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The magazine of the Albuquerque Museum Foundation — Spring 2019

Japanese Community | Palace of the Governors Rediscovered | New Curator


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ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM FOUNDATION PO Box 7006, Albuquerque, NM 87194 505.842.0111 ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM 2000 Mountain Road NW in Old Town 505.243.7255, 311 Relay NM or 711 Tuesday–Sunday, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Third Thursday of each month open until 8:30 p.m. Closed Mondays and holidays

DOCENT IMPACT AND SERVICE The Albuquerque Museum Foundation funds the training, materials, and support for the Albuquerque Museum Docent program. Docent volunteers are an integral part of the Museum’s education program and the hours of service they give in a year make these programs possible.

177

13,222

THE MUSEUM STORE 505.242.0434

NUMBER OF DOCENTS

TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS DEDICATED TO TRAINING AND TOURING IN A YEAR

CASA SAN YSIDRO The Gutiérrez/Minge House 973 Old Church Road, Corrales, NM 87048 505.898.3915

400

SLATE AT THE MUSEUM 505.243.2220 Breakfast and lunch: Tuesday–Sunday, 10 a.m.–2:30 p.m. Snacks, coffee, drinks, & pastries until 3 p.m. MAGAZINE EDITORIAL AND DESIGN E-Squared Editorial Services Emily Esterson, Editor Glenna Stocks, Art Director Ashley M. Biggers, Associate Editor Michelle Frank, Designer

Maria Griego-Raby, President

Stephanie Del Campo

Marney Hupper, Vice-President

Pamela Hurd-Knief

Dean Willingham, Treasurer

BJ Jones

473.5 AT CASA SAN YSIDRO

94

TOTAL NUMBER OF GUIDED TOURS PROVIDED

AT ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM

379.5

23,657 NUMBER OF PEOPLE REACHED THROUGH TOURS

TRAINING TIME

64

11,063

CLASSROOM HOURS

NUMBER OF STUDENTS REACHED

(PLUS LOTS OF HOURS OF HOMEWORK!)

CULTURAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT CITY OF ALBUQUERQUE Tim Keller, Mayor ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2018–19

TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS SPENT GIVING TOURS

LONGEST SERVING NUMBER OF YEARS

42 YEARS, BY DOCENT RENATE MANZ

Catherine Goldberg Mark Joiner

In This Issue:

Patricia Hancock, Secretary

Judy Jones

Deborah Good, Past-President

Joni Pierce

Elizabeth Allbright

Scott Schaffer

Perry Bendicksen

Judith Suiter

Alan Blaugrund

Corinne Thevenet

Interpreting Tradition........................................................................................................... 7

Emily Blaugrund Fox, Executive Director

Gerard (Roddy) Thomson, Jr.

Collecting Current History.................................................................................................. 8

Thomas Blueher

Kenton Van Harten

Andrew Connors, Museum Director

Alfred Volden

New Curator........................................................................................................................ 10

Margaret (Peg) Cronin

Tracey Weisberg

Patricia Kurz Tiffany Roach Martin

Jason Weaks

ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM BOARD OF TRUSTEES Judith Suiter, Chair

Maria Griego-Raby, AM Foundation

Hal Behl

Joni M. Palmer, PhD

Beverly Bendicksen

Pamela Weese

Wayne G. Chew

Alan Weitzel

Rediscover the Past.............................................................................................................. 2 Planting a SEED.................................................................................................................... 4 Lasting Marks........................................................................................................................ 6

Slaney Retires...................................................................................................................... 11 I aM a Member!.................................................................................................................. 12 I aM Giving.......................................................................................................................... 13

V I S I T U S AT:

AlbuquerqueMuseum.org


A PAST REDISCOVERED

Rediscover the Past

The Palace of the Governors collections come to Albuquerque.

S

ET ON THE SANTA FE PLAZA,

A Past Rediscovered: Highlights from

the Palace of the Governors

the Palace of the Governors exhibits

was originally constructed in

some of the rare, unusual, and seldom-

the early seventeenth century

seen items from these collections.

as Spain’s seat of government. The Palace

The seed for the exhibition and its

is the oldest surviving public building

catalogue, New Mexico’s Palace of

European settlers constructed in the

the Governors: Highlights from the

continental United States—making it a gem

Collections, was planted several years

in itself. Today, it anchors the New Mexico

ago when staff from the New Mexico

History Museum campus, which holds a

History Museum and the Albuquerque

16,000-object collection, as well as more

Museum met to discuss the idea of an

than a million images in its photo archives.

exhibition highlighting the collections of the History Museum and the Palace of the Governors. Seizing the opportunity to share the history and material culture of our state’s history museum with Albuquerque, the museums relied on a wide

TOP: Jeremiah Gurney & Son, Little Robe, Cheyenne, 1871. Photograph. Palace of the Governors.

array of staff and other experts, all of

ABOVE: William Workman, ca. 1855.

