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Traveler River Hills

ISSN 87501899

TRAVELER EXTRA

Route 66 & Fall Festival Supplement

SEPTEMBER 1, 2013

State park preserves Mother Road’s story

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By BARBARA GIBBS OSTMANN efore heading down the Mother Road, make time for a stop at the Route 66 State Park on I-44 near Eureka, about a half-hour southwest of St. Louis. After exploring the exhibits at this state park, you’ll be primed and ready to set out on the Main Street of America, as Route 66 is often called. The museum in the visitor center tells the story of the creation of Route 66, and how it became the stuff of legend. Pictures and artifacts bring the heyday of the road to life. There are old postcards, photos of many of the typical roadside motor courts and businesses, actual signs from motels and restaurants, Burma-Shave signs, and a variety of other memorabilia. Quotes from people who lived or worked along the route add personal depth to the tale. You can see the original of the first sign marking Historic Route

Missouri U.S. 66, which was posted in Springfield in 1991, in commemoration of the fact that Springfield was the birthplace of Route 66 in 1926. Alongside is a copy of the telegram from April 30, 1926, which contains the fateful words

Angeles road, if California, Arizona, New Mexico and Illinois will accept sixty-six instead of sixty, we are inclined to agree to this

asking for the number 66 for the route: “Regarding California-Los

change. We prefer sixty-six to sixty-

two.”

Tale of Times Beach There is more to this park’s story than Route 66. The visitor center is housed in a 1935 roadhouse that was a thriving business back in the days of Times Beach, which started as a Meramec River resort for people from St. Louis. In the 1920s, the former St. Louis Times sold lots as an advertising gimmick and created the resort, which grew into a town. Times Beach became infamous in the 1980s when it was discovered that the dusty streets of the town had been FROM ROUTE sprayed with oil laced 66 STATE PARK with dioxin. — Clockwise from top: Historic The entire town was purchased by the telegram naming Route 66; old government and a restaurant sign massive clean-up followed, including and hotel sign, exposed frame- a controversial incinerator. After work of Route the area was deemed 66 bridge over Meramec River. environmentally safe, it was turned Barbara Gibbs Ostmann photos. over to the Missouri Department of Natural Continued on Page 5

Fall events abound across Ozarks

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By JO SCHAPER all fairs, festivals, frolics and fetes abound across the region as Ozarks celebrate harvest time and fall’s color and cooler weather. If you can’t find an event in this list where you can have fun, you must be some kind of grouch. Enjoy. Sept. 3-8 Harvest Festival at Steelville. Arts, crafts.music. rodeo. Exploresteelville.com Sept. 4-7 St. James Grape & Fall Festival. St. James. Car show, grape stomp, parade, Beer and wine garden, livestock show, live music. 573-265-6649.

Girardeau. Truck/tractor pulls, 4-H competitions, draft animal competitions, Gretchen Wilson, Travis Tritt, pageants, midway. www.semofair.com.

information visit Yellow Sucker Pageant Facebook page. Sept. 14. Franklin County Day at Meramec Caverns. Stanton. All attractions ½ price. Celebrating 80 years of cave operation. www. americascave.com. Sept. 21-22 Old Greenville Days. Greenville Rec. Area Lake Wappapello. 9 am to 10 pm on Saturday and 9 am to 5 pm on Sunday. Arts and crafts displays and demonstrations, old time children’s games, funnel cakes, bluegrass and gospel music and much more. http://www.mvs. usace.army.mil/wappapello/events.htm.

Sept. 13-15 Greentree Festival. Kirkwood. Kirkwood City Park on Geyer. Community festival. www.kirkwoodmo.org. Sept. 26-28 HOBA 20th Annual Bluegrass Festival. HOBA Bluegrass Park West Plains. Bluegrass and gospel, scheduled performers and jams. Camping available. 888-256-8835. www. PIPES ARE CALLING — A piper in vintage U.S. Army garb plays durwestplains.net/tourism.events_festivals. Fee. ing the Mid-Missouri Horse, Mule & Ox Farming and Historical Craft Days near Gerald. The event will beld Oct. 5-6 this year. Check the Sept. 17-21 Stoddard County Parade & Sept. 6-7 Eureka Days. Eureka. Parade, County Fair. Dexter. Parade: 5:30 pm. Sept. calendar for more details. Jo Schaper photo. classic car show/cruise-in, talent expo, 21. Queen contest, Flashback, Maggie Thorn, trampoline bungee, Lions Run for Sight. Music chainsaw carving. FFA livestock show. www.stodFriday and Sat. evenings. Eurekadays.com. dardcountyfair.com. Sept. 14. 5th Annual Miss Yellow Sucker Days. Continued on Page 4 Sept. 7-14 58th SEMO District Fair. Cape Courthouse Square. Van Buren. 2-5 p.m. For more Sept. 7 8th Annual Jaycee Horsepower Festival. Sikeston.Antique cars/trucks, street rods, street machines, stock production, truck stock, race cars, sports compacts, high school class, military vehicles and motorcycles. Registration 8 a.m.-noon, Concessions, novelties and sound system round out the event. Call 573-703-4594.


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ROUTE 66/FALL FESTIVAL SUPPLEMENT

RIVER HILLS TRAVELER

SEPTEMBER 2013

EMINENCE CALENDAR OF FALL EVENTS

www.facebook.com/hauntinginthehills

SEPTEMBER

 

 

August 30 - September 2 Cross Country Trail Ride  September is Share Family Photos Month at Shannon County Museum Museum open Saturdays September 14 Share your family photos 10 a.m. to ???

September 2 Labor Day Blast Labor Day Blast golf tourna-

ment, 2-person scramble at the Roy L. Beck Golf Course in Eminence. (573) 226-3018   September 28 Fish Fry 2nd Annual Fish Fry at Stewart's Landing 4pm. Sponsored by the Shannon County Museum. (573) 226-3531   September 29 - October 5 Cross Country Trail Ride

OCTOBER

 

www.ozarkheritageproject.org

Blazer Boats - Often Imitated, Never Duplicated 573-663-3266 blazer@mcmo.net

www.blazerjetboats.com

Come Stay With Us and Sit a Spell....

September 29 - October 5 Cross Country Trail Ride

October 1 - 31 Indian History Month Indian History Month. Sponsored by Shannon County Museum. (573) 226-3531 October 5 Elk Banquet Missouri Elk Capital Chapter RMEF Banquet, sponsored by Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. (573) 226-3893   October 12 - 13 Scenic Riverways Arts & Crafts Show Annual festival with booths of arts & crafts, food, demonstrations, live music,

etc.  The Chamber sponsors lunch booth each day.  Shannon County Museum has a booth. Located at Circle B Campground. (573) 226-3618   October 10 - 31 Plan your road trip to Eminence and enjoy the Fall colors!   October 12-13 Haunting of the Hills Ozark past comes to life with folkway, demonstrations, reenactment, and storytelling. 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sponsored by the Ozark Heritage Project, 573-663-2269.

