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ERIN E. METELKA

145 Mount Vista Dr. Vonore, TN 37885 (865) 680-3349 eemetelka@gmail.com


INTERIOR DESIGN INTERIOR DESIGN URBAN DESIGN INTERIOR DESIGN GRAPHIC DESIGN

MUSICIAN LOFTS

RECORD STORE, RECORDING STUDIO

MAGAZINE LAYOUT

UNIQUE TEXT

double-page spread

type as image

05 GRAPHIC PRESENTATION

workspace interiors

SHOWROOM

URBAN DESIGN

04 COMPETITION

clarksville, tn

03 ARCHITECTURE

residential

commercial

02 CODES

FINISH SCHEDULE, DETAILS

CAFE, ARTISAN, TEAMWORK, INTELLECTUAL

construction drawings

corporate

01 TECHNICAL DRAWING


INTERIOR DESIGN PRODUCT DESIGN INTERIOR DESIGN

CODDLE

QUALIFICATIONS

KATOM & OLD MILL

r2r studio resume

MACADO’S

r2r studio

09 DESIGN-BUILD

interior design educators council

CLASSROOM

JOINT REHABILITATION

08 GROUP COMPETITION

chair

07 FURNITURE

ut medical center

06 HEALTHCARE

CONTENTS

ARCH FIRM WORK


corporate office

TECHNICAL DRAWINGS

01

This project was geared towards learning the importance of creative, realistic design. I began by researching corporate design and learning what is needed to have a successful office space as well as the history of the building and the area. I then used my corporate knowledge in combination with the historical findings to develop my concept. My concept was strongly dependent on the fact that the world is constantly changing. However, throughout the years, this building has remained as a constant, unchanging element. Its static nature is emphasized by acting as a dry goods warehouse for over 120 years. Now, I am proposing to transition this slow changing, static building into a high speed corporate office space. Corporate offices have changed drastically in the past and are constantly continuing to change. The idea of our building slowly changing for such a long time and now exponentially increasing in its speed of change led to the image of a shock wave as it increases in speed. The involvement of my corporate research is seen primarily through the organization and programming of the space, as well as in the material selections. In my research, I found a study which discovered a correlation between colors and material finishes with the success of the type of work being done, due to the energy created. In my use of this study, I split each floor into a category which includes, teamwork, artisan, and intellectual. The team work areas use more reflective materials with brighter colors to increase energy and inspire creativity. The intellectual floors need to be very relaxed using more neutral colors, matte surfaces, and curves. While the artisan floors need more moderate energy levels which come from a combination of the teamwork and intellectual floors.

Third Year Spring 2012 Professor Geren


EDITING AUDIO PRODUCERS

ADJACENT NEARBY NOT ADJACENT NOT RELATED

FREE LANCE LARGE STUDIO SMALL STUDIO EXECUTIVES

VAULT EQUIPMENT STORAGE MAILROOM

ACCOUNTING

PRODUCTION

EDITORS

PRODUCERS

CONTROL MACHINE ROOM PRESIDENT CEO BREAKROOM BRAINSTORM

FACILITIES

CONTROL

CLIENT CONFERENCE ACCOUNTING QUALITY CONTROL

STUDIOS

VAULT

ADJACENCY DIAGRAM

ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

MASSING DIAGRAM


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

LEVEL 2: COLLABORATION CAFE


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

LEVEL 3: ARTISAN


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

LEVEL 4: TEAMWORK


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

LEVEL 5: INTELLECTUAL


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

construction drawings

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

TECHNICAL ASPECTS

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BYPRODUCED AN AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED PRODUCED BY BY AUTODESK ANAN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCED PRODUCEDBY BY ANAUTODESK AUTODESKEDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONALPRODUCT PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

STAIRCASE SECTION PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

DETAILS

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

DETAILED PLAN AND FINISH SCHEDULE

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


musicians all-inclusive

CODES RESEARCH

02

This project was about learning programming and developing the a space to meet all of the client’s needs. Months of research went into this project in order to understand the building, its location, the client, and all the needs and information associated with each. I created an entire 97 page programming book detailing the information gathered on the building history, owner information, history of the time period the building was built, and the style associated with the building’s architecture. As well as the demographics of Knoxville, circulation and site information including traffic, noise diagrams, sun diagrams, and market competition. As is important with any project, the programming book also held detailed information on the client and adjacency diagrams for each client. In my redevelopment of this building, I proposed to turn it into an allinclusive musicians location including a recording studio, a record/music store, and musicians lofts. The goal was to create a location for musicians that is in the heart of downtown Knoxville where the majority of the music market is, but in a price range that musicians can afford. The concept for this building came from the properties of fire. This building burned in 2007, but is still standing today. The execution of the concept can been seen through the development of the space. The musician lofts are the calm before the storm, very clean cut, pristine. The record store is the fire taking over and enveloping the space in its warmth, and the recording studio is the remembrance of the fire while using it to avoid future fires in the space.

