Emerald Valley Almanac Annual

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c i l e n o r h c the

march 11, 2021 edition 1

Almanac

Annual

A Look Inside

CYCLING THROUGH THE TRAILS Page 6 THE BUZZ AROUND FLY FISHING Page 7 SUMMITING MOUNT PISGAH Page 9

O R G A N I C A L LY UNIQUE S T O RY BY DA N A M E R RY DAY P H O T O S BY E M M A RO U T L E Y

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here is something exciting in the way of organic agriculture happening a few miles east of Creswell. Out in the Cloverdale area resides My Brothers’ Farm, founded in 2013, and the modern version of the “Back to the Land” movement. It is also an ongoing experiment in sustainable, regenerative agriculture. It is the story of not losing the family, but founding one. Farm-to-table short loop, local food security, healthy rivers, freerange animals, family teamwork, partnering with universities and local nonprofits, taking leadership in local farming groups – it’s all part of what makes My Brothers’ Farm so unique. An operation this vast – and ideas this big – can hardly be contained here. It is just a snapshot, and what follows might be a mile wide, but is only inches deep. First, a little history. The seeds for My Brothers’ Farm were planted by dad, John Larson. His parents had bought an investment property near Cloverdale and there was a rental house on the property. The bulk of the 320 acres were being cultivated by a grass-seed farmer who still leases part of the acerage to this day. John and wife Debbie were renting a home in Eugene, and weren’t delighted with the idea of raising their young family in the city. John was born-and-bred in the Willa-

mette Valley and has both deep roots and extended family here. So John came up with an unorthodox idea: He asked the people renting the house on his parents’ land if they would “swap”

Bison are curious beasts. They will make the journey over from the opposite side of a pasture if something looks interesting enough on the other side. houses with him. To his surprise the tennants agreed and the Larsons moved on to the land, and raised their three boys on the very grounds they are now, as a family, farming. John and Debbie eventually bought the property from his parents. The boys went to school in Pleasant Hill and one by one

left to pursue college and their own way in the world. Even while apart, family members had an ongoing conversation about the land. They were always centered around the idea of this first-generation family farm being a return-to-the-land movement – something to create and sustain a family farm, rather than burying one. The challenges for small farms over the past several decades have been clear. The discussions, however, persisted. Taylor, the eldest son, was working with the Peace Corps as an agroforestry extension officer in Zambia when the whole family came for a visit. While in Zambia – a landlocked country in central south Africa – the family talked at length about starting a farm on the land the boys had grown up on. When Taylor returned stateside, his brother Austin called and asked, “So are we going to do this?” It was the spark that set the dream ablaze. My Brothers’ Farm got its start, a joint effort of the three brothers, Taylor, Austin, and Ben, mom Debbie, and now retired dad John. Maia, wife of Taylor, and Becca, partner of Austin, have joined the effort giving the team a bit more depth. Most of the team members have off-farm work as well, utilizing their different skill sets which allow for lots of flexibility working the farm. It

See MY BROTHERS’ FARM – 16

PLANTING BY THE STARS Page 11 HOMEMADE DOG TREAT RECIPES Page 13 PRESERVING YOUR GARDEN Page 14 CRYSTAL CLEAR REMEDIES Page 18 DON WILLIAMS’ TRAVELOGUE Page 20 BREAD BAKING & HOME MAKING Page 22 2022: YEAR OF THE TIGER Page 23


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EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

COMMINGLE RECYCLE INSTRUCTIONS: www.sanipac.com

(541) 736-3600

All recycling must be clean! Separating recyclables from your trash reduces the amount of waste in landfills, saves energy and reduces emissions! INCLUDE ONLY THE FOLLOWING ITEMS: Flattened Cardboard Boxes and Egg Cartons Excludes frozen food packaging, gable top cartons, and waxed cardboard.

QUESTION: Which bin does my waste material go in? ANSWER: Use the Waste Wizard at sanipac.com to find out!

Get the Sanipac app for free at the Apple or Android store!

123 Main St. Creswell

Your carts may be placed out no earlier than 7pm on the day prior to your regularly scheduled collection and empty carts must be removed from curbside no later than midnight on the day of collection.

PLACE OUT Fri, May 7, 2021

No earlier than 7pm day prior to pick up

REMOVE No later than midnight on day of pick up

Interested in yard debris recycling? Contact us to see if yard debris recycling is available in your area!

