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The Magazine of the Albuquerque Museum Foundation—Summer 2019

Links to Japan | A Past Rediscovered | Collector and Collected


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Saturday, April 13 • 7-11 p.m. Albuquerque Museum 2000 Mountain Rd NW

New Mexico Bank & Trust

“Aloha M

and Albuquerque Museum Foundation present

PRIZE PACKA MAUI INC

ALBUQUERQUE FOUNDATION SPECIAL COCKTAILSMUSEUM • DELICIOUS APPETIZERS PO Box 7006, Albuquerque, DJ DANCE PARTYNM 87194 FUN INTERACTIVE EXPERIENCES 505.842.0111 PRIZES AND MORE! ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM 2000 Mountain Road NW in Old Town 505.243.7255, 311 Relay NM or 711 EVENT TICKETS9•a.m.–5 $65 EACH Tuesday–Sunday, p.m. TO PURCHASE EVENT TICKETS Third Thursday of each month open until 8:30 p.m. albuquerquemuseum.org/shaken Closed Mondays and holidays

Museum Store • 505.842.0111

Saturday, 13 non-refundable. • 7-11 p.m. THE April MUSEUM All ticket sales are final andSTORE

Albuquerque Museum 505.242.0434 Ticket purchases (excluding raffle) are deductible to the fullest extent of theRd law.NW 2000 Mountain Guests must be 21SAN years or older to attend. CASA YSIDRO Cocktail Attire with Island Flair. SPECIAL COCKTAILS • DELICIOUS The Gutiérrez/Minge HouseAPPETIZERS

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MAGAZINE EDITORIAL AND DESIGN All ticket sales are final and non-refundable. E-Squared Editorial Services Ticket purchases (excluding raffle) are deductible to the Emily Editor fullestEsterson, extent of the law. GuestsGlenna must beStocks, 21 years older to attend. ArtorDirector Cocktail Attire with Island Flair. Ashley M. Biggers, Associate Editor CULTURAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT CITY OF ALBUQUERQUE Tim Keller, Mayor ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2019–20 Marney Hupper, President

Elizabeth Earls

Joni Pierce, Vice President

Alex Hauger

Dean Willingham, Treasurer

Mark Joiner

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DJ DANCE PARTY NM 87048 973 Old Church Road, Corrales, FUN INTERACTIVE EXPERIENCES 505.898.3915 PRIZES AND MORE!

SLATE AT THE MUSEUM 505.243.2220 Breakfast and lunch: Tuesday–Sunday, EVENT TICKETS • $65 EACH 10 a.m.–2:30 p.m.TICKETS TO PURCHASE EVENT Snacks, coffee, drinks, & pastries until 3 p.m. albuquerquemuseum.org/shaken

Round 5 nights Andaz M Full da The Feast a

Round tri 5 nights Andaz Ma Full daily The Feast at M

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EVENT TICKETS SOLD

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TOTAL IN-KIND SPONSORS

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$26,000 440 CASH SPONSORS

ATTENDANCE

$18,900 RAFFLE TICKETS SOLD

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In This Issue:

Patricia Kurz, Secretary

BJ Jones

Maria Griego-Raby, Past President

Max Parrill

Deanna Archuleta

Judith N. Suiter

Perry Bendicksen

Corinne Thevenet

Emily Blaugrund Fox, Executive Director

Gerard (Roddy) Thomson, Jr.

Collector and Collected....................................................................................................... 8

Andrew Connors, Museum Director

Kenton Van Harten

Garden Plots and Chatter at the Museum...................................................................... 10

Kenneth Conwell Margaret (Peg) Cronin Stephanie Del Campo

Beverly McMillan Scott Schaffer

Alfred Volden Jason Weaks Tracey Weisberg

ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM BOARD OF TRUSTEES Judith N. Suiter, Chair Helen Atkins

Marney Hupper, AM Foundation

Hal Behl

Joni M. Palmer, PhD

Beverly Bendicksen

Pamela Weese

Wayne G. Chew

Alan Weitzel

A Hide’s Hidden History...................................................................................................... 2 New Mexico’s Japanese Links............................................................................................ 4 Celebrating Statehood........................................................................................................ 6

I am Donating..................................................................................................................... 11 I am a Member.................................................................................................................... 12 What’s New at the Museum Store................................................................................... 13

V I S I T U S AT:

AlbuquerqueMuseumFoundation.org AlbuquerqueMuseumFoundation.org

1


A PAST REDISCOVERED

Things to Notice Seam where the hide was stitched together.