Daguerrotype. Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA), 13492.

whom brought their particular areas of knowledge into ABOVE: Eadweard Muybridge, Animal Locomotion, Plate 7642, ca. 1872 –1885. Calotype. Palace of the Governors. Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA), 188657

2

SPRING 2019

Art. History. People.

play to develop an extraordinary


A PAST REDISCOVERED LEFT: Gustave Baumann, Rain in the

Mountains, 1926. Palace Press. BELOW: Bernadino Polo, Our Lady of Joys, 1700. New Mexico History Museum.

ON VIEW

MAY 11–OCTOBER 20, 2019 Member opening for A Past Rediscovered May 10, 5:30–8 p.m. Exhibition preview and reception with light refreshments and a cash bar.

COMING SOON

exhibition highlighting rarely seen

several cased images for the exhibition.

historical collections.

Because of their fragile nature, they’re

The curatorial team has enumerated

rarely shown. Many of the images date

more than 300 of the best objects from

nearly to the dawn of photography. One

the Palace’s collection to tell the story of

is a daguerreotype of William Workman

New Mexico—though the curators took

dating to 1855, a Taos mountain man

different viewpoints on what constituted

known for fur trading and bootlegging.

the best. With some objects, the choice

Other objects are less splashy but just

was clear. That was the case with

as meaningful. The exhibition will feature

Segesser II, a hide painting and a rare

a letter from a Japanese American who

example of the earliest known depictions

was interned in Santa Fe during World

of colonial life in the United States.

War II. Alicia Romero, New Mexico History

It depicts an ill-fated 1720 Spanish

Museum curator, chose a cigar box full of

expedition into present-day Nebraska.

rocks to accompany the letter. “I included

The hide, which is named for the Jesuit

it to demonstrate to our visitors more

priest Phillip von Segesser who acquired

of the life that went on in that camp. … I

it, has hung in the Palace previously, but

wanted to answer the question ‘how do

it has been stored away from damaging

you pass the time?’” she says.

light and weather for several years. At

The exhibition will also include

eighteen-feet-long and four-feet-wide,

colonial paintings in their original frames,

it’s a feat to transport it from Santa Fe to

Mescalero Apache moccasins, and famed

exhibit it in Albuquerque.

printmaker Gustave Baumann’s carving

Daniel Kosharek, photo curator of the Palace of the Governors, selected

New Mexico’s Palace of the Governors: Highlights from the Collections, an exhibition catalogue created in partnership with the Albuquerque Museum, the Palace of the Governors, and Museum of New Mexico Press, will be available at the Museum store and other fine bookstores summer 2019.

tools, to name a few of the items telling the story of New Mexico.

AlbuquerqueMuseum.org

3


SEEDS OF CLIMATE CHANGE

T

Mixed-media exhibition grows agricultural wisdom. HE ANCIENT PRACTICE OF

change, and share this with the public.

in which they work, the ecology of their

AGRICULTURE is getting

SeedBroadcast began nine years ago

lands, the cyclical nature of agriculture,

a contemporary artistic

and is led by artists Jeanette Hart-Mann,

and the overarching changes happening

treatment through the fusion

Chrissie Orr, and Ruben Olguin. They

as a result of global warming. The

of creative-community collaboration,

intend to uplift the culture in agri-culture

exhibition highlights traditional and

installation, digital media, and

through inciting creative dialogue and

sustainable farming practices in three

performance in SEED: Climate Change

action. Two years of work with New

different communities, including

Resilience, a new exhibition opening at

Mexico farmers and the public led up to

young farmers from Acoma Pueblo, an

Albuquerque Museum.

the exhibition.

indigenous community organization

The exhibition is part of an

A series of large-scale photo collages

in Española creating a “healing oasis,”

ongoing effort by the artist collective,

is central to SEED. The photos express

and a northern New Mexico farmer

SeedBroadcast, to explore bioregional

the complex interactions between

dedicated to growing resilient open-

arid-land agriculture and climate

farmers, the specific cultural practices

pollinated seeds. It also includes a

4

SPRING 2019

Art. History. People.