Newspapers, Magazines, Junk Mail, Office Paper, Paper Scrap Clean paper only.

Milk Jugs and Drink Bottles Empty and rinse all containers. No food or liquid residue. No lids.

Pop Cans and Food Cans Empty and rinse all cans. No food or liquid residue. No lids.

Would you like to volunteer, discuss, or have questions about recycling? We value your input on recycling education! Please call Jess Guillen at 541-736-3614. For questions on recycling at the Lane County transfer sites please call 541-682-4120.

Dan’s Plants “A garden is a delight to the eye and a solace for the soul.” -Sadi

Visit Dan’s Plants today!

And find some great options to grow your garden. OPEN 10AM-6PM • 7 DAYS A WEEK 82242 Davisson Road, Creswell 541-953-3661

Cold crop flowers & veggies Veggies Produce Hemlock Bark Potting Soil Steer Plus Compose


EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

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A spe cial secti on to la st ye ar-roun d

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e’re thrilled to introduce our newest publication to The Chronicle family – an annual Emerald Valley Almanac! We’re taking our popular weekly Page 2 Almanac and creating an annual publication that you’ll want by your side every month of the year. This special section leans on the traditions of almanacs past, sprinkled with bits of wisdom, whimsical factoids, local knowledge about the sun, moon and soil, planting and growing and harvesting from homegrown gardens, and much more that we hope will inform and delight readers. Of course, it’s created in the same spirit as all of The Chronicle’s publications: It delivers hyper-local, institutional knowledge reflecting our lives in the southern Willamette Valley. This inaugural issue is the result of many creative efforts, and they each are worthy of special attention beyond a simple listing on this page. Chelsea Greenway, our creative director, has once again designed a special section

gazine ON

that mixes flair and utility. She designs the weekly Page 2 Almanac in The Chronicle, and has brought the same fun and sophisticated design sensibilities here. Dana Merryday, who regularly contributes storytelling on the people and places around Cottage Grove, eagerly accepted the assignment to write about the people behind My Brothers’ Farm. Merryday introduces us to a family that is restoring local, sustainable farming. Emma Routley’s photos also help tell the story of My Brothers’ Farm. She joined Merryday at the farm, and her images add even more depth and beauty to Merrday’s writing.

24 W. Oregon Ave. Creswell, OR 97426

The almanac borrows from Yaakov Levine’s archives and expertise. The licensed nutritional expert, who Chronicle readers have followed for decades, provided content throughout the section, including healthy recipes with local ingredients. Joey Blum and Frank Armendariz are also familiar to regular readers of The Chronicle, and who lent their time and effort to the almanac. Joey spoke to dozens of people in the area and recorded what each said was so important about gardening in their lives. Frank Armendariz, a leading river guide and local fishing expert who writes The Angler’s Log in The Chronicle,

541-895-4464 info@creswellwellness.com

E AT DR IN K V IS I T

Hours Monday - Friday 9:00am - 5:00pm Saturday 9:00 - 12:00pm

FARM TO TABLE, PLATE TO FACE

541-658-5544

WRITERS Dana Merryday

ROUND UP SALOON

DA K

Ron Hartman Don Williams Emma Routley

The Rou nd Up Sa loon is Creswell's oldest 24 W. Oregon Ave. 5 4 Creswell, 1-895-4 4 6 4 business. Esta blished OR 97426 over 80 yea rs ago, it T H Ainfo@creswellwellness.com I C U I5S4 I1 N- 8E9 5 - 4 4 6 4 info@creswellwellness.com is a must visit for a ny Hours FARM TO TABLE, PLATE TO FACE newcomers. Monday Hours - Friday FARM TO TABLE, PLATE TO FACE ley Magazine 9:00am - 5:00pm Enjoy great drinks, Monday Friday G Valley SOONMagazine Saturday d 2 W. Oregon Av e- 5:00pm 9:00am food and service from OMING SOON 9:00 - 12:00pm Saturday

gazine ON

Noel Nash

E AT D R IN K V IS IT

Erin Tierney

E AT D R I NK VIS IT

Cresw el l , OR 9:00 9 7 -212:00pm 46

Denise Nash Joey Blum Yaakov Levine

your favorite 5 4 1 - 6 saloon. 58-5544

Linda LaZar

44 W. Oregon OR 5 4 1 Avenue - 6 5 8 - 5Creswell, 544

dakthaicuisine.com

13 N Front St Creswell, OR 44 W. Oregon Avenue Creswell, OR 541-895-2002 CRESWELL VISITORS & NEWCOMERS GUIDE 2020–2021

Frank Armendariz

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ROUND UP ROUND UP SALOON SALOON

