Page 1

STUDIO AIR SEMESTER 1 2018, DAVID WEGMAN EMILY KOLACZ


Table of Contents 4 

Introduction

5

Previous Works

6

Part A

7

A1: Design Futuring

8-9

Case Study 1.01

10-11

Case Study 1.02

12-13

A2: Design Computation

14-15

Case Study 2.01

16-17

Case Study 2.02

18-19

A3: Composition Generation

20-21

Case Study 3.01

22-23

Case Study 3.02

24-25

A4: Conslusion

26-27

A5: Learning Outcomes

28

Algorithmic Sketches

29-30

References


INTRODUCTION

I am Emily Kolacz, and I’m currently a second year Architecture student, completing a Bachelor of Environmental Science. I had little background and limited experience in the world of architecture when I began; and hence completing this degree has provided an immense growth in knowledge, and acquisition of new and foreign skills. Having little experience in architecture, although often making things more difficult, has yielded me a fresh and unbiased view of the industry, for which I’m grateful. I am fascinated by the way in which design can benefit people, and am glad I have chosen a path where creativity and science can fuse into something philanthropic. I am excited for the opportunity to adopt a new style of thinking in Studio Air, my second studio, and all the possibilities that arise with such skill. I am particularly intrigued by the idea of learning a new design ‘process’, and gaining more experience in design itself.

4

CONCEPTUALISATION


DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTS A Space for Meditation 2016

Site Plan 1:400 N

THE BOATHOUSE EMILY KOLACZ

Workshop Plan 1:100 N

Boathouse Plan 1:100 N

Hire Plan 1:100 N

Cafe and Bathroom Plan 1:100 N

STUDIO WATER The Boathouse 2017

VISUALISING ENVIRONMENTS Bukudal Perspective 2017

CONCEPTUALISATION 5


PARTA CONCEPTUALISATION

6

CONCEPTUALISATION


A1. DESIGN FUTURING

FIG 1. FOSTERS + PARTNERS, SMITHSONIAN COURTYARD, WASHINGTON DC, www. fosterandpartners.com/projects/smithsonian-institution-courtyard/#gallery

Architecture, as both a profession, and a contribution to a global society, is evolving. The emergence of new scope in technology has broadened the horizon of design in both practise and in realisation. This development comes at a time when needed most; to help and enable humanity move forwards into the future of climatic, geographical, and political uncertainty1. Technology alone, however, will not solve every problem in isolation. What is necessary to entertain the idea of a sustained future for humankind, is an overhaul in the thought and design processes and workflows; to change and manipulate the way in which technology is used in design2 . Furthermore, it is necessary to be forward-thinking and of an anticipatory mindset when designing, to enable one to “design intelligently� 3.

1. Tony Fry, Design Futuring: Sustainability, Ethics And New Practice, 1st edn (New York: Berg, 2009).

FIG 2. FR-EE ARCHITECTS, MUSEO SOUMAYA, MEXICO, www.archdaily. com/452226/museo-soumaya-fr-ee-fernando-romero-enterprise/57337315e5 8ece515b000016-museo-soumaya-fr-ee-fernando-romero-enterprise-photo

FIG 3. SUMO, ONE OCEAN THEMATIC PAVILION, SOUTH KOREA, https:// www.archdaily.com/236979/one-ocean-thematic-pavilion-expo-2012soma/5001235628ba0d2c9f000af8-one-ocean-thematic-pavilion-expo-2012-soma-photo

2. Tony Fry, Design Futuring: Sustainability, Ethics And New Practice, 1st edn (New York: Berg, 2009). 3. Tony Fry, Design Futuring: Sustainability, Ethics And New Practice, 1st edn (New York: Berg, 2009), p. 12. CONCEPTUALISATION 7


Case Study 1.1 : The Eden Project Architect: Grimshaw Architects Year: 2001 Location: Cornwall, England

The Eden Project is an expanded collection several different architectural components working together to form an educational, ecological, biological, and communal hub in rural Cornwall, England. It is composed of a visitor centre, several geodesic Biome domes, a Foundation Building that provides a workspace for the some 600 staff employed there, and the Core; the project’s main education centre, all connected via landscaped grounds4. Some of these structures exist as additions and expansions to the original design and serve as a testament the project’s ongoing success in educating and enamouring the public.

natural forms; in particular, the Core: its roof echoing the form of a pinecone8. These buildings are also constructed using environmentally-aligned principles, again, aligning with their goal to both educate and be exemplary in themselves.