Third Year Fall 2011 Professor Robinson


TRAVEL DISTANCE DIAGRAMS

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

B

1 2D UP

1

>21D

DOWN

UP

OL=26

1

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

UP

DOWN

DOWN

OL=96

UP

A

D

DOWN

UP

UP

1

UP

DOWN

D

A 3RD FLOOR STREET A1=120 feetDistance Travel DiagramLEVEL B1=98 feet

SUB-BASEMENT Sprinkler Plan

OL=451

OL=47

STREET LEVE Occupancy Loads Calculations

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

SUB-BASEMENT Diagonal Distance Diagram

OL=2

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

DOWN

DOWN

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

1

UP

UP

UP

B

A1=144 feet B1=66 feet

A1=99 feet B1=141

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


RECORDING STUDIO

RECORD STORE

MUSICIANS LOFT


BASEMENT PLAN

MAIN LEVEL PLAN

THIRD FLOOR PLAN


urban design

ARCHITECTURE

03

This project was a summer intensive course which focused on a redesign of downtown Clarksville, TN. This project included month long research of the existing conditions, roadways, businesses, residents, etc. As well as a facilitation focus group to get Clarksville residents feedback and ideas. The project began with a master plan design and then individual projects detailing the improvements. Many of the ideas include multipurpose parking garages, urban gardens, hotel expansion, a convention center, a magnet school, social security offices, student housing, Roxy Theater renovation, and an assisted living combined with the Baptist Church.

Fourth Year Summer 2012 Professor Davis


Existing

New Additions


showroom

COMPETITION

04

In this project, I was asked to design an interactive showroom space that integrates healthcare solutions from Steelcase’s Nurture line with the latest furniture solutions from Steelcase. After analyzing current trends in healthcare, I proposed an innovative design solution. I made sure to solidify the Steelcase brand experience through the built environment, product display, and graphic messaging by investigating new ways to blend Steelcase’s broad product line with healthcare solutions by Nurture. When we first visited the live-work center, we were moved around the space as if on a NASCAR track, moving quickly, weaving in and out of the products while barely seeing them, and only stopping in the break room. While this forward momentum and constant movement is beneficial in design to always be striving for better, it is important not to forget the moment we are in and highlight what is here and now. In my project, I wanted to present Steelcase as one large machine with a various small parts and pieces working together towards a common goal. I began by organizing the space into zones. Each zone highlights a particular area of the Steelcase line, such as Coalesse, Turnstone, Nurture, etc. These zone also serve a second purpose of focusing on a particular audience such as education, corporate, healthcare, etc. I wanted to give each company its turn in the spotlight while still allowing the fluid interaction of Steelcase to shine through. After determining the best solution to break up the space, I began to work on the layout. I wanted to give the space a feeling of fluid movement, while giving each zone its pausing moment. I did this by creating a floor patter which moves you around the space in an efficient fashion, yet while you are moving, you are given the opportunity to see all the various angles of the products while staying on track. These zones are then highlighted and branded by the additions of the ceiling systems which help to define each zone and make reference to the inner working parts of a machine. Fourth Year Fall 2012 Professor Geren


PLAN

RCP

ELEVATION


type as image

GRAPHIC DESIGN

05

Graphics are an important part of every project. This project was designed to learn how text or type can be used as an interesting aspect of a design or graphic layout and not just as an informative block. This particular assignment was created by taking 20 rectangles of the same size and creating a composition that gave a feeling of movement. After creating this movement, I made a new composition using the minimum number of letters to make the same movement. The letters could not be stretched or skewed, they could only be enlarged, rotated, and mirrored.

Third Year Spring 2012 Professor Fox


double-page spread

GRAPHIC DESIGN

This project was intended to take an architectural project, and design a two-page magazine spread which is graphically pleasing and is inspired by the design ideas used in the architecture. I chose the Atheneum designed by Richard Meier. His design is largely geared by the a double grid system which is offset at a five degree angle. Within this grid, there is a large pathway that extends from the town of Harmony, Indiana, through the building and connects to the Wabash River. In my layout design, I used a three column grid and played with its shifting similar to the Atheneum. I then, made sure to maintain a continuous path throughout the layout to guide the reader’s eyes through the spread, while using text and breaks in text to reference the angles used in the Atheneum.