DA DAKK

24 W. Oregon Ave. Creswell, OR 97426

5 4 1 -T8H9 A 5-4464 T HI ACI UCI US II SNIEN E info@creswellwellness.com

PHOTOGRAPHERS Emma Routley Noel Nash Denise Nash

The Rou nd Up Sa loon The Rou nd Up Sa loon is Creswell's one of Creswell’soldest oldest is Creswell's oldest business. Esta blished businesses. business. Esta blished over 80 yea rs ago, it over 80 yea rs ago, it isisaamust mustvisit visit for for a any ny newcomers. newcomers. FARM TO TABLE, PLATE TO FACE

DESIGNER

E AT DR IN K V IS I T

Hours Monday - Friday 2 W. Oregon Ave 9:00am -25:00pm W. O re g on A ve Saturday Cresw l , ll, ORO97246 Cre el swe R 97246 9:00 - 12:00pm

-Noel Nash is publisher of The Chronicle.

The Team

44 W. Oregon Avenue Creswell, OR

24 W. Oregon Ave. Creswell, OR 97426

provides a look at fly fishing’s place in the southern Willamette Valley. Erin Tierney, our executive editor, has her fingerprints on everything we do, and she provided guidance on storytelling and display. She and Ron Hartman contributed important copy editing and context around content display. Two people spent the past several months promoting sales opportunities, making this publication possible in a practical sense. Jordan Cora Lampe and Denise Nash drove sales efforts, partnering with local small businesses who not only support this Almanac, but community journalism in our weekly paper. Finally, late in this project, Elyse Grau, a longtime Creswell-area resident, generously lent her knowledge, skills and time. Her broad experience and training as a part of Oregon State University’s extension program was invaluable.

Chelsea Greenway

CONSULTANT

Enjoy Enjoygreat greatdrinks, drinks, food and service food and service from from your yourfavorite favorite saloon. saloon.

Elyse Grau

513 413 1N-N6Front 5 8 - 5 5St4Creswell, 4 FrontSt Creswell, OR OR

44 W. Oregon Avenue Creswell, OR 541-895-2002 541-895-2002

E SE W I TROSR S EW CO I DEE 22002200––22 00 22 1 1 C R EC SR W L LE LVLI SVII TSO & &N ENW CO MM EE RR S S GGUUI D

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EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

SPONSORED BY

·M a HERB OF THE MONTH:

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an and Peggy Grou ing to D sebe Accord eswell, March is th ck o e r t C f Da i n m i s e t n t a l o P April and May plantin prepa n’s g. re fo r

WHAT DO THEY REALLY MEAN?

• Gardeners should build their soil at this time • March is the month to rake the garden area and the perennial beds of any debris. • Amend the soil with rich, aged steer manure and compost. • Clean garden pots, patio urns and planters; add or refill with organic potting soil. • Southern Willamette Valley weather is usually suited only for dry-root planting.

Organic

No man-made chemicals are used. Non-chemical means St John’s Wort alleviates are used for fertilization (such anxiety, depression and when as green manures, crop rotacombined with Valerian root tion, “closed systems” where helps with insomnia. Magical animal fodder is grown onintention: protection from site and animal waste plowed negativity, put under pillow to back into the soil). induce romantic dreams. In order for food manufacturers to use the word on their labels they must be certified by an independent organization accredited by the USDA. Oregon Tilth certifies local This refers to Genetically Modified farms as organic. Their standards may be higher than Organisms. They may have forthe federal ones. eign (such as fish genes inserted TAKE NOTE: There are local into a vegetable) or genetically farms who have eschewed modified genes to make them certification and simply more resistant to pesticides or label themselves as using to improve shipping or keeping qualities. Most organic companies organic methods as the certification fees are untenable willingly label their products, for smaller farms. but manufacturers and growers are not yet required to do so. Most non-organic soy and corn products are GMO.

GMO

• Dump the soil from last year’s flower pots, planters, and hanging baskets onto a large plastic tarp. • Pick out all the debris, dried-up root balls and dead plant material. Add fresh potting soil to the mix and repot your planters and pots leaving several inches from the top to plant new flowers and foliage.

