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Phase 3 Communications campaign - Manager’s guide

Avoiding slips and trips

Working with electricity

Driving safety

Working at height


An introduction

The next stage

What if you or one of your team were injured at work? How would it affect your health, your life, and the lives of the people you care about? Whatever your answer, chances are that life would never be quite the same again.

The programmes on this DVD take our health and safety engagement to the next stage, focusing on MITIE’s four most commonly occurring occupational hazards.

Work Safe Home Safe! is a companywide health and safety programme that started in 2010. It reminds us of our responsibilities when it comes to safety and well-being at work, and aims to keep us safe and well to enjoy the things that matter to us when we get home afterwards. ‘Look out for others’, ‘Get involved’ and ‘Think safety’ are the three behaviours that go towards making Work Safe Home Safe! a reality, whatever part we play in the company. Work Safe Home Safe! lies at the very heart of the MITIE business, not only because it shows that we care about our team-mates, but because it demonstrates our understanding of what contributes to a safe working environment, and are determined to always put this at the very top of the agenda, each and every day.

What motivates us to stay safe? In the programme launch video that was produced last year, we heard from a discussion group, drawn from across MITIE, who talked about the reasons they wanted to stay safe – family life, interests and hobbies, and activities they enjoyed. You’ll remember that they also shared their thoughts on how the three behaviours; Look out for others, Get involved, Think safety, applied in their part of the business. We also heard from the Divisional Managing Directors who gave us their personal perspectives on Work Safe Home Safe! If you have not seen the initial launch campaign, the full range of material is available from Gina Gobetti (gina.gobetti@mitie.com).

• Slips Trips and Falls • Driving while on MITIE business • Electricity • Working at Height Each programme features a dramatised scenario that will help your people to explore the risk from these activities and what the consequences can be; make connections with what they do in their own job, and understand how the three behaviours in the Work Safe Home Safe! programme contribute to a better, safer working environment.

Introductions and closing comments Each scenario is introduced either by a senior member of the QHSE leadership team for your Division, or your Managing Director. Facilities Management Martyn Freeman, Managing Director Russell Bone, Principal QHSE Manager Property Management Bill Robson, Managing Director Wayne Cole, Regional QHSE Manager Technical Facilities Management Martin Holt, Managing Director Gary King, QHSE Director Asset Management Mike Tivey, Managing Director John Nelson, QHSE Director

How to use the DVD The DVD contains four chapter headings: • Facilities Management • Property Management • Asset Management • Technical Facilities Management First of all, select the chapter relating to your Division; you will then be offered four scenarios. These are intended for use in team meetings; in order to have a meaningful session with your team we recommend showing one scenario per team meeting over the course of a period determined by your division. Do not show all four in one sitting as this will dilute the message. Each scenario provides you with different opportunities to explore the issues with your team. The notes on the following pages will tell you more, and suggest ways of getting the most from each session. If you have any questions, please contact your local QHSE Manager who will be able to provide assistance. Thank you for encouraging your team to engage with the Work Safe Home Safe! programme in this way; we hope that you, and they, find these materials of help in our efforts to keep all MITIE people free from harm. The QHSE team

Slips, Trips and Falls

Setting the scene This scenario shows how a lack of awareness of basic safety issues leads to an injury for one of the workers. We then see the same characters in a different office situation, but this time they demonstrate the Work Safe Home Safe! behaviours, which leads to a more positive outcome. Half way through the programme, you will be prompted to pause the film to lead a group discussion about the issues, risks and behaviours that led to a ‘slip’ incident.

Key messages addressed in this scenario are: • Slips, trips and falls at work account for almost 40% of reported incidents at MITIE • Holding the handrail is a really easy and effective way to reduce the risk of a fall • Don’t carry things that prevent you seeing where you’re going • Don’t take phone-calls on stairs • Ensure signage adequate; don’t move a warning sign – it is there for a reason • Clean up spills that you make yourself – or report it to the cleaner, don’t assume someone else will • If you see others behaving in an unsafe fashion, speak up – it could really prevent injury

The second half of the programme reveal the same characters, but this time demonstrating the WSHS! behaviours and successfully avoiding a ‘manual handling’ incident.

Key messages addressed in this next scenario are: • Avoid manual handling • If it can’t be avoided, use the correct lifting technique • Make use of trolleys if loads are bulky or heavy • Report unsafe or defective equipment • If there is an incident where no-one is actually injured, report it as a near miss so we can learn from it. Consider how this issue relates to your business and the environments you work in / tasks you undertake.

