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EMILY PEARSON

interior designer & creative

626.429.5626 www.epdesigns.org emily.br yce.pearson@gmail.com

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Meet Emily YWCA Syracuse United Nations World Expo Salt City Market Rebuilding Food Deserts through Urban Farming Photography

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MEET, EMILY PEARSON

Emily Pearson is a Los Angeles based designer with experience in interiors, graphics, photography, social strategy, & creative direction. ​ Emily received her undergraduate degree at Syracuse University in Environmental + Interior Design, B.F.A with hopes of eventually continuing her studies in Italy. At her University she has worked on collaborative projects with Syracuse’s Salt City Market, Syracuse’s Washington St. Partners,

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The YWCA Syracuse, & the United Nations World Expo. Throughout her studies, she has developed lifelong mentor ships and skills that will carry with her as she enters her work experience. ​ Outside of design, Emily has worked for many startups including WAYV, Home From College and at the Blackstone Launchpad. You can read more about Emily’s story to startups at www.epdesigns.org/about.


Emily believes that having strong empathy sets the foundation for any good design. She enjoys working on projects in which inclusivity and diversity are at the forefront of the concept. After working with the United Nations and several nonprofits, she enjoys the process of working with clients to understand the needs and wants of each project and then having the skills to bring it to life. Designer Lorinda Mamo once said, “Behind every great design, is an even better story.” Emily believes that any design project big, small, residential, or commercial has the opportunity

to transform lives. Without designers, our world would be vastly different and as a young designer, Emily is excited to be a part of it. In her pursuit of a new creative endeavor, she hopes to bring ambitious energy to the office. She enjoys collaborating with others and serves as a leader and listener to educate herself on the ins and outs of our world. If you are interested in working with Emily, you can reach her best by emailing emily.bryce.pearson@gmail.com.

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PROJECT YWCA Syracuse LOCATION 401 Douglas Street, Syracuse NY 13203

In partnership with Syracuse’s YWCA & Girls Inc., Syracuse University’s School of Design was asked to develop design ideas for a renovated office and recreation space at the YWCA. As a non profit, the YWCA is lacking funding to produce design concepts for a new space, so with the assistance of the SoD students, we came up with SP, SD, and CDs as conceptual ideas to bring to funding sources in order to complete their renovation. + 3 Environmental + Interior Design Students worked on this project

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Design Concept

It is imperative to have a space that is functional for not only the young girls, but for the employees as well. Through the use of flexible and adaptable design, the YWCA will be able to modify as time and circumstances change. Multi-functional space planning allows for distinct areas to be diverse yet still purposeful, while giving both the students and employees a proper environment to thrive.

The Zonta House

Founded in 1885, the YWCA aims to provide a safe, inviting space for young girls, where they can express their creativity and fuel their passions. Located in North Syracuse, this 20th century church is home to the YWCA community. Besides the addition of a gym and minor changes, the space has not been renovated since the 1980s. The building is in need of updated appliances, materials and space planning to create a space that fulfills the needs that the YWCA aims to achieve.

Goal

Create an organized foundation for students and staff to utilize flexible spaces for a variety of purposes, including professional areas, learning environments, and activity spaces, while enhancing both education and recreation.


Key Factors

Use furniture and design elements to create multi functional spaces Create a better work environment for the employees Incorporate YWCA branding colors to create a sense of identity Reprogram the space the ease the chaos between student and faculty areas Create a space students are eager to return to at the YWCA Make space functional and self sustainable for the foreseeable future Create a sense of professionalism to promote education

+ Full FF&E package available by request + Full CD set available by request

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Bengamin Moore Cedar Grove

Moodboard — Kid’s Areas

Lapalma Kipu | Anderssen & Voll 2014

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Smith System Interchange Diamond Desk


Moodboard — Office Areas

Sinetica A5 Desk

Lapalma Plus | Francesco Rota 2017

Bengamin Moore Gardenia AF-10

Lapalma Pass | Hee Welling 2012

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First Floor

The first floor acts as the main entrance to the YWCA Zonta House. After speaking with many users of the space, we concluded that the current layout lacks clear sight lines and directions when entering. Students do not have a place to put their belongings, the sound from the gym travels into the offices, and space is not used to its potential. Through the renovation, we decided to design a bigger entrance experience, a more functional layout, and a better divide between professional and play spaces.

