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PAT T E R N

T R A N S F O R M AT I O N

GOAL: Start with a pattern and transform it into a three dimensional object through a number of steps. The leaf-like pattern below is the image used in this project.

LIGHT TEXTURE AND COLOR

DESIGN: The pattern is extruded into a 3D porous object in order to explore the effect of texture, transparency, color, and light on the pattern. The images to the right are some of the most interesting results of these explorations. When applying a green texture, the images began to resemble plant cells. It was these images that served as inspiration for the next iteration.


TRANSFORMING AN IMAGE INTO A COMPLEX OBJECT

The next step was designing an object inspired by the most compelling image in the series. The image used was interesting because the manipulation of light caused the pores to read as solid leaf-like volumes. This image led to a curved object with plant-like characteristics. The two dimensional shape made of different sized pores shown was developed and extruded along a curve that formed the object. The last step was to take slices of this model in order to laser cut them and reassemble them into a physical model. However, these slices of the object were beautiful in their own right. The slices begged to be featured. So by exploring different ways of assembling the pieces, it was discovered that a simple rotation made the object so much more beautiful and compelling. The final form highlights the pores in a new way by allowing them to overlap and protrude into a shape that resembles a flower in bloom.


LIGHT BOX

A STUDY IN LIGHT AND FORM

GOAL: Transforming a one foot by six inch box into light box that explores the interaction of light, form, and space. DESIGN: The first iteration was a box that looked as if it had started to unravel at one end. Light was shone into the cave-like space and the disjointed pieces broke the light down into darkness. The concept later shifted to light escaping from the cave. Through charcoal studies, I explored the concept of a gradient of light escaping from the object, and in response the cave itself began to unravel to let light seep out. This allowed the gradient to spread fluidly from dark to light. In the final design, the box pieces extended through what was originally a floor-plate. This helps define the motif of the unraveled box and supports the cave concept by showing the darkest space where light doesn’t reach.


DECONSTRUCTED BOX

LIGHT SHINES INTO CAVE

LIGHT SHINES OUT OF CAVE

A GRADIENT OF LIGHT

FORM CUT TO FILTER LIGHT


DESIGN: The classical designs continue the axes of Tenth and I Streets with walking paths. They also include a new axis in the east of the site that breaks up the space and helps connect the garden and its major axes to Chinatown and the Convention Center The romantic designs revolve around using these major axes as view corridors. Important buildings and objects reside on these axes, and while meandering through the garden new views and perspectives of these are revealed. NE

O WY

AV RK

E

NW

10TH STREET

I STREET

H STREET

CLASSICAL GARDENS

GOAL: On the site of the old Washington Convention Center, design two classical and two romantic gardens.

WASHINGTON DC

ROMANTIC GARDENS

GARDEN DESIGN


ENVIR ONMENTAL CENTER GARDEN

GOAL: Design a new garden based on previous designs to house a new Environmental Center. DESIGN The biggest change was taking the new North-South axis from the classical gardens and tilting it to a diagonal. This takes the strong connections to The Convention Center and Chinatown and directs them through the building and to a windmill. The building and the winmill become visual cues along the meandering romantic paths. The windmill that sits on the tenth street axis not only produces on-site wind power but also could be seen from National Mall along Tenth Street. Visitors to the garden will catch glimpses of the environmental center and its meadow through the trees as they journey along these paths. The meadow in front of the Environmental center not only provides views to and from the building and but also a space for outdoor events.


ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER GOAL: Design an environmental center on the site of the old convention center in Washington DC. The program includes offices, a library, and a gallery for educating visitors on sustainability. The building itself is to be sustainable as well. DESIGN: The building is stacked into a bar to minimize its footprint. A private bar of offices and storage is stacked in the northern half of the building and the public zone containing the library and exhibition spaces are stacked in the south to allow sun access and views. The curve of the roof that defines the silhouette of the building has a number of purposes. It collects rain runoff and aids in tilting the solar panels to ideal angles for capturing solar power. It also curves up and out from the library to allow it to open to sun and views into the garden.


CONCEPT 1

CONCEPT 2

FINAL CONCEPT


ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER The private zone has thick walls to create a buffer zone to wind and cold in the winter. The bar is wrapped in reclaimed metal, has small punched openings, and sports a green roof. These sustainable elements also help to portray the solidity of the zone. The open zone that contains the library and gallery is made up of a system of wooden beams with large glass windows and doors. This opens the rooms up to the garden and allow natural light into to the public zones. They are also able to harness the sun for passive solar heating in the winter. Louvers and a roof overhang help reduce this solar gain in the summer while operable clerestory windows and doors allow for natural ventilation. Materials are used to connect the building to both the garden and the city around it. Recycled metal and low-e glass relate to the office buildings surrounding the site. Local wood and green roof are used to connect to the garden.

