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SAMPLE PORTFOLIO Research & Creative Activity

Ursula Emery McClure, FAAR, AIA, LEED AP BD+C A. Hays Town Professor School of Architecture Louisiana State University partner, emerymcclure architecture, llc (337) 356 7415 cell (225) 578 4259 lsu office uemery@lsu.edu ursula@emerymcclure.com www.emerymcclure.com


emerymcclure architecture research practice mission statement emerymcclure architecture is a Lafayette-based architecture and design firm that participates in the unique built and social environment of this region. In the contemporary global era where complex systems predominate and “nature turns out to be more like human nature -- unpredictable, sensitive to the surrounding world, influenced by small fluctuations” we agree with John Urry that “this suggests enormous interdependencies, parallels, overlaps and convergences between analyses of physical and social worlds.”1 (See our Venice Biennale projects NOkat, http://www. emerymcclure.com/no-kat/ and Alluvial City, http://www.emerymcclure.com/alluvial-city/.) Our research practice speculates on the role of design in the confluence of multiple, seemingly contrary systems and aspires to develop tectonics that configure their futures. Our sites are never grounded, our conditions are never predictable, and our parameters are always in flux; they exist at the edges and transformational zones where infrastructure, geology, cultural habitation, and ecology cohabit at best as a composition of disparate parts, an assemblage. Our research practice essentially searches to define the assemblage in order to reveal the elusive potentialities found within complex systems. We envision, investigate, and design these tectonics in a myriad of ways from tween literature and illustration (Ovala, a fairy tale, http://www.emerymcclure.com/new-page-1/) to film ( Fort Proctor, https://vimeo.com/106136671) to constructed works both temporary (Thatchsquatch 2, http://www.emerymcclure.com/thatchsquatch-2/) and permanent (BSL2, https://vimeo.com/106136671 ). emerymcclure architecture practices to contribute to the rich and unique global traditions where sociocultural and physical contexts are entrenched in the way architecture is established and constructed. 1. John Urry, “Complexity,” Theory, Culture & Society, Vol. 23 (2006): 111-117 at 111 PORTFOLIO 2016

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GATOR House, 2017 1250 s.f. hunting and fishing camp False River, Louisiana ON THE BOARDS

research practice mission statement My research and scholarship has focused on creating a body of work that is an active contributor to the profession of architecture while simultaneously engaging in peer reviewed scholarship. emerymcclure architecture was founded in 1996 as the primary vehicle to pursue a dual natured research agenda. We engage in the scholarship of design (writing and publishing scholarly texts engaged in the issues of design) and design as scholarship (positioning our design and building practice as an intellectual, cultural, and research oriented pursuit.) The design research practice of emerymcclure architecture engages this mission through its design works (constructed and recognized locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally). The built work, writings, and design speculations of emerymcclure architecture have been published in a wide range of periodicals including professional, academic, and popular press. The firm has won numerous peer reviewed design awards, including recognition from the AIA and Architectural Record. Our sustainable urbanism work has won design awards, been published in Places Magazine, was included in the book Writing Urbanisms: A Design Reader, and was included as part of the 2006 and the 2010 Venice Biennale. This combined body of work and research was recognized by the American Academy in Rome through the awarding of the Gorham P. Stevens Rome Prize in Architecture 2008-09. Most recently the firm and its collaborators have been awarded Grand Prize in the 2013 Unbuilt Visions Competition, Finalists in the 2015 Field Constructs Competition, and had a design installation constructed and exhibited at two universities. The firm’s mission to consistently search for, to question, and to define the assemblage in order to reveal and contribute to the elusive and yet constructed potentialities found within complex systems, enables us to practice design research wherever we are located and to date we have been successful in our eorts.

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BSL2 House, 2016 Single Family Beach House Bay St. Louis, Mississippi