What Kinds of Paints Were Used? Paint was applied directly to the hides with no gesso or background preparation. The blue paint is an indigo dye while the other colors are organic materials (clays for red and yellow) or minerals (iron sulfate for green and black) ground and made locally.

Things to Notice Holes in various parts of the picture might be from bullets piercing the bison’s hide.

TEXT ADAPTED FROM NEW MEXICO HISTORY MUSEUM: WWW.NMHISTORYMUSEUM.ORG/HIDES/

The Artistic Style The late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries were the final great period of European battle tapestries, the style of which may have influenced the commissioned Segesser hides. The wide, broadly painted flower and leaf borders simulate carved or gilded frames, which were typical of European tapestries from the same era.

A Hide’s Hidden History

T

Segesser Hide II has a deep back story.

HE17-FOOT-LONG PAINTING,

WHO WAS SEGESSER? Father Philipp

in Great Plains Quarterly in 1990, the

Segesser II, featured in A Past

von Segesser von Brunegg, a Jesuit

paintings may have been neglected

Rediscovered: Highlights

priest with a mission in Mexico, sent

or disappeared had it not been for

from the Palace of the

the hide paintings to his brother in

Seminarian Gottfried Hotz, who was the

Governors is one of the most important

Switzerland in 1758. The hides depict

curator of the North American Indian

Spanish Colonial objects in New Mexico.

Spanish, French, Oto, Pawnee, Apache,

Museum in Zurich. Hotz researched the

It is the largest of three hide paintings

and Pueblo Indians in a historical battle.

paintings’ origins, and reached out to

from this period. The hide’s story—its

Over the years, the paintings changed

Dr. Bertha Dutton, curator of ethnology

creation, acquisition, and the narrative

hands among the Segesser clan but

at the Museum of New Mexico at the

it depicts—has fascinated historians and

remained in Switzerland.

time. Hotz’s research identified Segesser

prompted them to re-interpret events of the time. 2

SUMMER 2019

As Thomas Chavez, then-director of the Palace of the Governors, wrote

Art. History. People.

II as showing the Spanish and Pueblo troops surrounded by European soldiers


A PAST REDISCOVERED

Things to Notice The complexity of the battle scenes.

Who Painted the Segesser Hides? Colonial census documents list a number of painters in pueblos and Hispanic villages in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Nicolás JirÓn de Tejeda, a painter and presidial soldier, was a member of the Segesser expedition. Tejeda was wounded and feared dead, but eventually returned to Santa Fe in 1733. Perhaps he painted this detailed acount of the battle.

ON VIEW THROUGH OCTOBER 20

during a skirmish thought to have taken

The French and Native Americans

A Past Rediscovered: Highlights from the Palace of the Governors

place on August 13, 1720. The Pawnee

outnumbered the Spanish contingent—a

and their Oto Indian allies—illustrated

rediscovered history. Accounts of the

by their painted and unclothed bodies

time do not mention the presence of

and shaved or close-cropped heads—

the French. Caught off guard, many of

ambushed the Spanish Pedro de Villasur

the Spanish died in the tall Nebraska

they felt the paintings belonged in

expedition. The painting also includes

grasslands.

New Mexico. The State of New Mexico purchased the hides in 1988; Segesser

thirty-seven French soldiers, identified by their European-style clothing—tri-

HOW DID THE SEGESSER HIDE GET

I and II are now part of the Palace of the

corner hats, coats, breeches, cuffs, and

HERE? In 1984, Palace of the Governors

Governors’ permanent collection. The

leggings—firing long arms at the Spanish

staff contacted Dr. Andre von Segesser,

third Segesser is still missing, its fate

military expedition.

then the owner of the paintings, saying

unknown.

