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Cedarburg Information Technology Plan June 2010–2013

Dr. Daryl Herrick, Superintendent

Approved by Board of Education: April 20, 2010 Contact Person: Linda J. Borkenhagen lborkenhagen@cedarburg.k12.wi.us 262-376-6107

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The mission of the Cedarburg School District is to provide an exemplary education that challenges students in a nurturing environment to become lifelong learners, to be responsible members of a global community, and to achieve their goals and dreams. In support of the mission, the school district is currently striving to embed twenty-first century skills into each curricular area and is looking for diverse ways that students can demonstrate these skills. The Information (Library Media) Technology plan was developed with this goal in mind. One of the strengths of the plan is that the district provides certified IMC directors and staff in every school that will play a central role in implementing the actions in this plan. The actions in the plan are centered on the following goals and measurable objectives: Goal 1: Professional development opportunities will be provided by the district for teachers to become proficient in twenty-first century skills and implement them into their curriculum and assessments. Objective: •

Objective 1.1: By June 2013, Teacher Proficiency will be at a 5.0 or higher as measured by the Dimensions21 online survey or will achieve a similar rating as measured by a comparable tool.

Goal 2: Increase teacher knowledge of how to implement and assess twenty-first century skills to provide multiple perspectives for our students and more student-designed projects. Objectives: • • • • •

Objective 2.1: By June 2011, 100 percent of educators will know expectations for student attainment of twenty-first century skills. Objective 2.2: By June 2013, the district will track student progress on twenty-first century skills. Objective 2.3: By June 2013, the percentage of student-designed projects will increase. Objective 2.4: By June 2013, the use of technology to support authentic local and community projects will increase. Objective 2.5: By June 2013, the level of online communications with experts, peers, and others will be at the exploration level or higher as measured by the Dimensions21 online survey or will be at a similar level as measured by a comparable tool. Objective 2.6: Each educator will participate in annual job-embedded professional development to develop and share lessons incorporating twenty-first century skills and digital citizenship.

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Goal 3: The District’s facilities and equipment will be well maintained and current to accommodate changing needs. Objectives: •

• • •

Objective 3.1: By June 2013, Access and Infrastructure will be at a 5.0 or higher as measured by the Dimensions21 online survey or will receive a similar rating as measured by a comparable tool. Objective 3.2: By June 2013, Access and Infrastructure will be at a 5.0 or higher as measured by the Dimensions21 online survey or will receive a similar rating as measured by a comparable tool. Objective 3.3: Each educator will participate in an annual online or blended learning experience as evidenced by individual teacher goals and evaluation. Objective 3.4: By June 2013, Dimensions21 results will show that the district has maintained a high level of technical support. Objective 3.5: By June 2013, the district will have increased access to online resources.

Goal 4: The district will use best practices for information and technology to meet the learning needs of all students. •

Objective 4.1: By June 2013, the district will have a system of tracking teacher proficiency and show continual improvement.

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CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .............................................................................................................................. 2 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................... 5 Research that Supports this Plan............................................................................................................ 5 Cedarburg School District Mission Statement....................................................................................... 7 BACKGROUND ........................................................................................................................................... 9 Collaborative Initiatives among Community Resources and Adult Literacy Providers ........................ 9 PLANNING PROCESS ................................................................................................................................ 11 COMMUNITY/SCHOOL DISTRICT DEMOGRAPHICS .................................................................................. 14 THE EVOLUTION OF THE LIBRARY MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM ............................................. 15 History of Technology in the District .................................................................................................. 15 History of the Instructional Media Program ........................................................................................ 15 2003–06 Advances in the Library Media and Technology Program ................................................... 16 2006–09 Advances in Library Media and Technology Program......................................................... 16 NEEDS ASSESSMENT STATUS .................................................................................................................. 20 Review of Previous Plan Goals ........................................................................................................... 20 ANALYSIS OF STUDENT PROFICIENCY..................................................................................................... 22 Identification of Underserved Populations Concerning Information and Technology Literacy, Access, and/or Equity ....................................................................................................................................... 23 ANALYSIS OF EDUCATOR PROFICIENCY.................................................................................................. 23 Strengths .............................................................................................................................................. 24 Needs ................................................................................................................................................... 24 ANALYSIS OF EFFECTIVE TEACHING AND LEARNING PRACTICES .......................................................... 24 Strengths .............................................................................................................................................. 25 Needs ................................................................................................................................................... 25 ANALYSIS OF ACCESS TO INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES ............................................. 26 Access to Library Media Information Technology Resources ............................................................ 28 ANALYSIS OF SUPPORT SYSTEMS AND LEADERSHIP ............................................................................... 31 ACTION PLANS ........................................................................................................................................ 32 1.0 Educator Proficiency Action Plan.................................................................................................. 32 2.0 Effective Teaching and Learning Action Plan............................................................................... 33 3.0 Access to Information and Technology Action Plan ..................................................................... 35 4.0 Support Systems and Leadership Action Plan............................................................................... 42 BUDGET ................................................................................................................................................... 43 DISSEMINATION TO STAKEHOLDERS ....................................................................................................... 45 MONITORING, EVALUATION, AND REVISION .......................................................................................... 46 APPENDICES............................................................................................................................................. 47

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INTRODUCTION Research that Supports this Plan The key elements of twenty-first century learning are represented in Figure 1 and the accompanying descriptions below. Figure 1 represents both twenty-first century skills student outcomes (as represented by the arches of the rainbow) and twenty-first century skills support systems (as represented by the pools at the bottom).

Figure 1. Key Elements of Twenty-first Century Learning

The Importance of Twenty-first Century Skills A recent report by The Partnership for 21st Century Skills entitled 21st Century Skills, Education & Competitiveness provides three reasons why technology is important to our nation’s economy (Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2008). They are: Reason # 1: Fundamental Changes in the Economy, Jobs and Business Over the last several decades, the industrial economy based on manufacturing has shifted to a service economy driven by information, knowledge and innovation (p. 2). Reason # 2: New, Different Skill Demands Advanced economies, innovative industries and firms, and highgrowth jobs require more educated workers with the ability to respond flexibly to complex problems, communicate effectively, manage information, work in teams and produce new knowledge (p. 6). 5


Reason # 3: Two Achievement Gaps For the past decade, the United States has focused nationally on closing achievement gaps between the lowest- and highest performing students—a legitimate and useful agenda, but one that skirts the competitive demand for advanced skills (p. 8). At the transformation level of using technology, technology is used as a tool to identify and solve real-world, authentic problems. Technology provides a seamless medium for information queries, problem solving, critical thinking skills, and product development. Interactive communication technologies are often employed to allow students to collaborate with other students and experts outside of the classroom. Learning activities are diversified and based mostly on student questions. The teacher serves more as a co-learner or facilitator in the classroom. Student projects are primarily studentcentered, alternative assessment strategies, including performance-based assessments, peer reviews, and student reflections, are commonly used. The use of technology emerges based on the needs of the learning and according to the student’s interests, needs, and/or aspirations and is supported by access to current computer applications and infrastructure (LOTI & ACOT). How Teachers Learn In the same way that students are being better served by learning communities that address their long-tail needs, teachers and other education professionals should be able to learn, grow, and develop professionally in a setting that recognizes their learning needs and supports them. Technology can help facilitate: •

Technical Training: Just-in-time “how to” training from sources such as Atomic Learning solves the long-tail problem of teaching the same task to different people at the exact time and level that each learner needs. Professional Learning Communities (PLCs): In districts like the JeffCo Public Schools in Colorado and nationally through organizations such as eCoach, PLCs connect teachers with like-minded colleagues for ongoing professional development and support. Social Networking for Teachers: Perhaps one of the most intriguing examples of the changing way in which teachers learn is the rise of social networking and “collective intelligence” through social networks such as Classroom 2.0 (Greenwood-Henke, 2009).