The BSL 2 House is a GULFside 2nd home in the historically designated area of Bay St. Louis. It is not only the client’s second home but it is the second design and second site for the house. The simple goals for the home are to create a small interior 3 bedroom 2 bath house, efficient in space and low on maintenance while maximizing the exterior spaces. The more complicated goals include designing a house that can be open when occupied and closed when not as it is 300’ from the Gulf of Mexico and must be secure from storms. For anyone who lives in hurricane prone areas, “boarding up the house” is an important part of storm preparation as it not only protects the home but also the neighbor’s. The clients, who live just far enough away and along the major evacuation routes to make “boarding up” even more difficult than it already is, requested that the house could be boarded up as part of the design. They did not want the off-the-shelf hurricane shutters, they wanted large pieces of glass, and they wanted the house to look inviting even when it was closed for a storm or when the owners were away. The resolution then became how to shutter the house not only at the scale of the windows, but also the doors, the large porch, and the small porch. The exterior of the house is detailed with large, galvanized, barn sliding door hardware from which the shutters hang. The shutters that close the house are constructed at the scale of the openings they protect (which means some are as large as walls) and materially are composed of a galvanized metal frame, stainless steel hardware, and stained treated lumber. These materials not only allow for the stability needed for such large shutters but also handle the salt of the Gulf air and the winds of a Gulf storm. They also, because they slide in tracks that almost completely ring the house, allow the house to be constantly changed. It can be closed (for storm or absence), it can be partially open (to block the sun or create privacy) or completely open and slid out of the way. This flexibility captures all the characteristics of a true working shutter and also makes them a major design feature of the house. The interior of the house is designed to capture the exterior space of the porches and match the vacation living activities. The bedrooms are small and private for sleeping late and in a dark space as the owner likes to do when vacationing. The main living space connects to the main large porch as one continuous room through a series of sliding glass doors and large glass transoms. When open the exterior and interior physically become one, when closed they visually act as one. The kitchen, dining and living areas (interior and exterior) are all combined to facilitate family gatherings, game nights, feasts, and lying about. On the front porch, a fixed ladder provides access to the kid’s loft which runs from end to end, directly centered over the main floor. The 10’ by 10’ by 62’ loft space is constructed with box truss framing which not only provided for the loft, but also the open floor plan in the main living area and the exposed framing in the porch and living area ceilings. The rear porch is designed for the beach activities. It is the first space the owner meets when returning from a swim or kayak. Thusly it houses the outdoor shower, the beach stuff closet (hidden behind another more solid sliding wall,) the hooks and rails to hang wet towels, and of course the area to take off sandy footwear. As with the rest of the house, it can be closed off with shutters when the owner is away or a storm is coming.

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Ovala a TALE, 2015-16 2015 Fairy Tales Competition Developing Novel with the author Moira Crone OVALA I. Once upon a time, in the place where land and sea met, a woman laid an egg with a baby inside. The infant was within the shell for many days, until one morning when she woke with a terrible emptiness in her chest. Thrashing around, she cracked her home, and burst through. She discovered she was in a nest, on stilts, above water, with a beautiful woman watching her. Finding her mother’s breast solved her hunger. Her people, the Caretakers of the Coast, marveled to see her, and called her Ovala. When word spread of her unusual birth, the Vizier from the Walled City appeared. In his deep voice, he said he’d have to take Ovala for a while. “Stay right here,” he commanded her mother, “I’ll get a cradle. She doesn’t belong in a nest!

Ovala’s mother flees the Vizier. Her mother took Ovala in a narrow boat and rowed out into the wide waters. Lying on her back, the child saw the grasses of the marsh, and a great heron high above, following them. Dark square clouds appeared. Her mother came to a pylon, tied up the boat, and climbed on to a platform. At the top, she pulled on a rope to bring one cloud in close. It wasn’t a cloud, though, Ovala saw, but a field of green, suspended in the sky. Upon the field lived a very old man, who was planting. Ovala’s mother told the man, “I’m hiding from the Vizier. He wants my child. Why?” “To study her,” he said. “What for?” “They are curious about everything that happens here,” he said. With great clatter the Vizier arrived in a mechanical bird. He called down as he snatched the child, “Disobedient! You’ll never see her again!” “Perhaps, perhaps not,” the old man said. Ovala’s mother wept. II. The Vizier took Ovala to the scholars in the Walled City. They picked her up and put her down and turned her over. They found strange nubs on her shoulder blades, said her hands would be claws, and announced, “We can’t study her. There’s no category for her---she too much of one, not enough of the other.” PORTFOLIO 2016

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The Categorization of Ovala. The Vizier’s wife longed for a child, so he brought Ovala home. Ovala loved the couple, even though they were strict. They believed there was only one way to live. That was in brick boxes on paved streets behind the Wall that kept them safe from water, seas, and storms. The earth was always below the sky. There were no patches of green in the air, just parks between the buildings on the ground. Ovala went to those parks every day and played until she was too tired to play anymore. When it rained, she ran out into it. The Vizier’s wife said she would get sick doing that. After every cloudburst the Vizier’s crews pumped away the puddles quickly as they could. The citizens praised the Vizier’s men for keeping the streets dry as bones. In school, Ovala learned to sort and separate. Rich was to be kept apart from poor, tall apart from short, loud from soft, great from small, Walled City from the Coastal lands, dry from wet--- many, many rules. Ovala was taught the Caretakers of the Coast were enchanted, or crazy. The reason? They lived in houses above the water, traveled everywhere in boats, farmed on soils they caught from the Gulf and suspended their fields in the air like great carpets, roots hanging down. Why not just build a Wall? But often Ovala dreamed of earth above sky, of water under land, of horizon upon horizon in layers, of her first mother, of the heron who followed them, and the old man. Remembering, she wept inside her dream, which is the saddest kind of weeping. III. The morning she turned twelve, Ovala woke feeling an extreme itchiness on her back. In the mirror she saw dark feathers coming out in two spots between her shoulder blades. She stayed inside her room, telling the Vizier and his wife she was sick. They came in at dusk to check on her, and saw the feathers. Ovala pretended to doze. The Vizier said, “No one will accept her like this. We’ll wait until they grow out entirely, then get them cut away. It will hurt.” “Tell them to cut off her feeling then too,” his wife said. U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


When they were gone, Ovala went to her window. Through the shade, she saw huge shadows in a strange, greenish sky. Passersby were saying, “Ovala is a monster, growing wings,” for they heard the rumor. But then they ran in fright, because the heavy clouds burst open. Rains fell harder than ever, flooding streets, and parks, and houses. The Wall began to crack. The Vizier’s men worked all night repairing it. Eventually, the flood did subside. The Vizier said, “The hundred year storms are here. It might not hold next time.” The citizens answered, “Impossible!”