AlbuquerqueMuseumFoundation.org

3


JAPANESE LINKS Emi Ozawa, Big Orange Bite, 2018, paper on board, unique variation edition, promised gift of Richard Levy and Dana Asbury, image courtesy of Richard Levy Gallery. RIGHT: Labels like this one were attached to packing crates of produce sent from the Nakayama’s farm in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Lent by Jane Nakayama Cole and Peggy Swoveland.

T

HIS SUMMER, three exhibitions carry a thread that links them to each other. A Past Rediscovered:

Highlights from the Palace of the Governors is a visual journey through New Mexico history. It also includes objects created by Japanese American men interned at New Mexico camps during World War II, a little-known moment in New Mexico history. One of the largest of the Japanese incarceration camps was built in Santa Fe, while another was operated in Lordsburg. Although prisoners, the Japanese American detainees maintained their culture, even running their own newspaper, the Santa Fe Jiho. The letters and other objects of

COURTESY RICHARD LEVY GALLERY

Shodo Kawamura, Benjamin Tanaka, and Kunitaro Takeuchi record the imprisonment of immigrants from Japan and also U.S. citizens of Japanese ancestry. They tell stories of resilience and creativity in the face of adversity. Down the hall in the Keleher

New Mexico’s Japanese Links

Three exhibitions highlight Japanese elements. 4

SUMMER 2019

Art. History. People.

Community History Gallery, Courage and Compassion: Our Shared Story of the Japanese American World War II Experience is on view through November. Nikki Nojima Louis, artistic director of JACL Players, the New Mexico Japanese American Citizens League (NMJACL) theater group, curated the exhibition. She has a personal connection to internment camps: She and her mother were prisoners in Idaho, while her father was


JAPANESE LINKS

MUSEUM MEMBER DEALS Simply present your membership card to the cashier.

J U LY FREE LEMON SQUARE

paper by artists with links to New

WITH PURCHASE OF AN ENTREE AND A DRINK.

Mexico. Works range from nineteenthcentury woodblock prints from the Edo period (1615–1868), to contemporary prints, photographs, and paintings through which artists both engage

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with and redefine traditional Japanese subjects, techniques, and approaches to art. The exhibition covers enormous ground in a small space, beginning with the seventeenth- and eighteenthcentury prints, modern takes on the Edo style, landscapes and abstract works, a Patrick Nagatani photograph depicting the nuclear threat of World War II, and contemporary works by Albuquerque-based artists Emi Ozawa interned in Santa Fe during World War II.

and Kei Tsuzuki.

Photographs and personal belongings from camp prisoners illuminate the and the local residents who befriended

ON VIEW:

and helped them. For example, in

THROUGH SEPTEMBER 29

Lordsburg, when members of the

Unfolding Tradition: Works on Paper by Japanese Artists in the Collection

stories of both the families in the camps

Methodist Church noticed that some of the men didn’t have winter clothing, townspeople donated coats to the church for delivery to the camp. Some women brought clothes that belonged to their husbands who were serving overseas. In Santa Fe, a local Episcopal minister would visit the men every other Sunday. He conducted services for the Episcopalians and evening prayer for anybody who wanted to attend. Unfolding Tradition features Japanese and Japanese American works on

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THROUGH OCTOBER 20 A Past Rediscovered: Highlights from the Palace of the Governors THROUGH NOVEMBER 3 Courage and Compassion: Our Shared Story of the Japanese American World War II Experience

2000 MOUNTAIN ROAD NW ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87104 Located inside the Albuquerque Museum

505-243-2220

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THE COLLECTOR

LEFT: Bea Mandelman, Untitled (Three Men,

Barrel Fire), ca. 1936. Lithograph on paper. Gift of Richard Levy and Dana Asbury. BELOW: Bea Mandelman, Three Houses, ca. 1936. Color lithograph on paper. Gift of Richard Levy and Dana Asbury.

Collector and Collected Richard Levy’s imaginative gifts keeps an eye to the future.