Heirlo om This references a specific variety that has been around for at least 50 years. They are all open-pollinated, and will come “true to seed.” The biggest benefit to heirloom veggies is their superior taste.

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PHOTO BY EMMA ROUTLEY TAKEN AT THE BOOKMINE IN COTTAGE GROVE

Noteworthy Dates 2

Libra Waning Gibbous

Libra Waning Gibbous

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Scorpio Waning Gibbous

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Scorpio Waning Gibbous

Capricorn Waning Crescent

Sagittarius Waning Gibbous

6 Sagittarius Third Quarter

National Day of “unplugging”

Thank you to our page sponsor Coast Fork Brewing & Feed Store (541) 942-8770 106 S. 6th Street Cottage Grove

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• Whether you’re a seasoned gardener or a beginner, it’s always a good rule of thumb to plan ahead of time before purchasing, making sure you select the right foliage and flowers for the areas in which they will grow.

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Capricorn Waning Crescent

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Aquarius Waning Crescent

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Aquarius Waning Crescent

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Aquarius Waning Crescent

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Pisces Waning Crescent

International Women’s Day

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Pisces New Moon

Renew your garden soil today “Our garden is my refuge on days when I need peace and solitude.”

-Sally Temple, Noti, equestrian

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Aries Waxing Crescent

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Aries Waxing Crescent

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Taurus Waxing Crescent

Daylight Saving Time

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28

Cancer Waxing Gibbous

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Palm Sunday Libra Full Moon

Taurus Waxing Crescent

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Taurus Waxing Crescent

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Gemini Waxing Crescent

Libra Waning Gibbous

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Cancer Waxing Gibbous

National Spinach Day

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Scorpio Waning Gibbous

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Leo Waxing Gibbous

Passover

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National Crayon Day Scorpio Waning Gibbous

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Gemini Waxing Crescent

First Day of Spring

St. Patrick’s Day

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Gemini First Quarter

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Leo Waxing Gibbous

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Virgo Waxing Gibbous

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Virgo Waxing Gibbous


EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

s r e n n i g e B

YOU WILL NEED: Lined mold, prepared lye water, pre-mixed oils, stick blender, and a spatula.

Herb of the month:

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Lavender is a small flowering shrub that is easy to grow in our area. It can be used medicinally, around the home or in food. Bees love it! Tea or tincture of lavender will calm a headache, and smelling the essential oil will calm the nerves.

pril·

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or f g n i D.I.Y. k a Soap -M

SPONSORED BY

Clean Up Naturally

SAFETY GEAR: Gloves and goggles.

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witch to non-toxic household cleaning products. Conventional household cleaning products are full of harmful chemical ingredients that are not good for our health (or the health of our kids or pets!). Switching to healthier alternatives is a simple way to reduce your exposure to environmental toxins in your home.

BASIC COLD PROCESS RECIPE (SUPER FAT 5%): 8 oz. Coconut Oil (24%) - natural to nature, produces a large lather 15 oz. Olive Oil (44%) - makes the soap mild and creamy 11 oz. Palm Oil (32%) - solidifies the soap

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4.8 oz. Lye **See note in calendar

se non-toxic skincare & personal care products. Similar to cleaning products, conventional skincare and personal care products are formulated with toxic ingredients we should not regularly let absorb into our body’s largest organ. Reduce the toxic burden on your body by switching to non-toxic personal care and beauty products.

11.2 oz. Distilled Water 99% isopropyl alcohol SCENT COMBINATIONS TO TRY: Lime and Spearmint Anise and Sweet Orange Lavender and Litsea Rosemary and Lemon WHAT ESSENTIAL OILS SHOULD YOU USE? Lavender for relaxation. Great for evening baths. Rosemary for oily skin & Sandalwood for dry skin. Lemongrass and Tea Tree for acne-prone skin. A mix of Sweet Orange and Spearmint for improved athletic performance. Wild Orange to lift your mood. SOURCES: HEALTHLINE.COM; SOAPGUILD.COM

Noteworthy Dates Advice from Heather Wedmore, a self-proclaimed “Soap Nerd” who has learned through the process of trial and error so you don’t have to.

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A LITTLE PRO ADVICE

Sagittarius Waning Gibbous

April Fool’s Day

Purchase a lye calculator. Lye is a dangerous metal hydroxide and using the wrong amount could cause skin burns or release fumes harmful to the lungs. It’s important to store extra soap bars in a cool, dry place.