“The building has two dispositions: the primary orthogonal grid, a response to the existing street grid of the town, and a secondary grid shifted five degrees. The latter takes its cue from the skew edge of the town and the river bank.”

ATHENEUM Cover Photo Photo 1 Photo 2 Photo 3 Photo 4

Architecture, like the phalanstery which was to be build in New Harmony by the architect Stedman Whitwell, assumed the role of agent of social and economic change; in the words of Owen’s French counterpart Charles Fourier, the problem was “to find the architectural conditions most appropriate to the needs of individual and social life, and to construct according to these conditions the type of habitation which would constitute the social beehive of the rural commune.” This utopian vision of the relation between habitation and social life may still be felt in the now-restored Harmonist architecture extant in the town. Located on a plain near the banks of the Wabash River, the Wabash floods to varying heights every year, and building on a flood plain is not without problems. It is for this reason that the Atheneum is elevated on a raised podium of earth. During flood season, it suggests the Atheneum is like Rapp’s “boatload of knowledge” which arrived in New Harmony with its cargo of settlers, the building seems to float above the water, a porcelain-paneled object from another time and context which contrasts with the town’s roughhewn fences and clapboard houses. However this radiant porcelainpaneled building is woven into the community by design and use.

The Atheneum represents Richard Meier’s fullest expression of architectural promenade as a plan generator. The irregular building form results from an internalized path as well as shifted grids and abstracted references to the site and history of New Harmony. The Atheneum, located on a rolling plain near the banks of the Wabash River at the edge of New Harmony, is the starting point for the tour of the historic town, and is intended to serve as a center for visitor orientation and community cultural events. Here the ethereality inherent in Meier’s architecture of whiteness and light becomes palpable. Although the program is not explicitly spiritual, the Atheneum embodies the spirit of the place. The town’s physical and symbolic link with the water and the outside world, the building is a place of arrival and initiation. Its architecture is conceived in terms of the linked ideas of architectural promenade and historical journey. Historically New Harmony was on of the most significant utopian communities in America. Founded in 1815 by George Rapp’s Harmony Society and then reestablished in 1825 by the British social reformer Robert Owen and the Owenties, it constituted

the building. As the ramp winds upward from the orthogonal grid and regains the orientation of the path from the river, the entire building is set in motion, the geometry of overlaid grids inducing a sense of spatial compression at certain points, tension at others; as one circulation path inflects toward another, one feels spaces arrowing, then opening up--of grids almost colliding. This collision resonates throughout the complex interior as the ramp, illuminated by a flood of light from above, resolves the two grids in plan and section. The ramp arrives on the second level at an exhibition space which contains a model of old New Harmony lit by a canted skylight. The light penetrating from skylights throughout the building serves to dematerialize the shifting wall planes and throws the changing ceiling and floor heights into relief. Upon reaching the exhibition space on the third level, the visitor can look back on the internal route he has traveled, through staggered interior slots and windows framing the essential spaces, as well as forward to what is to come. Framed views to the exterior allow controlled glimpses and five-degree offset

Multiple routes are incorporated into the building, including a long pathway that extends through the Atheneum and connects the riverbank to the town. Central to the concept is an internal ramp that directs movement through the building. Ascending the ramp, visitors travel through exhibition spaces, up and around the building, up to rooftop observation decks, and then down to enter the town itself. A visitor arriving by boat is deposited on a path that leads up through the field to the building. On reaching the podium, the water route is joined by a path from the parking lot. A three-story plane set at a forty-degree angle to the podium acknowledges the point of arrival. This plane conveys the visitor to the actual portal, a doorway shifted five degrees in orientation to announce the primary grid of the building. The building has two dispositions: the primary orthogonal grid, a response to the existing street grid of the town, and a secondary grid shifted five degrees. The latter takes its cue from the skew edge of the town and the river bank. Once the visitor has crossed the threshold, the entry box, like a small compression chamber, propels him past adjacent pockets of space to the foot of the internal circulation ramp. From here, the entire movement system through the building is a continuous experience, of which the interior ramp is chief mediator and armature. This ramped circulation spine, as it leads from the entryorientation level to the exhibition and lounge spaces to the film theater, progressively unfolds the content of

anticipations of the town and the landscape. Finally the visitor moves to the rooftop and upper-level terraces where the route of egress takes him through punctured that continually refer to and refract the scene outside. At the uppermost roof terrace, the visitor finds himself confronted with the town. On axis with the major monuments of New Harmony-the restored log cabins of the Harmonists, the Pottery Studio,the Roofless Church designed by Philip Johnson, and the commemorative gardens build in honor of Paul Tillich-this small space affords a panoramic vista like that from the prow of a ship. From here the visitor descends by way of a second ramp--this one elongated and stepped, an uncoiled version of the interior one--leading out of the building to the adjacent restaurant and amphitheater, and into the town itself. The Atheneum provides an introduction to the planes

