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SAMPLE PORTFOLIO Teaching Activity

Ursula Emery McClure, FAAR, AIA, LEED AP BD+C A. Hays Town Professor School of Architecture Louisiana State University partner, emerymcclure architecture, llc (337) 356 7415 cell (225) 578 4259 lsu office uemery@lsu.edu ursula@emerymcclure.com www.emerymcclure.com


Statement of Research Interests Institutional and Educational

In conjunction with the work I design, build, and investigate in my professional practice I also pursue research activities with collaborators within my institution and for my students. I must clarify that I see all my work as intrinsically integrated and based on the same core research principles. It is merely distinguished as the collaborators vary. For the past five years I have been developing research projects within the LSU Coastal Sustainability Studio for both myself and my comprehensive design students. Within the framework of the Studio I have developed and worked on multiple interdisciplinary teams to investigate the physical relationship between the built environment and the natural environment within dynamic systems. This research interest exists at multiple scales, from large infra-structural and ecological systems analysis and design (Changing Course Competition, Coastal Caretaker, The Louisiana Delta Research Minor) to the scale of building systems integration (Fort Proctor, OSH housing prototype, Symbiotic Shorebase.) It is the engagement of sustainable design within dynamic environmental systems across these scales where my research interests lie. At the ecological and infra-structural scale, I pursue investigations that question the singular development of the constructed realm as divided by professional discipline and singular needs. My collaborations with landscape architects, civil, geo-technical, and structural engineers, coastal scientists, oceanographers, film makers, and science fiction writers have all been organized to develop design actions that integrate the complexities of conflicting needs within dynamic systems. My goal as an architectural researcher is to find the design potentialities within the seemingly contrary and to innovate on the capabilities of the constructed realm. It is this substantiated research interest that garnered me a design position on the Changing Course Competition. This interest infiltrates my educational agenda as well. In my primary role as a building technologies professor, I engage the same inter-disciplinary environment for my students. I also teach technologically at both scales (environmental and building.) In my course The LA Tectonic, for example, this semester the students are working with the guest instructor, Guy Nordenson (engineer), to design resiliency strategies for threatened rural coastal communities. Their design strategies will consist more of policy, insurance, infra-structural, and civil engineering resolutions then the prototypical architectural resolution and will speak directly to what I believe an inclusive designer can be. In my Symbiotic Shorebase Studio, I created an environment where the science fiction writer Moira Crone collaborated with naval engineers from LEEVAC and the Gulf Division of the Chevron Corporation to work with the students to develop concrete building design resolutions for Chevron’s shorebase operations. As this was a comprehensive design studio, the design innovations were all at the scale of the building, intrinsically linked to the natural environment and the contrasting fields of both water and land. Students were challenged by myself and the Chevron Corporation to truly practice progressively and imagine integrated system resolution that had never been witnessed before. This research work was so well received that my firm has since been hired by an oil & gas supply company to work on the research and development of a new housing unit that can withstand hurricane force winds and salt corrosion while maintaining a featherlight construction and sustainable material palette. The OSH project is currently in proto-typing and is under a nondisclosure agreement but is a testament to my research interests in systems integration and architectural design.

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ARCH 7006

Graduate Design Studio VI 6 hrs.; Prereq.: Arch 7005. 12Hrs. Studio. Credit will not be given for both this course and ARCH 8000

Emphasis on the synthesis of all issues addressed in previous studios in the comprehensive design of buildings.

ARCH 7006 Comprehensive Design _ THE SYMBIOTIC SHOREBASE ursula emery mcclure spring semester

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“We can feel drawn to the mystery of how the world works, to what underlies what we see, and to what comes next in history, our’s and the world’s.” -- David Richo

“Judgment and closure are the greatest dangers to one who wants to retain the psychic mobility of an explorer.” -- John Lily The Louisiana Coast and the adjacent Gulf of Mexico are intrinsically linked by the mighty Mississippi River. The river and its deposits over thousands of years created the coast and also the oil found offshore. 65–2.5 million years before the present - the ter ary period, the great river carried large volumes of sediment towards the Gulf and created a major sedimentary basin, and many subsurface deposits. These subsurface deposits were composed of dead organisms that were buried before they could oxidize or burn up or decay. These non-decayed dead things become the major requirement for making oil long into the future especially those that formed in localized centers of deposi on. Faul ng of these Ter ary sediments led to the migra on and accumula on of hydrocarbons in massive fields below the coast, especially along the flanks of salt domes that were forced up through the sediments from the underlying rock strata (Roberts et al. 1989). In more recent geologic me, the ecosystems of coastal Louisiana have gone through more rapid changes driven by low topographic relief, geological processes, and climate. The River, as it changed course to the sea, created mul ple delta lobes that presently are in various states of degrada on/forma on. These lobes formed the eastern half of the state (the deltaic plain) while the western half of the state (the Chenier plain) was constructed during the glacial melt as layers of sediments were deposited on the eroded Pleistocene surface from the Gulf. Presently, the Louisiana coast exists in a fragile state: the river that fed it has been bound, the sea is rising, and the climate creates more erosive storms. The physical health of the coast is poor (see image below) yet it is cri cal to the state and country and environment. The coast serves as a protec ve barrier to the largest popula ons in the state, as the opera ons base for more than 1/4 of US energy resources, and 40% of the con nents wetland environment. If the coast is to con nue to serve and thrive, its rela onship with its inhabitants and the oil and gas industry must become more symbio c. This semester, The Chevron Shore Base project will inves gate symbio c design queries in the unique Louisiana condi on. INDUSTRY + HUMANS + COAST = SymbioƟc Environment

symbiosis, n \ˌsim-bē-ˈō-səs, -ˌbī-\ 1: the rela onship between two different kinds of living things that live together and depend on each other: a rela onship between two people or groups that work with and depend on each other 2: the living together in more or less in mate associa on or close union of two dissimilar organisms (as in parasi sm or commensalism); especially : mutualism 2: a coopera ve rela onship (as between two persons or groups) IMAGE 1_ h p://www.vrml.k12.la.us/victery/new08/louisiana/100_0311.JPG IMAGE 2_ h p://www.upli ingthecoast.org/coas ncrisis.htm IMAGE 3_ h p://blog.cleveland.com/pdopinion/2008/07/offshore_drilling_its_not_just.html

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scienceline.org/2010/03/how-do-barnacles-a ach-to-whales/ cpanelcloudvps.com

SYMBIONT 1 & 2 _ THE COAST AND ITS INHABITANTS Many argue that the only way to have a healthy Louisiana Coast is for all humans and human ac vi es to be removed. It is important to remember that even though humans clearly have an affect on the natural world, they are also part of the natural world. The studio this semester will ques on this rela onship and ask for resolu ons that do not priori ze one over the other but instead create a more symbio c rela onship. Presently one could argue that our environmental rela onship is in synnecrosis: a rela onship between symbionts that is mutually detrimental. As this is destruc ve, the rela onship must change. Our rela onship with the coast is obligate (meaning that all symbionts depend on each other for survival.) For the design inves ga ons you will make this semester, you must counteract the synnecrosis rela onship and try to find a more symbio c one. This may be a mutulis c or commensal. It cannot be one of parasi sm, amensalism, or synnecrosis. The technological and scien fic capabili es in the contemporary era present opportuni es for humankind to now assume the crea vity and responsibility for maintaining the environment. The natural world before the industrial revolu on seemed omnipresent and merely required nego a on and manipula on; now, humankind’s more equal presence demands the natural world to be tectonically re-envisioned, replicated, and nurtured. Nature is an infrastructure that supports the larger biosphere and is undoubtedly more cri cal to our survival than anything else. The Chevron Shore Base design project will par cipate in this responsibility and ini a ve while maintaining the requisites of contemporary life. It will inves gate what a healthy rela onship is between disparate symbionts and how design can be transforma ve at its best. SYMBIONT 3 _ THE INDUSTRY The oil and gas industry is as omnipresent in Louisiana as is the coastal environment. As previously stated, energy resources are plen ful for the same reason our wetlands were. One only has to look at a map of the industry to see its rela ve scale. “Louisiana has the greatest concentra on of crude oil refineries, natural gas processing plants and petrochemical produc on facili es in the Western Hemisphere.” (doa.louisiana.gov/about_industry.htm.) The industry employs thousands of humans who need to live along the coast to access their work environment. The industry also must occupy the coast as it serves as its BASE for opera ons for its shoreline and off-shore components. Without these bases, the industry could not subsist. The bases provide the necessary link between land and sea, humankind and livelihood, country and economy, supply and distribu on. Unfortunately where these bases need to occupy exists in the dynamic and eroding coastal condi on and paradoxically demand a place of permanence (base, noun. the part on which something rests or is supported.) This is especially true in Venice, LA where annual inunda on and erosion occurs with or without storm ac on. Like humans, the industry has contributed to the degrada on of the coast. Yet also, the oil and gas industry are part of human’s means of existence. This studio demands that the industry be the third symbiont in the symbio c rela onship. INDUSTRY + HUMANS + COAST = Symbio c Environment At its best can the industry be similar to the bee, nurturing and contribu ng to the health and welfare of the humans and the coast? True, the Chevron Shore Base at Venice is just a small component of the overall industry but it serves as a rela ve test project for issues faced by all the players. As Joan Ockman stated in a recent issue of JAE, The very act of designing and building is by defini on an affirma ve one. Today, an architecture that inquires deeply and radically into the rela onship between itself and society, itself and the world, is more resonant and relevant than ever. The complexi es of contemporary prac ce demand not only strategic realism but also cri cal discernment and conscience. Indeed, while architects have a minimal responsibility to do no harm, they may also aspire to do some good. 1. 2. 3.