Continued on next page

~Riverside Motel & Cabins~ & Beulah’s Country Home

Private River Access Waterfront Cabins Horse Boarding Swimming Pool OPEN YEAR ROUND

$5 off room • $10 off cabin with this ad Sun -Thurs

Only 150 yards from the Jacks Fork River! For reservations call

one night only • not good with other specials

Call us to reserve your style of Shannon County lodging NOW!

573-226-3893

Come and spend your vacation with us

•Cable TV •Heating & A/C •Playground Equipment •Laundromat • Full RV Hookups •Motel rooms & suites •Small Cabins (sleep up to 4) Large Cabins (sleep up to 10) •Story’s Creek Manor 3-BR ranch sleeps up to 12

Visit Scenic, Friendly Eminence:

• Elk Capital of Missouri

Coffee in Season

• Canoe Capital of the World

www.shadylanecabins.com PO Box 94 • N Hwy 19 • Eminence, MO 65466

573-226-3291 MOTEL: 511 N. Main • Eminence MO 65466

www.riversidemotelonline.com Your Home Away From Home in Current & Jacks Fork River Country


RIVER HILLS TRAVELER

SEPTEMBER 2013  October 12 Fall Final Golf Tournament 3-person scramble at the Roy L. Beck Golf Course in Eminence. (573) 2263018  

October 20 - 26 Cross Country Trail Ride

 

October 26 Indian History Program Shannon County Museum, 7 p.m.

NOVEMBER  

November 1 - 30 Veterans Month Sponsored by Shannon County Museum. (573) 226-3531

6 p.m. the evening Christmas Parade begins with floats, bands, horses and Mr. & Mrs. Santa Claus. Sponsored by the Eminence Chamber of Commerce (573) 226-3818   December 8 Old-Fashion Christmas & Open House at Alley Spring General Store 10 a.m. Sponsored by the Ozark National Scenic Riverways. (573) 323-8093  December 8 Holiday Concert A Holiday music concert sponsored by the Eminence Area Arts Council. (314) 607-5564

Come Celebrate with Us In the Ozarks

At Our Fall and Winter Events

Sept. 28 Fish Fry @ Museum Sept 29-Oct 5 Cross Country Trail Ride Oct 7-13 Ozark Rivers Bluegrass Camp & Jam October 26 Indian History Presentation @ Museum

October 5 Eminence RMEF Elk Banquet

October 12-13 • Arts & Crafts Show @ Circle B • Quilt Show @ Old Gym • A Haunting in the Hills @ Alley Spring October 20-26 Cross Country Trail Ride

November 2 & 3 Youth Deer Season November 16 Deer Season Begins December 7 Old Fashioned Christmas @ Museum Christmas Celebration @ Courthouse Crowning of Queens Lighted Parade - 6 p.m. December 8 Christmas Concert Nutcracker Suite Performance @ Old Gym

Eminence Area Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 415, Eminence, MO 65466 Phone: 573-226-3318

www.eminencemo.com

Calendar information is compiled weeks and sometimes months in advance of publication. Event schedules can change, so check websites and call phone numbers to verify before making long drives to attend any event listed in this section.

October 5, doors open at 5:30 pm at Cross Country Trail Ride, Eminence MO

Where the Hills and Rivers Meet

Sept 15 Gigging Season Begins

A WORD ABOUT OUR CALENDARS OF EVENTS

Missouri Elk Capital Chapter, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Annual Banquet Guns, Sporting Goods, and Home Decor Live Auction, Silent Auction, Raffles

DECEMBER

Sept 1-Oct 31 Community Wide Scarecrow Contest

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Missouri Department of Conservation (573) 226-3616

November 11 Veterans Celebration Sponsored by Shannon County Museum. (573) 226-3531  November 16 Deer Season begins.

December 1 - 31 Old-Fashioned Christmas Month Sponsored by the Shannon County Museum / Eminence Area Arts Council. (573) 226-3531   December 7 Bake Sale Annual Bake sale during the Christmas Parade - Sponsored by the Shannon County Museum. (573) 226-3531   December 7 Christmas in Eminence Celebration & Lighted Parade 2 p.m. Crowning of Queens, homemade goodies, craft booths and at

ROUTE 66/FALL FESTIVAL SUPPLEMENT

Visit us on

Current, ongoing gun raffles Weatherby Vanguard .243 youth rifle package (1 ticket for $1, 6 tickets for $5) 2 Gun Raffle - Weatherby Vanguard Deluxe rifle .257, Marlin X-7 .30-06 stainless camo rifle with scope ($10)

Progressive Drawing

Remington M700 rifle .338 stainless ($20 - chapter winner will be entered in national drawing for a hunt)

Tickets are $20 each Contact Jim Anderson at 573-226-3893 for more details

Scenic Riverways Arts & Crafts Association

FREE ADMISSION

Presents

45thAnnual

Live Music by The Bressler Family

2013 ARTS & CRAFTS SHOW & SALE LOCATED AT CIRCLE B CAMPGROUND HWY. 106 WEST, EMINENCE, MO

October 12 • 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. October 13 • 10 A.M. to 4 P.M. Wide Range of Exhibits: Oil Paintings, Wood Carvings, Quilts, Rugs, Jewelry, Handmade Furniture, Ceramics, Purses, Weaving & Much More! All items hand-crafted in the Ozarks. Many working exhibits! For Reservations of Exhibit Space, write: Scenic Riverways Arts & Crafts Association P.O. Box 395, Eminence, MO 65466 www.eminencemo.com

CONTACT: ROBIN STAPLES (573) 226-3618 Food Concessions by the Eminence Chamber of Commerce, the Eminence High School Senior Class, and others. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS


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ROUTE 66/FALL FESTIVAL SUPPLEMENT

RIVER HILLS TRAVELER

SEPTEMBER 2013

Big trucks & tractors, arts & crafts, food & drink...what’s not to love? Continued from Page 1 Sept. 27-29 Leadwood Fall Festival. Leadwood Park. Arts and Crafts, Live Music all weekend, includes Rt. 67 leadwoodfallfest@yahoo.com or 573-562-7125. Sept. 20-21 East Perry Community Fair Altenburg. 4-H exhibits, livestock judging, truck and tractor pulls, jumping mules competition, horse show, rides, local foods, and live entertainment. “The Best Little Fair in the Land.” 573-824-5827. Sept. 21 St. Clair Main Street Festival. St. Clair. 2-11 p.m. Booths, music, kids area, dance from 9-11 p.m. stclairmerchants@gmail. com. Traveler will be there.