One of the design’s most important and pioneering purposes was to educate and excite the public about sustainability and the environment; the geodesic domes being paramount here. The site itself has been transformed from a kaolinite quarry with extremely poor soil quality, to a flourishing eco-community with excellent soil quality5. In the words of the architect, the site’s transformation from what it was, to what it is now, was the primary environmental objective6. The dome shape was chosen over a funnel-like structure because it proved a more suitable choice for the shifting and unstable conditions of the site, which, at the time of construction, was still being mined7. The structure itself, being so lightweight and membranous, appears non-invasive and futuristic. Paired with the domes’ visual precedence over the site, a distinct and exciting visual hierarchy becomes apparent. The design of the Foundation Building and the Education Centre (the ‘Core’), both echo

FIG 4. GRIMSHAW ARCHITECTS, THE EDEN PROJECT, https:// grimshaw.global/projects/gallery/?i=577&p=96008_N303_a3

4. Grimshaw Architects, “The Eden Project Master Plan Cornwall, UK”, Grimshaw.Global <https:// grimshaw.global/projects/the-eden-project-master-plan/> [Accessed 12 March 2018]. 5. Colin E Dunn, Biogeochemistry In Mineral Exploration, 9th edn (Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2007), p. 213. 6. Grimshaw Architects, “The Eden Project Master Plan Cornwall, UK”, Grimshaw.Global <https:// grimshaw.global/projects/the-eden-project-master-plan/> [Accessed 12 March 2018]. 7. Grimshaw Architects, “The Eden Project: The Biomes Cornwall, UK”, Grimshaw.Global <https:// grimshaw.global/projects/the-eden-project-the-biomes/> [Accessed 12 March 2018]. 8. Grimshaw Architects, “The Eden Project: The Core Cornwall, UK”, Grimshaw.Global <https:// grimshaw.global/projects/the-eden-project-the-core/> [Accessed 12 March 2018].

8

CONCEPTUALISATION


FIG 5. GRIMSHAW ARCHITECTS, BIOMES, https://grimshaw. global/projects/gallery/?i=577&p=96008_N303_a3

FIG 6. GRIMSHAW ARCHITECTS, THE EDEN PROJECT DOME SKETCHES, https:// grimshaw.global/projects/gallery/?i=577&p=96008_N303_a3

CONCEPTUALISATION 9


Case Study 1.2 : Green Solution House Architect: 3XN Year: 2012 Location: Bornholm, Denmark The Green Solution House is an experimental conference centre built on the Danish island of Bornholm. Its exceptionality stems from its information feedback loop, whereby guests can interact with their room’s environmental indicator statistics via an app, tracking, understanding, and playing with the room’s settings to manipulate things like air quality, or passive room temperature9. This information is also accessed by the designers, allowing this building to become a platform to develop knowledge about sustainable performance and design, and a building of continuous improvement10. The structure itself is designed for disassembly, meaning it can be updated for material performance as needed with little ecological impact11. This design also follows Cradle 2 Cradle® design principles, that is, all the materials used in the build are either fully recyclable or fully biodegradable12. This is important because it goes beyond typical ecological design by making a closed-loop system that has no ‘waste’ products; for example, daily flow materials are either recycled or composted, and on-site, integrated greenhouses provide the organic fruit and vegetable for the site’s restaurant13. The Green House Project expands on the notion of The Eden Project by creating a conference centre that’s liveable, modern, and has the potential to be a new kind of normal. As said by Peters, the Green House Project is an example of architecture that produces “[h]ighperforming buildings, designed and renovated to be environmentally sustainable, adaptable and resilient without sacrificing architectural quality”14. Furthermore, this design meets the present environmental, social and economic requirements whilst also anticipating future needs, highlighting that this building adds a potential adaptation to workflow that could have position implications for the future15 .