Ovala wades through the flooded city. That evening Ovala went to the windowsill again. With her very long fingernails, she slit the shade wide open, threw up the sash. She glimpsed a great heron high above, hovering, but quickly, he was gone. She burst through, and strolled with glee in the deep puddles still in the streets. She climbed to the top of a building like the pylon her mother had once scaled. She unfurled her perfect wings—for they had finished growing in the night--- and flew south. Soon, below her, she saw patches of green suspended above the waters, and fine necklaces of lights in the marshy seas. She’d found her first home. She saw her mother waiting for her with the old man in the suspended field. She settled there, as if she’d never left, almost. The Caretakers fished and sang, planted the fields. The people called her “good luck” ---still, she was different. But no one trimmed Ovala’s wings. Ovala’s homecoming. IV. The storms came, stronger and stronger, battering everyone. Where the Caretakers lived, the winds were fierce and the water rose. The hanging fields swayed, never fell. The city fared worse, for the Wall cracked often. The Vizier’s men worked for years fixing it, but could never finish the job. Eventually he grew tired. The couple went looking for Ovala, as they longed for her in their old age. Ovala was a young woman now, and she missed things about the Walled City ---the certainty in life, her childhood friends, even how “this” was always distinct from “that.” When the couple came, she asked the Vizier if they would take her wings away if she were to visit, and his wife said, “Just an operation, darling, then you will be a beauty.” PORTFOLIO 2016

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“No,” Ovala’s mother said. “She was born with them. Leave her alone!” The two mothers were about to come to blows. Ovala was torn, as well, wanting both to be happy. The great heron, who had been watching all this time, flew in at that moment, and landed. He was astonishing, with fine white feathers on the sides of his face. He said to the Vizier and his wife: “The storm far out in the Gulf coming now is too strong. The only way to save the city is to let the Wall crumble, for you will all drown inside it. To the old man, he said, “The hanging fields are well established. It’s been a hundred years. It’s time. Lower them. The fields and marshes will protect the city. You have built new land--- it’s good for all. You have cared for the coast and cultivated it.” Her mother said to the Vizier, “If Ovala can stay, we’ll see about lowering the fields.” “How shall we live with no Wall?” The Vizier asked the heron. “With water flowing in and out. Your houses beside rivers, canals. Otherwise, you will perish. I have seen far, and seen this.” The old man gathered the Caretakers together and told them of the bargain. They agreed, for love of Ovala. They dropped the hanging fields upon the waters. The Vizier’s men in the city dug canals and made ponds where the streets and parks once were, and took the Wall down. The Great Storm came. The new lands slowed its approach. The Walled City let the water in. When it receded, they had survived. When the sun returned to the Coast, the Caretakers walked out upon the marvel they had created, and began again to farm –on their new earth this time. Ovala stayed at the coast, but visited the Vizier’s family often. When all was well, the heron visited her, and said: “Follow me, on a world flight. From high above, you will see how one kind of land and life might merge seamlessly with another---without tragedy. I’ll show you a little of the future. It’s your destiny to show others.” She obeyed. Taking off into in sweet currents of air, she felt home at last, for she was his daughter

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Baronne Kitchen, 2015 1100 s.f. Private kitchen/office renovation New Orleans, LA

The Baronne project began with a crowded living space in a grand old New Orleans home. A multitude of mismatched renovations over a 100-year lifespan had left a series of narrow spaces that cramped the family, limited the socialization, and had everyone tripping over each other. Even though the house was physically quite large, most of the main floor (besides the formal living room) acted and felt small and tight and confusing. The first priority of the renovation was to open up the space and recapture the grandeur of the main floor. The second priority was to take the office, the bar, the homework station, the storage of life, the entertainment, the eating, the cooking, and the hanging out and accommodate all these activities around a ten foot slab of marble. The experience for the clients will now be for large gatherings “in the kitchen,” “homework on the counter,” glitter crafts behind movie house doors, dogs snoozing in cabinets, and roast meats while children shoot hoops. One can be in the space and be able to do and see all. The new openings create connections between the inside and the outside, the front street and the back yard, the formal living room and the casual living, the prep and the serve. With all the barriers that have been removed and all the storage that has been added, the Baronne renovation aims to facilitate the busy life of a family, clear out the clutter, and bring back openness and order to the historic house. In order to facilitate opening up the space, two key design strategies were utilized. The first was to reframe and reopen the axis of the house from front to back. Not only did this bring light deeper into the long lot house but it also reframed the entry hall creating a true entry foyer that connects to all parts of the main floor and to the stair to the second floor. The second was to create a new structural element that allowed for all the partition walls to be removed while still fitting in with the historic home. Using reclaimed timbers, a tree column with four staggered branch beams was situated to support the upper floors, bracket the four quadrants of the new casual living area, and engage the new center, the marble island. The materiality of the column, coupled with the reclaimed movie house doors and the traditional white calacatta marble, help balance the new space and contemporary conveniences (the appliances, nest thermostat, data strips, etc.) with the house’s existing historic fabric.