Sept. 20-22 Washington Chili Cook-off and Strassenfest Arts and Crafts Festival. Washington. Cookoff Friday: 5 to 9 p.m.; Arts n Crafts 11 a.m. -6 p.m. Sat. and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun. 888-7WASHMO. Sept. 20-22 Missouri Trappers Assn. Fall Rendezvous. Montgomery County, MO. Three days of trapping workshops and fellowship. Contact Jack/Vicky Glendenning 800-5433474 for rooms; trapperpage@ hotmail.com or John Daniels 417-8187308 for info on the rendezvous.. Sept. 28. National Public Lands Day. Day of service on federal public

33rd Annual Fall Festival

Saxon Lutheran Memorial Frohna, MO, October 12, 2013 9 am - 4 pm

Gospel A capella Music by

OLD FAVORITES

Reflections from Cape Girardeau

• 1800s skills demo • Schnitzelbank skit Come Join our Silent Auction • Country Store • Craft booths Featuring several baskets • Fresh baked bread & coffee cake from area schools. • Horse and buggy rides Explore our German Lutheran Buildings, • Soaps and saws and shingle-making and our Kinderchoir

Lifeways and Heritage • Crafters • Food

Free parking, handicap parking available. Large group charter buses welcome. Freewill offering is gratefully accepted as an entrance fee.

For more information, directions or any other details contact us at:

573-824-5404 • slmlynda@att.net

www.saxonlutheranmemorial.org F a rm

ers Mar kets

~ Conservation Nature Center & Trails ~ La Croix

rail ~ Trail of Tears State Park & more! Recreation T

OLD TIME MUSIC is a regular feature of the Annual Fall Festival at the Saxon Lutheran Memorial in Frohna. This fall’s event is slated for Oct. 12. Jo Schaper photo.

lands. Observed at Wappapello Lake, 573-222-8562; Mark Twain National Forest 573-364-4621 and Ozark National Scenic Riverways, 573-3234236. Traveler will be set up next to the Henges Shooting Range in St. Louis County. More later on our blog.

competition, Restless Heart music food and craft vendors. Julie Pratt. 573-546-2709. Oct. 5-6 17th Annual Mid-Missouri Horse, Mule, Ox Farming and Historical Crafts Days. Gerald. Demonstrations of farming and crafts of yesteryear. Email tenacity@ fidnet.com or 573764-2629.

Sept. 24-28 American Legion Cotton Carnival. 1308 Ingram Rd. Info Sikeston– AmericanLegion. com. Tue. -Fri., 3 p.m.-midnight; Sat., Oct. 5-6 Trappers 10 a.m.-10 p.m. 573471-9956. of Starved Rock October Shoot Sept. 24 28 Delta and Rendezvous. Fair. Kennett. Demolition derby, comSioux Passage petitions, midway, Park, North of 4-H, FFA, FCCLA, Florissant. Prearmband night. (573) 1840 rendezvous, 888-9051, deltafunCOTTON CANDY LADY — What’s primitive camps, fair.com. a fair without the sweet, pink, shooting. Living sticky stuff. This scene is from the History Reenactors Sept. 27-29 St Charles Oktoberfest. St. Clair Street Festival slated for this year, too! Sept. 21 downtown. Frontier Park. Arts, Begins 8 a.m. Sat. crafts, beer. Wiener 636-947-6402. dog race and fashion show. 5K run; www.trappersofstarvedrock.com. 1-mile root beer walk. Parade, car show, weingartens. Fri. 4-11 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m.-5 October 3-5 Madison County Fair. p.m. Fredericktown. JayCee Park, Fredericktown. Livestock show, Oct. 5-6 2nd Annual New Madrid Fall Festival. New Madrid. 5K run, tractor pull, old-time games. 573-7833303. pageant, car, truck and bike show, food, booths, music. Dawson Park downtown. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. www.wix. Oct. 11-12 Iron Horse Rodeo. com/newmadrid/fallfestival Contact Pacific. Liberty Field. Eureka’s Rodeo Christina, 877-748-5300. moves west. 3 p.m. Friday, 4 p.m. Saturday. 636-271-0500 x 196 Oct. 4-6 Viburnum Old Miners Day. Underground mine tours, mining

Continued on Page 9

St. Clair Merchant’s Committee

STCMC 5th Annual Main Street Festival

September 21 • 2 -11 pm Adult Area 2 p.m. to 11 p.m.

VisitCape.com/GreatOutdoors 800·777·0068

VisitCape

r the scenic beauty that can be found on Discove ly in Cape Girardeau. Enjoy !

Family Area 2 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Petting Zoo Bounce Houses Washer Tournament SCFD Smoke House Bash Car Elks Barrel Train Adult & Teen Games Family Music Victims of Circumstance Dance Performances DJ & Live Band from 2-7 Bubble Gum Blowing Contest Sinners N Saints Hula Hoop Contest Live Band from 7-11 Food & Merchandise Vendors Sidewalk Chalk Drawing Contest Games Vendors Beer-Wine-Margarita Garden Much, Much More! Brought To You By:

FREE ADMISSION TO FESTIVAL!

Y’ALL COME! FAMILY FUN JUST OFF OLD RT. 66!


SEPTEMBER 2013

RIVER HILLS TRAVELER

Auto campers sought nature, adventure along Route 66

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By JO SCHAPER hen one thinks of Route 66 through Missouri, and across the nation, the first thought is often of the quaint architecture: the motels, the no-tells, the mom and pop restaurants, gas stations; of neon and “vernacular” rock construction meant to separate the automobilist from his or her dollar. The foundations of The Coral Court, the neon drive-thru and even the Dust Bowl Grapes of Wrath migration lie in the roadside adventures of auto travelers of the 1910s and 1920s, the auto camp movement. In those early years, starting with the

first Model T off the production line in 1908, people fortunate enough to put together the $825 purchase price paid for something still primary in the American spirit: the spirit of explor– ation at their fingertips, powered by the internal combustion engine. It may be hard to believe, but Model As and T’s came with tenting attachments, not so different than awnings and canopies that can be purchased as van and truck add-ons today. And people did the same thing. They hit the road.

