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BALLARD, WA

emily elizabeth nina

seabass publishing

PORT TO THE PNW


BALLARD, WA PORT TO THE PNW written and designed by emily elizabeth nina published by Seabass Publishing


©2019 Emily Elizabeth Nina. All photographs ©2019 by their respective owners. Illustrations and design by Emily Elizabeth Nina. The scanning, uploading, and distribution of this book without permission is a theft of the author’s intellectual property. If you would like permission to use material from the book, please contact permissions@seabasspublishing.com. Thank you for your support of the author’s rights.

Published by Seabass Publishing www.seabasspublishing.com 1000 Lenora St Seattle, WA Printed in the U.S.A. First Edition: March 2019 ISBN 123-4-567-89013-4


To the Scandinavian heritage of Ballard that established its foundation, the people that give it life and vibrancy, and the Duwamish land it sits on.


what’s inside


C O N T E N T S

HELLOS

02

BEGINNINGS

04

SEE

08

INDULGE

12

WANDER

16

REST

20

GOODBYES

24


meet ballard Situated just north of Seattle, Ballard is a

shopping, features a thriving farmer’s market,

neighborhood across the water from Interbay,

and boasts some of the trendiest restaurants

and is home to logging facilities, various

in the city. While nods to the neighborhood’s

breweries, a plethora of locally-owned shops,

Nordic roots are still present in its embracing

and perhaps most famously, the Hiram M.

of Nordic celebrations and sustained industrial

Chittenden (Ballard) locks.

economy, the Ballard we see today has come a long way. And it’s going even further. There

After spending the morning wandering above

are several new development projects

the locks and strolling the Nordic Museum,

happening around the area, and more new

Ballard slowly began to take shape in my

residential construction sites seem to be

mind. It first came to me in the form of a

appearing everywhere.

sleepy maritime town. As I made my way further north, Ballard came alive into a

Ballard’s average age is 34, making it a

hip, vibrant neighborhood rich with many

remarkably young neighborhood of Seattle.

possibilities of ways to fill the rest of the day.

This lends itself to a micro-culture teeming

Seattle’s laid-back, pacific northwest attitude

with quirky boutiques, local artisan creations,

makes its way upstream to this evolving port,

and authentic, intimate restaurants. Though

and the hygge-like feeling of comfort lives in

not many people are overnight guests in

peaceful cafes and cozy shops.

Ballard, there are a couple beautiful lodging options that perfectly encapsulate the

Though the neighborhood was originally a

neighborhood’s small-town charm and affinity

Scandinavian fishing and logging town (after

for curious treasures.

the Duwamish tribe’s inhabitance), that has since transformed. Today, the area is a hotspot for young city-dwellers to find unique local

02

INTRODUCTION

· E M I LY E L I Z A B E T H N I N A


STILLA

//

BALLARD: PORT TO THE PNW


04

beginnings


A

PA S T N O R D I C

Ballard is steeped in history. What began

a booming logging and fishing epicenter

as Duwamish land eventually turned into

after the gold rush, and it still holds on to its Scandinavian roots today. Between naming the town after a ship’s captain, and establishing a major thriving industrial port, Ballard quickly a place away from the city that celebrates its history, and never loses sight of the future.

Children look on at a boat passing through the Chittenden Locks during a memorial day celebration. Ca. 1919, courtesy MOHAI.


industrial roots

Wooden planks stack up beside

A man stands besides piles

a train track leading over a

of cut wood at an old logging

bridge at the Ballard Locks.

plant in Ballard, Washington.

Ca. 1919, courtesy MOHAI.

Ca. 1919, courtesy MOHAI.

06

BEGINNINGS


The land that we now call Ballard was originally inhabited by the Duwamish people. Settlers arrived from Scandinavia in the mid-1800’s. The arrival of these Nordic people slowly transformed the area from native land into a small fishing and logging town. The town grew steadily after the establishment of these industrial entities, until it officially became a city in 1890. The name Ballard comes from the captain William Rankin Ballard, who lent his name to the newly-verified city. Captain William Ballard was the captain of a Puget Sound stern-wheeler called the Zephyr. Once Ballard was settled, Scandinavian immigrants began pouring in. In order to sustain this new growing population and new families moving in, people of all backgrounds got to work establishing themselves as new merchants, workers, etc. Some worked as bakers, some as shoemakers, others as butchers, furniture makers, and more. Perhaps one of the most successful of these new merchants is Swedish immigrant John W. Nordstrom. After finally striking gold in Alaska, he returned to Seattle and opened a shoe store. Today, Nordstrom is one of the largest retailers in the United States.