Why the Teaching and Learning Environment Needs to Change Students learn in a multitude of venues, many of which are outside the formal school day. Increasingly, educators are recognizing the value in preparing students to be self-directed in these informal learning spaces. This helps them ask deep questions and sustain curiosity, as they seek clarity, depth, accuracy, comprehensiveness, and currency of the topics they are exploring. Informal learning represents tremendous opportunity for extending students’ exploration and understanding of academic content beyond the school day (The Metiri Group, 2009).

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The Importance of Library Media Specialists The highest-achieving students come from schools with good library media centers (Lance, Rodney, Hamilton-Pennell, 2000). Library media specialists have multiple roles they play in the school system, including teacher, instructional partner, information partner, information specialist, and program administrator (ALA, 1998). Library media specialists play all of these roles in this plan as well. References: ALA. (1998). ALA | Roles & Responsibilities of the School Library Media Specialist. Retrieved March 13, 2010, from http://www.ala.org/aaslTemplate.cfm?Section= informationpower&Template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=19 930. Greenwood-Henke, K. (2009). ExecSmry2009-Artcl_3-LongTail-v3.pdf. Retrieved March 12, 2010, from http://www.cosn.org/Portals/7/docs/compendium/2009/Executive% 20summaries/ExecSmry2009-Artcl_3-LongTail-v3.pdf. Partnership for 21st Century Skills. (2008). 21st_century_skills_education_and_competitiveness_guide.pdf. Retrieved March 12, 2010, from http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/documents/21st_century_skills_ education_and_competitiveness_guide.pdf. The Metiri Group. (2009). Dimensions21 Report.

Cedarburg School District Mission Statement The mission of the Cedarburg School District is to provide an exemplary education that challenges students in a nurturing environment to become lifelong learners, to be responsible members of a global community and to achieve their goals and dreams. Information and Technology Literacy Mission and Vision The mission of the Cedarburg Information (Library Media) and Technology Literacy Program is to ensure that students are life-long learners and effective users of information and technology resources to solve problems, satisfy personal curiosity, construct new knowledge, interact, communicate and collaborate globally in a safe and ethical manner. The vision of the Cedarburg Information (Library Media) and Technology Literacy Program is that students will: •

•

have equitable access to current, well-maintained facilities, equipment, information and technology resources incorporated into a comprehensive, relevant curriculum supported by a well-trained certified staff and a dynamic IMC program be active and responsible users of information and technology 7


Staff will: •

• •

use the collective expertise of the Cedarburg educational community to ensure that Information and Technology Literacy benchmarks are met and 21st century skills are developed model and teach 21st century skills appropriately show continued growth in the integration of current technologies on a consistent basis

Cedarburg School District will: •

• •

• •

expect effective integration of information and technology skills into the K–12 curriculum based on Wisconsin Information and Technology Literacy Standards and 21st century skills, ISTE NETS, and AASL standards provide a collaborative environment that fosters effective communication among students and the Cedarburg education community provide professional development opportunities to include proficient use of resources, adequate time for collaboration, and integration of information literacy and technology resources into the curriculum require safe and ethical use of information and technology provide cutting edge, well-maintained facilities, equipment, and information and technology resources to accommodate evolving needs in our global community

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BACKGROUND Table 1 illustrates the demographic makeup of the student populations for each school in the Cedarburg School District. Table 1. Cedarburg School District Student Demographics School

Cedarburg High School Webster Transitional School Parkview Elementary School Thorson Elementary School Westlawn Elementary School District Total

School Enrollment

Percent of White Students

Percent of Black Students

Percent of Hispanic Students

Percent of American Indian Students

Percent of Asian/Pacific Island Students

Percent of Students Receiving Free and Reduced Lunch

1,117

96.2

1.2

1.4

0.1

1.2

4.9

692

95.7

1.6

1.2

0.1

1.4

7.1

401

92.5

1.0

1.0

1.2

4.2

9.5

492

96.7

0.4

0.6

0.2

2.0

2.4

319

93.1

1.6

1.6

0.9

2.8

9.7

3,080

95.3

1.3

1.2

0.4

1.9

6.0

* Source: 2008–09 WINNS data

Collaborative Initiatives among Community Resources and Adult Literacy Providers The Cedarburg School District maintains a number of community partnerships related to technology that benefit both the school district and the community. Existing partnerships include: • Cedarburg Education Foundation • Cedarburg Fire Department • Cedarburg Police Department • Cedarburg Light and Water Utility Company • Cedarburg Public Library • Cedarburg Rotary Club • Community arts organizations (e.g., ENCORE, Cedarburg Performing Arts Center) • Community senior care facilities (e.g., Lasata, Cedar Springs, Harbor Village) • Area higher education facilities (e.g., MATC, Concordia University, Marquette University, UW-Milwaukee, MSOE) 9


• • • • • • • • • • •

Cedarburg parent organizations (e.g., PTA, PTO, Dad’s Club) Ozaukee Council Community business partnerships (for classroom presentations, field trip connections, Junior Achievement, school-to-work partnerships) CESA #1 Wisconsin Education Innovations (formerly known as the Sally Ride Academy) CMS4Schools Website Consortium Ozaukee County Assistive Technology Committee Build Your Own Curriculum Consortium Starting Point of Ozaukee County Riveredge Nature Center Pineview Rehabilitation Center

The Cedarburg School District has offered classes to the community since 1995 through its Adult Continuing Education (ACE) program. Classes to increase technology skills are offered as part of each session. A copy of a brochure of recent course offerings is included as Appendix A. The District has a partnership with Wisconsin Communities Recyclor, Inc., a nonprofit electronic recycling company dedicated to the preservation of the environment and the responsible use of natural resources. Equipment the district can no longer use is donated to this organization, which in turn, rebuilds computer systems for nonprofit organizations like schools, churches, and other community organizations.