ROUTE 66/FALL FESTIVAL SUPPLEMENT

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LAST OF THE BREED — Camp Joy at Lebanon closed in 1971, after 44 years of serving Route 66 travelers. Photo courtesy LegendsofAmerica.com Route 66 follows old Osage Trail Louis for later trading. Contrary to The route of U.S. Highway 66 takes opinion, it was not part of the Santa through the Ozarks Fe Trail. The route may be as old as later became the People would just drive Butterfield stage human occupation here. With a few route, the (telegraph) into the countryside, occasional dips to Wire Road, the and set up a tent along a the cross rivers, the Springfield Military river, or a road, paying Road during the route goes from the Tri-State area to Civil War, the route no attention to who the confluence of the southwestern owned a piece of land... of the Missouri and branch of the Pacific They just wanted to Mississippi rivers. Railroad (later The Osage, whose get out and experience the St. Louis and territorial headquarters San Francisco or nature...” included the Big and “Frisco” Railway.) Michelle Neubauer, Little Osage rivers When Missouri and the Marais des joined the “Good Meramec State Park Cynge (Swan Marsh) Roads” movement in just north of that area the 1910s, the route along the Missouri/Kansas border, was designated Missouri Hwy. 14, and used the route as their main trail with the coming of the federal system, into the Ozark hunting region, and in 1926 to the confluence area, as well as St. Continued on Page 8

Snake man charmed tourists at Silver Star Court

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By SUE BLESI referred to as a “tow sack,”full of om-and-pop motels and poisonous snakes, not something the restaurants once lined average artist has in his baggage. He Route 66 and had to was immune to snake venom and compete for the tourist could handle the slithering serpents trade. In the era before air conditionwithout fear, allowing them to crawl ing, telephones, and over him. television became His deadly common amenities reptile menagin hotel accommoerie included not dations, business only rattlesnakes owners did what and copperheads, they could to make but more exotic their facilities more species such as appealing to the cobras and a highly traveling public. venomous mambo Paul and Cora nerve snake, even Cox bought Silver an alligator. Star Courts in 1957. Dutch offered to It was located about spend two weeks eight miles west of IDEA MAN — Dutch Dunnell’s in a pit with his St. Clair, Mo., with schemes for attracting visitors to the terrifying collection many competing Silver Star Court included murals on if one could be built businesses nearby. room walls and glass-topped snake to his specificaThey began looking pit. tions. It needed to for ways to increase be four feet wide, their share of the Route 66 bonanza. seven feet long and eight feet deep. They advertised 15-cent hamburgers, He wanted it covered with glass so or seven for a dollar. That was a good tourists could gape and gawk in safety move, but they wanted to do better. at this strange man covered with his The answer to their marketing creepy, crawly companions. A ventiladilemma came when Dutch Dunnell tion fan would bring a limited supply approached them with two ideas to of fresh air into the pit. Billboards improve their occupancy rate. The first would be constructed to proclaim the idea was exciting. He would paint bill- unique attraction that would convince boards and create murals on the walls passers-by to spend their tourist dolof the motel rooms in exchange for lars at Silver Star Court. They were to room and board. That would be some- be charged 25 cents to view Dutch. thing the competitors didn’t have. Elmer Cox and Rolla Parks went to But, they were incredulous when work building the pit and soon Dutch they heard his next idea. Dutch had had a captivated, but ever-changing brought along a burlap bag, then audience. He would pick up rattlers

BEFORE THE INTERSTATE — The Silver Star, like many tourist courts of its era, featured individual cottages and relied on fuel, meal and postcard sales for additional income. This Route 66 business died when Interstate 44 was completed. Photos courtesy of Sue Blesi.

and squirt the glass with their venom while kids shrieked and mothers recoiled. Kids talked to Dutch when the top was opened so food could be carefully lowered to him. Sometimes, Dutch would curl up and read a book while the snakes slithered around and over him. His stay in the pit was cut short by rain, but it certainly provided the motel and restaurant with a means of pulling in more tourist dollars. Many bought gas, spent the night, had a meal or bought a postcard while they were stopped. Dutch milked the snake venom and provided it to local doctors who used it in treating snakebite victims. Gathering no moss, Dutch Dunnell eventually packed up his deadly luggage and moved on, continuing to

paint murals and billboard and, likely, exhibiting his snakes elsewhere. He died in Oklahoma. Silver Star Court underwent many changes over the years. In 1955, it had to be moved back from the highway due to a road-widening project. The cabins were spaced evenly and the spaces were eventually changed into garages. Later still, the garages were turned into additional rooms. When Interstate 44 was built, the modern limited-access highway killed their business. Route 66 brought life to many mom-and-pop businesses along the Mother Road, but the same phenomenon that created them eventually, in the name of progress, snuffed out most of them. Silver Star Court closed in 1972.


6 ROUTE 66/FALL FESTIVAL SUPPLEMENT

Saluting the 24th annual Missouri Route 66 Association Motor Tour “Rockin’ to the Devil... Rollin’ to the Saints” Sept. 6-7-8 Carthage to St. Clair

s k c i K r u o Y t Ge

, i r u o s s i M , d l e fi g In Sprin of Route 66! e c a l p h t r i The B Springfield, Missouri, is the officially recognized birthplace of Route 66. It was here on April 30, 1926, that officials sent a telegram proposing the name of the new Chicago-to-Los Angeles highway. Come see where the legendary Mother Road was truly born. In Springfield you can visit several historic buildings, eat at an original diner and even stand on the old pavement. Visit our Route 66 Information Center for information, memorabilia, maps, and more. Participate in our Route 66 Scavenger Hunt and pick up a free prize!

RIVER HILLS TRAVELER

RIVER HILLS TRAVELER

SEPTEMBER 2013

The Nation’s only full-service restaurant inside a cave 100 feet above the Gasconade River We have canoes • rustic cabins • event space • great food! Six miles north of I-44 Hwy. 7 at Richland Exit 150

Not just a place for that “special dinner” We’re a special place for dinner !

We Survived the Gasconade Flood! Come for Dinner or the Weekend Bring your Friends! OPEN

7 Days A Week Year Round

Welcome To Pulaski County USA! Enjoy one of the most scenic drives on Route 66 in Missouri The Route 66 Audio Driving Tour Our driving tour is your personal turn-by-turn guide to 33 original miles of Historic Route 66 in Pulaski County.

PulaskiCountyUSA.com/Rt66

Remember the small-town hardware store with everything from ice cream to fishing & hunting licenses to thumbtacks? It still exists at Bourbon Family Center.

The

CaveRestaurant and Resort

26880 Rochester Road Richland, MO 65556 573-765-4554 www.thecaverestauranatandresort.com

We hope you enjoy our natural and historic sites. Take some time along the way to enjoy the hospitality of our shops and restaurants. Tourism Bureau & Visitor Center 137 St. Robert Blvd., Ste. A in St. Robert 573 336-6355

Tour two stunning show caves., viusit our museum and gift shop Camp, hike, picnic, swim and fish and at Onondaga Cave State Park.

At 80 years, we’re the oldest stop on Route 66. Cave tours, boat rides, zipline, world-famous fudge. It’s all at Meramec Caverns.

Take Pulaski County USA’s Audio Driving Tour and enjoy one of the most scenic drives on Route 66 in Missouri.

The Cave Restaurant & Resort, featuring the nation’s only full-service restaurant inside a cave. Canoes and cabins, too.

Stop and Gaze into the Past

Your family resort on the Meramec River is easy to get to. Just follow Hwy 19 south from Cuba, cross the river and look left.. Rafts, canoes, kayaks, tubes, tent & RV camping.