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Sag. Waning Gibbous

World Autism Awareness Day Good Friday

Soap gets better with age, the longer soap matures, the better the lather will be. **Slowly add lye to water, do NOT add water to lye. You could blow up your kitchen.

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Capricorn Third Quarter

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Capricorn Waning Crescent

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Aquarius Waning Crescent

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Aquarius Waning Crescent

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Pisces Waning Crescent

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Pisces Waning Crescent

3 Capricorn Waning Gibbous

Thank you to our page sponsor Sanipac (541) 736-3600 1650 Glenwood Blvd. Eugene

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Aries Waning Crescent

Gemini Waxing Crescent

Easter

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Aries Waning Crescent

National Pet Day

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Aries New Moon

Taurus Waxing Crescent

Beginning of Ramadan

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Taurus Waxing Crescent

National Gardening Day

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Gemini Waxing Crescent

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Gemini Waxing Crescent

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Virgo Waxing Gibbous

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Tax Day

“Hands in the dirt working the soil. It’s soothing to the soul … our gardens nurture us.”

-Mia Bruer, Lorane, retired teacher

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Cancer Waxing Crescent

25

Libra Waxing Gibbous

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Cancer Waxing Crescent

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Leo Waxing Gibbous

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22

Leo Waxing Gibbous

Earth Day

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National Blueberry Pie Day

National Pretzel Day Libra Waxing Gibbous

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Leo First Quarter

Scorpio Full Moon

Scorpio Waning Gibbous

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National Raisin Day Sagittarius Waning Gibbous

Sagittarius Waning Gibbous

Virgo Waxing Gibbous

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EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

Cycling through the trails BY ALAN BENNETT CHRONICLE CORRESPONDENT

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MATT KINCAID LOCAL RIDER SCOTT BRIGGS GETTING SOME AIR AT WHYPASS.

McKenzie River Trail & numerous trails out of Oakridge are known far and wide for their

b e a u t y, challenge, & flow.

BILL RAMSEY TRAILBUILDER TERRY SAYRE DOES A “FLOW CHECK” ON A NEWLY BUILT BERM.

orld-class singletrack? Lane County mountain bikers don’t even need to travel outside our own county to enjoy some of the best of the best. McKenzie River Trail and numerous trails out of Oakridge are known far and wide for their beauty, challenge and flow. Many trails are seasonal, though, so as the rains come and the snow falls, the choices get limited. During the dark and wet time of year, local riders need only to drive 15-20 miles southwest of Creswell, to just outside Lorane, for a high-quality singletrack fix. The network of trails, officially called the Carpenter Bypass Trail System but known to locals as Whypass, hosts trails that suit just about any type of riding. My most recent ride there was a couple days after some extended rains, but the trails rode wonderfully, with great drainage, some re-routes making the lines smoother, graveled spots firming up the soft stuff, and some trails reclaimed after recent logging. Trail volunteers from the Eugene-based Disciples of Dirt Mountain Bike Club are constantly improving the trails; in Covid-hampered 2020 alone, they put in 1,153 hours of labor there. My ride was a 14.2-mile jaunt with more than 2,000 feet of climbing (and descending!) – about 13 miles of it being twisting, undulating, challenging, beautiful brown ribbons of singletrack. And my dog loved it as much as I did! In fact, Whypass is a great place for taking your own trailhound, as the relatively short climbs and descents allow for your pup’s recovery between the rippin’ downhills. The trails have existed (then, for motorcycles, and to a lesser extent, horses) at least as far back as the 1980s. I have ridden there since 1995, and they were a different story back then. Trails were built anonymously and with the knowledge that they could be logged over at any time, a kind of cat-andmouse game between riders and landowners, i.e., logging companies and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Many trails went straight up and down, without the flow that makes trails more interesting and sustainable. Trailbuilders weren’t especially concerned with proper drainage, and riders could expect to be sunk down to their bottom brackets in mud – and to be completely covered at the end of a ride. A small group of mountain bikers improved and expanded the trail system in the mid- and late-90s. At that time, if there was another vehicle in the parking area, the rider would know who else was on the trails. A core group of trail builders flagged routes and gathered crews to build in the expanding network. And sometimes their work

Directions to Carpenter Bypass Trail System Drive to Lorane via Hamm Road/Territorial or Cottage Grove-Lorane Highway. From the junction of Territorial Road and Siuslaw River Road, go west on Siuslaw River Road about 1.5 miles (just past milepost 43) to the signed intersection of Carpenter Bypass Road. Turn left and climb .8 miles to a big pullout on the left, or drive another mile up to the south parking area.