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PLANNING PROCESS In spring 2009, teachers in the district took the Dimensions21 online survey. Dimensions21 provides schools with insights into the elements required to translate twenty-first century learning into action. The survey measures the following dimensions: • • • • • • •

Forward-Thinking, Shared Vision Systems Thinking Twenty-first Century Skills and Learning Approaches Twenty-first Century Learning Environments Teacher Proficiency with Twenty-first Century Skills and Technology Access and Infrastructure Accountability and Results

These seven dimensions represent the divergent and innovative thinking it takes to ground school practices in emergent cognitive, social, and neuroscience research. Each dimension is an indicator of the school’s progress with twenty-first century learning and is calibrated on an eightpoint scale, as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2. Dimensions21 Scale

Eight administrators and 164 teachers took the survey. Figure 3 shows how the district scored on each dimension.

Figure 3. Cedarburg School District Dimensions21 Scores

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A planning committee of representative stakeholders was formed to analyze data from the Dimensions21 survey and to work on developing the plan. The District is grateful for the time and expertise shared by the following members of the planning committee: Deanna Barth

IMC Director, Cedarburg High School

Linda Borkenhagen

Director of Technology

Shannon Coenen

Fifth Grade Teacher, Thorson Elementary School

Kelly Hagen

IMC Director, Thorson Elementary School

Fredrika Harper

Director of Curriculum and Instruction

Ann Ingham

Fourth Grade Teacher, Westlawn School

Mary Karpowicz

IMC Director, Parkview Elementary School

Robert Klimpke

Principal, Webster Transitional School

Patti Knudson

Sixth Grade Teacher, Webster Transitional School

Lorraine LeSage

IMC Director, Westlawn Elementary School, Westlawn parent

Scott Mantei

Assistant Principal, Cedarburg High School

Eric Mesa

Technology Department Staff

Chad Meyer

Meyer Solutions IT Consultant, Parkview Parent

Annie Montguire

Science Teacher, Cedarburg High School

Kim O’Rourke

Kindergarten Teacher, Thorson Elementary School

Cindy Overschmidt

Cedarburg High School IMC assistant and CHS parent

Chris Rogers

Fourth Grade Teacher, Parkview Elementary School

Mary Stoiber

IMC Director/Coordinator, Webster Transitional School

Ellen Wilde

School Board Member

Amanda Zurbuchen

Occupational Therapist/Assistive Technology Coordinator

In each meeting, the planning committee reviewed Dimensions21 data and relevant research and worked on developing action plans around identified areas of need. The committee met the following times to work on different parts of the plan: • • • • • •

Mission and Vision: August 20 Effective Teaching and Learning Practices: October 13 Educator Proficiency: December 2 Access to Information and Technology Resources: January 28 Support Systems and Leadership: February 16 Review of the draft of the plan: March 29

In addition to meeting as a committee, representatives also worked hard to inform other stakeholders about progress on the plan. Members of the committee shared progress on the plan 12


at staff meetings, Administrative Council meetings, and PTO meetings. Information and updates were also posted on the district website and included in school and district newsletters.

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COMMUNITY/SCHOOL DISTRICT DEMOGRAPHICS The Cedarburg School District is located in Cedarburg, Wisconsin. Approximately 3,100 students attend schools in the Cedarburg School District. The district has one early learning center, three elementary schools (K–5), one middle school (6–8), and one high school (9–12). About 90 percent of students attend higher education following graduation from the district. The district employs approximately 350 staff members. Cedarburg is a suburban community located eighteen miles north of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Cedarburg’s current population is about 11,440. The district encompasses approximately thirtysix square miles and serves all or portions of the cities of Cedarburg and Mequon; the towns of Cedarburg, Grafton, and Jackson; and the Village of Grafton.

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THE EVOLUTION OF THE LIBRARY MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM History of Technology in the District The district began to purchase hardware and software to support teaching and learning in the late 1980s. The district had a part-time technology coordinator and a district technology committee. There was no line item for technology in the district budget. Consultants were hired to study the use of technology within the district. As a result of that study, the district hired a full-time technology coordinator. District funds were also allocated for the purchase of technology. In 1996, a referendum allocated approximately one million dollars for technology infrastructure. Telephones were installed in each classroom, a local area network was created within each building, and a wide area network connected all schools. Library software and hardware was purchased for all of the schools. Voicemail capabilities were made available to the elementary and middle schools. In the late 1990s, the district converted from the Follett Library automation software to Winnebago software. Printers and some computers were added at all three elementary school libraries. Each school also received a new file server for this system and a computer for data entry. The libraries received computers for search stations. Access in the high school began to improve with the installation of PCs in every classroom and in other areas such as teacher’s lounges. File servers were upgraded to minimize downtime, and additional wiring was added to improve access. A Citrix system was also added to provide staff access to school files and software from home. The District Strategic Plan was adopted by the Board in the summer of 2003. The process involved wide stakeholder involvement and provided the framework for the planning process for the Information and Technology Literacy Plan. Eighty people were involved in the process.

History of the Instructional Media Program The Instructional Media Centers (IMCs) in the Cedarburg School District have provided a full range of information, technology, and reader services for many years. The IMCs have evolved as education has changed over the decades with the addition of new facilities, services, and many technologies. The IMCs are an integral part of the instructional program, as national and state standards advocate. In the 1970s, unified IMCs that combined library and audiovisual services were developed at the building level, and coordination at the district level was established. Paraprofessional staff, cable television services, an information skills curriculum, and additional equipment and media materials were added. In 1976, the position of District IMC Coordinator was added. The district’s role was established under Standard (J) of the State Statutes to provide direction and coordination for the district’s library media program. A long-range plan and a selection policy were developed.

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All IMCs have facilities for print and electronic materials, computers, online catalogs, and access for students to subscription online databases. The IMCs advocate a higher degree of collaboration and instruction in information literacy and technology so that students are able to analyze and use information in print and electronic media and enjoy the skill of reading for lifelong learning. IMC directors provide leadership on the building technology committees and have been an integral part of developing all district technology plans. The IMC program has received continuous support for its growth from the Board of Education and administration, and it will continue to strive to be an exemplary library media program in Wisconsin.

2003–06 Advances in the Library Media and Technology Program The following are highlights of the library media and technology programs from 2003–06: • • • • •

• • • • • •

• •

The number of computers in the IMCs, labs, and classrooms has increased. Equipment available throughout the district has become more standardized to reduce training and technical time. Subscriptions to additional online databases were purchased to increase resources for students and staff. The level of technical service to students and staff increased with the purchase of new hardware, new software, and staff realignment. New student and financial databases were purchased, providing a web-based grade book, family access to student information (including grades, lunch account balances, and email addresses for staff), and better access to financial and student data. The district’s website was redesigned with the purchase of a Content Management System, which includes an Intranet for posting information for staff. All Information and Technology Literacy standards are aligned with specific grade levels or required courses. The process of revising curriculum evolved with the purchase of a web-based system (Build Your Own Curriculum (BYOC)). Morning announcements are broadcast live at Webster Transitional School through the use of new hardware and software. An electronic help desk system has been purchased (Track-It!) to reduce turnaround time for addressing technology issues. The Technology Integration—Plain and Simple (TIPS) program offering job-embedded training was implemented for grades EC–8; grades 9–12 began offering this training in 2007. A security camera system was installed in the high school with direct access to the Cedarburg Police Department. Policy revisions related to technology were approved/revised as necessary (NIMAS, Board e-mail, assistive technology).