synnecrosis /syn·ne·cro·sis/ (-nĕ-kro´sis) n. symbiosis in which the rela onship between popula ons (or individuals) is mutually detrimental. com·men·sal·ism (-sə-ˌli-zəm) n. A symbio c rela onship between two organisms of different species in which one derives some benefit while the other is unaffected. mu·tu·al·ism (mych--lzm)n. An associa on between organisms of two different species in which each member benefits. mutu·al·is c adj.

The American Heritage® Dic onary of the English Language, Fourth Edi on copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Co

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


SYLLABUS _ POSTULATE AND THEN PROVE THE QUESTION GENERAL INFORMATION: Ursula Emery McClure, FAAR, AIA, LEED AP Professor of Architecture 229 Atkinson Hall Office Hours: 11:30 to 12:30, MWF and by appointment via email Studio Hours: MWF 1:00-5:00

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INTENT: This studio will focus on the comprehensive design development of a building program into a terminal project emphasizing the tectonics, mechanics, and presenta on cri cal to the profession. This project represents the culmina on of the architecture design process - the synthesis of conceptual ideology with the very tangible mechanics and tectonics of an architecture project. As a future architect, your ability to integrate and coordinate these components in the development of a project is fundamental. The semester is arranged as an escala on, an expansion step by step, where each phase informs the next, and each phase must be completed in order to con nue to the next. These phases draw on the skills you have accumulated in the past three years and combined, result in architecture. Architecture is “the art and science of designing and erec ng buildings.” This is what you will accomplish this semester, the nature of the profession.

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PRODUCTS:

COURSE OUTCOMES: At the conclusion of this course the student will have completed the following: Project Research Data Book (to include the following) Building Type - Code Analysis and Interpreta on Program Analysis and Interpreta on Site Analysis/Process Construc on and Interpreta on Precedent Analysis and Interpreta on Project Development from Schema c to Design Development Schema c Design (Formal Presenta on) Building System Integra on and Assembly Environmental Sustainability Goals and Projec ons (Analysis and Interpreta on) Design Development Project Documenta on (Formal Presenta on, CD, and Booklet) REQUIRED READERS, TEXTS, AND RECOMMENDED REFERENCE MATERIALS: There will be an in class library/Class MOODLE that contains relevant texts regarding site and environment. Theory texts and readings will be found on the program statement and are subject to instructor. Readings and Film: To be completed by start of spring semester Varies per semester Code sources: NFPA 101: Life Safety Code, 2015 edi on Uniform Building Code -2012 IBC, ADAAG, See Class Moodle Template Interna onal Green Construc on Code Version 2.0 See Class Moodle Template Reference Materials: Kwok, Alison and Grondzik, Walter. The Green Studio Handbook Allen, Edward and Iano, Joseph. Fundamentals of Building Construc on Materials and Methods. Ramsey/Sleeper, Architectural Graphic Standards, 11th edi on. Allen, Edward & Iano, Joseph. The Architect’s Studio Companion. Ching, Frank, Building Construc on Illustrated, Building Codes Illustrated Ramsey / Sleeper. Architectural Graphic Standards. Wakita, Osamu and Linde, Richard. The Professional Prac ce of Architectural Detailing. White, Edward. Introduc on to Architectural Programming, Site Analysis, Space Adjacency Analysis

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Reinforce and extend the knowledge and skills required to iden fy, evaluate, and develop appropriate design concepts. • Perform and analysis of the project’s context (spa al, environmental, regulatory, social/cultural, etc.) • Document the results of the analysis in an expressive manner. • Produce a representa on of the site that describes how the site’s development expresses the inten ons of the project. 2. Integrate the technical considera ons as design influences. • Explore the poten al of technical considera on to communicate one’s design inten ons. • Clearly ar culate the regulatory requirements associated with a project. • Iden fy sustainable issues associated with a project and u lize them in the design. • Produce system drawings/models for the major building systems (structure, HVAC, fire suppression and life safety) • Research and propose materials and means of assemblage. • Define and represent a tectonic and environmental strategy for the project. • Produce technical drawings/models that describe the enclosing system and its rela onship to other building components. 3. Reinforce and develop the contextual issues, both man-made, natural and environmental, as design determinants. 4. Reinforce analy cal and evalua ve skills. 5. Reinforce and develop communica on skills both visually and audibly. • Write ideas in an organized and logical manner. • Represent inten ons through drawing and model with accuracy and expressiveness. • Demonstrate an ability to speak clearly to and audience. • Iden fy specific visual representa ons (models, drawings, diagrams, etc.) in wri en, drawing, and model form. 6. Reinforce, test, and extend the one’s understanding of the design process and the sequence of development from an idea to construc on. • Show an ability to define short-term inves ga ons, set a work program, and arrive at conclusions. 7. Interpret and develop an architectural program, and analyze and interpret a specific site in rela onship to that program. 8. Take a schema c design for a building into the design development phase. • Define the a ributes of a schema c design and those associated with design development. • Represent the various a ributes of a schema c design in drawing, wri en, and model form. • Represent the a ributes of the design development phase in drawing, wri en, and model form. 9. Test one’s ability to maintain a precise and consistent rigor in the development of a project and their understanding of reiteraon in the clarifica on of a design. • Demonstrate an ability to work for extended periods of class me. • Demonstrate an ability to engage in a re-itera ve cri cal process. • Demonstrate an ability to incorporate cri cism into one’s work.

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SYLLABUS _ SCHEDULE

PHASE 1 PHASE 2:

(SEE PROSPECTUS) Schema c Design Development

Schema c Design – the phase of architect’s services in which the architect consults with the owner to ascertain the requirements of the project and prepares schema c design studies, consis ng of drawings and other documents illustra ng the scale and rela onship of the project components to the owner. KEY WORDS: SYNTHESIS, EVALUATION, ACTION, AND REEVALUATION The schema c design phase will focus on combining phase 1 and phase 2 with the informa on gathered by group and individual research. This phase will also bring in the very specific loca on of your individual sites. It will begin the synthesis of the conceptual with the material, the technological with phenomenal, the urban with the suburban. U lizing the process, research, and analysis previously acquired, schema c design studies will be completed. It is important to remember that the development of an empirical site analyses into a design concept and then into a concrete design is a systema c process. Schema c design is where design hypotheses are tested against tangible factors and requirements. Most of the mes these ini al tests fail and adjustments must be made. It is a repe ve process, which gains validity and depth within the required cyclical tes ng. It is important for the designer to examine each a empt (test) for informa on (processes) that inform the next steps to be taken, to construct limits for the next test. It is also important to remember the ini al design hypothesis may require modifica on (IT IS NOT PRECIOUS) and as the design develops, it should be tested against more and more requirements. Site planning issues along with preliminary plans, eleva ons and sec ons as well as conceptual construc on systems will be dealt with. Addi onal components of the design process to be addressed in this phase are as follows: Site Rela onships Circula on Program spaces Code Requirements Infrastructure/Building Systems Building Assembly/Materiality Sustainable and Environmental Ini a ves Phase 2 Review Requirements: (These are general requirements to be updated during the phase.) Material Site model = scale to be determined Building Concept Models/Drawings Site plan = 1/32” Site Sec ons = 1/16” Plans = 1/8”(architectural, structural, mechanical) Sec ons = 1/8”(including building systems detail) Site Eleva ons = 1/8” Perspec ves = Atmospheric detail views PHASE 3: Design Development Design Development – the second phase of an architect’s basic services which include developing structural, mechanical, and electrical drawings, and specifying materials. Con nuing the escala on, the design development phase will build upon phase 2. The physical nature of the building will be established and influenced by the conceptual development and research that came before. Addi onal components of the design process to be addressed and concre zed in this phase are as follows: Construc on Assembly Materiality Structure Mechanics and Environmental Contribu ons and Sustainability Construc on Details Final Review Requirements: (These are general requirements to be modified during the Phase.) Mass Model = scale to be determined Bldg. Model = scale to be determined Site plan = scale to be determined Site sec ons = scale to be determined Plans = 1/8” (architectural, structural, mechanical) Bldg. Sec ons = 1/8” (including building systems detail) Bldg. Eleva ons = 1/8” Perspec ves = Int. Views (matls., ligh ng, etc.) Mul ple Wall Sects. = 1/4” Details = scale to be determined (model or drawing) U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