FIG 7, 8, 9. 3XN, GREEN SOLUTION HOUSE, ROOF VENTILATION DETAIL, http://gxn.3xn.com/project/green-solution-house

9. 3XN Architects, “Green Solution House: How Do We Explore Circular Sustainability?”, Gxn.3Xn.

13. Alison Furuto, “Green Solution House / 3XN”, Archdaily, 2012 <https://www.archdaily.

Com <http://gxn.3xn.com/project/green-solution-house> [Accessed 12 March 2018].

com/199658/green-solution-house-3xn> [Accessed 12 March 2018].

10. Alison Furuto, “Green Solution House / 3XN”, Archdaily, 2012 <https://www.archdaily.com/199658/green-solution-house-3xn> [Accessed 12 March 2018]. 11. Alison Furuto, “Green Solution House / 3XN”, Archdaily, 2012 <https://www.archdaily.com/199658/green-solution-house-3xn> [Accessed 12 March 2018]. 12. Alison Furuto, “Green Solution House / 3XN”, Archdaily, 2012 <https://www.archdaily.com/199658/green-solution-house-3xn> [Accessed 12 March 2018].

14. Terri Peters, “Data Buildings: Sensor Feedback In Sustainable Design Workflows”, Architectural Design, 88.1 (2018), 92-101 <https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.2263>. 15. Terri Peters, “Data Buildings: Sensor Feedback In Sustainable Design Workflows”, Architectural Design, 88.1 (2018), 92-101 <https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.2263>.


FIG 10, 11. 3XN, GREEN SOLUTION HOUSE, FACADE AND INTERNAL GREEN STRUCTURE http://www.greensolutionhouse.dk/en


A2. DESIGN COMPUTATION Computation has opened up enormous scope in the design and architecture field in a myriad of ways. The programs available to architects can process huge amounts of data far more efficiently than the human mind, leaving more ‘brain space’ to the designer to solve the creativebased problems an algorithm cannot. Furthermore, a computational approach provides an opportunity to explore abstract and completely new thought processes, providing designers the opportunity to work outside of their own analogue. These programs also provide optimisation of workflow through the freedom of collaboration between disciplines, firms, and skillsets; and the freedom of easy and documentable experimentation. It introduces algorithmic thinking; a new, interpretive way of thinking that seeks to understand the generation of code, and how code can be used to explore new design potentials16. The combination of such algorithmic thinking and the ability to share and accumulate this knowledge worldwide enables the emergence of a new concept, the “building of algorithmic thought”17. This shift pushes design both into the unknown, and into a world of data, knowledge, and choice. Computational simulation is a tool to help designers understand and use new building materials, and how these buildings function and perform in the built environment, in a similar vein to the Green House Project discussed earlier. Furthermore, it can be argued that the success of architecture is measured by its interaction with and reception from the public; and hence, the success of design itself can begin to be measured through computational simulations – another avenue allowing progress and development in the field of design18.

15. Achim Menges and Sean Ahlquist, Computational Design Thinking, 1st edn (Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, 2011). 16. Brady Peters, “Computation Works: The Building Of Algorithmic Thought”, Architectural Design, 83.2 (2013), 8-15 https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1545, p. 11. 17. Stan Allen, Architecture, Technique And Representation (New York: Routledge, 2008), p. XIV. 18. Mark Burry, Scripting Cultures, John Wiley & Sons (Chichester), 2010, p 8.

12

CONCEPTUALISATION


“We are moving from an era where architects use software to one where they create software” - Mark Burry in Scripting Cultures

CONCEPTUALISATION 13


Case Study 2.1 : Hertfordshire House Architect: Facit Homes Year: 2012 Location: Hertfordshire, UK

Facit Homes are a firm who are one of the first in the industry to use digital fabrication to produce architecture on a domestic scale, and do so on-site with a mobile production facility (MPF). The firm itself has a patented design process, ‘D-Process’, whereby it 3D digitally-models the house down to the finest detail, then transforms these components into the home’s exact physical components, using a computer-controlled cutter (CNC)20.