2006–09 Advances in Library Media and Technology Program The District continues to employ certified professional staff for IMCs in each school. They meet regularly to plan, coordinate district purchases, communicate services, sponsor authors, and

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discuss library media activities in the local area and state. They are active members of school technology committees, which meet monthly; most directors chair the committees. The following are highlights of the library media and technology program since the last plan was developed: • • • •

• • •

Selected and implemented a web-based online catalog. Increased the number of online resources and provide home access to them for students and staff. Investigated, evaluated, and selected a video streaming resource (Learn360) to enhance all areas of the curriculum. Added equipment such as computers, digital cameras, SMART Boards, document cameras, and LCD projectors in IMCs through the use of Common School Funds, Cedarburg Education Foundation grants, district technology funds, school funds, and parent organization funds. Kept collections up-to-date through weeding and purchasing new materials. Worked with the technology department to create electronic calendars so staff can reserve the dedicated computer labs and those in the IMCs. Elementary IMC directors work with student blog opportunity for Level 3 gifted and talent students.

Additional Highlights at Specific Schools Thorson IMC • • •

Developed blended learning experiences with Moodle for IMC book clubs, art history, and nutrition units. Added databases, ebooks, and playaways for differentiated learning. Increased resources with multicultural emphasis.

Parkview IMC • •

• •

Led Junior Great Books opportunity for second graders. Collaborated with classroom teachers in the areas of social studies, science, and language arts on various projects such as author studies, research on the biomes, and American Revolutionary War. Facilitated forensics activity for fifth graders. Coordinated Book-It reading program, Read Across America, and Read to Succed programs.

Westlawn IMC •

Collaborated with classroom teachers on several projects infusing twenty-first century skills, including students properly citing resources when creating multimedia projects, 17


team teaching communication arts lesson involving digital storytelling, and co-facilitating student use of spreadsheets to analyze collected data. Co-planned and delivered TIPS training with another Westlawn teacher for the entire staff of regular education classroom teachers. Followed training sessions by supporting and team teaching as lessons infused with twenty-first century skills were delivered to students.

Webster IMC • • • •

• •

Collaborated with teachers on numerous projects that incorporate best practices and technologies to enhance experiences, including Web 2.0 tools such as VoiceThread. Communicated with students using a webcam to communicate with others throughout the world. Worked with many different classes in creating various video projects, some of which are posted in the Webster IMC Moodle course. Organized author visits that include writer workshops. Students worked with the IMC director at Webster to create podcasts of the work created in these workshops. Projects were added to the IMC Moodle course. Encouraged lifelong readers through two active book clubs, the lunchtime book club and The Early Bird Book Club, which connect parents, teachers, students, and community in book discussions. Worked with students and teachers in developing research skills through the use of online database instruction and web evaluation, including proper MLA citation. Organized professional development opportunity about copyright for all K–8 staff and some high school staff.

CHS IMC •

• • •

Collaborated with health, social studies, and English teachers on various research projects, incorporating use of online and print resources to address many Wisconsin technology and information standards. Increased resources in the areas of journalism, religion, mythology, mental health, controversial issues, and Soundzabound royalty-free music. Updated the Cedarburg High School MLA handbook to reflect recent changes. Converted the collection from two cataloging systems (Dewey and Cutter Numbers) to one system (Dewey) reflected in the call number tags.

Advances in the Technology Program •

• •

Collaborated with Cedarburg Light and Water to connect all schools with fiberoptic cabling along with all CL&W pumping stations and electrical substations. The 1 GB connection to all school provides a cost-effective solution for increased reliability and speed. Completed two security audits with external contractors. Upgraded all computers to Windows XP and Office 2007 prior to the start of the 2007–08 school year. 18


• •

• • •

• •

Created a wireless environment in the District Office Board Room; installed wireless router, LCD projector, and ten laptops for training, working on curriculum, and meetings with small groups of individuals. Upgraded phone and voicemail systems to a Voice over IP (VoIP) system, providing more efficient use of the T-1 lines connecting the elementary schools to the high school. More channels can be used for carrying data when not needed for phones. Configured NetStorage, a feature of Novell, to allow middle and high school students access from home to their electronic files at school. Purchased and installed an auto phone dialer system (School Messenger) to provide another tool for communicating with parents and staff. The system is used for nonemergency calls, such as lunch account balances, and for emergencies, such as school closings. Implemented NWEA MAP testing system. Redesigned website using best practices in web design and input from a committee consisting of parents, administrators, teachers, support staff, and students. Created Skyward Student Access logins for high school students to have access to see grades, missing assignments, and class messages from teachers so students take a more active role in their education. Began using NComputing to stretch district dollars. The system allows one computer to be used to support either four or six users, depending on the box selected. NComputing is now being used in one lab at the middle school and in about six classrooms throughout the district. See Figure 4. Figure 4. NComputing Setup Set up and implemented a Moodle server to be used to develop online courses. Through staff training opportunities co-taught by the Director of Technology and Director of Curriculum and Instruction, over fifty teachers and administrators have created blended courses to supplement their faceto-face classes and prepare students with twenty-first century skills. Increased bandwidth to 10 MB; added additional 5 MB and will continue to monitor. Purchased and installed a new Internet filter with tremendous capabilities and reports (see Appendix H).

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NEEDS ASSESSMENT STATUS Review of Previous Plan Goals Goal 1: The district will use best practices for information and technology to meet the learning needs of all students. Objectives: • •

By September 2007, a District Information and Technology Committee will be formed. By February 2008, the draft of a new teacher evaluation tool will include a technology component.

Progress on Goal: The district incorporates best practices for information and technology to meet the needs of all students in a variety of ways. The district uses a backward by design approach (Wiggens and McTighe, 2005) in its curriculum mapping process and incorporates twenty-first century tools and grade level Information Technology Literacy (ITL) Standards in the curriculum adoption cycle. ITL standards have been embedded in all core curricular areas K– 8 and in required courses in grades 9–12. The district also provides professional development on best practices through its job-embedded training and annual Wisconsin Education Innovations (formerly known as the Sally Ride Academy). A District Information and Technology Committee was formed in August 2007. Members of the committee gained a broader view of technology from the district perspective, served as liaisons to building technology committees, and served as advocates for technology in their schools and the community. Most members of that committee joined others to form the committee developing this Information and Technology Plan. A new teacher evaluation tool was developed based upon the ten Wisconsin Teacher Standards, several of which provide specific benchmarks related to the use of technology. The district formally adopted use of this new tool during the 2008–09 school year. Goal 2: The district will provide students with a variety of resources incorporated into a comprehensive, relevant curriculum supported by well-trained staff and a dynamic IMC program. Objectives: •

By June 2010, all teachers will participate in job-embedded professional development that enables them to design a lesson enhanced with technology and tied to student achievement. By June 2010, staff use of technology at home will increase so that the use of technology increases at school.