N e w Harmony experience with an orientation film, communal history exhibits, and an observation desk. The Atheneum serves as the visitor orientation center for New Harmony and the region. It is also used for community events and programs. All tours begin here with a free orientation at the Hospitality Table. Brochures and maps of the town and region are available for visitors and tickets for historic site tours can be purchased here. Guided tours begin with an orientation film about New Harmony history and a tour of the Atheneum and its exhibits. To emphasize its function as a public building all spaces not necessarily enclosed, such as the theater, are visible. The glass walls add to the feeling of openness. The large windows are used to frame selected views of the town, relating to the information given to visitors.In its formal structure the Atheneum recalls the 1920s work of French architect Le Corbusier (1887-1965) of the “International Style” school, by its use of ramps, glass walls, columns and graceful curving lines. Meier expanded and manipulated the Modernist architectural vocabulary and evolved out of it a highly personalized style. Planes, columns, and projections are assembled in a complex arrangement. As in his earlier works, square white porcelain steel-backed panels coat the exterior in a grid-like pattern.The name Atheneum is derived from the Greek Athenaion, which was a temple in Athens dedicated to


06

KNOWLEDGE

joint rehabilitation

-PRIVACY

-UNDERSTANDING

-INTERFACE

HEALTHCARE

CONTROL -NOISE

-PREPARATION

STRESS

-GARDENS

-WAYFINDING

-NATURE

-HOBBIES

-VISITORS

-HAPPY FACES

-WINDOWS

SOCIAL

PROPOSED FENESTRATION

DISTRACTIONS

This project was my first exposure in healthcare design. We were asked to redesign the seventh floor at The University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville. The purpose was to redesign this floor to be used as a Joint Rehabilitation center. This means this floor would not be a critical care unit and most patients would remain here for three or four days. The client continually described wanting a “spa-like” atmosphere to the space, therefore I began by researching the bones of what a spa is. The term “spa” is associated with water treatment which is also known as balneotherapy. The belief in the curative powers of mineral waters goes back to prehistoric times. Day spas are also quite popular, and offer various relaxation treatments, personal care, and even the idea of hot water therapy for medicinal purposes and stress relief. Stress typically describes a negative concept that can have an impact on one’s mental and physical well-being. For this reason, my design focuses on creating a stressfree environment. Much research has shown a negative effect stress has on the immune system. Responses to stress include adaptation, psychological coping such as stress management, anxiety, and depression. Over the long term, distress can lead to diminished health and/or increased opportunity to illness. Since stress has such an impact on an individuals immune system, psychological supportive design to reduce stress can actually help patients heal faster. Patients are under two major sources of stress: illness and physical-social environments. Some ways to improve a patient’s stress level through design is to give them a sense of control with respect to their physical and social surrounds. This includes addressing noise travel and control, wayfinding, visual privacy, a place to pursue personal hobbies, control of room temperature, and easy access to staff. Additionally, social support can be beneficial to patients mental well being.

Fourth Year Fall 2012 Professor Geren


PARTIAL FLOORPLAN

PATIENT ROOM PCP


coddle chair

FURNITURE

07

This project, I wanted to create a chair that caters to my personal preferences. I have a very hard time getting comfortable when sitting and wanted to create a chair that formed to my body and coddled me, supporting the areas I needed. My program for this chair was for it to be used in my living as a casual type of seating which was comfortable for sitting and working on the computer, watching tv, or visiting. I began this process by sketching a shape that made me feel comfortable and coddled. I then transformed the shape into three dimensions and developed the chair through a series of drawings, 3D models, scale models, and full scale models. The end product I feel was a success.

Fourth Year Fall 2012 Professor Aoukar


08

ACTIVE

SOCIAL

classroom

IDEC COMPETITION

REFLECTIVE

CLASSROOM

CAFE INDEPENDENT STUDY

FIVE GOALS 1. Improve knowledge retention 2. Challenge the traditional classroom environment 3. Unify spaces 4. Promote equality through universal design 5. Facilitate variety in learning