One of Facit’s most prominent designs, making its way onto the TV programme Grand Designs, is the Hertfordshire Home for Celia and Diana. For this house, the process combined both on and off-site production: the chassis of the house was constructed on-site, whilst more sculptural elements, such as the staircase and balustrade, were digitally fabricated, and finished to a high quality off-site in a workshop25.

This is an example of a change in traditional workflow, enabled by computational design. The company focuses on strategies for assembly, adopting a similar approach to the manufacturing industry21. However, in this model, “the traditional role of the architect, consultant team, the design, engineering research and development, prototyping, production, and assembly processes are all undertaken by a single entity”22. Unlike current cookie-cutter prefabricated models, however, Facit’s ‘D-Process’ allows for sensitive and individual design, that best responds to the requirements of both the site and the clients23. Facit Homes uses a ‘Chassis’ system for creating the bones of the design, which is a system of integrated components that can be manipulated into complex forms and has massive design potential24.

This too indicates a shift in traditional workflow towards a process that is more efficient and can achieve higher quality results. Furthermore, construction and assembly was a consideration from the beginning, hence, Facit generated machine code for the production of the building components; achieving a direction communication between design information and construction components without the need for a contractor’s interpretation26.

20. Bridget Borgobello, "Facit Homes Claims To Build World's First "Digitally Fabricated" House", Newatlas.Com, 2012 <https://newatlas.com/ digitally-fabricated-homes-facit/23844/> [Accessed 13 March 2018]. 21. Bruce Bell and Sarah Simpkin, "Domesticating Parametric Design", Architectural Design, 83.2 (2013), 88-91 <https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1560>. 22. Bruce Bell and Sarah Simpkin, "Domesticating Parametric Design", Architectural Design, 83.2 (2013), 88-91 <https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1560>. 23. Bruce Bell and Sarah Simpkin, "Domesticating Parametric Design", Architectural Design, 83.2 (2013), 88-91 <https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1560>. 24. Facit Homes, "The Facit Chassis", Facit Homes <http://facit-homes. com/the-facit-home/facit-chassis> [Accessed 13 March 2018]. 25. Bruce Bell and Sarah Simpkin, "Domesticating Parametric Design", Architectural Design, 83.2 (2013), 88-91 <https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1560>. 26. Bruce Bell and Sarah Simpkin, "Domesticating Parametric Design", Architectural Design, 83.2 (2013), 88-91 <https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1560>. 14

CONCEPTUALISATION

FIG 12, FACIT HOMES, STAIR DETAIL , “Domesticating Parametric Design”, Architectural Design, 83 (2013)


FIG 13, FACIT HOMES, BALCONY DETAIL, http://facit-homes.com/clients/selected-details

FIG 14. FACIT HOMES, EXTERIOR, http://facit-homes.com/clients/selected-exteriors

CONCEPTUALISATION 15


Case Study 2.2 : Kuwait National Bank HQt Architect: Fosters + Partners Year: 2007 Location: Kuwait

The National Bank of Kuwait Headquarters is a building designed to be both environmentally responsive, and of complex geometry. These goals were achieved simultaneously via parametric modelling with the goal of achieving a “fully rational shape that embedded serious consideration of the various performance parameters”27. Fosters and Partners’ specialist modelling group (SMG) worked in close conjunction with the engineers, Buro Happold, using specialised modelling algorithms and programs to produce complex geometries that worked in conjunction with the design’s environmental objectives28. This in itself is an example of an altered workflow. Furthermore, what isolates this design is that the form was dictated by the environmental data produced by the algorithmic modelling specifically for this building. The benefit of computational design in this instance is also in the experimentation that occurred during the design process. The programs used were able to create high volumes of complex, differentiated output for evaluation, constantly producing options to be evaluated by the design team. Specific to this design, this mode of working allowed the building’s ‘fins’ to be adjusted minutely and accurately via parametric model until the most environmentally-efficient outcome was achieved29.