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By June 2010, all teachers will have designed a lesson incorporating productivity software (e.g., spreadsheets, databases, concept mapping).

Progress on Goal: The district has provided numerous opportunities to make sure staff is well trained in the area of technology integration. With the exception of some new staff, every teacher has participated in the job-embedded professional development plan in which teachers design a lesson enhanced with technology and tied to student achievement. Lessons are shared with others through network access. In grades K–8, teachers have common planning times that are often used to share best practices and lesson plans. In addition, the district pays for teachers to attend the annual Wisconsin Education Innovations summer academy and has provided professional development on Moodle and the new math curriculum. Teachers can also improve technology integration skills through independent studies and book studies. Opportunities on early release days and school-led before and after school training sessions have also helped the district attain this objective. The district has taken a number of actions to ensure that it has a dynamic IMC Program. Each building has a certified IMC director and support staff to service staff and students. Twenty-five percent of Common School Funds is used to increase access to technology resources in the IMCs. This has provided funds to add a lab in each IMC so computers are available for every child in a class. IMC directors meet monthly to collaborate on best practices. IMC directors also serve on curriculum and grade level committees. In addition, the IMC curriculum has been updated since the last plan to incorporate technology standards. Goal 3: The district will provide staff development opportunities to include proficient use of resources, adequate time for collaboration, and incorporation of information literacy and technology resources into the curriculum. Objective: • By June 2010, 100 percent of teachers will develop a lesson in TIPS training and post it on Build Your Own Curriculum (BYOC). Progress on Goal: With the exception of some new staff, every teacher has participated in job-embedded professional development opportunities to design lessons enhanced with technology and tied to student achievement. Lessons are shared with others through network access rather than through BYOC at this time. Goal 4: The district’s facilities and equipment will be well maintained and state of the art to accommodate changing needs. Objectives: • By July 2007, access to school resources from home will be improved.

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•

By June 2009, purchases suggested by school technology committees will be based upon need as determined by lab and IMC usage.

Progress on Goal: Several additions to school resources have increased access from home. The web-based online catalog provides access from anytime, anywhere. NetStorage was configured so students in grades five through twelve have access to their school files from any computer outside the schools. E-mail, grade books, payroll information, Moodle, BYOC curriculum development software, and numerous online subscriptions provide staff and students, where applicable, access anytime, anywhere. A web version of the software used for IEPs is currently being implemented.

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ANALYSIS OF STUDENT PROFICIENCY Identification of Underserved Populations Concerning Information and Technology Literacy, Access, and/or Equity The district provides technology resources to meet the needs of all learners. In addition to the computer labs and online resources available to all students, specialized resources are in place for students needing additional support. As an example, the online courseware NovaNet is available to support at-risk high school students. Wilson Reading provides reading support for students at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. StarMath has been purchased to help identify students who may need additional support in math, and Rosetta Stone software and websites are available for English Language Learners (ELL) needing help with translations. Individual and classroom amplification systems have been purchased to provide equal access to instruction for students needing that assistance. The district will continue to analyze student needs and find technology resources to meet those identified needs. The district has an active Assistive Technology Committee that meets regularly. Teachers from each school serve on this committee. The committee uses meeting time to discuss and learn how to use new technologies as well as plan what information needs to be shared with all staff in their schools before the next meeting so that knowledge of assistive technology increases. The Assistive Technology Coordinator provides leadership for the committee in maintaining an inventory of all assistive technology tools available for students who may benefit from them.

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ANALYSIS OF EDUCATOR PROFICIENCY Strengths There are people in the district who are knowledgeable about twenty-first century skills and about the research underpinnings and practical applications of these skills. Twenty-first century skills are intentionally being embedded into the curriculum. As a result, discussions about twenty-first century skills are continuing to grow throughout the district. The district offers graduate courses for developing blended instruction courses with Moodle with an emphasis on twenty-first century skills. Courses that emphasize product assessment as well as assessment for learning are also offered. The district has tools and resources in place, such as NWEA MAP testing, that help educators differentiate instruction.

Needs The district needs to educate all staff throughout the district on twenty-first century skills and help them understand that they involve more than just technology. The district IMC directors need to be an integral part of this process. More professional development around data-driven decision making is needed. In addition, structures need to be put in place to facilitate more collaboration around areas in effective teaching and learning that are working. Teachers in the district also need professional development on how to leverage technology resources to assess core content areas. As more technology is used in the district, such as scientific microscopes, probes, LCD projectors, document cameras, and SMART Boards, more professional development time is needed.

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ANALYSIS OF EFFECTIVE TEACHING AND LEARNING PRACTICES Strengths Dimensions21 data revealed that teachers perceive technology’s role in academic areas as very important. Information and literacy skills and teaming and collaboration were ranked important skills to both teachers and administrators on the Dimensions21 survey. Teachers and administrator results indicated that teachers had a high comfort level with using creativity and innovation in instruction. Teachers reported a higher level of importance than the level of current use of twenty-first century skills, indicating a readiness to go forward. There was also a high comfort level with online research and interaction with parents strongly supported by technology.

Needs Dimensions21 data revealed that there are different perspectives between teachers and administrators. Data also indicated that not all teachers know what twenty-first century skills are. There is a predominance of teacher-designed projects versus student-designed projects. There is a need for students to have more opportunities to engage in local and global community projects. Another area of need is for students to have opportunities to engage in online communications with experts, peers, and others in the group. Figure 5 shows Dimension 2 findings for the district.

Figure 5. Cedarburg Dimension 2 Findings

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ANALYSIS OF ACCESS TO INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES The infrastructure in the district is fast and reliable. Staff and students have appropriate access to software (both web-based and standalone). The majority of staff indicated that technical support in the district is very good, as reflected in Figure 6.

Figure 6. Cedarburg Dimension 6 Tech Support Findings

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As Figure 7 shows, students and staff would like more access to computer labs and other mobile devices that connect to wireless networks throughout the schools.

Figure 7. Cedarburg Dimension 6 Access Findings

Resources and Fixed Assets The district has made great strides in standardizing hardware and software purchases to reduce the cost of technical support and training. An electronic system, TrackIt, is used to audit all hardware and software to ensure proper licensing and standardization. The system is also used for logging work orders for technology repairs. Appendix K is a sample work order. An inventory of instructional software is included as Appendix I. The district uses Skyward as its student and financial information databases. Numerous training and conference opportunities for these systems have been offered to staff. The systems meet the needs of the district, and many efficiencies have been realized with the upgrade to this system. The Skyward database includes an online grade book for staff and family access to grades, lunch account balances, and demographic data. Employees use Web access to obtain payroll information and human resource data. Parents have access to their child’s grades through Skyward Family Access, curriculum through BYOC, and staff e-mail address and schedules through webpages developed by staff. Hardware Inventory A robust Novell network connects all hardware in the district. There are approximately 1,200 workstations for student and staff use. In addition to computers in every classroom, each school has at least one computer lab and computers in the IMCs. File servers are replaced every three years, and computers are replaced or upgraded every six years. Network printers, shared by teams or departments, have replaced standalone printers. Additional network printers are located in offices, computer labs, IMCs, and common areas. Building technology committees prioritize 27


hardware and software requests from staff and recommend purchases to the Director of Technology and building principals. An inventory of hardware is included in Appendix H. AV and Peripheral Inventory Each classroom in the district has cable access either through a TV or mounted LCD projector. All schools also have scanners, digital still and video cameras, and overhead projectors. IMC directors maintain an inventory of this equipment and plan for audiovisual equipment replacement as needed. Interactive white boards, DVD players, AlphaSmarts, document cameras, LCD projectors, student response systems, scientific probes, and microscopes are also available at schools.