T

HE RECENT ACQUISITION

of thousands), stereographs, albumen

of 31 Beatrice Mandelman

print photography, art nouveau and

prints is just one of many

deco posters, paintings, sculptures, and

Museum gifts from gallery

prints. Another recent acquisition is a

owner and collector Richard Levy. Levy’s donations can be found on the

walls and in the vault of the Museum. He promised a gift of Emi Ozawa’s

6

SUMMER 2019

Art. History. People.

folk-art style hooked rug Levy made himself in the style of an Albuquerque Route 66 tourism postcard. This consummate collector donates

maquette Big Orange Bite, which is

art to the Museum, he says, in part

included in the Works on Paper gallery

because it’s local, but also because

exhibition Unfolding Tradition. There

it sheds light on area history. “I’ve

are also prints by the late photographer

been here since about 1970, and it’s

Patrick Nagatani; and in the future,

the local museum and I’ve collected

there will be selections from Levy’s

the local stuff. Josie [Lopez, curator

astonishing collection of postcards (tens

of art] came and picked works from


THE COLLECTOR OPPOSITE PAGE: Richard Levy

dyes fabric for his hooked rugs. LEFT: The Albuquerque hooked

rug Levy created for the Museum. BELOW: It took two years to

create this highly detailed piece.

the Valerie Roybal show. We found a couple of people who made donations

didn’t always want to sell them to me.” Levy also champions Albuquerque

to the Breast Cancer Foundation so

artists nationally. “I started here as an

the Museum could have them. The joy

art dealer, and Tamarind was here, and

in all of that, is that Andrew [Connors,

there were interesting artists coming

museum director] or Josie will do

from all over. The artists I show now are

something with all of those things. They

more from Albuquerque than at any

show Patrick’s [Nagatani] prints. They’ll

other time in the history of the gallery.

do something with Bea Mandelman’s

Emi Ozawa I discovered in a survey

WPA stuff.”

of Albuquerque artists that Andrew

A UNM graduate in art and art history,

Connors did—local artist, Japanese

Levy owned the Silver Sunbeam antique

American, paper. We were thrilled to

store in the 1970s and ’80s, named

buy [that piece] from Emi and show it in

after an 1890s photographic manual.

Unfolding Tradition.”

He frequented the Fourth Street Flea

“Richard’s collections have

Market, where he purchased Works

astonishing diversity,” says Connors.

personal—they depict the family dogs;

Progress Administration photographs

“There’s a really eclectic spirit in his

Biddeford Pool, Maine, where his family

and art nouveau lithographs for very

collecting. He shows very cutting-edge

spends summers; and the Isotopes—

little money. He knew he was on the

contemporary work at the gallery, and

he was not willing to part with them.

right track as a collector when the

yet his personal collections range from

Instead, he made one specifically for the

curator of the UNM Art Museum visited

popular culture to prints, to folk art, to

Museum. It took two years.

the store to see what he had. Later Levy

paintings and sculpture. His personal

went to work for Beatrice Mandelman

enthusiasm is all over the map, yet

will have a home is a driving motivation.

as an archivist. “In cataloging her

consistently imaginative.”

“He’s really thinking about the future

paintings, we came across these prints,

Connors saw one of Levy’s hooked

Knowing that work Levy has collected

of the objects, that they do have a life,”

and every now and then we’d come

rugs in a show at 516 Arts and asked

says Connors. “Richard is making sure

across another. Every time I went there,

if the Museum could acquire it, but

that they are placed so they help the

I’d find a few more,” Levy says. “She

because Levy’s rug works are highly

community.”

AlbuquerqueMuseumFoundation.org

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ALL PHOTOS BY SUZANNA FINLEY

Celebrating Heritage CASA SAN YSIDRO OFFERS SLATE OF LECTURES AND CLASSES. THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER, Casa San Ysidro:

own ancestor was a presidio soldier in the territory of New

also be about Bernardo de

recognized political border.

The Gutiérrez/Minge House

Spain, will discuss his family’s

Galvez, a soldier during the

A behind-the-scenes tour of

will host events highlighting

legacy and how the citizens

American Revolution, who in

Casa San Ysidro’s artifacts from

New Mexico’s cultural heritage.

of the territory, no matter

2014 became only the eighth

the early twentieth century

The first event, Celebrating

their financial circumstances,

person to receive honorary

when the Territory of New

Statehood, features lectures

donated money to the

American citizenship along

Spain became the State of New

by New Mexico historians on

rebel cause.

with Winston Churchill,

Mexico will also be offered.

Saturday, July 13. Jim Harris,

“My [great, great] grandfather

Garcia’s presentation will

William Penn, and Saint Teresa.