SEEDBROADCAST 2016

Planting a SEED


SEEDS OF CLIMATE CHANGE

MUSEUM MEMBER DEALS Simply present your membership card to the cashier.

AP R IL FREE ICED TEA

WITH PURCHASE OF AN ENTREE

M AY BUY ONE PASTRY AND GET ONE

OF EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE FREE

JUNE ADD A SHOT!

BUY ANY ESPRESSO DRINK AND ADD A SHOT FOR FREE. SEEDBROADCAST 2016

SEED: Climate Change Resilience, explores bioregional arid-land agriculture and climate change, in partnership with the Acoma Ancestral Lands Program and Farm Corp.

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sculptural installation of “Seed Stories,”

to participate. For SeedBroadcast, the

several textual wall pieces, and a

participatory and collaborative aspect

participatory space resembling the

of this exhibition is critical, along with

SeedBroadcast’s traveling Mobile Seed

acknowledging that “project partners

Story Broadcasting Station.

and collaborators are as much the

SeedBroadcast and their partners will present events during the exhibition

animators and creators of this work as we are.”

such as a Seed Slam performance featuring Albuquerque’s Poet Laureate, Michelle Otero, and an outdoor earthwork garden growing seasonal heritage plants. Film screenings, a

ON VIEW: JUNE 22–

seed exchange, panel discussions with

SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

farmers from regional communities

2000 MOUNTAIN ROAD NW

SEED: Climate Change Resilience

ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87104

and pueblos, and several hands-on workshops will offer visitors a chance

Located inside the Albuquerque Museum

505-243-2220

www.slatestreetcafe.com AlbuquerqueMuseum.org

5


COMMUNIT Y LEGACY

LEFT: After World War II, Roy Nakayama

(nicknamed “Dr. Chile”) earned his Ph.D in plant pathology. He was professor and researcher in agriculture and horticulture at New Mexico State University for 32 years and introduced two new varieties of chiles, the NuMex Big Jim and the NuMex R Naky.

men, women, and children in difficult conditions. New Mexico had four such confinement camps. The upcoming exhibition, Courage and Compassion: Our Shared Story of the Japanese American World War II Experience, chronicles the attack on Pearl Harbor through the incarceration of Japanese Americans, and the postwar fight for redress. Courage and Compassion has travelled nationally while highlighting local stories at each location. Albuquerque is the tenth stop. Organized by Go for Broke National Education Center (GFBNEC) with funding in part by a grant from the National Park Service, Courage and Compassion runs from June

NIKKI NOJIMA LOUIS

1 through November 3 in the William A. + Loretta Barrett Keleher Community History Gallery. The community-curated part of the exhibition focuses on the formation and

Lasting Marks Albuquerque’s Japanese American community legacy ON VIEW:

JUNE 1–NOVEMBER 3, 2019 Courage and Compassion: Our Shared Story of the Japanese American World War II Experience

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Art. History. People.

T

development of the Albuquerque Nisei Club, from its inception in 1947 as a social club to its current iteration as the New Mexico chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL), a cultural and civil rights organization. Through photographs, artifacts and personal belongings from camp prisoners, visitors will learn how Japanese families in Albuquerque and

HE INCARCERATION OF MORE THAN 100,000

surrounding communities weathered the storm of war, and about the heroism of

JAPANESE AMERICANS

those white, Native American, and Latino

(many of them U.S. citizens)

individuals who stood by their Japanese

during World War II left an indelible mark

friends and neighbors when it wasn’t

on the nation and on New Mexico. Prison

always popular to do so.

camps run by the U.S. War Relocation Authority isolated tens of thousands of

Community curator Nikki Nojima Louis, a playwright and head of JACL’s theater


LEFT: The Nakayama

NIKKI NOJIMA LOUIS

family pictured in Las Cruces. Roy Nakayama was born near El Paso to Japanese parents in 1923. He went on to serve in World War II and was captured at the Battle of the Bulge.

group, developed the local stories in the Keleher Gallery exhibition. Louis herself was interned with her mother and siblings in an Idaho camp. “I really tried to capture the environment at the time, not just with the Asian community but in general. That generation was very stoic … veterans would come home shell-shocked (now called PTSD) or damaged in some way and put their lives back together,” Louis said.