Minature golf, swimming pool, cabins, RV hookups & tent camping in a friendly, family atmosphere at Candy Cane RV Park. West of Steelville on Hwy. 8.

10% off over $10 with this coupon!

~ Come See our Treasures from the Earth ~ Minerals • Fossils • Carvings • Bookends • Jewelry • Geology books • Special buys • Estate specimens • One of a kind rock gifts Constantly changing inventory • Visit us whenever you pass by!

Route 66 Information Center

Fall Creek Rock Shop

815 East St. Louis Street (Downtown Springfield on old Route 66)

11010 Dillon Outer Road • I-44 Exit 189 Rolla MO 65401 • 573-368-3737

Hours: Mon. - Fri., 8am - 5pm

800-678-8767

OPEN 7 days a week: 10-6 Mon-Fri • 9-6 Sat • 11-6 Sun

www.SpringfieldMO.org

On April 30, 1926, officials in Springfield sent a telegram proposing the name of the new, Chicago-to-Los Angles highway. Visit our Route 66 Information Center, 815 E. St. Louis St., in the birthplace of Route 66.

The old bus stop in St. Clair is now a friendly gathering place for coffee, tea, sandwiches & pastry and a gallery for local artists. Don’t miss the Old Bus Stop Coffee Shop & Gallery.

When you reach St. Clair, on Sept. 8 Route 66 Come for coffee and pastries!

Minerals, fossils, carvings, one-ofa-kind rock gifts and other treasures from the earth at Fall Creek Rock Shop.

Visit The

Nearly six-and-one-half miles of Route 66 runs through Joplin, mentioned in one verse of Bobby Troupe's song, "Route 66." Get more information at our Convention & Visitor’s Bureau, 602 S. Main.

River Hills Traveler Rt. 66 Bookshop

-Download the print edition or audio tour from our website-

On Historic Route 66!

Download our free mobile app at www.VisitSpringfield.mobi for help navigating Route 66 through Springfield.

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ROUTE 66/FALL FESTIVAL SUPPLEMENT

Coupon expires 12-31-13

Sandwiches, Soup Pastries, Coffee, Tea and Much More! “A Bus Stop is where passers-by become friends”

545 North Commercial on Historic Old Route 66 St. Clair, MO 63077 Call 314-606-6136 or 314-606-6282 for hours

Bourbon Family Center Bourbon Plaza Shopping Center Just South of I-44 Ext. 218

Hunting & Fishing Permits & Supplies Guns & Ammo • Beer • Liquor • Lottery Hardware Camping & River Goods Scoops ‘N’ Snacks Hand Dipped Ice Cream • Auto Car Wash • CO2 Fill Station • Paintball Supplies • Storage

Mon-Thurs 8-9 Fri-Sat 8-10 Sun 9-7

573-732-5517

www.CANDYCANERVPARK.com 1-573-975-2889 / T.F. 1-866-316-3976 18 HOLE MINIATURE GOLF SWIMMING POOL BIRTHDAY PARTIES

CABINS RV HOOK UPS TENT CAMPING BILL SIEMS J.R.

11 HIGHWAY M E-MAIL: STEELVILLE, MO 65565 BILL@CANDYCANERVPARK.COM

l Rockin’ t i v e o D t h e i l l o s R n’ to t n i the Sa

Eighty Years

as the oldest stop along Highway 66 Come Celebrate with us Saturday, September 14 FRANKLIN COUNTY DAY Half Price off ALL Cave Tours •Zipline Tours • Boat Rides

HAVE A PIECE OF OUR WORLD-FAMOUS FUDGE! 9 a.m to 5 p.m. 1-573-HOT-CAVE www.americascave.com (1-573-468-2283)


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ROUTE 66/FALL FESTIVAL SUPPLEMENT

RIVER HILLS TRAVELER

SEPTEMBER 2013

You can make a buck selling Ozark rocks

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By JOE SONDERMAN s traffic increased on Route 66, it wasn’t too long before someone figured out that travelers wanted trinkets and souvenirs, unique to the places they traveled. The glittering mineral wealth of the Ozarks lured tourists to buy gas or other supplies, and at a fair profit. There were families who risked their lives to mine rock and then painstakingly created hand crafted works of art. Ozark Rock Curios west of St. Clair, and others attracted roadside rockhounds, starting a tradition that persists today. Paul Jacob Woodcock was a Nazarene minister who moved to St. Clair in 1932. Work was rare, so he eagerly became a miner’s apprentice, digging blue tiff at nearby Anaconda. The miner couldn’t pay Paul. He told him to take some of the blue tiff and place it outside his home. The miner promised the rocks would sell. The miner was right. Paul was soon making roadtrips for more rocks to sell. His wife Lola May made gazing globes, lamps, clocks, vases, flower pots and even a two-story “Bird Castle” that sold for $3. The items were made from drusy quartz, held together with concrete and decorated with “fade proof” colored mortar. Drusy quartz is also called blossom rock. One side sparkles with bright quartz crystals in varying colors. The Woodcocks also incorporated traveler’s treasures into their work. They used shells, coins, buttons,

rings, marbles, beads and other items, inviting customers to “take those cherished memories out where you can enjoy them!” Paul arranged 10 large display stands so the first stand sold items for 10 cents. The items grew more expensive as tourists moved down the

Model T to haul petrified wood right out of the Petrified Forest! The family shipped rock by ton, filling boxcars to ship to wholesale buyers. Petrified wood sold wholesale for two cents per pound with rose quartz bringing as much as 10 cents per pound. A shed served as the “Fluorescent

ABUNDANT RESOURCE —Ozark Rock Curios, which formerly stood on Route 66 west of St. Clair, featured creations mined and crafted by the Paul and Lola May Woodcock family. The business got its start selling blue tiff from the nearby Anaconda mine. Photo from Joe Sonderman’s personal collection.,

line. The last stand held stones that could cost hundreds of dollars. Meanwhile, Paul also ventured into caves to mine stalactites, a practice that would make us cringe today. Lester B. Dill, master promoter of Meramec Caverns, bought them for his souvenir shop. Paul saved the two biggest cave rocks to erect in front of his business. He also built two tall columns of stone to serve as signposts. He traveled all over the country, using his

House,” displaying minerals that change glowing colors under ultraviolet light. It also housed little turtles made of balsa wood, with red eyes made of rock and toenails painted purple. Their heads and feet could move in a fan breeze. Paul’s son, Earl, said as a child he would direct tourists into the room and get them close to a turtle. He then flipped on the fan and hit the ultraviolet light. The screams were apparently pretty loud.