Talking points After the scenario has played and your MD or QHSE manager has made his closing remarks, lead a discussion about how your team can make a difference by applying the WSHS! behaviours. If asked, please reassure your team that the unsafe situations featured in this film – and in the other three too were deliberately set up to illustrate particular safety issues, and were carefully planned so that no-one was ever in any danger. Broaden out the discussion to bring in additional issues, such as those below: • If you’re cleaning a floor, don’t slip yourself! • Have the confidence to warn others (clients / public included) • Stairs present an additional risk to people using them to get plant in and out of buildings • Wet boots/wet weather • Cabling/power leads as a trip hazard

Further discussion areas You should make reference to the poster which accompanies this pack, which should be displayed in prominent places ahead of the team meeting. It shows an image at home, linked to an image at work and makes the observation that “You wouldn’t let this happen at home”. • Why do we sometimes behave quite differently at work than at home when it comes to safe behaviour, and what we can do at work to remedy this? • The poster also invites people to ‘Bring those values to work ’ – so remind them that you really back this approach too, and that they will be supported if they stop work and report an issue if they think it’s not safe • What opportunities do your team have to get involved in health and safety issues? Do they make the most of them? • What would create an even safer environment where you work? • Finally, remind your team of any examples relating specifically to your site or operation; you could also expand on the comments made in the introduction, or in your Managing Director’s comments


Driving safety Setting the scene The aim of this scenario is to remind our people that their loved ones are relying on them to come home safely. It starts and finishes with a domestic scene; we find ourselves wondering whether the family will be left without the father at the end of the day as a result of his actions on the road. Half way through the programme, you will be prompted to pause the film to lead a group discussion about the issues, risks and behaviours that were demonstrated in the film.

Key messages addressed in this scenario are: • Plan any journey well in advance • Always maintain attention whilst driving • Never use your handset – you must use Bluetooth or similar hands-free apparatus • Never take a call unless you have a hands-free kit •D  on’t take calls while driving if you can avoid it •A  void making calls completely •N  ever text while driving •A  void programming your satnav while on the move •D  on’t exceed the speed limit •C  heck your vehicle is road-worthy (tyres, fluid levels, brakes) •D  on’t drive while tired •A  lways maintain space around your vehicle - keep your distance and a protective ‘bubble’ around you

Talking points After the scenario has played and your MD or QHSE manager has made his closing remarks, lead a discussion about how your team can make a difference by applying the WSHS! behaviours. If asked, please reassure your team that the unsafe situations featured in this film – and in the other three too – were deliberately set up to illustrate particular safety issues, and were carefully planned so that no-one was ever in any danger. Broaden out the discussion to bring in additional issues, such as those below: • Do you have to make the journey – would a conference call be a suitable alternative? • Even with Bluetooth, it’s up to you whether or not you take the call; better to pull over and call back

• Keep your concentration – don’t let your mind wander to work issues or similar while driving • Think about how recent personal activity outside of work – a night out on the town, a sleepless night with the kids, illness, medication – can affect your ability to stay focused and make the right decisions behind the wheel • General maintenance / tyre pressure etc. are all part of safe driving Ask your team what they found useful about the comments from Simon Elstow, Director of Training at the Institute of Advanced Motorists. What can we learn from his expertise? What prevents us from following this sort of advice more often when we know it makes sense? How can we remedy this?

Further areas for discussion Make reference to the poster, which accompanies this pack - which you should please display in a prominent place ahead of the team meeting. It shows a road sign with two routes: ‘Hospital’ and ‘Home’ plus the heading ‘Make the right decision’ / Choose the right way? Go home safely! • Why do we sometimes make the wrong decisions behind the wheel? • What can we do to address this issue and therefore drive more safely? • Why do we need to get home safely: a family celebration like the one in the video, or a social gathering, or perhaps a longanticipated holiday • How would an accident affect plans / career / income / social life/ dependants? • Finally, remind your team of any examples relating specifically to your work area or operation; you could also expand on the comments made in the introduction, or in your Managing Director’s closing comments

Working safely with electricity Setting the scene In this scenario, we meet a number of different people – including MITIE employees and a subcontractor, all engaged in different types of work for customers. Andy, a painter, and Dave, an electrician are working on the refurbishment of a council house. Angela, a trainee, and her manager Jason have been asked to fit a new towel-rail in a tenant’s home and Mark, a subcontractor electrician, who is completing a wiring job in the kitchen of a housing association property. It is explained in the video that “Each and every one of us takes pride in going the extra mile and delivering a first-class service to our clients. But let’s remember that the situations in which we work do present dangers that we need to be aware of and carefully assess before we get started…” As the scenes unfold, we see each of the operatives taking risks with electrical power in ways that could potentially kill them. Half way through the programme, you will be prompted to pause the film to lead a group discussion about the issues, risks and behaviours that were demonstrated in the film. Who gets away with it? Who has a minor injury? Who is electrocuted? The point to be made is that they are all ‘gambling with safety’, which is something that must never happen in MITIE.