NOTE: A COMPLETE BOOK OF THIS STUDIO IS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST AND AT WWW.SYMBIOTICSHOREBASE.COM

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Above Primary perspective of three main vessels of Aqua Dock that define ship bays and other ancillary functions

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Top Regional site plan illustrating platform access from shorebase Bottom Aerial perspective of ship slips docked in Mississippi River

SITE PERSPECTIVE

Dean Kelly [AquaDOCK]

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CONTINENTAL SHELF VENICE SITE TO GULF ACTIVE DEEPWATER OIL PLATFORMS DEEPWATER OIL WELLS

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AqueDOCK re-imagines the operation and function of a coastal energy shorebase, establishing a new typology that is informed by the flexibility of the landscape. The project site, Venice, Louisiana, is the last town accessible by road as the Mississippi approaches the Gulf of Mexico, the last connection to land before the landscape gives way to water. Here Venice occupies a tenuous position subject to flooding, erosion, land subsidence, and violent hurricanes. AqueDOCK replaces the existing, static, Chevron shorebase with a system that adapts to unstable conditions and embraces the flux inherent to the landscape. PORTFOLIO 2016

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Left Structural Detail of land to water product supply tube Below Perspective inside employee transport in supply tube

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


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1/4” ATTACHMENT BOLT 2” X 4” STL ANGLE 10 GUAGE STL ANCHOR PLATE FOR HURRICANE RATED ASSEMBLY 8" C CHANNEL LIGHT GAUGE JOIST AT 16" O.C. JOIST HANGER W18 x 76 STEEL BEAM AT 10' O.C.

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Above Exploded axonometric of boat slip structure with dwelling units and hangar in foreground

Right Permeable wall envelope displaying structural scale of vessels and human scale that exists within structure

PERMEABLE WALL ENVELOPE U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D

PREFABRICATED WALL SLEEVE GALVALUME SIP PANEL CAP EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE SIP CORE GALVALUME SIP PANEL CLADDING


NOTE: A COMPLETE BOOK OF THIS STUDIO IS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST AND AT WWW.SYMBIOTICSHOREBASE.COM

Top Perspective of shorebase revealing the strata of operations

Elliot Manuel [LA Rising] 1. What is the effect of large-scale industrial production and its connected systems of operation to the notion of cultural creation in a place? 2. What is the effect of living and making in a place where the physical notion of a place is eroded because of human intervention? 3. How does architecture respond to the preceding two conditions by accepting a future in which the physical place will no longer remain but attempt to create permanence for the future of a place, a people, and its history? The preceding questions are the foci of the project for a shore base in Venice, Louisiana. Each of these questions describes in some form the unique relationship of how humans occupy the coastal condition of Southern Louisiana. The residents of Venice occupy the visible realm of the Earth’s surface, which places human occupation in the coast at a unique level. Residents in Venice experience the realities of environmental degradation and the effects of industrial production on the natural environment; however, oil operations in the Venice area are not concerned with the epithelial layer of the environment but seek to maintain economic derivatives much deeper in the strata. This condition of connection and disconnection between the strata’s of the coastal condition is what defines the unique environment of Louisiana. For Louisiana, the sediment of the Mississippi River negotiates the entire operation of human life in this section of the state; insofar, that the architecture of a symbiotic shore base will frame the horizontal understanding of the coast’s infrastructure and place it into a vertical condition, thereby increasing the efficiency of the shore base by industrial standards and intensifying natural processes that support the dynamics of coastal Louisiana. PORTFOLIO 2016

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Upper Left Southeast elevation of tower displaying stair and highway superstructure Upper Right Northwest elevation displaying use of exterior pipes to connect lower oil levels with upper residential quarters Lower Left Southwest elevation of tower displaying interlocking of oil and residential layers Lower Right Northeast elevation displaying second stair and front garden for residences to utilize during extended stays

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


Left Access to shorebase from land for supply chain

Left Perspective of shorebase highlighting transportation methods utilized to service structure

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[Circulation]

Ancillary support for vessels occurs on outside edges of tower to increase efficiency

[Circulation]

Vertical shafts bring goods down to water and into upper floors of the tower

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Water of Mississippi River ranges from a depth of 15’ to 50’ at site

[Diagram] Shorebase Processing

[Circulation]

[Heliport]

Circulation tower to bring worker up and down tower

Landing pads for helicopters

[Living]

Residential spaces for shorebase workers

[Water Cisterns]

Cisterns located at top of tower to collect rain water for residences

[Heliport] Helicopters land on top of tower

[Louvers]

Horizontal louvers to protect works from solar radiation

[Heliport]

Landing pads for helicopters

[Louvers]

Corrugated steel panels enclose parking level and residential levels [Structure]

Structural attachment for residential louvers

[Garden]

Roof-top garden for nutrition and spatial qualities of shorebase workers [Circulation]

Circulation tower to bring workers up and down tower

[Circulation]

[Mega Highway]

Exterior stairway for human circulation

Highway connecting towers over Louisiana landscape

[Solar Panels]

Denoted area for solar panels to generate power

[Mega Highway]

Highway connecting towers over Louisiana landscape

[Louvers]

Vertical louvers to protect workers from Southern solar radiation

[Prevailing Winds]

Winds coming from the eastern direction of the site

[Water Level]

Water of Mississippi River ranges from a depth of 15’ to 50’ at site

[Water Level]

Water of Mississippi River ranges from a depth of 15’ to 50’ at site

[Diagram]

[Diagram]

Structural Attachments

Structure and Sustainability

Upper Left Axonometric diagram displaying circulation and egress in tower structure Upper Right Axonometric diagram displaying goods processing for the tower Bottom Left Axonometric diagram displaying structural systems and skins used in tower Bottom Right Axonometric diagram displaying sustainable systems in tower

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


Human Comfort, Arch 7006 Comprehensive Architectural Design, Graduate Design Studio VI Urban Bathhouse and Olympic Training Facility, Houston TX “The architecture of out time is turning into the retinal art of the eye. Architecture at large has become an art of the printed image fixed by the hurried eye of the camera. The gaze itself tends to flatten into a picture and lose its plasticity; Instead of experiencing our being in the world, we behold it from outside as spectators of images projected on the surface of the retina.â€? Juhani Pallasmaa experience, n. 1. trial, proof, or test. 2. an actual living through an event or events; personally undergoing or observing something or things in general as they occur. 3. anything observed or lived through. 4. eect on one of anything or everything that has happened to him; individual reaction to events, feelings, etc. phenomenon, n. 1. any fact, circumstance, or experience that is apparent to the senses and that can be scientifically described or appraised; 2. the appearance or observed features of something experienced as distinguished from reality or the thing in itself. phenomenology, n. 1. the science dealing with phenomena as distinct from the science of being.