Panorama_ Before

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Coastal Caretaker Gulf of Mexico 2013 Grand Prize Unbuilt Visions 2013 International Architectural Design Competition, d3 One of 4 projects awarded, co-designed with Sarah Young and Kristi Cheramie In Louisiana, the shoreline is not a line but a plain, composed of low marshes, scraggly cheniers, and fertile estuaries. In its present fragile state, it serves as the natural storm-surge barrier for five urban environments: New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Lafayette, Lake Charles, and Houston, TX. Basically flat in elevation, increased storm-action and a 1-meter sea level rise will inundate this barrier plain and place these five urban environments directly on the Gulf of Mexico. The COASTAL CARETAKERS work to reconstruct the inundated coastal plain repurposing the elevated infrastructure that remains after future sea level rise and storm system actions. The caretakers clamp to the vertical structure of the abandoned and flooded elevated highways, bridges, train trestles, etc. and cast their nets to capture the sediment deposits of the Mississippi. Over time, these deposits are layered, treated, planted, and then re-deposited to actuate the formation of barrier islands. This environmental adaptation initiates regrowth of the coastal plain, the storm-proofer for these communities. To care for this plain is the responsibility of the COASTAL CARETAKER infrastructure.

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THA HATC HATC TCHS HSQU HSQU QUA QUAT AT TCH CH Thatchsquatch harnesses the physical and metaphysical characteristics of warmth. Physically it incorporates layering and thickening to enrobe the lifeguard stand and shield the audience from the ice and winds. The outer layer is thatched with bundles of reeds creating a dense coat; the interior layer is fringed with recyclable plastic grocery bags stitched tightly to form a downy ďŹ ll. From afar, Thatchsquatch hunkers down to face the wintry bluster. Inside, a diaphanous and dense fringe white like snow but soft like fur nestles the audience and frames the wide expanse of winter. These two layers create a thickness with independent framing systems that attach to each other and clamp around the stand. It looks and acts like a warm coat. When time to dismantle, Thatchsquatch breaks apart as assembled; the interior fringe is taken back to the city for recycling, the thatch burned on the beach in a ceremonial bonďŹ re.

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ThatchSquatch/ThatchSquatch 2 Competition Entry/Installation Toronto/Mashburn Gallery, University of Houston , TX Paul and Lulu Hilliard University Art Museum, Lafayette LA ThatchSquatch 2 Installation by emerymcclure architecture 2015 Winterstations Competition co-designed with Sarah Young and Kristi Cheramie

Originally designed for the 2014 ‘Winterstations’ competition in Toronto, Thatchsquatch investigates the physical and metaphysical characteristics of warmth. It physically incorporates layering and thickening and was originally designed to enrobe a lifeguard stand and shield the audience from ice and winds of a Canadian beach. The outer layer is thatched with bundles of reeds creating a dense coat; the interior layer is fringed with recyclable plastic grocery bags stitched tightly to form a downy fill. From afar, Thatchsquatch hunkers down to face the wintery bluster. Inside, a diaphanous and dense fringe-- white like snow, but soft like fur-- nestles the audience and frames the wide expanse of winter. These two layers create a thickness with independent framing systems that originally attached to each other and clamped around the lifeguard stand. It looks and acts like a warm coat. This installation, Thatchsquatch 2, presents a full scale material study of the original design.

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OSH Research/Development/Prototype Louisiana Oil & Gas Company In Development-Under Non-Disclosure Agreement 2014-2015

OSH is an R&D project for off-shore housing for the Oil&Gas Industry. It investigates issues of weight, durability, sustainability, and efficiency. Developed with industry experts, the goal of this project is to transform the construction and mobility of these units. It employs new material technologies not typically seen in the industry and attempts to achieve efficiencies previously thought unattainable.