“[f]ully rational shape that embedded serious consideration of the various performance parameters” Dusanka Popovska in Architectural Digest

27. Dusanka Popovska, “Integrated Computational Design: National Bank Of Kuwait Headquarters”, Architectural Design, 83.2 (2013), 34-35 <https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1550>. 28. Dusanka Popovska, “Integrated Computational Design: National Bank Of Kuwait Headquarters”, Architectural Design, 83.2 (2013), 34-35 <https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1550>. 29. “National Bank Of Kuwait Headquarters - Burohappold Engineering”, Burohappold Engineering <https:// www.burohappold.com/projects/national-bank-of-kuwait-headquarters/> [Accessed 13 March 2018].

16

CONCEPTUALISATION


FIG 15. FOSTERS + PARTNERS, KUWAIT NATIONAL BANK HEADQUARTERS, https:// www.fosterandpartners.com/projects/national-bank-of-kuwait/#gallery

FIG 16. FOSTERS + PARTNERS, KUWAIT NATIONAL BANK HEADQUARTERS, https:// www.fosterandpartners.com/projects/national-bank-of-kuwait/#gallery

CONCEPTUALISATION 17


A3. COMPOSITION/GENERATION Architecture has experienced a major shift in the last decade with the shift from composition to generation; the introduction of algorithmic thinking, parametric modelling, and scripting cultures has begun to change both the physical appearance of design, and the thought process preceding and succeeding it. It is interesting to analyse the advantages and disadvantages of this shift, focusing not only on the end result, but in the changes that occur during the transformation, and which changes must occur in order for the best result to occur. For example, it is important that these computational skills become ubiquitous, and not a sheltered skill held by a select few. This is important to ensure that ideas can come from the most expansive pool of people possible; that ideas become less of an exclusive commodity30. Another difficulty with current computational design is the incomplete discourse, and resulting limitations, between design and fabrication31. Advantages of the shift from composition to generation include the ease and traceability of variation within enormous modelling potential, the opportunity for material and structural optimisation, the chance to increase efficiency within firms, and the possibility for an entirely new realm of thought and design processes. Furthermore, these programs allow for a much greater degree of flexibility than achieved previously, meaning that building design can begin to adapt to changing environments32. These programs can also allow a great degree of communication, in that people can begin to create their own programs to solve unique problems, creating an ever-expanding potential knowledge and problem-solving base33. The shift, allowing greater access to information, is seeing firms design primarily from a performance-based aspect, as opposed to a form-based approach34.

30. Tony Fry, Design Futuring: Sustainability, Ethics And New Practice, 1st edn (New York: Berg, 2009). 31. Brady Peters, “Realising The Architectural Idea: Computational Design At Herzog & De Meuron”, Architectural Design, 83.2 (2013), 56-61 <https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1554>. 32. Brady Peters, “Computation Works: The Building Of Algorithmic Thought”, Architectural Design, 83.2 (2013), 8-15 https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1545, p. 11. 33. Brady Peters, “Computation Works: The Building Of Algorithmic Thought”, Architectural Design, 83.2 (2013), 8-15 https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1545, p. 11. 34. Brady Peters, “Computation Works: The Building Of Algorithmic Thought”, Architectural Design, 83.2 (2013), 8-15 https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1545, p. 11. 18

CONCEPTUALISATION


FIG 17, 18, 19, ZAHA HADID ARCHITECTS, GUANGZHOU OPERA HOUSE, http://www.zaha-hadid.com/architecture/guangzhou-opera-house/

CONCEPTUALISATION 19


Case Study 3.1 : Smithsonian Courtyard Architect: Fosters + Partners Year: 2007 Location: Washington DC, US

The Smithsonian Institute Courtyard, now called the Kogod Courtyard, was briefed to be the new urban centrepiece of Washington35. The geometry forming a roof over the Smithsonian Institute was generated by a single program, made by an architect and member of Foster + Partners’ SMG team, Brady Peters.