Texas and New Mexico into a

During summer and fall

director of the Lea County

was born in Corrales in 1757,

Museum, will discuss how

and when the American

was a hero to the Americans

exploring New Mexico’s

statehood and the oil boom

Revolution broke out, Spain

in the War of Independence. If

heritage. In the Basic

dramatically changed the

declared itself an ally of the

it hadn’t been for that victory

Blacksmithing class run by

economics and demographics

United States. Everyone

we would be part of the British

UNM Continuing Education,

of New Mexico’s southeastern

in Corrales was asked to

Empire and there would be no

artist-blacksmith Dave Sabo

region. Historian George

contribute two pesos to the

New Mexico,” Garcia says.

introduces skills in heating and

C. Garcia specializes in the

cause. Back then a peso was

little-known lore of Spanish

worth about thirty dollars, which

will feature a discussion of

both useful and beautiful. The

contributions to the American

was more than a lot of people

the process of transforming

Introduction to Homesteading

Revolution. Garcia, whose

had, but everyone gave.”

the imaginary line dividing

series, taught by Rachel Hillier

8

SUMMER 2019

Art. History. People.

“Galvez was a Spaniard who

Celebrating Statehood also

visitors can also take classes

forging metal to make objects


OPPOSITE: Dave Sabo introduces basic blacksmithing. THIS PAGE: Harvest Festival happenings include crafts,

traditional foods, hands-on spinning classes, and many vendors selling modern takes on traditional arts.

of Little Dirt Farms in Corrales, celebrates traditional foods

($10 fee, register in advance) Fiber artists Myra

and sustainable farming

Chang Thompson, Carla

methods of the Southwest.

Wackenheim, and Emily Stovel

patterns for jerga (a coarsely

can enjoy free demonstrations

Each session comprises a

teach a series of hands-

woven mat or item of clothing)

in spinning and weaving,

lecture followed by hands-on

on heritage spinning and

and colcha (a decorative fabric

blacksmithing, horno bread-

activities. The July 27 class

weaving workshops. On July

often used as a bedspread).

baking, crafts, music and

focuses on the time-honored

27, students will learn how to

On September 28 and

traditions of fermenting,

make yarns using a spinning

29, Casa San Ysidro, in

plenty of activities for kids.

canning, freezing, and drying,

wheel. The August 24 class

collaboration with the Village

Visitors will also be able to

and the August 10 class

will include a demonstration

of Corrales, puts on its annual

support local artisans and

explores planting fall crops.

of table looms and traditional

Harvest Festival. The public

food vendors.

dance performances, and

AlbuquerqueMuseumFoundation.org

9


A New Garden

ERIC J. KELLER/SOULCATCHER STUDIO

Acoma Ancestral Lands Farm Corp, Archival Pigment Print, Triptych, 168” x 192,” 2019

A GARDEN: THE BIRDS ARRIVE is an earthwork

farmed the river valley. The

and experimental garden

in a history of many-species

located on the north side of

relations centered on food and

the Albuquerque Museum on

agriculture that does not exist

view through September 22,

there anymore. Currently, the

2019. Created in conjunction

surrounding land has been

with the SeedBroadcast

developed into museums,

DIALOGUE AROUND GLOBAL WARMING,

exhibition Seed: Climate

parks, a diverse suburban

local food, healthy communities, and the

Change Resilience, this project

community, industry, tourist

revitalization of bioregional indigenous agri-cultural

is a collaborative installation

shops, and restaurants.

practices are the themes of Seed: Climate Change

conceived and created by

ground underfoot was buried

The garden was seeded

A Resilient Relationship Resilience, an exhibition at the Museum through

University of New Mexico Land

with a winter cover crop of

September 22. The conversation turns musical with

Arts of the American West

Middle Eastern and Southwest

Chatter’s tenth annual August concert series.

artists and art and ecology

Asian heritage grains. After

students who call themselves

the winter grains are removed,

and explore nature, the seasons, and life’s

7th Regen.

amaranth—one of the oldest

questions and challenges. Classics from Bach and

grains in the Americas—will be

Mahler alternate with modern masterpieces and a

through compacted layers

planted with great intention

world premiere.

of geology, gravel, soil, clay,

and ceremony. The resurgence

and trash, the artists learned

in heritage grains is based on

Rises,” a piece for string quartet by contemporary

that the land under and

several factors, including the

American composer John Luther Adams.

surrounding the Museum

biodiversity they engender,

Comprising one monolithic musical image

building used to be one of

their ability to survive in

undergoing constant, gradual evolution, this

the largest vegetable truck

challenging environmental

music will expand and alter listeners’ sense of time

farms in the region. Prior to

conditions, and the quality of

and space.

this, the area was home to

nutrition they offer.