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: Hiroshi Miyamura was born and raised in Gallup, New Mexico, and later became one of the city’s best known residents.

Interpreting Tradition Casa San Ysidro offers slate of educational programs.

After the bombing of Pearl Harbor by the Japanese during World War II, Miyamura recalls how the

CASA SAN YSIDRO:

resource for research and

principal of his school told students not to blame

The Gutiérrez/Minge

a gathering place for the

their Japanese classmates for what had happened.

House opened for the

community,” says Aaron

Two months later, as Japanese

season in February with a

Gardner, site manager.

residents on the West Coast

new and comprehensive

were sent to internment

schedule of programs. The

of a nineteenth century

camps—and some towns and

Corrales-based satellite of

rancho, Casa San Ysidro’s

cities voluntarily incarcerated

the Albuquerque Museum

historic adobe, stone, and

their Japanese and Japanese

is filled with artifacts

log structures, originating

American residents—the town

from Spanish Colonial

from throughout New

of Gallup declared that they

and Territorial periods.

Mexico, are energized with

would stand by their Japanese

Programming at Casa

historic traditional arts

neighbors and not participate.

this spring focuses on the

and furnishing typical of

artisan skills appropriate

frontier life in New Mexico.

Korean War. During the Korean War he was taken

to the environment, and to

Its programs include the

prisoner while providing cover for his squad. For

Casa’s history. “We want to

Second Saturday workshops

these actions, President Eisenhower awarded him the

create a lot of opportunities

and talks.

Medal of Honor. Miyamura still lives in Gallup where

for people to get involved

he has a high school and an overpass named for him.

in Casa San Ysidro as a

Miyamura served in World War II and again in the

Revitalized in the style

(continued on page 9)

AlbuquerqueMuseum.org

7


CURRENT HISTORY

ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM PHOTO ARCHIVES

ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM PHOTO ARCHIVES

Debra Haaland and members of her campaign staff celebrate her election to the U.S. House of Representatives, November 6, 2018. Albuquerque Museum, gift of Deb Haaland for Congress. BOTTOM: President John F. Kennedy shakes the hands of supporters during a rally at UNM, 1960. Albuquerque Museum, gift of Zelda and Jerry Danziger.

Collecting Current History Museum archives include Haaland material. The accession of Haaland’s photograph

O

sitting back and waiting for pivot points

is part of the Museum’s commitment to

of history to become clear in retrospect,”

collect items that preserve the stories

Connors says. “However, by asking the

of Albuquerque and New Mexico for

campaign staff to collect objects before

NE OF THE Albuquerque

future generations. According to Museum

history was decided, we hoped to ensure

Museum’s recent acquisitions

Director Andrew Connors, once it became

that the Museum could talk about a national

is a photograph from

clear that Haaland was rising to the top of

event from an insider’s perspective.”

election night 2018, when

the slate, Albuquerque Museum curators

The Museum contacted the campaign,

Debra Haaland won New Mexico’s first

knew they needed to capture a moment

and, at that point, campaign organizers

congressional district. As one of the first two

in history when the first Native American

began to save items. “We didn’t just want

Native American women ever to be elected

woman might go to Congress. “Usually

to tell history from the front pages of

to Congress, Haaland is making history.

history museums feel more comfortable

national newspapers and screen shots

8

SPRING 2019

Art. History. People.


CURRENT HISTORY

ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM PHOTO ARCHIVES

On April 13, Russell Skowronek of Rio Grande

with community groups;

Valley Texas University, and

classes include heritage

Spanish Colonial historian

spinning and weaving,

Dr. Linda Tigges will discuss

and blacksmithing.

the Manila Galleon and El

An Introduction to

Camino Real—one of the

Homesteading series will

longest and oldest trade

teach people about water

routes in North America.

rights, acequia farming, and

Traditional carpentry is

Senator Pete Domenici stands with Evelyn and Nancy Merritt at the U.S. Senate, December 7, 1984. Albuquerque Museum, gift of Nancy Merritt.