Access to Library Media Information Technology Resources Each school has a full-time certified IMC director. Students and staff access print and non-print resources (playaways, videos, DVDs, audio books, etc.) through Alexandria, the online catalog. Alexandria can be accessed from any computer with Internet access. Stakeholders are made aware of Alexandria through classroom visits to the IMC, one-on-one instruction, or parent newsletters. The district has a variety of electronic resources available to students and staff to support the curriculum. Learn360 is an online video library resource added in September 2009. NetTrekker is an educational search engine that was added in September 2008. Staff are made aware of new resources in a variety of ways, including brochures, classes, staff meetings, TIPS training, e-mail and technology inservices. Students are notified of new resources through classes, printed information, and links on the website. The high school also has access to e-books. The high school IMC director introduces these online books to classes or individuals who may benefit from them. An e-mail alert about these resources was also sent to teachers. Library Media Collection Each IMC director annually uses a collection-mapping tool to evaluate the print collection. The statistics available from this analysis and their knowledge of the curriculum provide the IMC directors with the information needed to determine which resources need to be updated and weeded. Table 2 reflects the current status of the library media collection in each school in the district. In addition to the areas of focus identified in the chart below, IMC directors will add resources when curricular materials acquisitions are made (e.g., 2010–11 science for middle and high school, 2011–12 science for elementary schools).

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Table 2. Cedarburg Schools’ Library Media Collections

School Cedarburg High School

Strengths Updated collection in the areas of journalism, religion, mental health issues, and fiction

Area of Focus 2010–13 Add biographies of journalists 2010–11: Reference 2011–12: Science and math 2012–13: Geography

Webster Transitional School

Updated science section Fiction is up to date Collection consists of 36 percent fiction vs. 64 percent nonfiction

2010–11: Reference 2010–11: Biographies 2011–12: Social science and literature

Parkview Elementary School

Updated the collection in the areas of fiction, easy picture, early readers, and awardwinning titles In the nonfiction area, current biographies, biomes/science topics that reflect the curriculum, fairy tales, military, sports, and space Weeded the easy picture book, easy readers, biographies, and reference

2010–11: Biographies and reference 2010–11: 500s 2011–12: 600s and 700s 2012–13: 800s and 900s

Thorson Elementary School

Fiction, easy picture, and the arts updated with multicultural and award-winning titles Playaways added to serve variety of ability levels Biographies weeded and updated from last plan

2010-11: Easy readers 2011-12: Reference: need dictionaries in various ability levels and languages 2012-13: Social science and applied technology

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School Westlawn Elementary School

Strengths Updated the collection in the nonfiction areas of 500s, 600s, and 900s (state books), replacing outdated titles with contemporary well-reviewed selections that reflect the curriculum Updated collection in the 300s of Dewey, with an emphasis on 398.2, tales section Updated fiction and easy read section with award-winning titles

Area of Focus 2010–11: 500s 2010–11: Biographies 2011–12: 700s, with an emphasis on sports 2012–13: Easy readers

Early Learning Center

New Facility Common school funds allocation for purchasing new materials

Need to add a small collection Westlawn maintains records in catalog and collaborates with ELC teachers to develop collection

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ANALYSIS OF SUPPORT SYSTEMS AND LEADERSHIP The Cedarburg district leadership is forward-thinking and committed to preparing students for life after graduation. The district also believes that performance assessments are important in making instructional decisions. The leadership is currently striving to embed twenty-first century skills into each curricular area and is looking for diverse ways that students can demonstrate these skills. Teachers in the district believe that students have strengths in teaming, collaboration, and interactive communication. Another strength is that the district provides certified IMC directors in every building. The district needs to build a common definition for twenty-first century skills. Time to develop twenty-first century assessments as well as ongoing professional development on how to incorporate these skills into the curriculum are also needed.

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ACTION PLANS 1.0 Educator Proficiency Action Plan Need: More time for professional development is needed to help teachers incorporate twentyfirst century skills into their teaching practices. Goal 1: Professional development opportunities will be provided by the district for teachers to become skilled in twenty-first century skills and implement these skills into their curriculum and assessments. Objective 1.1: By June 2013, Teacher Proficiency will be at a 5.0 or higher as measured by the Dimensions21 Survey or will receive a similar rating as measured by a comparable tool. Table 3. Educator Proficiency Action Plan

Action: 1.1.1 Educators will participate in jobembedded professional development annually 1.1.2 District will provide a variety of opportunities for professional development outside of the school day (e.g., online training, Web 2.0 tools, webinars, podcasts, faceto-face, etc.)

Person/People Responsible: Director of Technology and principals

Timeline:

Resources Needed:

June 2013

Budget for substitutes, IMC Directors, consistent professional development with set criteria incorporating twentyfirst century skills, Web 2.0, and digital citizenship, professional development days

Director of Technology, Director of C&I, principals

June 2013

Budget for web resources and professional instructors within and outside of the district and site visits, IMC Directors, teacher leadership committees, building technology committees, technical support, Twentyfirst Century Skills at a Glance http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/ documents/P21_Framework.pdf flyers, twenty-first century websites.

Evidence of Success: Number of lessons developed and shared

Minutes, attendance, logs in programs

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2.0 Effective Teaching and Learning Action Plan Needs: • • • • •

Thirty percent of educators indicated that they did not know what the expectations are for student attainment of twenty-first century skills. Currently, the district does not have a system in place for tracking student progress with twenty-first century skills. The majority (57 percent) of assignments are teacher designed rather than student designed. Technology is only used 6 percent of the time for authentic local and community projects. Current use of online communications with experts, peers, and others is at the awareness (1.9) level on Dimensions21 results.

Goal 2: Increase knowledge of implementing and assessing twenty-first century skills to provide multiple perspectives for our students and more student-designed projects. Objectives: • • • • • •

Objective 2.1: By June 2011, 100 percent of educators will know expectations for student attainment of twenty-first century skills. Objective 2.2: By June 2013, the district will track student progress on twenty-first century skills. Objective 2.3: By June 2013, the percentage of student-designed projects will increase. Objective 2.4: By June 2013, the use of technology to support authentic local and community projects will increase. Objective 2.5: By June 2013, the level of online communications with experts, peers, and others will be at the exploration level or higher as measured by D21. Objective 2.6: Each educator will participate in annual job-embedded professional development to develop and share lessons incorporating twenty-first century skills and digital citizenship.