Shared Spaces Employee’s Areas Kid’s Area

STORAGE

RECORDS

CLOSET

GYM

BATH

GYM

BATH

BATH LOBBY

GIRLS’ SERVICES

SCHOOL AGE SERVICES PPS

First Floor [Existing]

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CLINICAL COORDINATOR

ADMIN

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR

LOUNGE AREA

KIDS’ PLAY AREA

First Floor [Proposed]

MEETING RM 2

RECEPTION

OFFICE


KID’S PLAY AREA

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Basement

One of the main goals of the Zonta House renovation was to more efficiently divide the student and employee spaces. Through our research and many conversations, we found the basement would be best suited to be maintained by the students and their supervisors. The basement is currently very crowded with too many walls which is why we decided to open it more, creating designated spaces for activities rather than individual rooms. We also added a small kitchen for the students to maintain so there is less traffic upstairs to the main kitchen.

Shared Spaces Employee’s Areas Kid’s Area

ACTIVITY RM

LIBRARY

STORAGE

MEDIA RM.

OFFICE

KITCHEN

CLOSET

ART AREA

RECREATION RM.

LOCKERS

MECHANICAL RM.

STORAGE

P

E

R XIT

AM

P

R IT

BATH

AM

EX

PANTRY

READING NOOK

BATH STORAGE

ART RM. CURRICULUM RM.

BATH BATH

Basement [Existing]

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Basement [Proposed]


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Second Floor

The second floor will primarily be used by the employees and guests, using the offices or conference room. With the employees upstairs, they can work in a quieter space away from the students in the basement but still watch the students in the gym through glass windows. The kitchen also includes a second staircase as well as a barn door which can be closed if the YWCA ever hopes to rent that space out.

STORAGE + LAUNDRY

Shared Spaces Employee’s Areas Kid’s Area

BATH STORAGE + LAUNDRY BATH

PANTRY

CONFERENCE RM.

ACTIVITY RM.

MEETING RM 1 BATH

KITCHEN

Second Floor [Existing]

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STORAGE

OFFICES

STORAGE

KITCHEN

Second Floor [Proposed]


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Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

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1

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

3D View 9

3D View 9

No.

2

2

Description

3D View 10

3D View 10

Second Floor | Offices

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Basement | Media Room

3D View 13

Owner 3

3D View 13

Project Name Unnamed Project Number

www.autodesk.com/revit

Date

Projec Is

Drawn By Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Checked By

PERSPECT Scale

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

P

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

First Floor | Kid’s Play Area 1

3D View 9

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

18 2

3D View 10

Description

Date


Kid’s Play Area

Curriculum Area

Offices

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PROJECT United Nations World Expo 2020 in Dubai LOCATION Dubai, United Arab Emrites

Syracuse University’s School of Design was asked by the United Nations to conceptualize ideas for the World Expo 2020 in Dubai that would display the history of the United Nations and the role they play worldwide. Each team was comprised of Communications Designers, Environmental + Interior Designers, and Museum Studies Designers to work collaboratively on a concept. + All exhibitions were conceptualized and designed by a team of Communications Designers + The architecture of the museum space was built by a team of Environmental + Interior Designers

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193 United

As there are 193 nations in the United Nations, this exhibit will focus on the power and progress that occurs when people and countries are unified. The 193 members of the United Nations exist to: 1. Unite all people across the world as one human race 2. Prevent misinformation, hate, and wars to divide people 3. Develop solutions for humanity’s hurdles

We are taught the truth that the world improves over time with unity

3 1 We begin as one body

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2 Sources attempt to divide and disrupt our unity

We are shown the progressions that can be made when people unify


Progress

An exposition to unite all nations through means of problem-sol ving, creativity, & design thinking.

Division

Unity

An area to contemplate the negatives that arise when people are divided.

A showcase for the invisible threads and similarities that connect all humans

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Zone 1 includes stories and cultures from three different parts of the world, each with a message of inclusivity and different challenge for the audience members to familiarize themselves with the people around them.

Zone 3 aims to answer the question, How can we show the audience that the world is improving due to mass movements? It is an area for conflict to be solved by means of collaboration and innovation.

Exhibits in Zone 2 encompass the destruction our world faces when we are divided. We used both solid and glass panels to break up the audience, allowing them to follow their own path. Along the way, they will encounter relevant information on the topic of division. At the end of the exhibit, users have the opportunity to experience an AR truth wall that displays the peace and progress our world has made, despite it feeling divided.