Casa is also partnering

sustainability. Instructor

the subject of a session on

Rachel Hillier, of Little Dirt

June 13. Woodworker Mark

Farms, will lead sessions on

Parrish, an apprentice of

soil restoration, planting,

Pete Smith—a prominent

harvesting, and preserving

figure and carpenter who

food.

built and designed many Corrales homes—will

from national televised news,” Connors says. “We wanted

celebrate the craftsman’s

examples of the door hangers, postal mailers, and hand-

life, and discuss the items

annotated speeches that represent the immense labor and

at Casa that Parrish himself

constant refinement that lead to political victories.” After

helped restore.

VISIT cabq.gov/casasanysidro for a full schedule and class times.

the campaign was over, Museum Photo Archivist Jill Hartke received a box that included posters, t-shirts, door hangers, photos, and scripts from speeches and press conferences— all items the campaign had saved for the Museum. Along with the newly acquired Haaland campaign items, Museum archives include images of Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and William H. Taft speaking to crowds in Albuquerque, President Franklin D. Roosevelt with Mayor Clyde Tingley standing beside him, and President John F. Kennedy shaking hands at a rally at the University of New Mexico in 1960. The archive also includes an autographed photo of United States Senator Pete Domenici, the longest serving senator in New Mexico

PREVIOUS PAGE: During an event in partnership with Bridging Ages International, characters will interpret 1700s lifeways.

history, at the U.S. Capitol; and a photo of Senator Dennis Chavez, the first Hispanic man elected to the U.S. Senate, shaking the hand of a man riding a horse. Says Connors:

ABOVE: Presentations will highlight Casa's unique architecture and cultural heritage.

“Having such objects in our collection means that the Albuquerque Museum can tell history from a different

BELOW: Heritage Festival includes traditional foods.

perspective, a humane, humble, yet heroic perspective that can help us understand the importance of the actions of the Albuquerque electorate.” ethics demand objectivity—collecting history for history’s sake, to tell the stories of our city and its people to future generations.

SUZANNA FINLEY

While politics is ever-changing, museum curatorial

AlbuquerqueMuseum.org

9


New Curator Josie Lopez brings local and global knowledge to the Museum.

University, I presented my research on satire, caricature, and freedom of the press from the perspective of 19th-

JOSIE LOPEZ, PH.D, joined the Albuquerque Museum as curator of art in

century Mexico. At that time, the attack

December 2018. Her research and curatorial projects have included examining

on the French satirical magazine Charlie

art as a discursive agent in the political arena, the intersections of art and the

Hebdo took place and it occurred to me

environment, modern and contemporary Latin American art, 19th-century France,

that my art historical research had a direct

Spain and Mexico, Spanish art from El Greco to Goya, and the history of New

connection to what is happening today.

Mexican art.

At University of California at Berkeley, the academic approach in art history shaped my understanding that it is

Josie Lopez with UC Berkeley Professor Genaro Padilla and Albuquerque Museum Director Andrew Connors

important to have a broad knowledge of both art and history. It is my job to tell stories by interpreting the incredible objects in the Albuquerque Museum collections as well as the works that we bring from all over the world.

Q

WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR THE MUSEUM?

A

Collaboration, exchange, and conversation inform what I do. I

will think about how we tell the stories of our city and region within a larger context. We have a regionally specific identity but we are also connected globally. I will continue to develop relationships with other institutions in our state and beyond.

Q

WHAT EXPERIENCES WILL SHAPE YOUR WORK AT THE ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM?

Museum and influenced my sense

A

the Museum a special place to work.

of being able to contribute to the collaborative environment that makes

Q

YOU WERE ON AN ACADEMIC PATH, BUT PIVOTED TO MUSEUM WORK. WHY?

A

It is important that my work be relevant, accessible, and

Curating The Carved Line: Block

Experiences like curating at 516 ARTS

Printmaking in New Mexico and

and being the Eleanor Tufts fellow at

reaching broader audiences. In the

writing the accompanying book was a

Southern Methodist University reinforced

museum field, there is a convergence of

wonderful opportunity to get to work

my interest in being relevant in our

research, storytelling, and community

with the talented staff at the Albuquerque

time and place. At Southern Methodist

that I am drawn to.

10

SPRING 2019

Art. History. People.

collaborative. I am interested in


LEFT: Deb Slaney curated many exhibitions,

Slaney Retires Curator of history had an impact.

including the Route 66 exhibition (right). ABOVE: Radio artist Jules Allen in front of

the Firestone service building, ca. 1931. Photographer: Brooks Studio. Albuquerque Museum Photo Archives. Gift of Channell Graham, PA1978.151.327.