PERSPECTIVE A

PERSPECTIVE B


CITY SITE MATERIALS

GARDEN SITE MATERIALS

WINTER SUN PERSPECTIVE C

SUMMER SUN

NATURAL VENTILATION


MIXED USE APARTMENTS GOAL: Design an urban block in NW DC and design a mixed use building to place in it that includes a museum, nine apartment levels, and a library on top. DESIGN: The existing 10th and I Streets are continued through the site to define the shape of the block. A second north-south axis serves as a pedestrian walkway that is flanked by shops and offices. This axis is cranked diagonally to create a strong connection to the nearby public hub of Chinatown. Because of the strength of this connection, the axis terminates in a park on that corner. The mixed use apartment building is situated along this space with a tower jutting out into the park, making it a prominent feature. The pedestrian walkway also terminates in this tower, and so a forced perspective develops along the axis to focus the attention of visitors in the north end of the walkway toward the building.


SOUTH FACADE

PERSPECTIVE A

PERSPECTIVE B

The tower is announced by large expanses of glass and a grandeur that draws the eye. This gives it the visual power to organize the spaces around it. A separate apartment lobby mirrors the tower and helps to bookend the wide south facade. Limestone defines the Museum as the base of the facade and grounds the design. In addition, large two story windows indicate the public nature of the space. The southern facade allows an unobstructed view into the large temporary exhibit room to entice visitors with new displays. The middle of the facade sports punched windows set in brick to denote the private levels. Larger apartments get prime views of public spaces through expansive windows in the tower. The Library level meets the sky with an expression of glass and steel pulling out from behind the heavy mass of the building. The lightness of the top piece helps to transition from the limestone and brick body to the sky above.


MIXED USE APARTMENTS The tower unifies all of the major public spaces. It pulls the pedestrian street into the scheme, and makes a connection between the Library and Museum through nine floors of apartments. The museum lobby is centered in the tower and has entrances on three sides. The two story space at the center reorients visitors and directs them down the main eastwest corridor. This hallway leads to the elevator core and intersects the north-south axis. The corridor also opens up to a flexible exhibit space through a colonnade. The second axis draws people from this space into other exhibits and the lecture hall atrium. The elevator core takes visitors up to the Library and through a reverse procession. This sequence ends where the Museum’s began, in the tower. Here, a reading and sitting area on the mezzanine level is surrounded by large windows. Whereas the Museum had physical connections to axes and public spaces, the Library makes visual connections to the same features.

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17.

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SECTION A


MUSEUM 2. 6.

3. 11. 4.

5.

Lobby Flex Exhibit Space Permanent Exhibit Space Lecture Hall Cafe Storage and Mechanical

OFFICE FLOOR 7. Reception 8. Office 9. Conference Room

3.

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

RESIDENTIAL

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10. Lobby 11. Courtyard

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LIBRARY 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

Rooftop Garden Reception Mezzanine Reading Room Conference Room Mechanical and Storage

A

1.

SECTION B

B

B

A


VISUAL ANALYSIS

ARCH470 FALL 2010

IDENTITY MATRIX: Design a matrix by answering a number of questions about who you are. Include a picture. Along the silhouette are things that are percieved at face-value. It fades through internal qualities to things about me that one might learn when they know me better. POSTCARD: Pick a movie and illustrate a scene in Form-Z to be used as an image for a postcard. This scene from the movie the Labrynth is set in a version of the escher stair. The main character falls from the steps as they unravel and this is her view up as she falls. BARCELONA PAVILLION : Using a digital model of the Barcelona Pavillion, visually illustrate its main concepts. I used manipulted typography to tell the story of how these aspects actually behaved and were used to enhance the spaces in the pavillion.

IDENTITY MATRIX

POSTCARD

BARCELONA PAVILLION ANALYSIS


FINAL PROJECT: Design a folly for the great space of the UMD Architecture building.

STUDIO TREEHOUSE

MEDITATION

OBSERVATION

INTERACTION

DESIGN: In this building there is no space for students to relax, so I designed a “treehouse” that exists between the first and second floors for them to climb up into. A box on the second level has bunks to give students privacy and allow them to sleep. The platforms facilitate any activity students require, from group meetings to watching a presentation. Finally, The highest platform sits above eye level under a skylight for meditation.

THE GREAT SPACE


ARCHITECTURAL SKETCHES I am very lucky to have lived so close to Washington D.C. my whole life and to attend school close enough to use it for architectural studies. As a result all of my best architectural sketches are of buildings and spaces in Washington D.C. On the bottom of this page are detailed renderings done for my undergraduate architecture application. They were first sketched on site and slowly redrawn and retraced in order to perfect the lines and details. The rest of the drawings were done as part of a visual analysis class designed to help develop field sketching skills to quickly and efficiently express concepts about the subject. The sketches range from plans and facade details to spacial analysis. All of these drawings were to be done in under 45 minutes and the focus was to be more on expressing ideas than making a pictureperfect image.



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