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Circulation

The exhibit is meant to be traveled from Zone 1 to 3 in order to experience the full concept and story. The first zone acts as an introduction to the connections our world has with each other, greater than we might believe. As you enter Zone 2, the lighting gets darker and the walls get more crowded to exemplify the sources of division. As you complete your visit, you are to walk around the final screen to Zone 3, which has many small exhibits that can be viewed in any order.

Drop Ceiling

The drop ceiling is added to create a tighter and more crowded feeling as you enter Zone 2: the division.

Structure

One of the primary exhibitions of the exhibit is the 4 human needs: food, water, shelter, and fulfillment. Each are shown in Zone 1 with examples of these needs from countries around the world. They are carried through the exhibit through a structure that is lost in Zone 2 but is picked back up in Zone 3.

Installations

Throughout the entire museum, you are able to experience many exhibits within each zone. Some of them include Voices from around the world, a UN timeline, an AR eyeglass visual, an imagination board, historic speeches and more!

ZO N

E1

ZO N

E2

ZO N

E3

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Zone 1 An introduction to the exhibit & understanding of how our world is connected.

food

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water

shelter

ful – fill – ment


Zone 2 + 3 A visual experience as to what divides our nation and all of the progress we have made to unite each other.

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PROJECT Salt City Market LOCATION 484 S Salina St, Syracuse, NY 13202

Syracuse, NY is home to many refugee neighborhoods, all with their own unique story and history. The Salt City Market is a newly built market in the heart of Downtown Syracuse that aims to bring authentic foods from around the world to the market with 12 different vendors. On the corner of Onondaga and Clinton, the food hall has a large market space, parking lot, and outdoor dining experience. We were tasked to design a food cart that could be used by additional vendors in the summer and could be easily switched over to different occupants each month. The cart was to be designed and built by the Syracuse University Environmental + Interior Design team. + 3 individuals worked on this project [due to COVID-19 the cart is still waiting to be built]

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Design Concept When working with the owner of the Salt City Market, he had requested the cart be made at a low cost that includes storage and versatility. For our design, we designed to use a few wood crate sizes to be arranged as well as additional custom crates to act as the facade and storage space. We proposed a few design options including one with a fridge, an ice chest, a lifted display counter or a removable display piece. To easily switch out vendors we included a chalkboard below the awning for each to write their name. Several teams proposed their design for this project and our team wad chosen to be built.

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STORAGE OPTIONS

OPTION 2: a shelving cavity with one shelf and no bottom that allows for space to slide a minifridge into place, resting on the ground.

OPTION 3: a shelving cavity with two shelves for maximum storage capabilities.

OPTION A: a shelving cavity with two shelves for maximum storage capabilities.

OPTION B: a section of the counter top that lifts on a hinge and is then fitted with a display piece with a lip at the bottom to hold display items.

OPTION C: a flat counter top with an added display piece that sits on top of the counter. This piece can be moved around on the counter and can be stored in the shelves below.

COUNTER TOP OPTIONS

OPTION 1: a shelving cavity with two shelves with the bottom shelf supporting an ice chest with a bottom drain.

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Outdoor Canvas Fabric

3/4” Welded Steel Frame

1/2” Welded Steel Frame

Customizable Chalk Board

Wood Butcher Block

3/4” & 1/2” Welded Steel Frame

Metal Casters Custom Wood Crate (Optional) Refrigerator

Lazy Susan attachment for connection to other units

Custom Wood Crate

Wood Crates

Removable & store bought

Suggested Color Pallet 33


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PROJECT How Urban Farming Can Help Alleviate Food Scarcity & Rebuild Neighborhoods in Los Angeles County

Growing up in Los Angeles, I have witnessed the diversity in different neighborhoods, each with its own history, food, and background as well as access to basic resources. I have personally seen the gap that some Los Angeles natives face due to their geographical location creates food deserts with one of the largest counties in America.

LOCATION 421 N 19th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90031

For my senior capstone, I was enticed to create a solution for those facing food insecurity through sustainable farming methods, right in our own city. After intense research, I designed a large urban farm with an opportunity for education and recreation to provide greater access to nutritious foods for everyone.