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Fort Proctor, A Conditional Preservation Fort Proctor, Lake Borgne, LA Best Conference Paper 2013 ARCC Conference at the University of North Carolina – Charlotte, One out of 115 papers presented Funded Research $20,520 LSU Coastal Sustainability Studio $52,340 NPS, US Department of Interior

The preservation and sustainability of building cultural heritage in indeterminate landscapes and sites at extreme environmental risk raises several questions regarding methodology. 1. What are the priorities for preservation of built works where degradation is accelerated by global environmental shifts? 2. What does one preserve of past cultures when the physical ground it once occupied is gone? 3. What are the methods for Historic Preservation when to preserve means much more than stabilizing a built project in time but also includes the preservation/sustenance of the land, the environment, and the cultural relevance? 4. If one cannot physically preserve does that mean its presence and cultural significance is nullified? To investigate these questions, the research team selected Fort Proctor, a NHRP site at extreme environmental risk. Fort Proctor is one of several forts built along Lake Borgne in Southeastern Louisiana following the War of 1812. Since then, Fort Proctor has remained in a fluctuating landscape as a static marker or datum, recording major ecological changes within the dynamic coastal environment. To understand the structure’s deconstruction and degradation as well as the changing Gulf of Mexico ecologies, a rich historical context was assembled from a complex array of disparate datasets (physical site and geographical condition surveys, material analyses, photogrammetric and photographic documentation, and GIS mapping.) From the data, the researchers developed time-based animations that explore the test site in four time-scales; one day, one year, 200 years, and geologic time. The animations present perspectival visualizations that illustrate the aesthetic and atmospheric qualities for each scale while overlaying analytical data and historical facts. They create a composite temporal framework allowing the viewer to digest the disparate datasets as single narratives. These animations and the procedure for their composition present a new preservation methodology for sites where physical preservation is prohibitive and loss unavoidable: “the conditional preservation.” Project Investigator_Ursula Emery McClure Faculty Collaborators_Brad Cantrell, Michele Barbato Student Investigators_Ben Buehrle, Audrey Cropp, Claire Hu, Taylor Alphonso

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88˚ 50’W 30˚ 50’N

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Film Clip_ A Day in the Life

Film Clip_ The Life of the Fort

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Film Clip_ Geologic Time

Film Clip_ A Year in the Life

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Tené, 2011 SUKKAH CIY STL Winning National Competition Entry in collaboration with Drew Shawver The tené is a sukkah, temporary in structure but rooted in locality. Named after the Old Testament Hebrew word for a large deep basket used for gathering the harvest from the garden or field, the Tené serves as both a shelter and symbol for gathering. It is materially frail but in its congregation (like the Israelites) gains its strength. Sometimes empty, sometimes full, the Tené shields the sun but yields to the heavens reminding the celebrator of God’s providence. The Tené is a sukkah made of a singular repetitive unit that changes only in orientation and content: wire mesh, stone gravel, leaves, fiber rope, and D rings. The sukkah is triangular at its base, bending and angling to an oculus at its apex. Each unit singularly gains strength with folds and collectively with contact points of adjacency. Stacked, tied, and filled, their assembly creates the necessary shelter. As each unit is equilateral, they are able to compose wall and roof. Their orientation to each other however changes throughout creating stability and fulfilling program. So does the fill. Sometimes the unit is filled with organic material (leaves, husks, wheat thresh, pine needles, etc.) to create shelter from the sun and symbolize the gathering of the harvest and change of season. Sometimes the unit is filled with stones to stabilize the base and ground the sukkah to the earth. For this entry, the ascending units are filled with fall foliage. The leaves that fall seasonally to the ground are plentiful, colorful, and identifiably locale. The units can be used to gather by hand the leaves, or any other fallen organic matter. The organic fill creates shade while simultaneously remaining physically light as the units ascend. Over the seven days of use, the leaves change referencing the autumnal season.

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eye to

the sky

t

nigh

day

pil g au rima tum ge n

The Tené strives to illustrate both mobility (each unit one can carry by hand) and stability (their intertwined assembly method.) The materiality is able to enclose and provide shelter while being intrinsically open. The organic and earthly fill is familiar in its origin yet unusual in its gathered application. The Tené sukkah represents the dichotomy inherent in the holiday of Sukkot.

___ ___ ___ ___ ds_ [___

___

lter

__4

she

4.5

han

ce en an tone s mm un e

tra fal nsie l fo nc lia e ge

eart

co

ea t s lee p

h

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D

stars de sha

___

___

n

___

ope

___

___

__]

sky

rm

pe

[___32.5 hands____________________]


white poplar

FILL The fill for the Tené unit comes from the local environment. The foundation units are filled with local gravel or small stones. Fall foliage fills the ascending units: the colored leaves of fall that fill one’s backyard or the thresh of the local harvest. The units can be used, similar to a basket, to gather the material. Wherever one builds the sukkah, the fill represents the locale through its color, texture, and scale.

the tené gains locality through local fill USDA Plant Hardiness Regions A: Northwest B: Southwest C: Rocky Mountains D: Midwest E: Southeast F: Northeast

SHADE The Tené achieves its shading through the orientation of the two and a half walls and the fill. First, the angled walls address the morning and afternoon sun. Second, the unit’s fill of stone or organic material provides the density. Since the organic material is asymmetrical, small gaps will exist creating a dappled filter for the sun’s rays.

hemlock pine cones

red oak

cottonwood

wheat chaff

sugar cane bagasse

pine needles

red maple

ASSEMBLY Each unit begins as unfolded wire mesh (0.218 hands thick). The mesh is then folded and crimped to create a faceted tené. Each unit has three equal facets (pyramidal) and three folded corners. The folds at the corners create an opening for the fill. The units are filled and then stacked in a rotation pattern to create the ephemeral boundary. They are attached to each other at stress points with D rings.