Architecture defines environments with physical and metaphysical constructions. Together the material and the immaterial create experience. This studio will use the human comfort experience as the design initiative, motivation, and program. The experiences of relaxing communally (bathing) address the levels of human comfort. What spaces can be constructed that truly capture the phenomenal experience of the aforementioned action? What building systems can be used to question the ultimate experience of human comfort and pay respect to energy, environmental, and climatic sources? How does one conceive of, construct, establish, and confirm the experiences of climatic environments? What can be determined? What can be successfully indeterminate? Does the space of an event modify the levels of human comfort? Should it? Should comfort be conditional? Quieting the mind Deep in the forest Water drips down. Hosha

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human comfort @ houston_rysher structural/mechanical diagram 1. mechanical, electrical, and plumbing system pipes encased in insulation 2. single source system of heating and cooling pods 3. water storage tanks for pods 4. steel frame with moment connections 5. lightweigh concrete on coated metal decking 6. precast concrete u-beam 7. cast in place concrete columns 8. fiber glass beams with fiber glass mullions 9. suspended ramp from steel frame 10. hvac system for locker rooms and first floor suites

1 2 3

5

6

9 7 8

4

10

A

AA

A.1

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

5 LOUVERED VENTED WALL

1

8' - 0" 8' - 0"

A. Mens Locker Room B. Womens Locker Room C. Lobby D. Office Suite E. Payment Room F. Mechanical Room G. Laundry Room H. Storage

1

1 8' - 0"

F 2

2

E 8' - 0"

3

2

3

H 4

G

D

C

4 8' - 0"

8 5

5

A 8' - 0" 8' - 0"

6

6

6 B OPEN TO

3

UP 24"x48" PANELING

ABOV E

CMU BLOCK

9

9

4 AA

A

A.1

B

C

10

locker room level

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D

D

E

F

G

H

I

K

UP

10


1 A

A.1

B

C

26' - 10"

D

16' - 9"

E

12' - 0"

2

F

24' - 0"

G

12' - 0"

3 H

12' - 0"

I

12' - 0"

K

J

24' - 0"

1. Pod in place 2. Pod expansion Space 3. Circulation 4. Natatorium

12' - 0"

12' - 5"

4' - 6" 50' - 9" 4' - 5"

1' - 5"

3' - 8"

1' - 1"

3' - 8"

5' - 5"

4' - 2"

36' - 4"

4' - 3"

6' - 1"

3' - 8"

4' - 5"

1' - 3"

16' - 2"

53' - 3"

48' - 3"

MECHANICAL PIPING

1

1 ROLL UP DOOR

7' - 2" 1' - 2"

2 DN

4' - 8"

4' - 8"

4' - 8"

1' - 2"

0' - 7 " 4' - 8 "

4' - 8"

4' - 8"

4' - 8"

2

1' - 2"

1' - 2"

3' - 10"

POD EXPANSION SPACE

12' - 4"

POD 16 7' - 2"

6' - 9"

POD 15

11 ' - 5 "

POD 14 6' - 11"

POD 13

OPEN TO BELOW

15' - 4"

4' - 4"

0' - 10"

4' - 5" 1' - 10"

4' - 7"

4' - 5"

3 C4

11' - 9"

11' - 2"

11' - 5"

ROUGH FINISH CONCRETE FLOOR

4' - 4"

1' - 4"

OPEN TO BELOW

4' - 5"

1' - 10"

3

PAINTED CONCRETE FINISH SEE SPEC FOR COLOR

0' - 7"

WALKWAY

34' - 8"

1' - 10"

10

4' - 7"

5' - 5"

ROLL DOWN PRIVACY SCREEN ABOVE

14' - 10"

4' - 7"

4' - 7"

14' - 8"

8' - 8"

19' - 3"

55' - 0"

1' - 10"

5' - 0"

43' - 0" 12' - 5"

POD 18

POD 20

C4

POD EXPANSION SPACE

16' - 1"

POD 17

POD 19

4

0' - 7"

4

OPEN TO BELOW

12' - 5"

14' - 6"

NATATORIUM 15 Not Enclosed

4' - 1"

1' - 8"

15' - 4"

16' - 6"

12' - 3"

PRECAST CONCRETE U-BEAM

1' - 8" 1' - 9" 8' - 0"

C3

2' - 3"

2' - 6"

49' - 3"

5

16' - 5"

HUNG BACKSTROKE TURN INDICATOR

HANGER FOR POOL LIFT

HUNG FALSE START ROPE

PRECAST CONCRETE U-BEAM

10' - 10"

5' - 10"

HUNG BACKSTROKE TURN INDICATOR

18' - 8"

C3 1' - 7"

16' - 5"

1' - 7"

5

8' - 0"

2' - 6"

C3

5' - 10"

16' - 11"

8' - 1"

16' - 7"

3' - 0"

18' - 6" PRECAST CONCRETE U-BEAM

12' - 2"

9

2' - 8"

3' HIGH PRECAST CONCRETE PANEL WALL

C4

RECTANGULAR PRECAST CONCRETE U-BEAM HANDICAP POOL ACCESS RAMP

6 34' - 2"

6

FLOATING LANE SEPERATOR

8' - 0" 48' - 2"

RECTANGULAR FIBERGLASS BEAM BELOW

24' - 7"

ACRYLIC BOTTOM POOL

9

24' - 8"

112' - 7"

97' - 0"

9

C4

10

10

24' - 8"

4

11 15' - 6"

15' - 6"

11

C4

11' - 9"

191' - 10"

A

natatorium/wall detail

A.1

B

C

D

H

I

J

K

natatorium level

10

11

4' - 1"

0' - 5"

3' - 3"

4' - 0"

8' - 10"

PRECAST CONCRETE PANEL RAIL EPOXY MORTAR BED SETTING SUPPORT PLATE WITH ROD WELDED ON POCKET MILLED INTO CONCRETE PANELS BOLT SHIMMED , BOLTED, AND WELDED SUPPORT PLATE SAFING

L.W. CONCRETE ON METAL DECKING

1/2" ROUNDED BOLT STEEL COMPRESSION MEMBER

3' - 0"

WATERPROOF NEOPRENE ACRYLIC

WATERPROOF NEOPRENE 1/2" BOLT F.G. ENCASEMENT 2" COMPRESSION BOLT

ACRYLIC AQUARIUM GLASS

7' - 0"

F.G. COMPRESSION PLATE BACKER ROD AND SEALANT NEOPRENE COMP. GASKET 0' - 4"

8' - 0"

0' - 2"

7' - 10"

0' - 8"

8' - 8"

E

SECUREMENT F.G. BOX BEAM 12X20X1/2

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6' - 7"

VARIES

3' - 5"

3' - 3"

VARIES

1' - 8"

METAL TUBE RAILING

1' - 9"

F

E 1' - 3"

1' - 3"

1' - 3"

1' - 0"

1' - 3"

1' - 3"

2' - 3"

0' - 7"

1' - 0"

56' - 0"

MOLDED WOOD BENCH

57' - 0"

2' - 10"

MOVABLE METAL SCREEN 54' - 6"

2' - 8"

MOLDED FIBERGLASS SEAT SLIDING POCKET DOOR

1' - 3"

LIGHT GAUGE ZEE

METAL LOUVERS

TREATED WOOD CLADDING VARIES

VARIES 2' - 1"

LACONICUM

COILING METAL DOOR

ADA CIRCLE 2" MIN.

4' - 11"

0' - 3"

SLIDING POCKET DOOR FRAME

2' - 1"

PAINTED METAL CLADDING THERMAL BARRIER RIGID FOAM INSULATION THERMAL BARRIER MOLDED FIBERGLASS

SLIDING GLASS POCKET DOOR

FOLDABLE ADA HANDRAIL

INSULATED POCKET DOOR

WOOD CLAD LACONICUM WALL

1' - 6"

MOLDED FIBERGLASS BENCH 1' - 11"

ADA HANDRAIL MOLDED FIBERGLASS BENCH HINGED ARM INSULATED COILING DOOR

MOLDED FIBERGLASS FINISH

55' - 0" 57' - 0"

55' - 0"

MOLDED WOOD BENCH 1' - 5"

5' - 5"

MOLDED FIBERGLASS BENCH 2 3

MOLDED FIBERGLASS STEP/SEAT 0' - 11"

A500 A503

PAINTED METAL PANELS

CALDARIUM

TEPIDARIUM

MOLDED FIBERGLASS SEAT THERMAL BARRIER RIGID INSULATION MOLDED FIBERGLASS FINISH

ADA CIRCLE INSULATED POCKET DOOR 0' - 11"

MOLDED FIBERGLASS POOL SHOWER ABOVE

AISC STEEL TUBE 4x3x3/8 0' - 11"

2' - 6"

LIGHT GAUGE ZEE

AISC STEEL TUBE 4x3x3/8

0' - 8"

W12X58 STEEL COLUMN W14X82 STEEL BEAM

VARIES

E

VARIES

1' - 0"

56' - 0"

1' - 3"

1' - 3"

1' - 3"

1' - 0"

0' - 9"

1' - 6"

1' - 8"

F

0' - 10"

3' - 3"

COLD WATER RESERVOIR

3' - 0"

pod section FRIGIDARIUM MECHANICAL SERVICE PIPE ADA CIRCLE HEAT PUMP

54' - 6"