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Rebuilding Food Deserts in Los Angeles County

Good nutrition is fundamental to maintaining good health & wellbeing. Although, healthy foods are limited to those who have access to it. According to the US Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service, about 23.5 million Americans live in a food desert, half of which are considered low income. Because of these statistics it is essential to understand the consequences scarce neighborhoods face due to socioeconomic factors. Historically, Los Angeles has experienced food scarcity based on economic status, ethnic background and geographical location since racial segregation in the mid-1900s. To this day, many communities in LA still experience food shortages and are unjustly living the consequences. The current response to food insecurity in Los Angeles includes small community gardens but doesn’t have the ability to reach the supply that is needed. Integrating urban farming practices such as vertical farming would provide opportunities for greater food access and educational initiatives to engage communities and improve food scarcity. The purpose of this design study is to examine the current response to food deserts in LA County by establishing a mix- used space for mass food production & wellness education for communities experiencing food scarcity. This project is place in a 5 story the abandoned jail near the LA River and Elysian Park. Through space planning, the project scope includes vertical farms along with recreational and educational opportunities in selected spaces.

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Historical review of food deserts in Los Angeles County, Britannica Los Angeles County has had a long history of food insecurity since the mid-1900s. Starting in the 1940s, Los Angeles’ population quickly rose after the Second Great Migration as African Americans from the South began to reach the west coast. During this time, Los Angeles put a lot of restrictions on housing, limiting minority groups to about 5% of the available land in LA, as 95% was considered off-limits. Racial segregation forced minority groups to settle in South East Los Angeles (Watts, Compton, Commerce, etc). These minority groups received little resources and attention from local government, lacking public transportation, proper schools and public funding. In 1965, during the Civil Rights Movement, there was an incident regarding police brutality as a police officer arrested a man for driving under the influence and eventually led to an aggressive conflict. Others joined in which eventually led to large scale rioting. Los Angeles, especially the neighborhoods of South East LA, were outraged by this event along with being fed up with their lack of public efforts which then started the Watts Riots. For multiple days, riots, looting and fires turned Los Angeles into a warzone. This effort was to bring attention to the police incident but also to recognize the lack of support these communities get to live a life that lives up to the surrounding neighborhoods. Following this incident, Los Angeles County set a goal to improve schools, employment, housing, etc. These goals were not met by the time the 92 Riots happened after a similar incident regarding police brutality. Los Angeles, again, had to rebuild a large portion of LA, which was incited by the South East LA neighborhoods they asked for more grocery stores. Again, those needs were not met which is why we still see a lack of access to grocery stores in neighborhoods across LA Country and food deserts still exist. Statistics on Food Security in Los Angeles County, Feeding America California as a while has a variety among countries of food insecurity. According to Feeding America, 11.4% of Los Angeles County is food insecure which is about 1.1 million people. California as a whole has over 4 million people facing food insecurity which means Los Angeles makes up about 25% of them. Of those people, 13% lie above the SNAP

(Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) poverty line and 84% below. Los Angeles County spends around $672,171,000 on their food budget each year in order to fulfill the needs of those facing food insecurity. The impact urban farming can have on food systems, Architecture Vertical farming in an urban setting has the potential to provide produce and green spaces in heat islands that statistically damage our earth as well as lack the ability to grow food nearby. Through methods such as rooftop gardens, green facades, community gardens and edible landscape, there is potential to implement more greenery and vegetation into largely established cities. Smaller community gardens can provide the opportunity to reconnect communities and increase biodiversity all while producing 2x the current production rate of farms. Community gardens aim for “creating community empowerment and taking back control of the food system. Instead of looking at urban farms as the solution to all of the problems we have in the food system...we should look at them as part of a larger solution.” Although urban farming is a great method for rebuilding neighborhoods and establishing community engagement, they require a large sum of money to maintain and keep in production. of farmers do not make a living from farming and as the cost of real estate in a city is much higher the construction of the space will be extremely expensive. Obtaining the budget to build the space and buying the technology to produce the amount of food needed can only come from donations that do not need investment back. Growing Vertically Can Make an Impact, Bowery Farm Horizontal farming, or regular farming as we know it, relies solely on the soil it is grown in as well as the weather conditions it can service in. Farms in rocky areas, have a less likely chance of surviving due to its bad conditions. Vertical farming however does not have these limitations as there are other methods such as hydroponically, aeroponically, and aquaponically which do not require soil. Instead, purified water can filter the water with nutrients to grow the plants. Another limitation to farming is temperature and light. With indoor vertical farming, that can all be controlled by a switch of a button. LED lights can replicate the sunlight to help the plants grow. With these lights, plants can grow faster as they can be “sunny” 24 hours a day.