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U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


Venice Biennale of Architecture In 2010, the design project ‘Alluvial City’ was commissioned by the LSU Coastal Sustainability Studio to be part of the American Pavilion at the Venice Biennale The Venice Biennale is a is a major contemporary art exhibition in Venice, Italy. The Venice Film Festival is part of it, as is the Venice Biennale of Architecture. from the Biennale website: Mostra di Architettura di Venezia, the Architecture section of the Venice Biennale, was established in 1980, although architecture had been a part of the art biennale since 1968. As well as addressing the academic side of architecture, the Biennale is an occasion where big-name architects and designers can showcase new projects, arranged in different pavilions, each with different themes. The Biennale is currently held in the Biennale Gardens. “The Venice Biennale is one of the most important artistic events in the world, an interesting and fascinating global exposition […]. The Observer, Rowan Moore – 5th September 2010 “The Architecture Biennale in Venice – the most important international architecture exhibition – is the place to discover avant-garde practices and thought, and to see the latest projects and how they are presented”. Architect Magazine, Cathy Lang Ho – 6th October 2010 AWARDS and JURIED EXHIBITIONS (international) Palisade Bay / Mississippi Delta: Constructing with Water, Venice Biennale, August 29-November 11, 2010, Design Contributor and Member of the LSU Coastal Sustainability Studio submission 12th International Architecture Exhibition “Workshopping,” US Pavilion Renewing the Mississippi Delta: Building Land with water, DELTAS2010: World Delta Dialogues, October 17-20, 2010, Design Contributor and Member of the LSU Coastal Sustainability Studio exhibit in New Orleans, Sponsored by Chevron North America Exploration and Production (regional/local) 2010 Best in Show LA 2010 Annual Conference, American Institute of Architects, 2010 Alluvial City Postcard, Annual Postcard Competition American Institute of Architects Louisiana State Convention, Baton Rouge, LA 09/10 Past Present Future, Digital Exhibit of works by AIA Architects emerymcclure architecture projects featured, Alluvial City, Countermeasures and New Orleans Revisited

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ALLUVIALcity, 2010 wetland community regeneration speculation Infrastructural systems, vacation/fishing camps, commercial seafood port recreational marina and tourist facilities ALLUVIALcity speculates an architecture for a refurbished wetlands east of New Orleans along and across the closed MRGO waterway. It is designed in synthesis with a comprehensive engineering speculation for five major Mississippi waterway diversions. The diversion projects construct land with water refurbishing the salt infiltrated wetland ecosystem with the rich, silt-laden, fresh water from the mighty Mississippi. The architecture of ALLUVIALcity imagines humankind’s occupation of nature as a more symbiotic system of ‘both-and’; ‘both-and’ must become the culture of habitation. The architecture works to preserve (stabilization of the historic Fort Proctor) to maintain (continued access to Lake Borgne, to develop (tourist and commercial fishing port), to secure (safe harbor and light house) and to contribute (erosion control systems.) This project envisions new tectonics where nature and buildings work as integrated infrastructure to become active agents for the greater good and a more viable future.

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


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U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D

vacation camp

canoeing

fishing piers

oyster reefs

recreational boat marina

ice house


middle ground

ALLUVIAL CITY EXTENSION off-grid vacation/fishing camps overlooking replenished wetlands

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lake borgne

replenished wetlands

community rainwater cisterns vertical circulation

box truss superstructure camp access and camp community

fishing/vacation camp

background


(site)

ALLUVIAL CITY AT LAKE BORGNE recreational marina, fishing port, fishing camps, fort proctor state heritage site

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D alluvial city superstructure road bed, pedestrian sidewalk boat and car storage off-grid habitation, fishing pier

lake borgne lighthouse ice house /catch storage/fuel dock

solar panels

fishing/vacation camps

replenished MRGO

commercial seafood port safe harbor docks

stabilized fort proctor recreational/tourist facility

lake borgne


PEER REVIEW for ‘Dredging for Ostia’ and ‘Nuova Ostia Antica’ AWARDS (national) Gorham P. Stevens Rome Prize, “emerymcclure architecture – Terra Viscus: Hybrid Tectonic Precedent,” 2008- 2009, The American Academy in Rome’s annual national competition American Academy in Rome National Prize awarded to thirty emerging artists and scholars in the early or middle stages of their careers who represent the highest standard of excellence in the arts and humanities. Awarded to emerymcclure architecture and provides a stipend, living, meals, workspace, etc. for a one year term in Rome, Italy. (regional/local) Louisiana Southwest Merit Award, American Institute of Architects, 2010 Nuova Ostia Antica. Rome, Italy. Completed 6/09 Emogene Pliner Professorship in Architecture, LSU School of Architecture, 2008-2011 Professorship awarded for substantive scholarship, research, and/or creative accomplishment