During the excavation and

many indigenous people and later, colonial settlers who 10

SUMMER 2019

Adapted from an article in SeedBroadcast Journal by Jeanette Hart-Mann.

Art. History. People.

The concerts share music from across centuries

The first concert features “Everything That

Pianist Judith Gordon returns to Albuquerque to play Bach’s “Goldberg Variations” for the second concert. Complex structures and relationships are


Donating

I

Albuquerque Museum Foundation in their estate plans. Ed and Virginia’s generous gift will ensure access for future generations to the community enrichment, quality programming, and world-class art featured at the Museum. Since Ed and

Flutist Jesse Tatum in last summer’s Chatter program, where she went by the alias FluTeBot.

LEAVE A LEGACY WITH AM SOCIETY

Virginia became members

The aM Society honors

featured prominently in

those who have chosen to

their lives, and has provided

generously commit to the

meaningful and continued

future of the Albuquerque

engagement.

in 2005, the Museum has

Museum by including the

“No matter the season, a trip

Albuquerque Museum

to the Albuquerque Museum

Foundation in their

is for us like a mini-vacation,”

estate plans. Giving from

say the Fultzes. “A leisurely

generation to generation is

stroll through the galleries and

one of the most meaningful

changing exhibits is always

tempered by Bach’s human qualities which stir the

and significant ways

a special outing followed by

passions and feed the soul.

philanthropic-minded people

discussion during lunch or a

can leave a lasting legacy.

snack in the Museum café. The

The third concert explores Arnold Schoenberg’s adaptation of Mahler’s “Das Lied von der Erde.” It’s

It is important to specifically

been adapted for chamber orchestra and features

list the Albuquerque Museum

vocal soloists singing texts based on ancient

Foundation in your will so

Chinese poetry. It explores the themes of youth,

that your gift may be properly

the seasons, loss, and change.

managed and acknowledged,

The final concert brings a world premiere from

and your wishes honored. If

Portland-based composer Ryan Francis. In the

you are interested in joining

piece Chatter commissioned, “Voynich Transcripts:

the aM Society or want

The Search for Lost Knowledge,” Francis draws

information about estate

inspiration from a fifteenth century codex, the

giving, please call or email

Voynich Manuscript, which features detailed

Emily Blaugrund Fox at

drawings of botany, astronomy, and biology. “Things

505.338.8738 or ebfox@

can be lost, and are being lost,” Francis says. “How

albuquerquemuseum.org.

much knowledge will be lost due to climate change? How many species of plants are going to be lost,

A GIFT FOR THE FUTURE

and what diseases would they have cured?” Francis’s

This spring, Ed and Virginia

compositional style looks forward, even as he asks

Fultz reached out to aM

listeners to reflect on the wisdom of the past, much

Foundation staff with an

of which is waiting to be rediscovered.

intention to include the

Museum is a treasure, rather like a valued friend.”

Per current IRS policy, distributions made from Donor-Advised Funds or Family Foundations may not be used to fulfill a pledge or Patrons’ Circle Membership that would result in a personal benefit to a donor or a member of donor’s family (e.g. tickets to events, dinners, tables for events etc.) Please call if you have additional questions or need clarification.

AlbuquerqueMuseumFoundation.org

11


A Member

I

MEMORIALS AND TRIBUTES March 10 through June 5, 2019 IN HONOR OF JESSICA ABERLY Naomi Aberly

the event more approachable for firsttime collectors.” Jenna’s responsibilities include general fundraising activities, securing sponsorships, donor relationships, and the aM Society. She’ll also be involved with other, more established programs, such as Magic Bus. “I’m thrilled to be part of the team at aMF, advocating for a Museum that has featured so prominently in my life,” she says.