“The integrated design solution was a gently

The computer code generated by Peters was used to explore and constantly modify potential design options, eventually generating the final model and the information needed to analyse structural and acoustic performance36. It was also used to create the fabrication data necessary for its construction37.

undulating lattice shell

“The integrated design solution was a gently undulating lattice shell that efficiently dealt with the structural requirements, provided protection from the rain and snow, acted as a giant acoustic absorber, and provided a sun shading and natural lighting solution”38. The canopy consists of twisting steel beams and glazing, paired with louvre-like fins for solar control, designed in a parametric modelling system, however the fins were later disregarded because they interfered with beam depth and glazing maintenance39.

rain and snow, acted as a

that efficiently dealt with the structural requirements, provided protection from the

giant acoustic absorber, and provided a sun shading and natural lighting solution” Brady Peters in The Smithsonian Courtyard Enclosure

Once an optimised structure was generated, SMG used their Flatpattern tool to flatten the beams into 2D shapes to be laser-cut, which could then be easily assembled40. The final geometrical result possesses a high degree of complexity, however the rules that algorithmically generated the canopy’s geometry were relatively simple 41. This is a marked and inherent benefit of computational design.

35. Brady Peters, The Smithsonian Courtyard Enclosure: A Case Study Of Digital Design Processes (Fosters + Partners, 2007) <https:// cumincad.architexturez.net/system/files/pdf/acadia07_074.content.pdf> [Accessed 14 March 2018]. 36. Brady Peters, “Computation Works: The Building Of Algorithmic Thought”, Architectural Design, 83.2 (2013), 8-15 https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1545, p. 11. 37. Brady Peters, “Computation Works: The Building Of Algorithmic Thought”, Architectural Design, 83.2 (2013), 8-15 https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1545, p. 11. 38. Brady Peters, The Smithsonian Courtyard Enclosure: A Case Study Of Digital Design Processes (Fosters + Partners, 2007) <https:// cumincad.architexturez.net/system/files/pdf/acadia07_074.content.pdf> [Accessed 14 March 2018]. Brady Peters, The Smithsonian Courtyard Enclosure: A Case Study Of Digital Design Processes (Fosters + Partners, 2007) <https:// cumincad.architexturez.net/system/files/pdf/acadia07_074.content.pdf> [Accessed 14 March 2018].

20

CONCEPTUALISATION


FIG 20, FOSTERS + PARTNERS, SMITHSONIAN COURTYARD, https://www. fosterandpartners.com/projects/smithsonian-institution-courtyard/

FIG 21, FOSTERS + PARTNERS, SMITHSONIAN COURTYARD, http:// www.gsadc.com/robert-and-arlene-kogod-courtyard/

39. Brady Peters, The Smithsonian Courtyard Enclosure: A Case Study Of Digital Design Processes (Fosters + Partners, 2007) <https:// cumincad.architexturez.net/system/files/pdf/acadia07_074.content.pdf> [Accessed 14 March 2018]. 40. Brady Peters, The Smithsonian Courtyard Enclosure: A Case Study Of Digital Design Processes (Fosters + Partners, 2007) <https:// cumincad.architexturez.net/system/files/pdf/acadia07_074.content.pdf> [Accessed 14 March 2018]. 41. Brady Peters, The Smithsonian Courtyard Enclosure: A Case Study Of Digital Design Processes (Fosters + Partners, 2007) <https:// cumincad.architexturez.net/system/files/pdf/acadia07_074.content.pdf> [Accessed 14 March 2018].

CONCEPTUALISATION 21


Case Study 3.2 : Bloom Architect: DO|SU Year: 2011 Location: Los Angeles, US

Bloom is an outdoor structure constructed entirely of thermobimetal panels that are designed to curl and move to create shade and self-regulate its temperature in response to thermal energy received from the sun. Each of the 414 panels is also unique. It is a researchoriented prototype designed with the aim of using such metals to create passively-regulating building skins, and as a prototype for a passive, dynamic shading system42. Its nuanced and complex form was achieved entirely through Grasshopper and parametric modelling, in both its design and fabrication43. This is an example of the benefits of parametric modelling in functional experimental design. This is not a permanent structure, however, as the surface and its biomimetic properties will begin to degrade after approximately five years 44. The architect, however, hopes that this design will prompt further research and development in this area45.