JURIED EXHIBITIONS (international) Academy Architects at the Acquario, Casa dell’Architettura, Rome Italy, 6/03-6/19/09 International architecture exhibit featuring emerymcclure architecture Sponsored by the Ordine Degli Architetti Pianficatori Paesaggisti e Conservatori Fellows’ Annual Open Studios, American Academy in Rome, Italy, 5/27-5/20/09 “Dredging for Ostia” by emerymcclure architecture Champagne, Firebird, Yardbird, Art and Architecture Exhibit, American Academy in Rome, Italy, 11/08, Curated Selection of selected works by emerymcclure architecture

PUBLICATIONS (national) with McClure, Michael A. “Town and Country: Speculations on a Hybrid.” True Urbanism: Planning Healthy & Child-Friendly Communities. Publication Pending. With McClure, Michael A. “nuova Ostia antica.” D3:dialog>assemble, International journal of architecture and design, New York. January 2011. Publication Pending. Article featuring Rome Prize project by emerymcclure architecture with McClure, Michael A. “Both-AND.” Where do you Stand. Washington DC: ACSA Press, April 2011: 243-251. (regional/local) “Clean Sweep.” The Independent, Lafayette, LA: The Independent Weekly, LLC. No. 361, August 18, 2010: 12-13. Article on emerymcclure architecture’s AIA’s award winning project, Nuova Ostia Antica

LECTURES (national) “Town and Country: Speculations on a Hybrid,” 10/18/10, International Making Cities Livable Conference, Charleston, SC “Ostia, Old and New,” 6/03/2009, Ostia Antica, Rome, Italy “Dredging for Ostia,” 2/24/2009, American Academy of Rome, Rome, Italy

“Looking for a more vibrant future,”1/21/11, College of Architecture Art + Design Lecture Series, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS “emerymcclure practices” 3/24/2010, School of Architecture Lecture Series, LSU, CoA+D, Baton Rouge, “a year in Rome,” 10/30/2009, University of Louisiana-Lafayette, School of Architecture, Lafayette, LA

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Dredging for Ostia, 2008-2009 Master Plan, urban infrastructure, Ostia Antica redevelopment, Productive Landscape Mixed Use, Multi Family, Single Family, and Town House Prototypes

We came to Rome as examiners of past and present strong cultural conditions as a means to creating our work. This is a fundamental component of our practice as we believe that in order to contribute to the making of place, it is important to understand and acknowledge the identifiable culture of that place. Because of where we practice (Louisiana), we are especially interested in the culture of place making as it relates to (origin) geography, ecology, infrastructure, historical building, and constructed landscapes. We strive to find a way to contribute contemporarily to the continuation and development of identifiable culture. So we bring these questions about how to practice in the contemporary world came from our work in southern Louisiana to Rome and we have found at Ostia an exemplary site to test the questions…. How can a contemporary investigation be simultaneously respectful and critical of as many factors in place-making as possible? At Ostia one must be respectful of its history, development, and connection to geographical situation. One must be critical of its problematic contemporary position of suburban sprawl, in-effective land use, and disconnect with the geographical surroundings. What type of investigation can relevantly negotiate these unique environments toward the creation of a more vivid future? At Ostia one finds innumerable unique landscapes must incorporated to fulfill its potential of a more vivid future: ecological, cultural, agricultural, infrastructural, etc… Can an investigation, like the region, be simultaneously local and global? Ostia is local: its history, building typologies, land use are absolutely tied to its locality. Ostia is global: suburban sprawl, unplanned land use, ecological deterioration, etc… How can infrastructure be an active agent in place making? Ostia was founded through its relationship to infrastructure: port, etc. Now, Infrastructure is required for habitation to control the flooding, to clean the river, to make potable water, to create power, to produce food, to sustain the environment, to provide access, to distribute goods. We engage infrastructure critically to activate environments. Ostia once again is situated well to test this engagement.

SECTION @ ECO-SAN BRIDGE_TIBER RIVER

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


Using Ostia as the catalyst, our research project consists of 3 components: program, regional strategies, and building prototypes. The major goals that enable us to strategize solutions are: 1. Create more density in productive landscapes and human habitation. 2. Re-center and reengage Ostia Antica and the Tiber River. 3. Find appropriate relative scales of productive landscape to habitation. The major cultures we work to develop and sustain are: 1. Aquaculture 2. Park culture 3. Building Culture In conclusion, we aspire to accomplish the following as so eloquently composed by the architectural historian, Joan Ockman. “The very act of designing and building is by definition an affirmative one. Today, an architecture that inquires deeply and radically into the relationship between itself and society, itself and the world, is more resonant and relevant than ever. The complexities of contemporary practice demand not only strategic realism but also critical discernment and conscience. Indeed, while architects have a minimal responsibility to do no harm, they may also aspire to do some good.” (Journal of Architectural Education, Volume 62, Issue 3, Pgs. 26 – 27 © 2009 ACSA)