Table 4. Effective Teaching and Learning Action Plan Action: 2.1.1 Create a twenty-first century skills committee

Person/People Responsible: Director of Technology; Director of Curriculum & Instruction

Timeline: 2011–12 school year

Resources Needed: Time, technology tools and resources to support twentyfirst century learning environments

Indicators of Success: Committee agendas and minutes

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Action:

Person/People Responsible: Curriculum Committees, Administrative Council, Building Leadership Teams, School/District Technology Committees

Timeline:

Resources Needed: BYOC, time, professional development

Indicators of Success: D21 survey results

2.1.3 Evaluate and select Web 2.0 tools so that studentdesigned projects increase

Twenty-first Century Skills Committee, Administrative Council

Committee work beginning 2011–12, completion in 2012– 13 District implementation takes place in 2012–13

Time for site visits, research, meeting time

Examples of student-designed assessments at each level Annual review and evaluation

2.1.4 Use technology to support authentic local and regional community projects

School leadership teams

2012–13

Business partners (e.g., Cedarburg Light and Water, Rotary, Chamber of Commerce, CEF, parent organizations) models/research, time

Documentation by school

2.1.5 Increase the level of online communications with experts, peers, and others

IMC Directors, GT school coordinators

2012–13

Time, teacher leaders, administrators

D21 Survey Results

2.1.6 Integrate digital citizenship learning targets into curriculum

Curriculum Council representatives, Director of C&I

Ongoing as curriculum is updated

Time

BYOC

2.1.2 One hundred percent of educators will know what the expectations are for student attainment of twenty-first century skills.

January 2013

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3.0 Access to Information and Technology Action Plan 3.1 Access and Usefulness of Resources Needs: For students to graduate with twenty-first century skills, they will need twenty-first century tools. At the high school, teachers desire more access to technology tools, as reflected in Figures 8 and 9.

Figure 8. Findings on Dimension 6: Instructional Technologies

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Figure 9. Findings on Dimension 6: Technology Peripherals

Goal 3: The district’s facilities and equipment will be well maintained and current to accommodate changing needs. Objective 3.1: By June 2013, Access and Infrastructure will be at a 5.0 or higher as measured by the Dimensions21 online survey or will receive a similar rating as measured by a comparable tool. Table 5. Access and Usefulness of Resources Action Plan

Action: 3.1.1 Continue to support the district replacement cycle for equipment to keep things up to date 3.1.2 Continue to purchase equipment such as document cameras, LCD projectors, interactive whiteboards to support interactive instruction

Person/People Responsible: Technology Department

Timeline:

Resources Needed:

Ongoing based upon replacement cycle

Schedule, technology funds, common school funds for library replacement

District Technology Department, School Technology Committees, principals

Ongoing and reviewed annually

District budget, grants funds (CEF, parent groups, etc.)

Evidence of Success: Annual review of current hardware

Evidence of equipment purchased and used for interactive instruction throughout the classrooms

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3.2 Infrastructure Needs: The district has a disaster recovery plan that needs to be strengthened. Goal 3: The district’s facilities and equipment will be well maintained and current to accommodate changing needs. Objective 3.2: By June 2013, Access and Infrastructure will be at a 5.0 or higher as measured by the Dimensions21 online survey or will receive a similar rating as measured by a comparable tool. Table 6. Infrastructure Action Plan

Action:

Person/People Responsible: School technology committees

Timeline:

Resources Needed:

Completed by June 2011

Dept/Unit/Staff meeting time; documentation on Help Desk FAQ in Moodle, Totally Tech Newsletter

3.2.2 Implement a server virtualization solution that will reduce the footprint of the data center and provide a disaster recovery infrastructure

District Technology Department

December 2010

District budget

SAN at another school

3.2.3 Update disaster recovery plan for the District and review annually 3.2.4 Investigate the feasibility of implementing a single sign-on environment

District Technology Department

June 2011, June 2012, June 2013

See CoSN IT Crisis Preparedness

Written plan

District Technology Department

June 2011

Time

Report on findings

3.2.5 Develop a plan for moving into a wireless environment across the district

District Technology Department

December 2010

Time, data, rationale

Map of access points

3.2.6 Implement a wireless environment across the district

District Technology Department

June 2013

District budget

Wireless access increases in district

3.2.1 Educate staff on file management practices and remote use of systems

Evidence of Success: Resources used properly to conserve space; system logs

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Action: 3.2.7 Analyze Internet Activity logs to determine current use and future needs

Person/People Responsible: District Technology Department

Timeline:

Resources Needed:

Monthly/Log (share with buildings)

Time, access to the data

Evidence of Success: Logs indicate fewer peak periods, fewer complaints from users

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3.3 Access to Online Learning Opportunities and Web 2.0 Tools Needs: For students to acquire twenty-first century skills, they need to have twenty-first century learning tools. Goal 3: The district’s facilities and equipment will be well maintained and current to accommodate changing needs. Objective 3.3: Each educator will participate in an annual online or blended learning experience as evidenced by individual teacher goals and evaluation. Table 7. Access to Online Learning Opportunities and Web 2.0 Tools Action Plan

Action:

Person/People Responsible: Director of Technology

Timeline:

3.3.2 Provide education on cyberbullying for students 3.3.3 Each educator will participate annually in a minimum of a halfday job-embedded professional development to include twenty-first century skills and Web 2.0 (3.0) tools

Library Media Specialists/Guidance, guest presenters

3.3.4 Each educator will participate in an annual online or blended learning experience as evidenced by individual teacher goals and evaluation

3.3.1 The district will update its AUP to include education on cyberbullying for students

Resources Needed: Current policies from other districts; approval of Board of Education

Evidence of Success: Updated policy

Annually starting Fall 2010

Time

Every student in grades 3–12

Director of Technology, principals, IMC directors

Annually, beginning 2010

Funding for substitutes, release time for facilitators to plan, release time for educators to participate, computer lab usage

Posted lessons on BYOC

Director of Technology, principals, IMC directors

June 2013

Funding for substitutes, release time for facilitators to plan, release time for educators to participate, computer lab usage

Posted lessons on BYOC

Spring 2010

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3.4 Technical Support Needs: As more equipment is added, the district will need to maintain its high level of technical support. Goal 3: The district’s facilities and equipment will be well maintained and current to accommodate changing needs. Objective 3.4: By June 2013, Dimensions21 results will show that the district has maintained the high level of technical support. Table 8. Technical Support Action Plan

Action: 3.4.1 Maintain high quality of technology support 3.4.2 Communicate strategies for getting technology support

Person/People Responsible: District Technology Department

Timeline:

Resources Needed:

Review annually

Adequate technology personnel

District Technology Department

Quarterly

Time, data concerning problems

Evidence of Success: Survey feedback shows strong ratings of technology support Electronically distributed Totally Tech newsletter