KYLE HUGHES TRAIL CREW TEAM SCRAPER ON A RECENT WORK DAY AT WHYPASS.

KYLE HUGHES TRAILBUILDERS WORK ON THE NEWEST JUMP LINE AT WHYPASS. TRAIL CREDIT: TEAM SCRAPER.

would get logged over – ultimately, it was and is a working forest. Sometimes trails could be reclaimed, but often it was a case of keeping at it and building more. Over time, trail building techniques evolved, and the network expanded further. The Borough of Land Management knew about the trails, but “they willfully turned a blind eye,” according to one of the builders. There was talk of approaching the BLM to legitimize the trail system, but fears of a blanket shutdown of the network, or consequences for illegal trail building, held them back from doing so. Another hesitation was that the club, of which all the key players were members, had started to show off the trail system to the world with an event called the All-Comers Meet, which included guided trail rides, bonfires, beer sponsors and raffle prizes – all without a permit.

MATT KINCAID A RIBBON OF SINGLETRACK AT WHYPASS.

As these stresses were coming to a head, the core group held a meeting (at my house!) to decide whether to, and how to, approach the BLM. The decision was to come clean with the BLM, and not long after, a memorandum of understanding between the BLM and Disciples of Dirt Mountain Bike Club allowed continued use of the trails without expanding the network any further, without taking down trees or without bringing heavy equipment in to build. The trails were officially blessed around 2012 by the BLM, which earmarked money for parking, a bathroom and some trail improvement. They have sanctioned some technical, rocky downhill trail with jumps and drops for the gravity junkies, while improving and adding to the existing crosscountry trail network. The BLM has also embraced mountain biking on land at Alsea Falls, between Monroe and Alsea, and at Sandy Ridge, near Mt. Hood, and riding in both locations has been immensely popular. January of 2020 saw the 16th annual All-Comers Meet, billed as “officially the largest free mountain bike event in the Northwest.” It is billed as an “all-abilities social ride and party – it is not a race.” The 2021 event fell victim to Covid, but its return is fully expected and eagerly awaited. So jump in. Embrace the mud, because, as improved as these trails are, you will still get muddy. Come prepared with a map or the Trailforks app; the web of trails can be confusing and daunting to newcomers. You’ll get a great outdoor winter adventure, nearby, on two wheels. And maybe four legs as well. And though the network was originally developed as a winter alternative to the more famous trails in our neck of the woods, it has become popular yearround! For more information, visit blm.gov and disciplesofdirt.org


EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

From my garden, with love “My garden surrounds my studio with quirky, textured plant structures, a mixture of colors and heights I call circus flowers. Something blooms nine months of the year. My garden collects my energy, habits and personality. In it, I have laughed hard, cried hard, toasted marshmallows, drank wine, and sang ‘Highway to Hell’ at the top of my lungs with my stereo blasting, the flowers swaying, giggling, and thriving with me. Magical blessings from the Earth are gardens. Nothing expresses love and light like a flower or vegetable in a salad or sitting pretty in a humble washed-out glass jar on the counter or left to share at your friend’s door. Total happiness out of the ground.”

The buzz around

Fly Fishing

·M

- SHANNON WEBER, COTTAGE GROVE, ARTIST

Fly fishing has benefited from advancements in fly-rod manufacturing technology. Pictured is my 50-year-old Hardy reel that was milled from a single block of Aluminum. The essentials – fir and feathers wrapped on a hook, cast by a rod and line – remain.

By Frank Armendariz

From Ancient Macedonia to the banks of the McKenzie River, here is a brief History of Fly Fishing.

T

here is no consensus of historians about who invented fly fishing. There are references to innovative individuals but there is no single person credited with the invention. Or any recorded date on which the first fish was caught on a fly. But some of the earliest use of feathers and fur attached to a hook to attract fish was observed and recorded by a Roman general named Claudius Aelianus in late 200 AD. Aelianus was impressed by Macedonian fishermen that had tied feathers and wool on a hook and he wrote “… they have planned a snare for the fish, and get the better of them by their fisherman’s craft. ... They fasten red wood, round a hook, and fit on to the wool two feathers from a rooster’s neck. Their rod is six feet long, and their line is the same length. Then they throw their snare on the water and the fish, attracted and maddened by the color, comes straight at it. Thinking from the pretty sight to gain a mouthful; when, however, it opens its jaws, it is caught by the hook, and enjoys a bitter repast, as a captive.” Modern archaeologists have found cave drawings that date back to well before 400 BC that appear to show people casting a feathered lure to rising fish.