FIG 22, DO|SU, BLOOM, https://www.archdaily.com/215280/ bloom-dosu-studio-architecturecom/project-gallery/bloom_1

The design process combined both physical and digital modelling combined to uncover an optimised, selfsupporting structure 46. The use of parametric modelling meant that the structure could be designed very specifically: it was designed for maximum efficiency on the day of Spring Equinox, where it opens to allow the most ventilation to occur from the underside of the structure 47. Furthermore, the digital component of the fabrication allowed the individual panels to be numbered, and assembled following a guide, much like a Lego set â&#x20AC;&#x201C; another clear advantage of such design47.

FIG 23, DO|SU, BLOOM, https://www.archdaily. com/215280/bloom-dosu-studio-architecture.com

42. Bradley Cantrell and Justine Holzman, Responsive Landscapes: Strategies For Responsive Technologies In Landscape Architecture ([S.l.]: ROUTLEDGE, 2015), pp. 221-22. 43. Bradley Cantrell and Justine Holzman, Responsive Landscapes: Strategies For Responsive Technologies In Landscape Architecture ([S.l.]: ROUTLEDGE, 2015), pp. 221-22. 44. Russell Fortmeyer and Charles Linn, Kinetic Architecture (Mulgrave, Vic.: Images Publishing Group, 2014), pp. 84-9. 45. Russell Fortmeyer and Charles Linn, Kinetic Architecture (Mulgrave, Vic.: Images Publishing Group, 2014), pp. 84-9. 46. Russell Fortmeyer and Charles Linn, Kinetic Architecture (Mulgrave, Vic.: Images Publishing Group, 2014), pp. 84-9. 47. Russell Fortmeyer and Charles Linn, Kinetic Architecture (Mulgrave, Vic.: Images Publishing Group, 2014), pp. 84-9. 48. Russell Fortmeyer and Charles Linn, Kinetic Architecture (Mulgrave, Vic.: Images Publishing Group, 2014), pp. 84-9.

22

CONCEPTUALISATION


FIG 24, DO|SU, BLOOM, http://www.architectmagazine.

CONCEPTUALISATION 23


A4. CONCLUSION The readings, lectures, and precedents studied to unravel Part A have highlighted the necessity of a new way of architectural thinking, in order to meet the complex and changing needs of society. This material has, in turn, highlighted the way in which algorithmic thinking can begin to approach these problems from various perspectives, unveiling new and unprecedented approaches to tackling such problems. My intended design approach is to focus on the salt uptake of mangrove trees and the methods of removing said salt. In viewing this in the context of a contemplative space, it becomes a biological metaphor for releasing emotions or thoughts that no longer serve the individual; hence, an important concept in the understanding of contemplation and meditation.

24

CONCEPTUALISATION


A5. LEARNING OUTCOMES My grasp and definition of what architecture is, and can be, has been completely overturned with the introduction to a different thought process, and for its potential to be limited only by my skill and imagination. Before this semester, I had no knowledge of Grasshopperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s function, nor that these kind of outcomes could even be entertained, let alone make positive and radical changes in the industry; it genuinely excites me. This type of workflow and thinking could have helped me in form-finding; allowing me to find more freedom in my designs, and produce design that moves away from the simpler geometry I have previously favoured.

This is the last printable page in your book and will print on the left side. CONCEPTUALISATION 25