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mistress_infrastructure

mistress_water

mistress_park

mistress_building

model studies

mistress_existing

ST. CLAUDE AVE mixed use streetscape

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SECTION @ SCAVI_ECO-SANITATION

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D bridge eco-sanitation control structure

road, promenade, batture flood equipment eco-sanitation park

marina

public promenade eco-sanitation equipment, access

urban forest

ostia antica archeological park

courtyard prototype

domus tower prototype

undiscovered artifacts

archeological park access, amenities archeologist team storage, amenities

saline fields


spur train line

saline fields

fish farms

saline field trail access recreational facilities

public market

domus tower prototype

undiscovered artifacts

domus internal lawn

domus tower prototype

domus unit interior

SECTION @ FISH FARM_SALINE FIELDS

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U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D domus tower prototype

bio-swale, irrigation canal control structure

courtyard prototype

urban farms

saline fields

undiscovered artifacts

urban forest

piazza, public market

public promenade eco-sanitation equipment, access lift bridge river quality equipment, housing road, promenade batture, flood equipment

public park, parking, retention basin

marina

eco-sanitation park

bridge, eco-sanitation control structure

internal unit courtyard courtyard prototype

SECTION @ ECO-SANITATION_URBAN FARMS


re-visioned: William Stanley Haseltine ‘Castle at Ostia‘

eco-sanitation equipment public promenade, access

domus tower prototype

bio-swale, irrigation canal control structure

courtyard prototype

re-visioned: Jean-Baptiste Adolphe Gibert ‘The salt marshes, Ostia‘

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re-visioned: Leonardo Coccorante ‘Port of Ostia in Calm Weather’

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D

amenities archeological park access archeologist team storage

domus tower prototype

courtyard prototype

re-visioned: Claude Lorrain ‘Port Scene with the Villa Medici‘


PUBLICATIONS (national) Samuels, Linda. “Infrastructural Optimism.” Places Recovering, Volume 21, Number 1 Places Journal, Design History Foundation: Spring 2009: 30-36, http:// places.designobserver.com/toc.html?issue=717, Article featuring NOkat by emerymcclure architecture INVITED LECTURES and EXHIBITIONS (international) Design Invitational, “CounterMEASURES”, November 2007 Symposium/Exhibition for Design Strategies examining New Orleans’ extreme conditions One of eight firms selected internationally to submit a design proposal (national) NOkat, Poster Session, 96th Annual ACSA Meeting, University of Houston, Houston TX, March 27-30, 2008, Juried Selection of NOkat project by emerymcclure architecture

max.

surg

e

MISSISSIPPI RIVER multi family tower/ spillway intersecting single family houses PORTFOLIO 2016

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NOkat, 2007 No Katrina, No Catastrophe, No Category Master Plan, urban infrastructure, Holy Cross neighborhood redevelopment, Landscape Mixed Use, Multi Family, Single Family, and Town House Prototypes If we can reconceive the infrastructure to work with the natural systems Then we can establish more relevant habitations. If the infrastructure, habitation, and urban systems are combined Then all can share resources, inform each other, and adapt in unison to change…daily, seasonally, at extreme conditions. If Saffir-Simpson hurricane categories are based on potential loss of property and flooding Then no property loss or flood damage means no category. If “we are responding culturally to water or its absence” Then “water management is a frictionless key that unlocks archives of data about the built environment of other cultures like other elements of the built environment however it can also rise above the purely utilitarian into the range of art.” 1 If we can establish awareness (knowledge) of the terra viscus condition as the given Then we can propagate sustainably (cultural, economical, and ecological.) “The scale of action we’re talking about is not unprecedented,… But it took a sense of national purpose. Not federal purpose. That’s the key thing here. That’s why people should care about what happens here. It’s not because you have to love Cajun food or you love pulling some oil company’s fat out of the fire. It’s because, quite frankly, the country has a lot at stake here.” 2 Mark Davis If you are going to live in it, Then you got to live with it. emerymcclure architecture with William J. Soniat, Jr. 1. Dora P. Crouch and June G. Johnson, Traditions in Architecture (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001) 49. 2. Nicholas Varchaver, “The Next Energy Crisis,” Fortune Magazine, Aug. 8, 2007.

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


infrastructure

buildings

roads

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ST. CLAUDE AVE mixed use streetscape

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power filmÂŽ architectural fabric

floodable sub-level

water level access


industrial canal

claiborne bridge

occupiable air cam

chinampa fields

CLAIBORNE AVE mixed use/ market/ chinampa fields

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D


car/ floodgate lift mechanics

runoff purification swale

rainwater collection

power filmÂŽ architectural fabric

floating sublevel

shared lawn with car elevator/ light well

single family streetscape

FLOOD STREET CANAL causeway/ single family houses

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operable flood wall

adapted holy cross site

town house breezeway

REYNES STREET holy cross municipal core/ town houses/ floodzone

U r s u l a E m e r y M c C l u r e , FA A R , A I A , L E E D A P B + C D

UEM RESEARCH PORTFOLIO 2016  
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