Paul preached in St. Clair for a time. He was asked if they made such beautiful specimens such as bladed barite or pointed calcite. His brochure answered, “Only God is able to make the exquisite and varied specimens found in the Ozarks. What we do is take these natural specimens he has lavishly provided and build them into, or around useful novelties.” Absolutely no business was conducted on Sunday. Many people drove hundreds of miles to arrive on a Sunday and went away disappointed. Woodcock moved a little bit west when four-lane Route 66 construction began in 1948. The giant stalactites were sold to the Grotto of the Redemption in West Bend, Iowa, where they still stand. Paul built a new house, complete with a massive fireplace made of rocks and minerals. The house still stands. In 1963, Paul felt a calling to move west and minister to the Navajo in New Mexico. The wholesale business continued for several more years, as Paul mined petrified wood with a bulldozer. Ozark Rock Curios finally closed in July, 1977. Earl left home in 1963, but came back in 1995 and purchased it. He died in 2010. Items handcrafted at Ozark Rock Curios still turn up occasionally on e-Bay. And somewhere there may be a balsa wood turtle with red crushed rock eyes and painted toenails. lurking in the darkness, just waiting for a gust of wind or glint of light to scare the living daylights out of some unsuspecting soul.

Meramec State Park established at site of informal auto camp Continued from Page 5 became designated as U.S. 66.

Auto camp movement reaches the Ozarks “The auto camp movement started in the east around 1910,” said Michelle Neubauer, former park naturalist at Route 66 State Park, who now works at Meramec State Park in Sullivan. “Once cars like the Model T became somewhat widely available, people bought them, and once they had them, the felt compelled to get out and drive them.” Neubauer explained there were no state parks, no roadside camps at the time. “People would just drive into the countryside, and set up a tent along a river, or a road, paying no attention to who owned a piece of land. “They just wanted to get out and experience nature,” she said. “It’s interesting. Just like they sell SUVs these day on television bouncing over rocks and splashing through water—the early advertisements for cars showed the same thing- cars in the woods.” “Needless to say, some farmers didn’t like these trespassers. Some towns or entrepreneurs set up “auto camps” – places with a well, or maybe a privy, that these travelers could stay overnight or for a few days.

“A lot of what our state parks became is based on these old auto camps,” she aaid. “The parks sprang up at the same time. “When Meramec State Park opened in 1927, it had been one of these places where people had gone down to the river for picnics and camping. They had 10,000 people out here that weekend.”

Early tourism switches from trains to cars Leland Payton, author of See The Ozarks: The Touristic Image, explained further. “Places like Hollister and Kimberling City were originally tourist destinations reached by rail,” he said. “Once Route 66 developed as a paved road, and automotive technology improved so you didn’t have to carry a set of tires with you, places which were off feeder roads became more accessible. Route 66 being in place led to a lot of CCC roadwork, and those secondary roads led to Branson, and Lake of the Ozarks and down into the Current River country.” “Auto camping could be hard work, though,” Payton said. “and that’s where the motor courts with bare bones cottages and cabins came into being. Even running water and a toilet seemed luxurious after a long day on the road, and local people were

happy to furnish such amenities.” Natural attractions closer to the road were developed for tourists. Fisher Cave was the centerpiece of Meramec State Park. The park ‘refuge manager’ was Thomas Benton Dill, who soon put his young sons Hugh and Lester to work guiding tourists. When a different park manager was appointed and the cave concession taken from the Dills, Lester scouted around and hatched his dream of Meramec Caverns, complete with his own “auto camp” and later, motel. Onondaga made the transition from a rail/wagon destination to one accessible by car. Lyman Riley, an associate of Dills, had attained enough credibility as a Route 66 promoter so that he attended the dedication of Hwy. 66 as the Will Rogers Highway after the commentator and humorist’s untimely death. All along Rt. 66 in Missouri, private fishing lakes, and river accesses became private auto camps long after most of the originals had vanished. The last auto camp, Camp Joy in Lebanon, closed in 1971 after 44 years of service. Without Route 66, the look of camping, and nature tourism in Missouri would have been quite different.

Route 66 State Park has both recreational, historic features

Continued from Page 1 Resources. The 419-acre park opened in 1999. The Times Beach story is also told in the museum.

More than a museum The park is not just a museum with lots of history and a super gift shop filled with Route 66 souvenirs; it is also a popular recreation destination. The bulk of the park is level, open land, perfect for hiking, bicycling and horseback riding. There are picnic grounds, a boat launch on the Meramec River, two pavilions and a playground. It is quite common to see deer and wild turkey, and more than 40 types of

birds have been identified in the park. The old bridge that once was part of Route 66 over the Meramec River is within the park, but it has been stripped down to the framework and is no longer open to vehicle or pedestrian traffic.

Getting there There are separate accesses for the visitor center and for the recreational area, one on each side of the river. To access the visitor center, take exit 266 off I-44. To access the park grounds, take exit 264 if heading west, or exit 265 if heading east. The park grounds are open from 7 a.m. to 30 minutes after

sunset daily. The visitor center is open from 9 a.m. to 4:30 daily from March through November. When we stopped by recently, a German couple was just leaving, and a Swiss couple arrived while we were still looking around. The map on the wall is dotted with colored pins representing the countries and states that visitors have come from — and that is just this year’s map. Route 66 is truly an international destination, and Missouri is fortunate to play such a key role in the route’s history. For more information, visit www.mostateparks.com/ park/route-66-state-park or call 636-938-7198.


RIVER HILLS TRAVELER

Continued from Page 4 Oct. 12-13 Old Iron Works Days. Maramec Spring, St. James. Old time crafts, fishing. Bluegrass bands, and 19th-century style demonstrations and crafts. . $10.00 Per carload. 573265-7124. Oct. 11-12 Timberfest. Ripley Co. Fairgrounds, Doniphan. Celebrates timbering in the Ozarks

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ROUTE 66/FALL FESTIVAL SUPPLEMENT

past present and future. $6 adults, $3 (K-12), 5 and under free. www. ripleycountymissouri.org or 573-9962212.

Missouri

Gun & Knife Show

Oct. 11-12 Riverways Arts and Crafts Show and Sale. Circle B Campground, Eminence. Sat. 9-5; Sun 10-4. (573) 226-3618.

Cape Girardeau, MO - Show Me Center Centrally located between St. Louis & Memphis

September 27-28-29, 2013

SHOW ME CENTER

Continued on next page

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West End

17th

Show Hours

Broadway Independence

Kingshighway I-55 Bus. Loop

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Women FREE Children under 10 FREE Children under 16 years of age must be accompanied by an adult at all times. All firearm regulations enforced. Not Responsible for accidents.