1' - 3"

11

55' - 0"

MOLDED FIBERGLASS STEP MOLDED FIBERGLASS SEAT

2' - 10"

57' - 0"

1' - 9"

56' - 0"

1' - 3"

MOLDED FIBERGLASS BENCH

A.1

pod floor detail

VARIES

VARIES 1' - 9"

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

MECH. PIPES FOR PODS

FLAT SEAM METAL ROOF RIGID INSULATION 2X8 METAL C-STUDS METAL PANELS

FLAT PANEL SOLAR WATER HEATERS

1

2

3

4

5

6

9

10

11

FLAT PANEL SOLAR WATER HEATERS FLAT SEAM METAL ROOF FLAT SEAM METAL ROOF 5TH FLOOR SOLAR PANELS

PIPE FOR MECHANICAL AND PLUMBING POD IN PLACE SEE DRAWING A402-2

RIGID INSULATION CMU BLOCK

POD IN PLACE PRECAST CONCRETE PANEL WALL GUARDRAIL TEXTURED LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE POOL DECK

SERVICE PIPE

WATER STORAGE TANK

METAL TUBE RALING HANGER FOR RAMP

POD IN PLACE

SUSPENDED EGRESS RAMP

SUSPENDED EGRESS RAMP

POOL W12X26 STRUCTURAL STEEL BEAM ENCASED IN F.P. PAINTED METAL DECK WITH ROUGH TEXTURE FINISH CLERESTORY

PRECAST CONCRETE U-BEAM 24" DIAMETER CONCRETE COLUMN

STAINLESS STEEL METAL FLASHING

PAINTED METAL DECKING WITH TEXTURED FINISH

PAINTED CONCRETE ON METAL DECK SEE SPEC FOR COLOR

PUBLIC PLAZA METAL STUD WALL

2X8 METAL C JOIST

FLAT SEAM METAL ROOF RIGID INSULATION 2X8 METAL C JOISTS METAL PANEL

C.I.P.CONCRETE

ELEVATOR SHAFT

PAINTED METAL TREAD WITH TEXTURED FINISH CLEAR ACRYLIC RISER

FLAT SEAM METAL ROOF

TERRACED GRASS CONCRETE STAGE AREA

RIGID INSULATION CLERESTORY STAINLESS STEEL EDGE FLASHING

CLADDING RETAINING WALL CONCRETE RIGID INS. CMU GLASS WALL ATTATCHED TO STRINGER

PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS SHEET PILING CLAD WITH PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS

CONCRETE L WALL

PILE CAP

FRICTION PILES

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D

CURTAIN WALL CONNECTED TO STAIR STRINGER

METAL PANEL RIGID INS. CMU BLOCK W12X58 ENCASED F.P.


ARCH 5005

Advanced Architectural Techniques 3 hr. lecture Preparation and correlation of working drawings, specifications, and/or manuals associated with various project phases and through a digital workflow.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Understanding and Controlling Information Distribution

Drawing upon your knowledge and experience in architecture this class will explore the complex relationships between theoretical, political, and practical forces that hold currency in offices today to see how they influence documenting architecture. This class is the connection between architectural concepts, as manifested in your studio, and architectural practice; where ideas become reality. The goal is to understand how architecture is communicated to builders using the protocols and methods of construction drawings. At the center of this class is the detail where we will investigate, using your design work, how various concepts, philosophies, and materials are assembled together to complete one’s architectural vision. COURSE OUTCOMES: At the conclusion of this course the student will have completed the following: Project Manual (as defined below) for 2 projects Building Type – General Code Reviews CD Set Compositional Exercises Sample Specification Outlines Building Design Details and Material Specifications Sample Construction Documents

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LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1. Learn the protocols of construction documents 2. Utilize oral, visual, and written skills for your work. 3. Demonstrate the ability to make complete and coherent drawings 4. Understand the methods that will allow each student to formulate an architectural approach to detailing. 5. Learn to discriminate between architecture and building via the construction document process. 6. Develop an understanding of code protocol and the development of a project manual. REQUIRED READERS, TEXTS, AND RECOMMENDED REFERENCE MATERIALS: The Professional Practice of Architectural Working Drawings, 3rd Edition, Osamu A. Wakita, Richard M. Linde Recommended: Technologies of Architecture Vol. 3: Materials, Specification and Detailing Norman Wienand; Taylor & Francis Publishing Selected handouts Code sources: NFPA 101: Life Safety Code, 2009 edition International Building Code 2009, see Moodle Template ADAAG, See Class Moodle Template International Green Construction Code Version 2.0, See Class Moodle Template Reference Materials: Allen, Edward and Iano, Joseph. The Architseentals of Building Construction Materials and Methods. Ching, Frank, Building Construction Illustrated, Building Codes Illustrated Ramsey / Sleeper. Architectural Graphic Standards. Wakita, Osamu and Linde, Richard. The Professional Practice of Architectural Detailing. White, Edward. Introduction to Architectural Programming, Site Analysis, Space Adjacency Analysis COURSE ASSIGNMENT AND LAYOUT: Assignments Phase 1 Project 1: Part A: Summarize your selected project in a letter addressed to one of the following- building inspector and contractor. Part B: Prepare an Outline for a Project Manual: Using your project from last semester, over the course of the next few weeks you will be developing a schematic set of construction documents (specification outline and construction drawings). Part B also includes a code review/summary sheets, schematic design drawings, and project summary. Address code issues such as, egress, building height restrictions, and area size. Project 2-6: Design and Documentation: Using your project from last semester as the example, you will develop your project through a series of CD drawing assignments and Specification exercises. Review handout and ask questions. The final corrected assignments will be collated as part of the construction documents referenced above. 11x17 sheet size for drawings and letter size for outline project manual. Phase 2 Project 1: Bring to class your current or past design project. Begin to think about how to document this in a CD set. Minimum requirements are as follows: 1 plan sheet, 1 Site Plan or Roof Plan sheet, 1 Building section sheet, 1 Exterior elevations sheet, 1 detail or wall section sheet. You must have a title block and a cover sheet. These drawings must be CD quality. A check list of minimum requirements for each sheet type will be issued. Note: some of these sheets will overlap and could be used with your 3rd year design studio. Like Phase 1, students will also prepare a project manual for their ongoing studio project.

I

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


structure/skin_accomando

PORTFOLIO 2016

89


cover sheet/site plan_borgmeyer

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


unit location plan/unit plans_borgmeyer

PORTFOLIO 2016

91


building section_borgmeyer

material studies_borgmeyer

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


details/structure_borgmeyer

PORTFOLIO 2016

93


title/site plan_reed

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


plan/elevations_reed

PORTFOLIO 2016

95


sections/details_reed

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


ARCH 4440

Vernacular Architecture and Material Culture Also oered as ANTH 4440; 3 hrs.; Prereq. : Acceptance into the BArch or MArch program or instructor permission Subject Matter and instructor may vary; additional details available from department. World vernacular architecture, including indigenous and folk buildings; other forms of material culture.

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THE OBJECTIVE:

THE LA TECTONIC – AN UNDERSTANDING OF MAKING

The LA Tectonic will delve into the origins and development of the architecture/tectonic culture of Louisiana and the lower Mississippi Valley. Beginning with the geomorphological condition of the Deltaic Region and its early settlement patterns, this course will analyze/research the technological developments that allow occupation in this fluvial terra. flu•vi•al Function: adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin fluvialis, from fluvius river, from fluere 1 : of, relating to, or living in a stream or river 2 : produced by the action of a stream <a fluvial plain> ter•ra Function: noun Inflected Form(s): plural ter•rae /-(")E, -"I/ Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, land

The seminar will also look at how the constructed culture has responded to the above condition and finds a way to establish a built existence, past and present. To gain understanding of the historical condition, the course will review the many cultures that built habitations (since the Paleolithic period.) To gain understanding of the contemporary condition the course will look at what is being made now and why and what of. By looking at the past and the present tectonic culture, its successes and failures, this course hopes that by gaining understanding of the ‘Hybrid Tectonic Nature’ new strategies for occupation along the Gulf Coast may be conceived and fabricated. The understanding of what is made and what needs to be made will extend to the natural condition, to include but not limited to, wetlands, marshes, coastal breaks, storm protection, etc. COURSE OUTCOMES: At the conclusion of this course, the student will have completed the following: • Tectonic Vocabulary • Reading Summaries and leadership in class discussion • Prescribed Tectonic Research and Analysis • Two Verbal and Graphic/Object Presentations of Prescribed Tectonic Research • A contemporary LA Tectonic Proposal (term project) LEARNING OBJECTIVES: 1. Understand the conditions and development of a specific culture of building and architecture especially in relation to its natural environment. 2. Explore construction and building theory and its relationship to material and vernacular architecture culture. 3. Propose, collect, organize, and collate for use a vocabulary of terms applicable to course content. 4. Read, Summarize, and prepare for class discussion, pertinent readings to the topical material. 5. Organize, collate, and synthesize for use a local tectonic systems. a. identify salient characteristics/components/assemblies/ uses. b. assemble and compose aforementioned data into a synthesized and crafted presentation. c. draw conclusions from data for use in final research project. 6. Propose, support, and produce a research project based on selected course topics. a. analyze the assigned topic. b. propose a collaboration of systems or modification of systems based on knowledge acquired throughout the course and the course readings. c. demonstrate ability to express intentions through research outline. d. demonstrate ability to articulate through speaking ones intentions. e. complete the outcomes set forth in self composed research outline. 7. Discipline a. demonstrate an ability to work for extended periods of class time. b. show an ability to define investigations (short term),set schedules for work and meet these deadlines. c. demonstrate an ability to incorporate criticism and self-criticism into work.