+ Full literature review & precedent studies available by request

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Lincoln Heights Jail 421 N 19th Street, Los Angeles CA, 90031

This site was selected to challenge agricultural farming methods into an urban setting. The Lincoln Heights Jail is a five floor, 229,120 sq ft building with a vast amount of space for vertical farming. Located near the LA River and Elysian park, vertical farming methods can compliment this abandoned site with biophilic design elements. The site is also surrounded by a # sqft parking lot, a bike bath and multiple train stations. The scope of this project will include all 5 floors, excluding the basement, of the abandoned jail including the rooftop and the entire parking lot. Through space planning, there is potential for a high yield of farming through vertical farms along with recreational and educational opportunities in selected spaces.

Site Analysis Elysian Park

Dodger Stadium

Elysian Park

Lincoln Heights Jail Project Site

Lincoln Heights Jail Project Site Lincoln Heights

Lincoln/ Cypress Station 0.7 mile walk

Lincoln Heights Jail Project Site

Lincoln Heights Jail Project Site

Dodger Stadium

USC Keck Medical

Union Station (Central) 2.1 miles

Museum Row Staples Center 5.1 miles

Skid Row

Downtown Los Angeles

Project Site 421 N 19th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90031

Built Environment Residential Commercial

Vegetation LA River Green Spaces

Transportation By car By foot

The Lincoln Heights Jail was chosen due to its proximity to its needs. Located right outside of Downtown LA, 3 miles from skid row, and an easy walk from the Goldline, this site is very central to the County of Los Angeles. It is also located next to the LA River and Elysian Park creates an opportunity for this urban farm and green roof to connect with nature even further.

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Site Plan Los

Existing Building

Existing Building

Ang eles Rive r

Project Site

N 19 Ave

Sun Analysis Summer

Summer

Spring

Spring Summer Fall Spring

Summer Winter Spring Fall

Fall Winter

Winter

Fall Winter

12:00 PM | As the sun diagrams illustration, the shadows cast north into the building on the south side. This creates an opportunity for the vegetation on the left hand side to obtain more natural light. Also by opening up the core of the building as well as floors 4 & 5, more light can be brought in. Architectural Proposal

Surrounding Buildings

Indoor/Outdoor - open up 2 floors in a parking lot style to maximize light - mix artificial lighting and natural lighting for farming

Entrance - use parking lot in close proximity - avoid entrance at street level - use the 2nd Floor terrace as an opportunity for a grander entrance - prioritize 1st Floor for production

Building Core - allow light to enter from multiple angles - create a platform on each floor that enlarges the vertical farming - easy access to each floor

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Proposed Space Planning

The Lincoln Height Jail was originally designed with many spaces including jail cells, courtrooms, offices, and more that are not necessary for the farm. Here you will find how each space will be re-allocated.

Loading Dock

Food Storage Offices

Kitchen

Food Pickup

Offices

Drunk Tanks

Post Harvest Production Offices

Lounge Entrance

Court Rooms

FIRST FLOOR [EXISTING] Court Rooms usentenced prisoners bail office court room doctors exam records room public defender parol officer

Offices ward bookkeeping room fingerprint room receiving room

Drunk Tanks holding rooms

FIRST FLOOR [PROPOSED] Offices + Management conference rooms (2) office desks private offices Food Pickup distribution sections for a variety of produce

Lounge Furniture Post Harvest Production washing stations packaging organization Food Storage pre-distribution

Kitchen kitchen annex bakery pantry Entrance + Check in Terrace

Dormitory Lounge

Dormitory

Vertical Farming

Dormitory

Dormitory

Education

SECOND FLOOR [PROPOSED] Entrance + Check In indoor and outdoor entrance check in desk

SECOND FLOOR [EXISTING]

Lounge Furniture

Dormitory inmate cells (varying in size)

Farming peak into vertical farming Education Space test kitchen indoor gardens exhibits

Offices Dormitory

Bakery

Dormitory OPEN TO BELOW

Dormitory

THIRD FLOOR [EXISTING]