Friday 4pm - 8pm Saturday 8am - 5pm Sunday 8am - 4pm

Admission from $6

William

October 5 - 10 am to 5 pm October 6 - 10 am to 3 pm

•Buy• •Sell• •Trade•

Antique & Modern Over 450 Tables

Southeast Missouri State University Sprigg

SEPTEMBER 2013

Visit us @ www.mogunshow.com

Morgan Oak

For More information

J.D. King 573-243-0499

Cape Girardeau Missouri

Jody Geiser 573-204-8888

Upper Meramec River Valley with Huzzah & Courtois Scan the QR codes with your handheld device to access websites or other online information about the businesses. STANTON

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River levels and weather conditions change quickly in the Ozarks and may vary widely throughout the region. It’s wise to call ahead to get current conditions before leaving home, or visit www.riverhillstraveler. com for USGS River Level information.

Leasburg

Riverview Ranch

Pea Ridge St. Forest

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19 SALEM

Our Opening Party is April 12-14. Reserve, pay in advance, 2nd night FREE!

970 E. Hwy 8 Steelville, MO 65565 1-800-367-4516 www.huzzahvalley.com vacation@huzzahvalley.com

River Trips • Cabins/Camping • Horses • BBQ Float the Courtois and Huzzah • 90 min from St. Louis

1-800-392-3700

www.bassresort.com fdicbass@misn.com

reMember: F.D.I.C. (Fun Down In the Country!)


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ROUTE 66/FALL FESTIVAL SUPPLEMENT

RIVER HILLS TRAVELER

From mountain music to zombie day, Ozarks has it all

Midwest Arms & Armor Society

Continued from previous page

FALL GUN SHOW 12-13 October 2013

Oct. 11-12 Haunting in the Hills. Alley Spring Park, ONSR, 6 mi. west of Eminence. Ozark crafts, storytelling, music. (573) 323-4236 or www.nps.gov/ozar.

SATURDAY 10am - 5pm • SUNDAY 9am - 3pm OPEN TO THE PUBLIC ! BUY • SELL • TRADE

UNIFORMED MILITARY, POLICE AND FIREFIGHTERS ADMITTED FREE!

PACIFIC EAGLES #3842 707 Congress Pacific, MO 63069

Admission: $5 Weekend Pass: $8 Children under 12 admitted free with parent or guardian

Oct 11-12 O’Fallon Fall Festival and Craft Bazaar, Civic Park-308 Civic Park Drive, October 12, 5-10 p.m.; Street dance from 7-10 p.m., Saturday, October 13, 9-4, 5K run, Saturday, October 13, 7:30 a.m. mseymour@ofallon.mo.us or 636-3795614.

Dollar-off coupon available on our website. Please visit us at www.MidwestArmsArmor.com Dealers: 8 ft tables available. $35 each. Call Show Coordinator Alan Fasoldt at (314) 631-2799. 24-HOUR SECURITY ON SITE! Directions:Take the I-44 Pacific Exit, then East on W. Osage, turn right on Payne St. (Moto Mart on corner), south on Payne St. to Congress (Payne St. ends). East on Congress to Pacific Eagles. GPS: N38 28.760; W90 44.956

NO SMOKING PERMITTED INSIDE

Oct. 12 33rdh Annual Fall Festival. Saxon Lutheran Memorial. Frohna. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Crafts, old-time demonstrations, buggy rides, costume contest. Free-will offering admittance. 573-824-5404.

HQ@midwestarmsarmor.com

RAILROAD DAYS 10 AM to 3 PM Pacific, Missouri Eagles Hall 707 Congress Ave

Adult $5 - Under 12 free with paid adult. $1 off coupons at Rt. 66 Railfan Center

At the tracks and First St.

Live Train Layout!

CIFIC

Please Visit Route 66 Railfan Visitor Center & Museum 100 E. St. Louis St.

Call:

314-393-3555 314-575-1771

For More Info ask for Ron

Big Piney & Gasconade Rivers

Oct. 26 Fall Rocks! Missouri Mines Historic Site. Park Hills. 5-9 p.m. Explore Southeast Missouri’s mineral heritage and personal recreational safety with park staff and representatives of Doe Run Company. Refreshments; for all ages. 573-4316226.

Oct. 18-20 Arcadia Valley Mountain Music Festival. Ironton. Plenty of hill music and bluegrass.

There’ll be a stage set up for pickers, so be sure to bring your instruments! 573-546-1441 or www.mountainmuOct. 19-20. Cuba Fest. Uptown Cuba. Chili cookoff, wine tasting, trolley mural tour, car show, crafts, 573-885-2988.

Saturday, September 21, 2013

PA

Oct. 26. Ste. Genevieve Rural Heritage Day. French Colonial Zombie Day, Déjà vu Reunion. Discover how Ste. Genevieve used to live, AND DIE! The first event ia all around town and free. Dress like a zombie, and get half price at the Bolduc House. $5/$2.50 fee for a cemetery tour of Ste. Gen’s famous graves from 5- 8 p.m. 1-800-373-7007

sicfestival.net.

MODEL TRAIN SHOW

Directions: Take the I-44 Pacific Exit, then East on W. Osage, turn right on Payne St. (Moto Mart on corner), south on Payne St. to Congress (Payne St. ends). East on Congress to Pacific Eagles.

SEPTEMBER 2013

Oct. 26-27. Apple Butter Festival. Streets of Kimmswick. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The streets are filled with people and vendors, and of course, apples and apple butter are everywhere. http:// www.cityofkimmswick.org/applebutterfestival.html. 636-464-7407. Know what Trav knows. Read Traveler every month.

www.rt66prc.com

CROCKER

Boiling Spring Campground

Boiling Spring

DEVIL’S ELBOW WAYNESVILLE Shanghai Spring

I-44 Roubidoux Spring

Family Camping & Canoeing In the♥of the Missouri Ozarks

18700 Cliff Road Dixon, MO 65459

larryh@dixoncamping.com

ST. ROBERT

Rt. 66 Canoe Rental


RIVER HILLS TRAVELER

SEPTEMBER 2013

TRAVELER CALENDAR Women’s Free Fishing Day. Sept. 14. Maramec Spring Park, St. James. No license, no trout tag required. Park car fee is in effect. Classes and instruction on trout fishing, fish cleaning, cooking, knot tying, and Fish ID. 573-265-7801 or email Ben.Havens@ mdc.mo.gov Old Greenville Days. Sept. 21-22. Greenville Recreational Area. 1840s rendezvous and Civil War activities. Saturday 8 a.m. – 9 a.m.; Sunday 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. 573-222-8562.

St. Clair Street Festival. Sept. 21. St. Clair. 2-11 p.m. Booths, music, food, kids activities. Traveler will be there with papers and a few books. Downtown St. Clair Main Street.

