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Today, those images, may be disseminated by anyone through the web, using simply a Tablet, a laptop, an Iphone, or a Blackberry. The Arab spring began with a photo, taken by a mobile phone, of Mohammed Bouazizi, a Tunisian boy of 26 years, a bachelor’s degree in computer science, unemployed, who on December 17 (2010), set himself on fire to protest against the dramatic conditions of poverty in which he was forced by the economic crisis. The image, retweeted thousands and thousands of times, like a spark, exploded as a fractal within the circuit of the “Multiplier Media” in a few days, occupying the pages online, and then has been printed on the main newspapers, invading the imagination of young people in the Arab world thanks to the news of the main TV broadcasting the Tunisian revolt. The “Sensationalism of the Invisible” became a symbol, acquiring a “use value”, evoking the desire of a revolution, overcoming the two-dimensional flat screen logic, the division in pixels of the images. What did the digital image exceeded itself. What happened cannot find explanation only with the rebellion for the need to protect the “human values” by the barbaric (‘of the machine’?).
In Tunisia and Egypt there was already a context with clearly symptoms of a imminent revolution. In 2008 were brutally sedated the riots in the worker district of Gafsa in Tunisia. In the Egyptian city of al-Mahalla al-Kubra there were a series of strikes of the textile industry, and always in the same country, in 2005, the elections (in a climate of violence caused by the police, even within the polling stations), with accusations of fraud, saw the Muslim Brotherhood obtaining the historical achievement of 88 seats in Maglis Al-Sha’ab‎ (The People’s Assembly of Egypt). Besides, by 2004, a cartel of 300 intellectuals gave life to the movement Kifaya, in which it has been developed an important cross-party opposition to the regime of President Mubarak. All general tests of a revolution which was later extended to a large part of the Arab world. The digital revolution of social networks followed, in a few years, the coverage of Pan-Arab satellite TV Channels. It began in the early 1990s, shortly before the advent of Al Jazeera, the satellite tv that since 1996 broadcasts from Qatar, contributing to the construction of a ‘common

Profile for Emiliano Di Marco

Nothing_Is_UnTrue_Eng  

Photo-reportage_The siege of Nablus (Palestinian National Authority), August / September 2003. English_Text_/Annex an article on the Impact...

Nothing_Is_UnTrue_Eng  

Photo-reportage_The siege of Nablus (Palestinian National Authority), August / September 2003. English_Text_/Annex an article on the Impact...

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