able to understand from my learnings that parametric design further each week i have come to realise computational design provides limitless amounts of ways in that the ideas that I have are no so easily expressed through which you can achieve desirable effects, with the assistance of algorithmic design. In order to design efficiently one has to not plug-ins such as kangaroo physics and python scripting (there have a preconceived idea of what the design may specifically are many more that I have not yet discovered). These plug-in look like as such as outcome may not be achievable. components allow the program to achieve new boundaries This inability to create what it is that I had in mind may also be and explore the design/algorithm further.

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L-SYSTEMS AND LOOPS - HOOPSNAKE

This creates lines and vectors to initiate the beginning point and therefore scale of the pattern.

This is a simpler way to express the above function.

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Creating pettern through repetition

Repeating the grouped element in order to create the pattern. Can become very tedious if need to repeat often.

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L-SYSTEMS AND LOOPS - HOOPSNAKE

Sliders at beginning of the definition allows you to alter the movement of each line.

Changing the initial plane allows the structure to grow vertically.

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With the addition of an extra line the growth looks more three dimensional. The hoop snake component allows you to repeat the element/ group without the tedious task of copying and pasting. Makes the process of repetition easier and more manageable.

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EXTRACTING OPEN STREET MAP DATA - ELK

The Elk component allows you to easily map out areas in which you wan to do so, specifying what it is you want to outline.

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This plug-in also allows you, using NASA data, to map the topography of the site as a surface in rhino.

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PARTICLE TRAJECTORIES AND LOOPS WITH ANEMONE: ROBERT STUART-SMITH DESIGN - HELSINKI PUBLIC LIBRARY

This begins to map out the direction in which something would flow off the surface, such as water. The beginning of a loop system.

The Anemone loop system allows you to see how the points would flow off the surface as water may flow off it. This also allows you to track the movement of the points as well.

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Inserting spin charges allows for the curvature of the movement of pints along the surface. This creates a much mor interesting pattern, and by simply changing the radius and decay of the spin charges different effects can be created.

This begins to map out the direction in which something would flow off the surface, such as water. The beginning of a loop system.

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ALTERING FORM Mapping out the way in which people would move around the site. From this we would then create arches as to lead them through it.

CREATING THE ARCHES - DEFINITION ABOVE RESULT BOTTOM LEFT. These arcs create an interesting form. Maybe some height manipulation to relate to the amount of wind capture along the site. The arcs should become higher when closer in land as the wind would be blocked by surrounding buildings. and shorter when closer to the ocean.

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Creating curved surface to pull curves to, this cruved surface represents the desired height difference

MAPPING TO SURFACE - DEFINITION ABOVE RESULT BOTTOM LEFT. By pulling the curves to the surface above and then using those pulled curves to create the arcs it shows a different form, a more interesting to the one if the arcs were all of the same size.

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DESIGN CONCEPT - DISCOVERY 78

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STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS WITH GALAPAGOS BOLLINGER AND GROHMANN - SKYLINK

Using real-life constrcution elements and measurements to create the basis of a truss in rhino. The FE solver compnent will tell us what the deflection is for the system in place based on the weights and material information we inputted preivously. The loads that we have and the self weight.

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The Galapogus component essentially dtermines what components need to be connected where in order to give it the greatest structural integrity.

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ISOSURFACING AND MINIMISING WITH MILLIPEDE: MARK FORNES - UNDER TENSION

Using a set of geometry and a a cloud of points, you can see hoe relaxed or tight the around the points and lines can be

This will attempt to create a stretched mes along the lines similar to that of a previous project, using millipede

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Creating a box tp bound the area in which the tension meshes will go in.

e line

sh

Creating meshes around the surfaces

smoothing out the surfaces by inputting sliders to create this smooth effect. It changes how relaxed this is by changing the amount of relaxation points - but the vertices must be welded together in order to create this relaxation

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ISOSURFACING AND MINIMISING WITH MILLIPEDE: MARK FORNES - UNDER TENSION

works in a similar way as the component metaball however will treat the mesh as a series of points rather than a flat surface. For each vertice the distance to the influence point is found (influence point being the points placed manually in Rhino) To inverse relationshipt of distcane you divide with one so that the inverse is created.

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INTRODUCTION TO RADIATION ANALYSIS WITH LADYBUG

creating something similar to that of a curved building

Using ladybug to display radial temperatures based on real life data over one year

Changing the graph size changes the amount you are able to display on the surface

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SUN-RESPONSIVE PATTERNS

The test point vectors are the normals of each point and therefore we can use them for the number component so we can orient them. In order to create circle sizes that correlate with the radiation output they must first be normalised. To find the normal a mathemoatical calulation needs to be done.

By culling the pattern and setting a minimm value you are able to show a certain number of circles that reach that value

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Dividing the mass addition and length will create a point to be the points attractor position. Using hexagonal panels in the lunchbox addon for grasshopper we are then able to use these attractor points to scale the hexagons

To establish a link between the cells and the radiation analysis a closest point component is used and then the lines are joined up to create this link. Using a panel we are able to view the list coming out from the CP component and from this we are then able to use these indexes to select the specific radiation result we want to use to scale each cell

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FINALISING THE SKETCHBOOK 88

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CONCLUSION

In working through the algorithmic sketchbook I have noted that there are many ways to do one thing and that in order to be able to create brilliant designs inspired and created by algorithmic modeling the user would have to have had extensive, or intensive, reseach and practice on such programs. However these progrmas are able to simluate so many ‘real life’ occurances that it is a waste not to utilize such software. Algorithmic modeling is able to expand the ideas of the designer in ways he or she would not have imagined. There are components and addons and plugins that are able to do virtually anything you think is possble. By simply ‘playing around’ with what different compnenets do one i also able to gain an understanding of how such programs work. In my learning of Grasshopper, my understanding of how scriting, and algorithmic softwares has developped, I still have a long way to go to iimprove my technical skills however there are plenty of useful resources to assist anyone in learning these programs.

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Algorithmic sketchbook  
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