Nordic people transformed the area into a fishing and logging town.

STILLA

//

BALLARD: PORT TO THE PNW


08

see


B E T O P L A C E S T H E

From panoramic ocean vistas, to lush gardens, complex waterways and more, Ballard provides stunning scenery and class outdoor PNW destinations that are sure to delight any visitor. Take a stroll along the locks, explore the endless greenery at the botanical gardens, or take a picnic to a park overlooking the ocean.

The sun sets behind the lighthouse at Golden Gardens Park, overlooking the water. Photo by Steven Reilly.


view

& do The best sights in Ballard all revolve around history and nature. The most notable of these is the Nordic Museum. Dedicated to collecting, preserving, and educating since its founding in 1980, the Nordic Museum is the largest museum in the United States to honor the legacy of immigrants from the five Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. For an outdoor excursion, head to the water. Golden Gardens Park was developed by Harry W. Treat in 1907 as an “attraction” for the new electric car lines being built to induce townfolk to take a “Sunday outing” through the woods to a picnic or swim at a beach. This park features wetlands, a loop trail, and restored the northern beach. Golden Gardens offers strolls along a rugged coastline, hikes through forest trails, sunbathing on sandy beaches, fishing from a pier and a boat launch consisting of 300’ of shoreline at south end of the park. Before the ship canal and the locks were finished, water moved through Lake Washington in about five years -- fairly slowly. After its lowering, however, water moved through the lake in about two years. The Ballard Locks were named after Hiram M. Chittenden, and are a perfect spot for a picnic to watch the boats pass through.

a tribute to ballard’s nordic history

10

SEE


Water moves swiftly across the surface of the Ballard Locks on a breezy day in Seattle. Boats wait in line to pass through the bridge at the Ballard Locks. Photos by @urbanjj and @nchiangpradit.

Visitors gather in the museum lobby for a cocktail party celebrating the opening of the museum. Photo by the Nordic Museum.

STILLA

//

BALLARD: PORT TO THE PNW


12

indulge


B I T E S B E S T T H E

Local dining spots consist of cozy, intimate interiors, and eccentric options for all appetites. The neighborhood’s proximity to the water and prominent maritime history make the perfect backdrop for enjoying a delicious seafood meal. By nodding toward the salty sea, and leaning against Seattle’s sleek cuisine culture, Ballard’s dining scene is a delightfully odd mix of hip and rustic.

Visitors snap a picture of their meal before enjoying a hearty lunch at Ballard’s Bastille. Photo by @beautydesoul.


full of flavor

a love for cafe culture

A glass bottle full of water sits on the counter of the bar of Bastille Bar, just before happy hour begins. Photo by Bastille.

14

INDULGE


Sunny days outside at Bastille consist of fruity wine, and antique bistro-style seating. Photo by Bastille.

Patrons laugh in conversation at the round bar at The Walrus and the Carpenter. Photo by the Walrus Bar.

The dining scene is Ballard is dominated by local, seafood-centered cafes and bars. A favorite among visitors is the Barcnacle Bar. The Barnacle Bar has a menu that changes daily. This means you never know what your options will be until you arrive, but they’re all sure to be delicious. With nautical undertones, and a focus on authentic, experimental f lavors, Barnacle is a spot that you can keep coming back to again and again, and never get bored. By the same owners as the Barnacle Bar, The Walrus and the Carpenter was opened in 2010, and features a changing menu with hearty, no-fuss deliciousness. The menu includes nods to the area’s nautical history, and the space feels like a mix of seaside, airy, and industrial, which makes it the perfect place to spend a late afternoon (and into the evening, if you’re so inclined). For the perfect place to spend a romantic evening or enjoy a long afternoon coffee, head to Bastille. The interior of Bastille is reminiscent of a Parisian sidewalk cafe, and holds several decorative objects that pay homage to this source of inspiration. In addition to the main dining area, Bastille features a rooftop garden, and a back bar; both of which are perfect for a romantic meal, or late night rendez-vous.