It wasn’t until the late 1400s that the first real accounts of “fly fishing” are found in “The Treatyse of Fishing with an Angle.” A general fishing manual, it contained the first known instructions on how to tie fly fishing flies and had instructions on how to make the rods and other tackle. There is considerable debate but The Treatyse is believed to be written by Dame Juliana Berners. A Brit, Dames Juliana lived in a Catholic nunnery and developed her flies and tackle for fishing in England. The debate enters because women in the church were seldom allowed to sign their name to their own writings, so only fly fishing tradition–not a provable fact–has come to recognize Dame Juliana Berners the author of The Treatyse and the person responsible for principles of fly fishing others will eventually advance. KEY REFERENCES 1653, Izzak Walton wrote “The Compleat Angler or The Contemplative Man’s Recreation,” and declared “angling as a philosophical way of life.” A few years later, Charles Cotton – a casting instructor who taught the “fine art of fishing far off ” – wrote “How to Angle for Trout and Grayling in a Clear Stream.” Which became the first actual manual of modern fly fishing. 1774, “The Art of Angling“ was written by Sr. Richard Bowlker was essentially the first fly-tying instruction manual and a milestone for the sport.

Noteworthy Dates HERB OF THE MONTH: Chamomile is immune boosting and anti-inflammatory, and has a calming effect when consumed in a tea. Magical intention: love, healing, and reducing stress

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Cap. Waning Gibbous

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Aquarius Third Quarter

Aquarius Waning Crescent

Treat yourself to a cup of chamomile tea tonight.

ay· THE WILLAMETTE VA L L E Y

1863, Alfred Ronalds wrote “The Fly Fisher’s Entomology” that contained dozens of insect descriptions and the most precise illustrations of riparian insects in that time.

Thank you to our page sponsor The City of Creswell (541) 895-2531 13 S. 1st Street Creswell

Around 1970 a group of local fly fishermen from the southern Willamette Valley loosely organized into the McKenzie River Fly Fishers, while camping on a river gravel bar one night, celebrating a good day of fly fishing. They hatched an idea to create an organization that would teach fly fishing and the elemental skills of rod building and fly tying. Preserve the history of the sport and protect the habitats where fish live. The notion spawned “The Federation of Fly Fishers” which eventually became the largest international organization of fly fishers in the world. The history of fly fishing and the part that Oregonians have played is part of our historic sporting identity, our persistent outdoors culture and is a history that is still being written today by many of our citizens. SEE PAGE 15 FOR ANNOTATED GRAPHICS BELOW Fig. 1 - Nearly every species of fish that live in or return to Oregon waters can be caught fly fishing. See the species calendar to help determine the prime portions of the season. Fig. 2 - Trout are the most common species of fish, occupying nearly every river, creek, lake or pond with suitable habitat in the southern Willamette Valley. They are well-known for their selectivity, which is a function of abundance and the term “match the hatch.”

1 Creswell is the gateway to Oregon wine country, with 500+ wineries in the Willamette Valley. There are nearly 20 wineries within 90 minutes drive of Creswell.

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Pisces Waning Crescent

Cinco De Mayo

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SPONSORED BY

Pisces Waning Crescent

National Day of Prayer

7

Aries Waning Crescent

Try out fly fishing this weekend.

Capricorn Waning Gibbous

May Day

8

Aries Waning Crescent

Creswell Community Market, Sundays, 10a-3p, through October, 190 Emerald Parkway (Tractor Supply Co. parking lot)

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Aries Waning Crescent

10

Taurus Waning Crescent

11

12

Taurus New Moon

Taurus Waxing Crescent

17

Cancer Waxing Crescent

Cancer Waxing Crescent

23

Aquarius Waning Gibbous

18 24

Libra Waxing Gibbous

30

Gemini Waxing Crescent

14

Gemini Waxing Crescent

National Apple Pie Day

Mother’s Day

16

13

Scorpio Waxing Gibbous

31

Aquarius Waning Gibbous

Memorial Day

Leo Waxing Crescent

Special Election

19

Leo First Quarter

25

National Wine Day Scorpio Waxing Gibbous

Sagittarius Full Moon

20

Virgo Waxing Gibbous

National Pick 27 26 Strawberries Day

Sagittarius Waning Gibbous

15

Cancer Waxing Crescent

Armed Forces Day South Valley Farmers Market, Thursdays, 4-7p, through October, 7th & Main, Cottage Grove