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


REQUIRED READERS, TEXTS, AND RECOMMENDED REFERENCE MATERIALS: Readings will also be assigned and located in the online course reader. REQUIRED: Kenneth Frampton, Studies in Tectonic Culture, MIT Press emerymcclure architectue, Terra Viscus, Hybrid Tectonic Nature, LuLu Press REFERENCE: Edward Cazayoux, A Manuel for the Environmental & Climatic Responsive Restoration & Renovation of Older Houses in LA. Department of Natural Resources Press John M. Barry, Rising Tide, Simon & Schuster Press Ari Kelman, A River and its City, University of California Press John McPhee, The Control of Nature, Farrar, Straus & Giroux Arnold R. Alanen and Robert Melnik, Preserving Cultural Landscapes in America, Johns Hopkins University Press Craig E. Colton, An Unnatural Metropolis, LSU Press Joan Busquets and Felipe Correa, New Orleans, Strategies for a city in soft land, Harvard GSD Anuradah Mathur and Dilip da Cunha. Mississippi Floods, Defining a Shifting Landscape. Yale University Press Jay Edwards and Nicolas Kariouk Pecquet du Bellay de Verton. A Creole Lexicon ,Architecture, Landscape, People Edwards, Jay D.. (1988) Louisiana's remarkable French vernacular architecture, 1700-1900 Baton Rouge, La.: Dept. of Geography & Anthropology, Louisiana State University. Part 1:

The LA CONDITION

KEY WORDS: Environment, Condition, Geography, Geomorphology, Settlement, Habitation, Culture, Historical, Contemporary The conceptual framework of this part will begin with an in-depth reading and understanding of the Louisiana condition, past and present. Beginning with its geological formation and concluding with its contemporary occupation, the first half of this course will present an overall view of the constructed and made as we have seen it develop. If a truly tectonic architecture is naturally identified with its surroundings through its choice of materials and forms as they respond to availability and climactic conditions, then the class must gain understanding of the surroundings, available material and forms, and climatic conditions. Included Topics are but not limited to geography, geomorphology, Indian Settlements, Colonial Exploration, Colonial Habitation, Early Tectonics, and Contemporary Tectonics. Guest lectures and field trips may be scheduled so calendar is subject to change. Part 2:

The LA TECTONIC

KEY WORDS: Analysis, Puzzle, Propose, Speculate, Make, Material, Manufacture, Tectonic, Specify The second half of this course will focus on the present and future development of the LA Tectonic. Students will look closely at the salient characteristics, components, assemblies, and uses of prescribed tectonics, both natural and manmade. These prescribed tectonics will be specific to LA. Students will be challenged to look for the unique, the operational, the conditional and the construction of the tectonics and create an analytical object from said research. Each student will present their findings/objects to their classmates for discussion. Students will then propose and develop final projects based on both the research and the objects made. The primary goal and strategy for the final project will be to contribute appropriately to the constructed environment, to contribute to the sustainability of place (culture, environment, history, economics, etc.) - TO DEVELOP AND DESIGN THE LA TECTONIC. Through constructive discussion, research topics will develop and the class will establish a cohesive format for their term projects.

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hurricrane harvester_givens

gantry crane

+

sugarcane harvester

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


yellowjacket_crowe

mayhaw berry

+

dredger

PORTFOLIO 2016

101


coastal CRUST or ACEAN_layman

eastern prickly pear cactus

lateral motion

,,,

+

gantry crane

forward motion

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D

collection motiion


baleen barrier_ngyuen

+

sassafras

step 1_ barrier collects

,,,

gantry crane

step 2_barrier builds

step 3_barrier gone_island built

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103


the [sp] oil rig_holzman

+

virginia creeper

ABANDONNED OIL PIPELINES

shrimp boat

text

THE DREDGING USED TO PLACE PIPELINES HAS CREATED CANALS AND SPOILBANKS IN THE MARSH. BECAUSE OF THE NUMEROUS OIL PIPELINES THROUGHOUT LOUISIANA’S COAST (10% COVERAGE), THIS CONDITION DISRUPTS THE NATURAL SHEET FLOW OF WATER. WITHOUT THE NATURAL DISTRIBUTION OF WATER, AREAS OF IMPOUNDMENT DO NOT RECEIVE ADEQUATE AMOUNTS OF OXYGEN AND SEDIMENT RICH WATER, CAUSING HYPOXIA, ALGAL BLOOMS, AND SUBSIDENCE. THESE FACTORS ARE THE SOURCE OF FORESTED WETLAND LOSS, MAKING THE COAST SUSCEPTABLE TO STORM DAMAGE AND SALT WATER INTRUSION, WHICH INCREASES THE DEVASTATION.

WATER FLOW IMPOUNDMENT

SHEET FLOW

SPOIL BANKS KEY HOLE [OIL WELL]

OPEN WATER

CANALS

PIPELINE CANALS AND SPOIL BANKS IN UNHEALTHY MARSH

PROBLEM

40-120’

6-12’

HIGH TIDE

THE [SP]OIL RIG

SPOIL BANK OPEN WATER LOW TIDE

CANAL

THE LA TECTONIC

SECTION OF PIPELINE CANALS AND SPOIL BANKS IN UNHEALTHY MARSH

JUSTINE HOLZMAN

VIRGINIA CREEPER + SHRIMP BOAT = RESTORE THE NATURAL SHEET FLOW AND PREVENT SALT WATER INTRUSION, ALLOWING OXYGENATED AND SEDIMENT RICH WATER TO FLOW THROUGH THE MARSH. AIMING TO CREATE A PREDISTURBANCE CONDITION WITH HEALTHY AQUATIC CONDITIONS BY FOSTERING SEDIMENT BUILD UP AND OXYGEN RICH WATER.

THE [SP]OIL RIG SEDIMENT RE-DEPOSITION

OPERATIONS EARTH MOVING. LAND BUILDING. EXCAVATING.

BY USING THE PIPELINES AS AN INFRUSTRUCTURE TO CARRY SEDIMENT AND OXYGEN RICH WATER THROUGHOUT LOUISIANA’S WETLANDS, IT WILL PROVIDE A SYSTEM TO RESTORE LAND AND WETLAND LOSS. THE SYSTEM CONSISTS OF PIPELINES BEGINING AT AN PLUGGING - BUILD UP SMALL LEVEES OR PLUGS TO CANALS OUTLET OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER AND CARRYING THE WITH SALT WATER INTRUSION SEDIMENT RICH WATER FROM EAST TO WEST, AND CONNECTING WITH PIPELINES TO BRING IT FROM NORTH TO SOUTH. BACKFILLING - RETURNING SPOIL BANKS TO CANALS TO CREATE A SHALLOW WATER HABITAT

HEALTHY MARSH

SPOIL BANK

WATERWAY

SPOIL BANK

CANAL

POND

PIPELINE

THE [SP]OIL RIG WILL USE ITS DRILL ARM TO DRILL HOLES IN THE PIPELINES STARTING FROM THE MOST AFFECTED AREAS AT THE SOUTHWEST TO BEGIN SEDIMENT BUILDUP RAISING THE DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONTENT. AS THE WETLANDS BEGIN TO RECOVER IT WILL CONTINUE TO DRILL HOLES INTO THE PIPELINES CLOSER INLAND UNTIL THE WETLANDS HAVE A HEALTHY DISTRIBUTION OF WATER FROM THE MISSISSIPPI.