NEW DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE Albuquerque Museum Foundation’s new Development Associate, Jenna Kloeppel, has a background in art history. Her career so far has included corporate art sales and fundraising, with the bulk of her working years spent at Gerald Peters Gallery/Santa Fe Art Auction. Born and raised in Albuquerque, Jenna participated in education programs at the Albuquerque Museum. Outside her work at the Foundation, you can see Jenna perform as a soprano in the New Mexico Symphonic Chorus, where she has been a featured soloist. “I’m excited to get more people involved

ARTSTHRIVE EVENTS AT A GLANCE October 17: Collectors’ Dinner October 19: Morning Artist Preview and Opening Gala December 8: Members’ Champagne Reception More information to follow

and recruiting more young professionals to come to events and become art collectors. We have some great ideas that we will be putting into place at ArtsThrive. We want to make 12

SUMMER 2019

Art. History. People.

IN MEMORY OF BARBARA ELLIS Laurie and Thomas Barrow IN HONOR OF ORLANDO LUCERO Barbara Krzyczkowska and Massimo Prati MAGIC BUS IN MEMORY OF FRANK LOVE Judy Love IN MEMORY OF RUTH SCHULTZ Nancy Augustus Bronnie and Alan Blaugrund Nancy and Cliff Blaugrund Peg and Dick Cronin Gale Doyel and Gary Moore Ethel Garcia Mary Herring Judy Jones David B. Martinez Alex Montgomery and Sandra Kruzich Janet Moses Joanna and Livingston Parsons Georgia Will and Charles Purcell Kathleen Reyes Rodey, Dickason, Sloan, Akin & Robb, PA Sidney Schultz Louise Campbell-Tolber and Steven Tolber Marjorie Wallace Julie Ward-Wylie Joyce and Alan Weitzel Marion Woodham The Weinstein Girls: Jane, Barbara and Margie The Albuquerque Museum Foundation

in the Foundation. One project I’m excited about is aM Contemporaries

IN MEMORY OF GARO ANTREASIAN Laurie and Thomas Barrow

Contact the Albuquerque Museum Foundation for more information about Artsthrive 505.842.0111

makes every effort to record and acknowledge our donors accurately and appropriately. Please contact the AMF offices at 505.842.0111 if you notice incorrect information. Thank you.


MUSEUM STORE

EMBROIDERY KIT In conjunction with the Courage and Compassion exhibition, a great summer vacation/road trip project. Sashiko Kits, 6 southwest designs $21.95

TABLET COVER Very hip aesthetic for the tech set. 3 tablet and 2 laptop sizes Prices range from $54.95 to $94.95

FARMERS MARKET COOKBOOK Farm Fresh Journey: Santa Fe Farmers Market Cookbook, $45

GAME NIGHT Keep the whole family entertained on a hot summer night with this fun, fast-paced game. $14.95

AlbuquerqueMuseumFoundation.org

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NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID ALBUQUERQUE, NM PERMIT NO. 446

ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM FOUNDATION P.O. BOX 7006 ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87194

Front Cover Edward H. Kemp. Burros Loaded with Firewood in Front of Palace of the Governors, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1920–30. NMHM/POG Photo Archives, LS.1627

COMING SOON TO THE ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM THE JIM HENSON EXHIBITION: IMAGINATION UNLIMITED November 23, 2019 to April 19, 2020 The Jim Henson Exhibition: Imagination Unlimited explores Jim Henson’s groundbreaking work in film and television and his transformative impact on popular culture. This comprehensive exhibition reveals how Henson and his team of builders, performers, and writers brought to life the enduringly popular worlds of The Muppet Show, Sesame Street, Fraggle Rock, The Dark Crystal, Labyrinth, and much more. It also includes material from Henson’s experimental film projects and his early work, presenting him as a restlessly creative performer, filmmaker, and technical innovator. An exhibition organized by Museum of the Moving Image and toured worldwide by Flying Fish.

Jim Henson and Kermit the Frog on the set of The Muppet Movie.

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Albuquerque Museum Foundation Magazine Summer 2019  

Albuquerque Museum Foundation Magazine Summer 2019