A6. ALGORITHMIC SKETCHES

26

CONCEPTUALISATION


References Architects, 3XN, “Green Solution House: How Do We Explore Circular Sustainability?”, Gxn.3Xn. Com<http://gxn.3xn.com/project/green-solution-house> [Accessed 12 March 2018] Architects, Grimshaw, “The Eden Project Master Plan Cornwall, UK”, Grimshaw.Global<https:// grimshaw.global/projects/the-eden-project-master-plan/> [Accessed 12 March 2018] Architects, Grimshaw, “The Eden Project: The Biomes Cornwall, UK”, Grimshaw.Global<https:// grimshaw.global/projects/the-eden-project-the-biomes/> [Accessed 12 March 2018] Architects, Grimshaw, “The Eden Project: The Core Cornwall, UK”, Grimshaw.Global<https:// grimshaw.global/projects/the-eden-project-the-core/> [Accessed 12 March 2018] Architects, Grimshaw, “The Eden Project: The Foundation Building, Cornwall, UK”, Grimshaw.Global<https:// grimshaw.global/projects/the-eden-project-the-foundation-building/> [Accessed 12 March 2018] Architects, Grimshaw, “The Eden Project: The Visitor’S Centre Cornwall, UK”, Grimshaw.Global, 2018 <https:// grimshaw.global/projects/the-eden-project-the-visitor%E2%80%99s-centre/> [Accessed 12 March 2018] “Architecture Of The Eden Project, Cornwall”, Edenproject.Com <http://www.edenproject.com/ eden-story/behind-the-scenes/architecture-at-eden> [Accessed 12 March 2018] Bell, Bruce, and Sarah Simpkin, “Domesticating Parametric Design”, Architectural Design, 83 (2013), 88-91 <https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1560> Borgobello, Bridget, “Facit Homes Claims To Build World’s First “Digitally Fabricated” House”, Newatlas. Com, 2012 <https://newatlas.com/digitally-fabricated-homes-facit/23844/> [Accessed 13 March 2018] Cantrell, Bradley, and Justine Holzman, Responsive Landscapes: Strategies For Responsive Technologies In Landscape Architecture ([S.l.]: ROUTLEDGE, 2015), pp. 221-22 Dunn, Colin E, Biogeochemistry In Mineral Exploration, 9th edn (Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2007), p. 213 Fortmeyer, Russell, and Charles Linn, Kinetic Architecture (Mulgrave, Vic.: Images Publishing Group, 2014), pp. 84-9 Fry, Tony, Design Futuring: Sustainability, Ethics And New Practice, 1st edn (New York: Berg, 2009) Furuto, Alison, “Green Solution House / 3XN”, Archdaily, 2012 <https://www.archdaily. com/199658/green-solution-house-3xn> [Accessed 12 March 2018] Homes, Facit, “The Facit Chassis”, Facit Homes <http://facit-homes.com/the-facit-home/facit-chassis> [Accessed 13 March 2018] Menges, Achim, and Sean Ahlquist, Computational Design Thinking, 1st edn (Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, 2011) “National Bank Of Kuwait Headquarters - Burohappold Engineering”, Burohappold Engineering<https:// www.burohappold.com/projects/national-bank-of-kuwait-headquarters/> [Accessed 13 March 2018] Peters, Brady, “Computation Works: The Building Of Algorithmic Thought”, Architectural Design, 83 (2013), 8-15 https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1545 Peters, Brady, “Realising The Architectural Idea: Computational Design At Herzog & De Meuron”, Architectural Design, 83 (2013), 56-61 <https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1554> CONCEPTUALISATION 27


References continued Peters, Brady, The Smithsonian Courtyard Enclosure: A Case Study Of Digital Design Processes(Fosters + Partners, 2007) <https://cumincad.architexturez.net/system/files/ pdf/acadia07_074.content.pdf> [Accessed 14 March 2018] Peters, Terri, “Data Buildings: Sensor Feedback In Sustainable Design Workflows”, Architectural Design, 88 (2018), 92-101 https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.2263 Popovska, Dusanka, “Integrated Computational Design: National Bank Of Kuwait Headquarters”, Architectural Design, 83 (2013), 34-35 <https://doi.org/10.1002/ad.1550> Rael, Ronald, Earth Architecture (New York, NY: Princeton Architectural Press, 2000), p. 56 “Timeline”, Edenproject.Com <http://www.edenproject. com/eden-story/eden-timeline> [Accessed 12 March 2018]

28

CONCEPTUALISATION

Studio Air Journal Part A  
Studio Air Journal Part A  
Advertisement