ALTHOUGH SOME PEOPLE CHANGE CAREERS multiple times

Rust, and Revival on the Mother Road,

catalogue, chronicling the Museum’s

which ran in 2016, told the story of

collection, took almost two decades.

in their lives, Deb Slaney has had only

the Mother Road through the eyes of

Casa San Ysidro now has a new strategic

one: museum professional. It was all she

migrants and African Americans, as well

vision that Slaney hopes will see it

ever wanted to do.

as the route’s early history as told by

into the future with more resources

Slaney retired in January from the

Hispano travelers. “I think we brought

for programs and collections. She

Albuquerque Museum after eighteen

a dimension of Route 66 the people

also worked to acquire items for the

years as curator of history. Slaney’s

didn’t expect, and that it also had a

permanent collection that fill gaps in the

curatorial philosophy can be seen in

serious side—and an aspect of diversity

Museum’s ability to present historical

the interactive, story-telling nature of

that made it unique.”

themes and narratives, including a

the Only in Albuquerque exhibition, in

Other notable exhibitions include

forty-seven-star flag, an early nineteenth-

the artifacts she acquired, and at Casa

Dreamscape Desperado: Billy the Kid;

century bulto of San Felipe de Neri, and

San Ysidro: The Gutiérrez/Minge House.

The Leekya Family: Master Carvers of

a Jemez black-on-white jar made around

Slaney curated or coordinated thirty-six

Zuni Pueblo; Hollywood Southwest,

the time of Diego de Vargas’ return to

exhibitions at the Museum.

and The Artistic Odyssey of Higinio

New Mexico after the Pueblo Revolt.

“My greatest joy is to create original

V. Gonzales, which she either curated

Although she’s leaving the Museum, it’s

research and make it visual,” she says.

herself or collaborated with guest

likely she won’t stray far from her career

Some of her proudest work stems from

curators to bring to life.

roots. Her retirement plan? She plans

telling stories through differing lenses. For example, Route 66: Radiance,

Some of Slaney’s projects have taken years to come to fruition. The history

to relax, research, write, and consult for museums around the Southwest.

AlbuquerqueMuseum.org

11


a Member!

I

FOUNDATION’S 29TH ANNUAL ARTSTHRIVE: ART EXHIBITION & BENEFIT

carefully select artists to represent a diverse range of subject matters, styles, and media.

ArtsThrive: Art Exhibition & Benefit is a

The artwork is for sale for the exhibition’s

seven-week juried art exhibition and

duration at the Museum Store and online.

fundraiser at the Albuquerque Museum

Sixty percent of the proceeds go to the artist,

hosted by the Albuquerque Museum

and forty percent benefit the Museum to

Foundation. It returns in 2019 for its 29th

help fund education and exhibitions.

consecutive year.

ARTSTHRIVE EVENTS AT A GLANCE

ArtsThrive is on display at the

ArtsThrive allows art collectors, art lovers, and artists to view local and

December 8, 2019, with opening weekend

national works of art, add to their own

events taking place October 17 and 19.

collections, and support the Albuquerque

Contact Norah Kissell at the Albuquerque

Museum Foundation and Museum. During

Museum Foundation for more information

the exhibition’s selection process, jurors

about ArtsThrive at 505.842.0111.

Join us for a cocktail party benefit

• Two complimentary cocktails • Cash bar • Delicious appetizers • DJ dance party

EVENT TICKETS • $65 EACH

“ALOHA MAUI” RAFFLE PRIZE PACKAGE

TO PURCHASE EVENT TICKETS

FOR TWO TO MAUI, HAWAII INCLUDES

albuquerquemuseum.org/shaken

Round trip airfare

Museum Store • 505.842.0111

5 nights Andaz Maui at Wailea Resort

All ticket sales are final and non-refundable.

Full daily breakfast

Ticket purchases (excluding raffle) are

• Hula performances and lessons • Fun interactive experiences • Prizes and more!

October 19: Morning Artist Preview and Opening Gala More information to follow

NEW MEXICO BANK & TRUST and Albuquerque Museum Foundation present

SATURDAY, APRIL 13 • 7-11 P.M. Albuquerque Museum

October 17: Collector’s Dinner

Albuquerque Museum from October 17 to

• The Feast at Mokapu Luau

deductible to the fullest extent of the law.