NATURAL LEVEE

DESPOILER BACKFILLING A SPOIL BANK 65’

CANAL

HEALTHY MARSH

SPOIL BANK 20’

SPOIL BANK PIPELINE

12’

NATURAL WATERWAY IN HEALTHY MARSH

BACKFILLING SPOIL BANKS

HIGH TIDE

LOW TIDE

SECTION OF NATURAL WATERWAY IN HEALTHY MARSH

ARM AND CLAW MOVEMENT

SYSTEM

6-9’ HEALTHY MARSH POND

MACHINE

MISSION

OPEN WATER

SPOIL BANK

INCISIONS

CANAL

OPEN WATER

INCISIONS IN SPOIL BANKS

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


seavap_mason

+

magnolia

97% of the water on Earth is salt water; 2% of Earth’s water is frozen in the glaciers; leaving only 1% of the water on Earth available as fresh water. Problem? Not at all, simply transform your ocean water into fresh water, using the ...

Benefits of using the SEAVAP Patent No. 8675309 No Power needed. The SEAVAP relies solely on an infinite supply of energy from the sun. Increased efficiency because the device is operating under a partial vacuum, in which the boiling point of water is reduced from 212 F° to 122F°. Also because of the black color of the plastic dome the device is able to absorb the maximum amount of heat from the sun and the dome shape allows it to receive sunlight all day from all angles.

sugar processing evaporator

Also check out our wide range of accessories for the SEAVAP including: Water Storage Tanks Solar Powered Pumps Hand Pumps Solar Water Heating Array Anchoring System Piping for multiple units

The SEAVAP is a floatable desalination device that is powered by solar evaporation,and also doubles as a rain catchment system to provide you with fresh clean water anytime, rain or shine.

(Additional Accessories sold separately)

Rain or Shine, this device provides you with fresh, clean water because of the addition of the rain water harvesting system.

The process of the SEAVAP mimics the Earth’s natural water cycle.

Low maintenance, simply remove lower portion of device to remove salt deposits.

Easily transportable, fits in most truck beds.

Potential Markets for the SEAVAP

Michelle Mason 1+1 Final Project Arch 4440 Fall 2011

Condensation Precipitation

Solar Radiation

Evaporation n

How it Works:

The sun’s UV ray’s naturally heat up the air inside the dome, allowing the sea water to evaporate. Then the evaporated water travels to the top of the inside of the dome as a gas, then condenses back into liquid form and rolls down the side of the dome into the catcment tank leaving the salt behind. . .

Each unit can create about 10 gallons per day on a hot sunny day.

Off Grid Fishing Camps

Pressure Valve

Oil Rigs

City-use after a hurricane

Flotation Device

Filter Screen

Hook for Anchoring Device

4'-0" Sea Water in (Screen Filter on Valve) (Valve detachable so device can lay flat enroute) Spring Load Valve

Drain to Water Tank

The desalinated water is drained from the system by the means of a spring load valve. The rain water is drained by means of natural gravity forces.

When the fresh water containment area reaches the maximum level,the spring loaded release valve allows the fresh water to drain out to the storage tank, triggered by the weight of the water at full capacity. As water drains, volume is displaced from the area under partial vacuum. Therefore, to replace this volume, water is automatically drawn in from the sea water valve because of the natural laws of physics.

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ARCH 7001

Graduate Design Studio I (6) Prereq.: ARCH 4003 or equivalent. 12 hrs. studio. The use of space and form in relation to concept in the exploration of basic architectural elements.

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


ARCH/LA 7001: INTRODUCTION TO MAKING _ ASSEMBLY AND DISASSEMBLY fall 2011 cheramie and emery mcclure

SYLLABUS _ THE VALUE OF MAKING GENERAL INFORMATION:

Professor Kristi Cheramie Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture 203 Design Building Office Hours: M/W, 1-130, or by appointment Professor Ursula Emery McClure, FAAR, AIA, LEED AP Associate Professor of Architecture 229 Atkinson Hall Office Hours: TBD Studio Hours: M 130-430

W 130-600

F 1230-500

Sing, clear-voiced Muses, of Hephaestus famed for skill. With brighteyed Athena he taught men glorious crafts throughout the world â&#x20AC;&#x201C; men who before used to dwell in caves in the mountains like wild beasts. But now that they have learned crafts through Hephaestus famous for his art, they live a peaceful life in their own houses all year round. Homer, Hymn to Hephaestus (master god of craftsmen)

INTENT:

gordon matta-clark, pier in/out 1973, photo by artist

Designing (and eventually building) is a physical task. Involving both intellect and the manual operation of making thought manifest, the process of design invokes the full body. To that end, the beginning of a design education can quickly become overwhelming given the range of necessary skills and their careful and controlled orchestration. In this studio, you will be introduced to the process of design through a series of exercises that will ask you to engage the questions of our profession, first one at a time, then in combination, with each assignment adding new parameters or tasks to your current body of work. The language in this studio will be limited to the most basic words in the design catalogue. We will deal in space, volume, assembly, line, rhythm, measure, depth, structure, solid, and void. This is a very particular choice; it is not a choice that forsakes the language of the built environment, but rather gives it due reverence. A series of columns is first and foremost rhythm, structure, and line. When it can be understood in terms of these design ideas, only then can true explorations of its material and performative capacity take place. A grassy knoll at the edge of a forest is first a void, adjacent to a solid; then it becomes a hillside with a particular type of grass, near a particular glade of trees. The intent of this course is to assemble a functional base built from the fundamental and indispensable language of design, leaving you to expand and further tailor this diction in future studios and courses.

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ARCH/LA 7001: INTRODUCTION TO MAKING _ ASSEMBLY AND DISASSEMBLY fall 2011 cheramie and emery mcclure

SYLLABUS _ THE VALUE OF MAKING

PROCESS:

In this first semester, you will be introduced to ideas that lie at the core of our profession. You will be asked to concentrate your thoughts on single-minded tasks. The tasks will accumulate over the course of the semester, but it is important that you restrain yourself from casting too far forward. Allow yourself the time to meticulously pour over the making of each component, trusting that each task will, in the end, expand your definition of design, making, and ultimately the built environment. You will begin with one of the simplest of all built forms: the box. For the first few weeks, you will pour obsessively over the making of a box capable of expressing a clear language of assembly and logically organizes interior volumes. This box will be gradually un-made - and eventually grounded - as transformative environmental forces are introduced. In the second phase, we will operate in reverse, devoting ourselves to the design and construction of a dynamic, responsive ground which will be un-made through the introduction of occupiable space. This studio asks you to tactically engage both enclosure and environment, to explore space through both making and unmaking. The box, in your hands, will become a complete universe, Eliade’s cosmos with you as Maker at its center. But you will also be asked to respond to conditions beyond your control, to transform your approach to assembly by interfacing with external forces of change. You will situate yourself and your work within a larger cosmos, within a larger cycle of time, somewhere amidst both growth and decay.

gordon matta-clark, splitting, 1974, photo by artist.

Though the making of this box is, to a certain degree, a very architectural endeavor and the making of this ground may seem inextricably linked to landscape architecture, this studio is much more concerned with the processes of making than the paradigmatic nature of each form. Resist the temptation to attribute familiar architectural terms to the box or view the ground exclusively as a landscape. This will limit your ability to unlock the embedded potential of each. Ultimately, those preconceived notions have little bearing on the course trajectory and will only hinder your range as a designer. Instead, look to the relationship between space and force, look for ways to manipulate, alter, minimize, or accentuate the relationship. In short, one must make to unmake and everything that is made will eventually be unmade by the environment around it. This studio will explore the extent to which this relationship can brought into the fold of design. “Rather than outline a structure, we hope to follow and bring into play a crack that frustrates plans and shatters monuments.” (Denis Hollier)

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


ARCH/LA 7001: INTRODUCTION TO MAKING _ ASSEMBLY AND DISASSEMBLY fall 2011 cheramie and emery mcclure

SYLLABUS _ THE VALUE OF MAKING

TECHNIQUE:

The work completed in this studio will focus the hand on the task of construction. Time will be divided equally between modeling and drawing, both acts of construction. Between these working methods, time will shift between making and unmaking, with an emphasis on the implications of each move, rather than the final results. Your job is to gradually deepen your focus, tailoring your attention to the most specific details you can observe within your own work. In such specificity, unique opportunity lies. However, what precedes opportunity is meticulous attention to craft. Each assignment must be both conceived of and executed with absolute precision. Allow yourself the time needed to work slowly through each task. Well-crafted work will allow these idiosyncratic and unpredictable advances to become apparent. The work will deal in precise measurements and it is incumbent upon you to ensure that your explorations represents a consistent and trained approach to precision. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am a modern architect because I build in the manner of the ancientsâ&#x20AC;? (Adolf Loos)

gordon matta-clark, bingo, 1974

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ARCH/LA 7001: INTRODUCTION TO MAKING _ ASSEMBLY AND DISASSEMBLY fall 2011 cheramie and emery mcclure SYLLABUS _ COURSE NOTES STUDIO AND ATTENDANCE The studio should be considered your primary working space. While you are certainly at liberty to work at another location, you will derive great benefit from any time you devote to working in studio. This essential facet of design education will offer you a space specifically devoted to your design work, the opportunity to reflect on the progress of your work with input from your colleagues, and exposure to developing projects for other courses. This is a unique opportunity and one upon which we highly encourage you to capitalize. The studio will predominantly be occupied by working time. During these hours, we will often meet with each student, one at a time or in small groups, to discuss progress (desk critiques). We fully expect that you will not only be present for the full hours of studio armed with new developments to share but that you will utilize this as active working time. Attendance is mandatory for the scheduled duration of each class session. More than three unexcused absences may constitute grounds for placement on attendance probation (see Attendance Regulations in the LSU General Catalog, PS-22). As most of our work will be collaborative in nature, the studio time will be your opportunity to keep your portion of the project up to speed, balanced, and calibrated with your colleagues. Arriving late or leaving early, unless authorized by the instructor, will be considered an unexcused absence. Attendance of the College of Art and Design Lectures is also required. There are 4 lectures this fall that are specific to Architecture and Landscape Architecture. It is expected for you to attend a minimum of 3. The schedule will be circulated when officially announced by the College. GRADING METHODS We will be graded using a “split-grading” system. Each project will receive two, equally weighted grades. The first will be a grade for “Intention” and the second will be a grade for “Execution.” You will find that it is very difficult to both conceive of a dynamic design and execute it well. Though one of the major course objectives is to balance the design and representation of a project, this grading system will help you gauge where your efforts should be directed in future work. Grades will be awarded using the following letter scale (from the LSU General Catalog): A (A+,A,A-) . Distinguished mastery of the course material B (B+,B,B-) . Good mastery of the course material C (C+,C,C-) . Acceptable mastery of the course material D (D+,D,D-) . Minimallly acceptable achievement F . Failing Example of Possible Grade: Grade Received: A-/BInterpretation of Grade: This project demonstrated a sophisticated thought process and design intent. However, the execution of the work suffered. While the techniques attempted evidenced successful moments, the final product did not evidence clear design evolution. The translation of design thinking into making may have been rushed or not fully explored in diagram. Grade Distribution: Course grades will be based on the following percentages. 50% of each phase’s grade will be based on class participation and work presented prior to the completion of the phase. Grades will be given at the completion of each project. Individual participation is determined by professionalism, class discussions, critiques, and readings adn will be evaluated as part of your grade.The Studio Contribution portion of the grade will encompass your presence in studio. Project 1: 25% (12.5% participation) Project 3: 25% (12.5% participation)

Project 2: 25% (12.5% participation) Case Studies: 25% (12.5% participation)

Assignments not turned in on time will automatically drop one whole letter grade. Any missed deadline, assigned thereafter in agreement with the instructors, will result in another letter grade drop.

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


project 1_the artifact

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project 1_the artifact measured

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


project 1_the container made

project 1_the artifacts contained

howe

kelly

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project 1_the container unmade

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


project 2_making, measuring, revisioning the terrain_k. miller

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U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


project 2_making, measuring, revisioning the terrain_cox

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U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


project 3_observing a terrain

howe

shi

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U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


project 3_surveying the terrain_kelly

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U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


project 3_surveying the terrain_cox

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U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


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ARCH 4155

Recording Historic Structures (3) Prereq.: permission of department. 1 hr. lecture; 2 hrs. lab. Recording Historic Structures (3) Prereq.: permission of department. 1 hr. lecture; 2 hrs. lab. Hands-on field and laboratory experience in current methods of documenting historic buildings, including hand methods, photography and photogrammetry. Hands-on field and laboratory experience in current methods of documenting historic buildings, including hand methods, photography and photogrammetry.

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


THE OBJECTIVE: HABS DOCUMENTATION – RECORDING HISTORIC STRUCTURES This course explores field measurement and photographic techniques for recording historic buildings. It provides demonstrations and exercises using technical drawing skills and issues related to building diagnostics. Coursework includes mock set drawings on a small-scale project, precedent studies of previous HABS/HAER award winners, and production of drawings conforming to HABS standards in relation to Fort Proctor, located in Shell Beach, Louisiana. Students will fully understand the importance of graphically presenting accurate detailed illustrations when documenting historic structures. habs guidelines: HABS recording combines drawings, history, and photography to produce a comprehensive, interdisciplinary record. The documentation ranges in scope depending largely upon the level of significance and complexity. It should first and foremost convey what is most important about that particular structure. The drawings component generally includes floor plans, elevations, architectural details, and construction elements, sometimes expanded to include sectional or axonometric drawings to convey the interrelationship of the building parts. In the case of relatively simple vernacular structures, however, it may be enough to undertake only a first floor plan and significant architectural and structural details. The written history follows an outline format that begins with a statement of significance supported by the development of the architectural and historical context in which the structure was built and subsequently evolved. The report also includes architectural description and bibliographic information. Again, in the case of a structure of limited complexity, the HABS “short format” historical report may suffice. The large-format, black-and-white photographs record the environmental setting, elevations, and significant details, both inside and out. The number of photographs should be weighted against the other components (and visa versa); it may be more appropriate to photograph rather than draw or describe elements such as secondary elevations and architectural details. In any case, each component of the documentation conveys an important piece; together they create a comprehensive understanding of the site. COURSE OUTCOMES: At the conclusion of this course, the student will have completed the following: • Test Set of Drawings following HABS Guidelines • Precedent Studies of Previous NPS HABS Winners – Peterson Prize • Accurate Field Measurements and Photo Documentation • Accurate CAD Drawings of Fort Proctor following HABS Guidelines (term project) • Peterson Prize Submittal for the permanent HABS collection of measured drawings at the Library of Congress. LEARNING OBJECTIVES: 1. Understand and follow the United States Library of Congress requirements for the documentation for historic buildings, sites, structures, and objects. 2. Read, analyze, and summarize for class discussion, pertinent drawing precedent studies. 3. Explore historical construction narratives and drawings to understand a built structure. 4. Prepare clear and concise field recordings of assigned historical structure.

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5. Employ a variety of field measurement systems to document accurately a built structure. 6. Use photogrammetry techniques to validate and confirm field measurements. 7. Demonstrate the ability to make a complete and coherent set of architectural drawings. 8. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively towards a tangible deliverable. 9. Discipline a. demonstrate an ability to work for extended periods of class time. b. show an ability to define investigations (short term),set schedules for work and meet these deadlines. c. demonstrate an ability to incorporate criticism and self-criticism into work. 10. Engage in the reiterative mark-up process. RECOMMENDED REFERENCE MATERIALS: HABS Guidelines/Projects/Prizes: http://www.nps.gov/history/hdp/standards/standards.pdf Histories - http://www.nps.gov/history/hdp/standards/HABSHistory.pdf Drawings - http://www.nps.gov/history/hdp/standards/HABS_drawings.pdf Photography - http://www.nps.gov/history/hdp/standards/PhotoGuidelines_Nov2011.pdf Transmitting Documentation - http://www.nps.gov/history/hdp/standards/Transmittal.pdf Same Projects - http://www.nps.gov/history/hdp/samples/index.htm Charles E. Peterson Prize - http://www.nps.gov/history/hdp/competitions/peterson.htm OPTIONAL TEXTS: John A. Burns, Recording Historic Structures, Wiley Bernard M. Feilden, Conservation of Historic Buildings, Third Edition, Architectural Press Robin Letellier, Recording, Documentation and Information Management for the Conservation of Heritage Places, Donhead Publishing REFERENCE: National Park Service, Heritage Documentation Programs: HABS/HAER/HALS/CRGIS

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


F t Proctor_2012 Fort P t 2012 Ch Charles l E E. P Peterson t P Prize, i 1st 1 t Pl Place

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Fort Pike_2014 Charles E. Peterson Prize, 2nd Place

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D

UEM TEACHING PORTFOLIO 2016  
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