Women’s gigging night. Saturday Sept. 21. Twin Pines . Start at Twin Pines with some hands-on, go to Two Rivers to gig. Fishing license required. Over 18 only. Call 573-325-1381 to register by Sept. 18. Conservation Café- Sue Corvick. Sept. 24. 6:30-8 p.m. Painter Sue Corvick talks about nature painting. Reservations required. 573-290-5218 National Public Lands/Hunting and Fishing Day. September 28. Many

Continued on next page

Meramec State Park

Any season ~ Any repair ~ Anywhere you are

1-888-MERAMEC

636.583.2244 Office

888.733.3778 Road Service

or

(637-2632)

• Light Engine Maintenance • Appliance Repairs • Electrical • Plumbing • Body & Paint Work • Insurance & Extended Warranty Claims

• Major Repairs • Mobile Service to you for Minor Repairs • Winterizing • Free Roof Inspections • Bearings Packed • Generator Maintenance

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ROUTE 66/FALL FESTIVAL SUPPLEMENT

573-468-6519

Cabins Now Open until October 31st

CANOE, RAFT & KAYAK FLOATS on the Meramec River CALL 1-888-MERAMEC or 573-468-6519 FOR WEEKEND RESERVATIONS

636.583.2147 Fax

Ice • Firewood • Camping & Fishing Supplies • Licenses • Beer

Fireside Store & Grill

REPAIR | REBUILD | ROAD SERVICE

Grill features appetizers, burgers, fries, sandwiches and more!

• MOTEL • CONFERENCE ROOM

Groceries • Souvenirs • ATM • Propane

FOR RECREATIONAL VEHICLES & HORSE TRAILERS

4 Miles South of Sullivan on Hwy 185

7819 HIGHWAY 47 SOUTH | UNION, MO 63084 | 3rrv.com

Concessionaire Mike Fleming

Lower Meramec, Bourbeuse & Missouri Rivers Castlewood State Park

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RIVER

RAILROAD DAYS

RAILROAD DAY September 21, 2013

MODEL TRAIN SHOW

River Hills Traveler

Saturday September 21, 2013

Bookshop

780. N. Commercial Ave. (Hwy. 47) • St. Clair, Mo.

We’re on Old Route 66, just off I-44 Open 10-5 Thursdays & Fridays Major credit cards accepted Home of Traveler Publishing Co.

Eat • Gas up • Shop when you’re in town for:

314-393-3555

10 AM to 3 PM Pacific MO Missouri Eagles Hall 707 Congress Ave

636-742-1678

For More Info ask for Ron

www.rt66prc.com

www.pacificmissouri.com


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ROUTE 66/FALL FESTIVAL SUPPLEMENT

TRAVELER CALENDAR

RIVER HILLS TRAVELER

SEPTEMBER 2013

medical emergency. Ages 11-16 must have adult. 636-441-4554 for reservations.

Continued from previous page

agencies have free admission, free camping, programs. Inquire. Traveler will be at Hunting and Fishing Day just off Forest 44 and Boy Scout Beaumont Reservation Road (St. Louis County I-44 Antire Road.) Survival Tactics for the Outdoorsman. Oct. 2. Busch Shooting Range. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. How to survive in the woods if stranded, you are lost on a hike or you have a

Traveler welcomes brief event submissions for the Calendar. We’re especiallyinterested in outdoors or history-related, low-cost community or charitable events open to all. Info needs to reach us by the 15th of the month before the event. Call Toll-free to 800-8748423 ext. 2 or email to jschaper@rhtrav.com for consideration. We promise to read them all and to print as space permits or place the most interesting on the blog.

You asked for it...We’ve got it!

MTA Fall Rendezvous

New! Revised! Expanded!

September 20-22

Montgomery County Fairgrounds

A Paddler’s Guide to Missouri

Highway 19 Exit # 175, 6 miles north of I-70

Open to All - Free Admission

Be Sure To Stop and See Miss Missouri Shelby Ringdahl of Springfield,MO

It’s Oz Hawksley’s original book from 1965 plus a whole lot more: • 9 x 11 inches, gorgeous color phots, lay-flat spiral binding. Put it inside a sealable, clear bag and read while you float without flipping pages. • Maps & details of popular float streams plus lesser-known streams & tributaries. • Along with update, easyto-read maps, descriptions of access points, camping, state parks and conservation areas ONLY plus tax & shipping

Tentative Schedule:

THURS Sept 19: Arrive/Setup Noon FRI Sept. 20th

9AM - Tom Westhoff “Bobcat” 10AM – Tom Olson “Muskrat” 11AM – Clint Schutte “Coyote” 1PM – RIck Hempseth “Mink’’ 2PM – Tom Olson “Beaver” 3PM – Mark June “Bobcat & Coyote”

SAT. Sept. 21st

Special Attractions:

• Fish Supper • MTA Awards Banquet • MTA Meeting • Washer Tournament • Dry Land Canoe Race • Skillet Toss • Men, Women, Kid’s speed setting • Water Sets Contest • Land Sets Contest • MO Mountain Maids Dinner • MTA Auction • Sunday Worship Kenny Cook

8AM – 12PM Cable Restraint Class 8AM – Matt Spurgeon “Dry Land Sets” 9AM – Rick Hemspeth “Otter and Beaver” 10AM – Mark June “Bobcat and Coyote” 11AM – Doren Miller Fur Handling Demo 1PM – Jerry Schutte “Fox” Over 100 Dealer Booths Selling 2PM – Jordan Beshears “Raccoon” All Kinds of Trapping Supplies and Crafts 3PM – Jay Garrison “Water Trapping” 4PM – General Meeting

$8

SUN. Sept. 22 - Breakfast - Worship - Leave

To order send $12.75 to River Hills Traveler, P.O. Box 245, St. Clair, MO 63077 or phone Jo at 800-874-8423, ext. 2 with your credit card in hand

Nearby Lodging: Days Inn America’s Best Inn & Suites America’s Best Value Inn

For more information contact Robbie Page at 660-888-2369 or at trapperpage@hotmail.com or contact Bob Scarlett at 573-564-2079

Everybody Welcome! For more information: www.ripleycountymissouri.org

573-996-2212

Visit us on Facebook

OCTOBER 11-12 RIPLEY COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS DONIPHAN, MO Gates Open Friday - 4 p.m. Saturday - 8 a.m. FRIDAY Educational Demonstrations Collegiate Competitions Loggers Relay Chainsaw Carving

FRIDAY & SATURDAY Educational Demonstrations Food • Craft Vendors Log Rolling

SATURDAY

Timberworks Lumberjacks-3 SHOWS Chainsaw and Crosscut Race Collegiate Competition/Finals Pioneer Woodcutters Association Tag Team Rail Split and Demonstration Chainsaw Carving Auction Draft Horse Pulls

JOE COLLINS formerly of

“Ax Men”

Celebrating our Timber Heritage...and our future in the Timber

Ozark Regional Timberfest Sporting Events sponsored by Admission: $6 Adults • $3 Students K-12 • 5 and under Free


Route 66 Fall Festival section