Friends chat before ordering a warm dinner at Barnacle Bar’s counter. Photo by The Barnacle Bar.

STILLA

//

BALLARD: PORT TO THE PNW


16

wander


S H O P S T H E S T R O L L

The unique shopping culture is perhaps what attracts most of Ballard’s visitors. You never know what lost treasures you might find at one of the area’s several curiosity shops, and there are plenty of locally-owned stores to support independent business. Between old staples Swansons Nursery and trendy new spots like Root Plants, all kinds of visitors will find a place to stroll and shop while wandering Ballard.

Wall shelves filled with unique stationary and home objects at local shop Lucca’s Great Finds. Photo by @spacingout.


stroll

& shop rooted in ballard

Several fiddle leaf plants in ceramic pots sit beside a worn leather couch against the back wall, where shoppers relax.

Wall shelves filled with small succulents and house plants and a large round mirror sit above potted f loor plants. Photos by Root Plants.

Shopping in Ballard is never boring This is

product is a must in Ballard. Open since 2000,

mostly due to the neighborhood’s plethora of

the Ballard Farmers Market is Seattle’s first

curiosity shops, and locally-owned boutiques.

year-round neighborhood farmers market

Root is a brand new plant shop, and the space

selling produce exclusively from Washington

features a soft leather couch, open shelving,

state farmers. Visitors can stroll through

and a wide selection of house plants and

multiple vendors of local produce.

small-batch pottery for sale. For the serious

18

WANDER

plant-lover, Swansons Nursery was created

As one of many quirky boutiques, Curtis

by August Swansons in Minnesota orginally,

Steiner is a small art gallery and boutique store

where he first went after coming to America

named after its owner. Customers can browse

from Sweden 1888. He and his wife Selma

the various art pieces for sale, admire a wall

eventually moved their store to Seattle, and

filled with illustrated greeting cards, or search

it’s been carried on for generations since.

for a unique piece for the home. The Curtis

The nursery has several European-style

Steiner storefront is often photographed for its

greenhouses, generous retail space, and is

whimsical window displays featuring art, and

home to a popular cafe. Locally-sourced

intriguing antique objects.


A woman displays her woven shopping basket filled with fresh greens and f lorals at the Ballard Farmer’s Market. Photo by Mia Tarte.

Various greeting cards are displayed on the front wall beside a cloth dress form. Photo by Curtis Steiner.

Plants fill the aisles in the large, lush greenhouse at Swansons Nursery. Photo by Swansons Nursery.

STILLA

//

BALLARD: PORT TO THE PNW


rest 20 00


G E T

S H U T- E Y E S O M E

For overnight accomodations in Ballard, one

boutique hotels. Situated perfectly between

has the choice between two beautiful

the bustling main streets, and quiet residential neighborhoods, both Hotel Ballard and The Ballard Inn offer luxurious stays. Spending the night here is the perfect getaway from city noise, with just the right amount of access and activity. Whether you stay for a long weekend, or pop in just for the night, there is no shortage of delightful accomodations in

The ornate mirror in a guest room ref lects the decadent headboard at the Ballard Inn. Photo courtesy of the Ballard Inn Seattle.

the historic neighborhood.


stay

awhile

A rose chandelier hangs from the cieling in the foyer of the Ballard Inn.

Sun shines into the foyer of the Ballard Inn, as cars pass outside the window on a bright Sunday morning.

An ornate lamp sits on a bedside table next to a decadent heaboard in one of the inn’s guest rooms. Photos courtesy of the Ballard Inn Seattle.