Key messages addressed in this scenario are:

particular safety issues, and were carefully planned so that no-one was ever in any danger. Broaden out the discussion to bring in additional thoughts on the three behaviours.

• Always ‘lock-off’ – meticulous attention to the correct isolation of power is essential each and every time

The accompanying poster includes the WSHS! behaviour ‘Think Safety’, so explore the responsibilities that we have to each other, and to our clients as well.

(You can make reference to the poster in this respect: it shows bare wires hanging from a ceiling, with a worker very nearby. The caption asks the simple question: “Dead or Alive?”) • Don’t make assumptions with electrical work, in most instances you don’t get a second chance; and don’t assume that people are competent or qualified for the jobs they are being asked to perform – check • Be aware of those working around you – colleagues, sub-contractors, clients and the public • Ensure that you communicate clearly and that your instructions or briefings are understood • Distractions are common in many tasks, especially in customers’ homes; keep focused on the job in hand • Never rush a job, or leave it in a condition where the installation could harm others, or still be live and unprotected • Cable detection devices can only offer protection if used in the correct manner, so ensure relevant operatives are fully-trained and have the right competencies Consider how this issue relates to your business and the environments you work in / tasks you undertake.

Talking points After the scenario has played and your MD or QHSE manager has made his closing remarks, lead a discussion about how your team can make a difference by applying the WSHS! behaviour. If asked, please reassure your team that the unsafe situations featured in this film – and in the other three too – were deliberately set up to illustrate

Further areas for discussion Broaden out the discussion to bring in additional issues, such as those below: • Training and competency • Equipment availability and condition • Cables left behind can be a hazard too; tidy up after yourself • Check that technical drawings and site plans are current Finally, remind your team of any examples relating specifically to your site or operation; you could also expand on the comments made in the introduction, or in your Managing Director’s closing comments.


Working at height Setting the scene Near miss reporting is absolutely critical to developing and maintaining a safe working environment: it shows that we are alert to unsafe situations, and that we take responsibility for letting management know about problems when we encounter them. And that means there’s every chance we can avoid similar incidents in future. Near miss reporting – or rather the lack of it - provides the focus for the ‘Working at Height’ scenario, where in this staged event, the workers we see on a re-roofing job are clearly lacking even the most basic safety awareness. It’s no excuse that they’re rushing to make the site tidy ahead of an unscheduled client visit. MITIE people are famous for going the extra mile for the client – but it must never mean that safety is compromised, or that corners are cut in our efforts to do a good job.

Talking points The activity that we witness comes to a catastrophic conclusion when a worker is very seriously injured, perhaps even killed. At this point in the scenario, a ‘pause’ symbol appears on-screen, allowing you to pause the programme and lead a discussion about what you’ve seen. In particular, you should ask them to list as many specific near miss incidents as they noticed in the preceding couple of minutes. When you’re ready, you can then ‘un-pause’ the DVD: at this point, the whole scenario is repeated, this time with each of the near misses marked and numbered, as follows: 1. Failure to wear PPE when leaving the site office to go onto the site 2.  Using a chair as a means of gaining access to objects at height 3.  Over-reaching on a stepladder in such a way that both the operative and the manager are in danger 4.  Badly-footed stepladder, placed in a vulnerable position 5.  Using incorrectly-boarded scaffolding as a working platform 6.  Letting tools fall to the ground from the platform 7. Improvised access and unsafe walkways 8.  No PPE while working on the roof 9.  Security harness available but unused 10. Descending without ladder 11. Failure to use lifting cradle on hoist 12. Creating trip hazards 13. Over reaching 14. Incorrect manual handling procedure

Consider how this issue relates to your business and the environments you work in / tasks you undertake. If asked, please reassure your team that the unsafe situations featured in this film – and in the other three too – were deliberately set up to illustrate particular safety issues, and were carefully planned so that no-one was ever in any danger.

Further areas for discussion Broaden out the discussion to bring in additional issues, such as those below: • Accidents occur when approved safe systems of working are not closely followed – why is this? • Pre-planning is critical, both in terms of equipment and access • Managers and employees need to be aware of the controls ‘hierarchy’ when working at height • Make sure you employ all safety devices / correct PPE at all times • Competencies are key: know your limitations, make sure you are properly trained; if you don’t think it’s right, don’t do it! • Use the right tools for the right job, don’t improvise • Perform a risk assessment for each and every task (including those performed habitually, as complacency presents dangers all of its own) • Encourage reporting of near misses so we can put things right and others can learn Finally, remind your team of any examples relating specifically to your site or operation; you could also expand on the comments made in the introduction, or in your Managing Director’s closing comments.


Guide