Dormitory inmate cells (varying in size) Bakery

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Dormitory

Vertical Farming

THIRD FLOOR [PROPOSED] Offices + Managment break room study the progression of the farming process prepare food for distribution

Farming 36 vertical farms


Inmate Cells

Recreation

Prosecution

Egress

Kitchen

Offices

Offices

Dormitory

Dormitory

Vertical Farming

Dormitory

Dormitory

FOURTH & FIFTH FLOOR [PROPOSED]

FOURTH FLOOR [EXISTING]

Offices + Managment break room study the progression of the farming process prepare food for distribution

Dormitory inmate cells (varying in size)

Farming 55 vertical farms

Dormitory

Recreation

Dormitory

Dormitory Recreational Gardens

FIFTH FLOOR [EXISTING] Recreation fighting rings Dormitory

ROOF [PROPOSED] Recreation rooftop garden seating furniture

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Welcome to Bounty Farm — home to over 1000 crops of produce as well as educational and recreational opportunities! Here you’ll find something for everyone! Alleviating Food Deserts in Los Angeles County, CA Implementing vertical farming methods in Los Angeles County is a potential solution for those facing food insecurity. Los Angeles lacks land space for open air farming in a city so densely filled with highways, residential homes and commercial buildings. Vertical farming also creates a higher yield of production which brings quantity at the forefront of a solution. With on site production, Bounty Farms had the ability to feed neighboring cities, public school and those in need. Every Sunday the farm opens a drive thru pickup system where individuals can pick up fresh produce for their week! Vertical Farming + Sustainable Practices Vertical Farming is a sustainable practice used to produce a high volume of foods and plants with less water required. In an area like Los Angeles where land is not abundant, urban farming methods are a great way to grow locally! Vertical Farming requires 0.004% of the water used for open air farming.

Vertical Farming produces 30x the yield of open air farming. More than a Farm Bounty farm not only holds over 6 tiers farming stations, but also provides opportunity such as education and recreation. The main floor of Bounty Farm [Floor 2] is designed to be an education space for school, families and eager to learn individuals to understand the importance of nutrition, healthy eating and the history behind why some people are facing food insecurity. At Bounty Farm, guests are able to learn about how to take care of a food producing plant which develops independence, responsibility and entrepreneurial skills. The roofing the building is an open public gardens space anyone to utilize. The space spans a beautiful views of the city such as Elysian Park, the Los Angeles River, Dodger Stadium, the San Bernardino mountains and more. Walkways like the roof with smaller spaces with tables and chair for a nice space to relax or enjoy a picnic

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ON SITE DISTRIBUTION HIGH PRODUCTION FOOD DESERTS EDUCATION

DELIVERY TO AFFECTED NEIGHBORHOODS THE VALUE OF NUTRITIOUS EATING HISTORY OF FOOD DESERTS IN LA COUNTY

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PHOTOGRAPHY Travel Product Styling Personal MEDIUM Digital Film

I have always considered myself to be creative in many fields, but I owe it to my love for photography that kick-started my creativity. At the early age of nine years old, my parents passed down their old digital camera which initially led to hundreds of photos of flowers in my backyard but, as I got older, developed into portraits, architecture, travel, and more. I later learned how to use a film camera which has taught me how to live in the moment, capturing photos that allow you to relive those places and emotions after the photos have been developed. Today, I consider photography to be a skill and a hobby that I used both personally and professionally. You can view more of my photography at www.epdesigns.org.

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June 2020 The summer of 2020 was a historic year for us all. Through the Black Lives Matter movement and an ongoing pandemic, I found myself participating in many of those moments. I attended many of the protests to fight for those who were facing inequality and captured them on my film camera. I also used recycled materials to make collages using those moments to create art pieces in my journal.

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January 2020 - February 2020 While studying abroad in Florence, Italy I photographed many of the places I visited including Venice, the Cinque Terre and Interlaken, Switzerland on my film camera using B&W 400 ISO Film.

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Product Styling + Photography While interning at Studio LIFE/STYLE, I was tasked to photograph a collection of items that were sold online. I worked alongside the Creative Brand Manager to style each item and bring each piece to life.

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T

N HA

K YO U !

626.429.5626 www.epdesigns.org emily.bryce.pearson@gmail.com 51


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