22

REST


old grandeur with modern comfort & ease First up for overnight stays is the Ballard Inn, a fully-restored early 1900’s building. With pre-Art Nouveau touches throughout, the inn’s decor marries old grandeur with modern comfort and ease. There are only 16 rooms at the Ballard Inn, so each one displays the careful attention to detail beautifully. The Ballard Inn is a boutique hotel, and offers guests a romantic setting for a night away across the water from Seattle. For another charming overnight option, the neighborhood offers iconic Hotel Ballard. Hotel Ballard is located in the heart of the historic main streets. With 29 beautifullydecorated rooms, guests enjoy clawfoot bathtubs, plush robes, and delicate touches of historic elegance. The building’s facade is reminiscent of a European inn, and feels just as cozy and luxurious inside.

The lobby of Hotel Ballard features a beautiful round seating arrangmenet beneath a glittering chandelier. Photo courtesy of Hotel Ballard.

STILLA

//

BALLARD: PORT TO THE PNW


24

goodbyes


PA R T W E W H E R E I S T H I S

As our journey through Ballard comes to a close, I’’d like to take this opportunity to thank you for coming along for the ride. Whether you’re a long-time local looking for a place to escape the hustle of the city, or a faraway dreamer planning your next destination, I invite you to put Ballard on your list. Its rich Nordic heritage and unique neighborhood vibe will transport you to a place between past and present during your visit, and you never know what you might discover around the lock’s next bend.

Boats rest in the water just south of Ballard’s Nordic Museum. Photo by Emily Nina.


26

FUTURE


see you in ballard Creating Stilla was the ultimate passion

a treat. I was also especially interested in

project. My love of typography, the Pacific

the way the neighborhood so proudly

Northwest, design, writing, photography, and

embraces its heritage, and enjoyed visiting

illustration all came together to produce this

the Nordic Museum to learn all about how

book. I am incredibly happy to have been able

Ballard came to be.

to work on a project that celebrates Seattle’s northern Scandinavian neighborhood in such

Nestled between city, ocean, and forest, it

a unique way.

is truly the perfect place to spend a day away from downtown. Until next time, you can find

Ballard is a wonderful place, filled with

me with a book and a picnic watching the

interesting people, delicious food, beautiful

boats go through the locks.

scenery, vibrant history, and charming streets. Spending time getting lost in the botanical gardens, wandering the local shops, and

¡ E M I LY E L I Z A B E T H N I N A

walking along the docks by the water was such

STILLA

//

BALLARD: PORT TO THE PNW


about The body text of Stilla is set in Miller Text, with headlines in Caslon Graphique, which is inspired by old “fatface� typography. Subtitles are set in Proxima Nova Condensed Bold. This book was written and designed by Emily Elizabeth Nina, a second-year design student at Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle, Washington. Her work can be found online at www.emilyedesign.com, and on Instagram @emilye.nina, or @emilye.design. All photographs are credited in their respective captions to the photographer. Stilla is printed and published by Seattle Publishing in Washington. Cover photo by Caleb George of the Puget Sound.

28

COLOPHON


NORDIC ROOTS MEET MODERN LIVING IN BALLARD, WASHINGTON

Ballard is synonymous with the ocean, and its industrial maritime history. This is why the name Stilla fit this book perfectly: the word Stilla means Pacific in the Swedish language. Ballard is nothing if not tied to the ocean. Its first inhabitants, the Duwamish tribe, integrated the nearby waters into everyday life. The first Nordic settlers came to the area by ship, crossing miles of sea to land where they did. Maritime and logging industries became the foundation of the local economy as Ballard was just beginning to establish itself. A seafaring way of life is ingrained in Ballard’s history, along with its Scandinavian roots. The name Stilla marries these two driving forces. This book will take you from Ballard’s beginnings, up to its present day culture. By highlighting the must-visit spots all around the neighborhood and embodying the spirit of Seattle’s immediate northern annex, Stilla acts as your visitor’s guide and need-toknow overview of this coastal region. In its pages, you will find all there is to discover about Ballard’s coming-of-age, best bites, where to stay, places to shop, sites to see, and more.

Seabass Publishing www.seabasspublishing.com 1000 Lenora St Seattle, WA

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Stilla  

A book on Ballard, Washington. Written and designed by Emily Elizabeth Nina. This project was created for my sophomore year type + image f...

Stilla  

A book on Ballard, Washington. Written and designed by Emily Elizabeth Nina. This project was created for my sophomore year type + image f...

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