Raffle tickets 1 for $50 or 3 for $100

Guests must be 21 years or older to attend.

TO PURCHASE RAFFLE TICKETS

Cocktail attire with island flair.

albuquerquemuseum.org/raffle Museum Store • 505.842.0111

MAJOR SPONSOR

SUPPORTING SPONSOR

COMMUNITY SPONSORS

Winning ticket drawn at 9 p.m. during the Shaken, Not Stirred event. Need not be present to win. Raffle terms and conditions: albuquerquemuseum.org/raffle

12

SPRING 2019

Art. History. People.


I

Giving

LEAVE A LEGACY

organization with 2,400

Beginning July 1, 2019,

The aM Society honors

member households at

the Senior Member rate will

they were $60. Thank you for

those who have chosen to

all levels of participation.

be $50; previously it was

your important support each

commit to the future of the

Your annual membership

$40. General Memberships

and every year.

Albuquerque Museum by

provides wonderful benefits

including the Albuquerque

such as this magazine and

Museum Foundation in their

calendar; unlimited free

estate plans. Giving from

access to the Museum and

generation to generation is

Casa San Ysidro all year;

one of the most meaningful

invitations to exhibition

and significant ways people

opening receptions; and a

can leave a lasting legacy.

ten percent discount in the

will be $75; previously

Per current IRS policy, distributions made from donor-advised funds or family foundations may not be used to fulfill a pledge or Patrons’ Circle membership that would result in a personal benefit to a donor or a member of donor’s family (e.g. tickets to events, dinners, tables for events, etc.). Please call if you have additional questions or need clarification.

Museum Store. Your membership also provides vital, unrestricted Foundation support. The

MEMORIALS AND TRIBUTES December 10, 2018, through March 10, 2019

Foundation turns those gifts into education programs for children and families, docent education, third Thursdays programs, traveling and permanent It is important to list the

exhibition support, staff

Albuquerque Museum

development and salaries,

Foundation in your will

and communications and

and not the Albuquerque

public relations efforts for

Museum so that your gift

the Museum and Casa

may be properly managed

San Ysidro.

and acknowledged, and

The Foundation

your wishes honored. If you

and Museum have

are interested in joining

been experiencing

the aM Society or want

major cost increases in

information about estate

many operations and

giving, please call or email

programming areas. To

Emily Blaugrund Fox at

maintain the programs and

505.338.8738 or ebfox@

services for our members,

albuquerquemuseum.org

we now find it necessary to raise the cost of two of our

MEMBERSHIP DUES REFLECT RISING COSTS

membership levels. There

The Albuquerque Museum

small increase between

Foundation is a member

1999 and 2019.

has only been one other

IN HONOR OF BRONNIE BLAUGRUND’S BIRTHDAY Susan and Ian Lipsitch MAGIC BUS IN MEMORY OF SOLON ARTHUR ELLISON Jordan Ellison IN MEMORY OF LUCIA GONZALEZ Jodi Kimmelman IN HONOR OF JOSIE LOPEZ Mary Wommack and Jim Mackenzie IN MEMORY OF IRENE NAVARRE Elaine Richardson IN MEMORY OF BENITO SENA Renate Manz MAGIC BUS IN MEMORY OF ROSALIND ‘ROZ’ ZIMMERMAN Jory Bard Zimmerman The Albuquerque Museum Foundation makes every effort to record and acknowledge our donors accurately and appropriately. Please contact the AMF offices at 505.842.0111 if you notice incorrect information. Thank you.

AlbuquerqueMuseum.org

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NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID ALBUQUERQUE, NM PERMIT NO. 446

ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM FOUNDATION P.O. BOX 7006 ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87194

Front Cover Group of Five Men from Santa Fe Fire Department, ca. 1861-1880. Ambrotype. Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA), 145773.

MEMBERS: PLEASE JOIN US FOR THE

Albuquerque Museum Foundation

ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING LIGHT REFRESHMENTS FREE DRAWINGS (MUST BE PRESENT TO WIN)

LEARN ABOUT THE FOUNDATION’S DEVELOPMENTS AND PROJECTS OF THE PAST FISCAL YEAR.

Albuquerque Museum June 24, 2019 9:30 a.m. Ventana Salon No reservation necessary

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Albuquerque Museum Magazine Spring 2019