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2004 South brisbane

TRACES OF HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE Ilana Hastings

One Square Mile: Curfew Exclusion Zone for Aboriginal People During the 1950s a one-square-mile boundary was marked around what was known as Brisbane Town. The aim of the divide was to separate the spaces of indigenous and nonindigenous peoples. The river boundary enforced this racial divide. Police were able to enforce the removal and prevention of “nuisances” and the exit of every Aboriginal by curfew to ensure there were no “undesirables” within the boundaries after dark. As a result of this, major postcontact campsites emerged outside the virtual space. Areas of Aboriginal Significance The Queensland Government officially adopted a policy of assimilation in 1957, and in 1965 the Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders Affairs Act was passed, combining the principle of assimilation with amendments made to the 1946 Act. This eventually led to urban drift, with people moving to the city for housing and employment, particularly after 1970. Musgrave Park in South Brisbane, a traditional hunting and meeting place, became the primary gathering area for indigenous people in Brisbane. 1 South Brisbane 1885 2 Brisbane and Suburbs 1806 3 one Square Mile ONE SQUARE MILE

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4 Brisbane 1866 5 Brisbane Electoral and Town Boundaries 1886

South brisbane 2004

RAIL INFRASTRUCTURE Erica Nuttal

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6 Rail infrastructure 7 Space adjacent to rail infrastructure 8 Utilized space 9 Unutilized space RAIL INFRASTRUCTURE LAND INFLUENCED BY RAIL INFRASTRUCTURE

2004 South brisbane

NOISE/VIBRATION: Dba levels at Peak Times Christina Watterson

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