This project was a group competition project, hosted by the Interior Design Educators Council. The goal of the project was to research the changing trends in education design and incorporate technology. We had to come up with five primary goals to drive our design. In beginning this project, we chose to start with the question of “WHY.� We wanted to give this project purpose and passion. Our answer to the question of why is as follows: we believe in challenging the traditional classroom environment by focusing on the individual and creating a unique learning experience. It is now time to make the student the most important thing in learning. Our concept closely resembles the learning theory of brain-based learning. Brain-based learnings encourages the consideration of the nature of the brain and how it works best. Across the board, students are broken into three types of learning: tactile, auditory, and visual. Each of these learning styles must be addressed for each individual brain to perform at its optimal level. In our design, we broke the space into three main zones: reflective, social, and active. In order to make use of the space vertically, we created tiers using a system of ramps. As seen in the diagrams to the left, these tiers are broken into uses including: an independent study lounge, a coffee bar, a classroom, and a learning laboratory. Each space is organized so that there are active, social, and reflective learning environments incorporated into each of the main spaces. The use of the tiers allows for each area to have a sense of privacy while allowing continuity between spaces. In doing this, we have created a variety of spaces which highlight different learning types, and given universal access to all. Highlighting the different learning types helps to aid the student in customizing their learning to their unique brain and creating the most successful environment for brain-based learning.

Fourth Year Group: Riikka Ritola & Hannah Rice Fall 2012 Professor Geren


MEDIA LAB ELEVATION

CLASSROOM/CAFE SECTION

INDEPENDENT STUDY ELEVATION


MEDIA LAB LEVEL 1

CLASSROOM LEVEL 2

Momentum Piquant Mix

Wilsonart Blondecho 7939

INDEPENDENT STUDY LEVEL 1

Armstrong Natural Creations Arbor Art, Fruitwood

Maharam Agency

Wilsonart Astrostrandz 4940

Momentum Panorama Gamma

J+J Invision Emerge Transpire


macado’s restaurant

R2R STUDIO

09

This project was a project done by the architecture firm I work for, R2R Studio. Macado’s is a restaurant in Kingston, Tennessee. On this project, I created a multitude of floorplan options and a 3D model that were presented to the client. The client was extremely impressed with the body of work and we had an approved final floorplan after one meeting. This project in currently in the construction documents phase where I am working on all of the details needed to build and completing all codes research. While this project is not yet completed, I feel it is a perfect example of the work I am doing in the professional world and all that I am learning. The work on the next page are elevation sketches of two other projects we are currently working on the exterior for. At the firm, I primarily work on construction documents, 3D modeling, codes research, and space planning.

SKETCHUP MODEL R2R Studio: Scott Osborn, Daria Kroll, Lisa Bengston, Jason Atkins & Stephanie Hopson PLAN

Spring 2013


katom & old mill

OLD MILL ELEVATION SKETCH

KATOM ELEVATION SKETCH


Graduated: December 14, 2012

Overall GPA: 3.86/4.0

Bachelor of Science in Interior Design

College of Architecture and Design

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2009–2012

EDUCATION

Facilitated team practices, developed all choreography, coordinated with school administration, executed all fundraisers, and communicated with uniform reps.

Coach, 2011–present

Maryville Dance Team

Developed the master plan of the redesign of downtown Clarksville, TN, and acted as assistant facilitator.

Intern, 2012

Nashville Civic Design Center

Assembled all construction drawings, corresponded with product representatives, assisted with design, created 3D models, and performed code research.

Intern, 2012-present

R2R Studio

EXPERIENCE

Dynamic individual who utilizes creativity, leadership, and teamwork to design and execute solutions. One who uses effective planning and organizational skills that balance work, team support, and responsibilities in a timely and professional manner.

SUMMARY

145 Mount Vista Dr, Vonore, TN 37885 865.680.3349 eemetelka@gmail.com

ERIN METELKA


Design is where science and ar t break even.

References available upon request

Laser Cutter, Model Building

Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator

REVIT, Auto CAD, 3DS Max, SketchUp

SKILLS

Emerging Leaders Institute, 2008–2009

Student Government Association

Director of Fine Arts, 2008–2009

University Programs Council

Vice President, 2008–2009

Delta Gamma Sorority

2009–present

International Interior Design Association, IIDA Student Chapter

Vice President, 2011–present

American Society of Interior Designers, ASID Student Chapter, 2009

ACTIVITIES

Tau Sigma Delta, Architecture Honor Society, 2012-present

Angelo Donghia Foundation Scholarship Nominee, 2012

ASID/IIDA Showcase, 2012

Kurt J Keller Honor, 2011-2012

Frederick T Bonham Honor, 2011–present

Manfred and Stern Honor, 2010–present

Phi Eta Sigma Honor Society, 2008–present

National Society of Collegiate Scholars, 2008–present

Deans List nine semesters, 2008–2012

HONORS


Undergraduate Portfolio  

I am a recent graduate from The University of Tennessee with a Bachelors of Science in Interior Design. This portfolio is a representation o...

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