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3.5 Access to Library Media Information Technology Resources Needs: Students need a strong array of media resources to support the curriculum. Goals: The district’s facilities and equipment will be well maintained and current to accommodate changing needs. Objective 3.5: By June 2013, the district will have increased access to online resources. Table 9. Access to Library Media Information Technology Resources Action Plan

Action:

Person/People Responsible: IMC Directors; principals, Director of Curriculum & Instruction

Timeline:

Resources Needed:

Annually

Common school funds; curriculum committee meeting time; IMC directors meeting time

IMC Directors

December 2010, 2011, 2012

Common school funds/grants

Report of usage generated each month

3.5.2 Investigate ebooks and purchase those that are curriculum appropriate 3.5.3 Take active role in learning about new technologies and relevance for curricular use 3.5.4 Update IMC collection in areas of need

IMC Directors K–12

2010–11 school year

Trial subscriptions

Teachers and/or students evaluate resources

IMC Directors, Director of Technology, Technology Department

Ongoing

Time, professional publications

Implementation and usage

IMC Directors

Ongoing

Common school funds

3.5.5 Create a collection map

IMC Directors

Annually

Time

3.5.6 Include IMC Directors on District Curriculum Committees

Director of Curriculum & Instruction

Ongoing

Time

Improved collections to meet teaching and learning needs Improved collections to meet teaching and learning needs IMC Directors are aware of resources needed to support curriculum

3.5.1 Provide students with a variety of resources incorporated into a comprehensive, relevant curriculum supported by a dynamic IMC program with certified staff 3.5.1 Evaluate use of electronic databases and resources

Evidence of Success: BYOC, log of IMC classes and resources

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4.0 Support Systems and Leadership Action Plan Needs: Currently, the teacher evaluation process is aligned to the Wisconsin Teacher Standards. Goals: The district will use best practices for information and technology to meet the learning needs of all students. Objective 4.1.1: By June 2013, the district will have a system of tracking teacher proficiency and show continual improvement. Table 10. Support Systems and Leadership Action Plan

Action:

Person/People Responsible: 4.1.1 Examine how data District Technology on teacher proficiency is Committees, School currently collected and District Technology make recommendations Committee for collecting data and accountability systems for using technology in the classroom

Timeline: 2010–2011 School Year

4.1.2 Provide resources Director of Technology, Ongoing for administrators on Director of Curriculum effective teaching and & Instruction learning practices using technology

Resources Needed: Time

Evidence of Success:

Time

Improved ability to recognize and encourage best use of technology for teaching and learning

Improved system for tracking teacher proficiency and increased accountability

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BUDGET The following budget in Table 11 shows the financial resources the district anticipates it will need annually from a variety of funding sources to achieve its information and technology goals. Table 11. Budget Alignment Description to Action Plans

3.5.1, 3.5.2, 3.5.4

3.3.3

3.1.2 3.1.2 3.1.1

3.1.2

3.1.1, 3.2.2 3.1.1

Library Computers, Catalog, Online Subscriptions, software General Supplies and Computer Materials Professional Development Non-instructional Staff Training; Website Liaisons Instructional Software Instructional Non-Capital Items (professional periodicals, etc.) Instructional Non-capital Equipment Instructional New Equipment Instructional Equipment Replacement Repair and Maintenance of Equipment Phone Charges/Repair Personal Services Employee Travel— Director of Technology Computer Materials Non-capital Equipment <$300 per Item Non-Instructional (Instructional Support) Software Equipment Addition ($300-4,999/item) Equipment Addition ($5,000+/item) Equipment Replacement ($300-4,999/item) Equipment Replacement ($5,000+/item Dues and Fees Build Your Own Curriculum

E-Rate

IT Budget

Common Curriculum- Title School Budget IID Fund

Cedarburg District Education Foundation

$109,000

$1,000 $12,918

$6,600

$868

$6,890

$41,200 $1,000

$2,000

$5,000 $70,000

$5,000

$121,000 (2010–11 only)

$142,509 $1,000 $12,000 $6,000 $1,500 $300 $4,900 $57,425

$4,500

$150 $7,200

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NWEA MAPS Curriculum Online Communication $25,900 and Phones (incl. website development and hosting)

$27,558 $22,800

$17,100

The district anticipates receiving $25,900 from E-Rate to meet its telecommunication goals each year. The remaining budget will be made up of grant funds, title funds, common school funds, and district funds. E-Rate discounts are received for website hosting, online communication, and phone costs. Telephone access is crucial to meeting the communication needs of the district. Telephone service also increases parent involvement and communication. Internet support is needed to provide access to instructional resources for students and teachers.

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DISSEMINATION TO STAKEHOLDERS Strategies to be used to disseminate the Information and Technology Literacy Plan to all stakeholders include: • Information and Technology Planning Committee members will be ambassadors for the plan in their respective buildings. • The plan will be posted on the district’s website. • Principals or Information Technology Planning Committee members will hold staff meetings to introduce the plan. • Principals will talk to parent groups, such as the PTA, to inform parents about the plan. • Building meetings, staff development opportunities, curriculum meetings, job-embedded professional development, printed materials, e-mail reminders, administrative workshops/meetings, the district website, newsletters, PTA meetings, and school board meetings will be used to communicate the Information Technology Plan and proficiency requirements for students and staff.

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MONITORING, EVALUATION, AND REVISION A number of recommended actions in the plan address monitoring and evaluating. For example: • School technology committees will meet at least six times over the course of the school year to monitor and evaluate the school role in carrying out the District Information Technology Plan. • The District will survey students and staff late fourth quarter using two different instruments to measure progress, one that will assess the proficiency of students and staff and another that will assess self-efficacy. • The District Information Technology Committee will meet once per year to review progress in meeting the goals of the plan, addressing progress to date, obstacles encountered, revised strategies including additional activities, and, if appropriate, recommendations for School Board actions.

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APPENDICES Appendix A: Copy of Adult Continuing Education (ACE) Brochure Appendix B: Grade Level Information and Technology Literacy standards Appendix C: Acceptable Use Policy Appendix D: Interlibrary Loan Policy Appendix E: Copyright Policy Appendix F: Materials Selection Policy Appendix G: Materials Reconsideration Policy Appendix H: Hardware Inventory Appendix I: Instructional Software Inventory Appendix J: Lightspeed Internet Traffic by Category Appendix K: Sample Work Order Appendix L: Technology Special Needs Policy Appendix M: Titlewise Analysis Appendix N: Harassment Cyberbullying Policy

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Appendix A

48


49


50


51


Appendix B

52


53


54


55


56


57


58


59


60


61


62


63


64


65


66


67


68


69


70


71


72


APPENDIX C

73


74


75


76


APPENDIX D

77


78


79


APPENDIX E

80


APPENDIX F

81


82


APPENDIX G

83


84


85


86


APPENDIX H

87


APPENDIX I

88


89


APPENDIX J

90


91


92


APPENDIX K

APPENDIX L 93


94


APPENDIX M

95


96


97


98


99


100


101


102


103


104


105


106


107


108


109


110


APPENDIX N

111


112

Cedarburg Information Technology Plan  

June 2010-2013

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