21

Virgo Waxing Gibbous

28

National Hamburger Day

Capricorn Waning Gibbous

22

Libra Waxing Gibbous

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Capricorn Waning Gibbous


8

EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

SPONSORED BY

e n

·

OREGON BLACKBERRY BBQ SAUCE

·J u

Ingredients 2 C fresh Oregon blackberries ¼ C honey ¼ C ketchup ¼ C apple cider vinegar 2 Tbsp brown sugar 1 clove grated garlic 2 Tbsp minced fresh ginger ½ tsp onion powder 1 tsp minced chipotle pepper in adobo ½ tsp black pepper ½ tsp salt

COOKING WITHOUT CHARCOAL

Tips for grilling with wood – no sauces needed! BY KURT BLACHNIK, CRESWELL RESIDENT Barbecue season is here! Have you ever tried grilling with wood? I use apple, cherry, oak, hickory, and pecan woods. • Limbs can be obtained easily at little cost or even free, when friends trim their trees. The wood smoke gives flavor to meat without need for rubs or salt.

! N O S A SE DOWN TO THE SAUCE Three popular sauces

Preparation

Add strained purée to a small saucepan with the other ingredients.

• Small chunks of dried wood can be used in place of charcoal. It is best to avoid lighter fluid, instead use a fire starter stick made for wood stoves. Let the wood burn for a few minutes before starting to grill. The goal temp is about 300 degrees.

Simmer over low until reduced by about 1/3, stirring occasionally. Adjust seasoning to taste.

From my garden, with love “The space in our garden I love the most, is the bamboo. Bamboo is hardy and can take over space, but there is beauty in that too. Staring through the layers of green and yellow stalks takes me straight to an island where my worries melt away, where I can wear flip flops all year long, and where I feel at peace.”

• The meat should stay on the grill for a couple of minutes, then rotated a quarter turn and then left to cook for another two minutes. Flip the meat at the point, and repeat the process.

Tip: Once meat is removed from the heat, it continues to cook. It should be left on a plate to rest for five minutes or so, to prevent loss of moisture. The flavor is incredible!

1

2

Pisces Waning Gibbous

3

Pisces Third Quarter

National Hazelnut Cake Day

7

Taurus Waning Crescent

• Mustard-based sauce: South Carolina sauce also focuses on pork. This style is thin, spicy and stringent, made especially for pork shoulder. SOURCES: VINNIE OF VINNIE’S BBQ, PLEASANT HILL; DUSTIN, RATTLESNAKE BBQ, DEXTER; KURT BLACHNICK, CRESWELL RESIDENT

-MELISSA CLARK, CRESWELL. BLUE VALLEY BISTRO OWNER

Noteworthy Dates

Taurus Waning Crescent

• Vinegar-based sauce: This is the dominant choice in North Carolina, and tend to be thinner and spicier. These sauces are geared for the hog. A western Carolina strain contains a bit of ketchup, making it slightly pinker.

SOURCE: OREGON-BERRIES.COM

• When the grill is hot, remove it and rub vegetable oil on it (holding a folded paper towel in a tong and dipping it in a small bowl of oil). Once the grill is oiled and in place again, it is time to add the meat.

Thank you to our page sponsor Farmlands Market (541) 895-3500 204 W. Oregon Ave. Creswell

• Tomato-based sauce: The most-popular style uses a ketchup base with added ingredients for taste and thickness. Kansas City barbecue sauce (thick, sweet and tangy), .St. Louis, Texas and Memphis barbecue sauces are similar, although Texas and St. Louis omit molasses for a thinner, less-sweet sauce.

Purée the blackberries, then strain through a sieve, pressing out the pulp and juices with a wooden spoon or rubber spatula (if desired, the pulp and seeds can be reserved).

• Quality meat makes a difference. My preferences are ribeye and New York steaks with plenty of marbling, and ground beef and pork sausage.

6

IT’S

8

Taurus Waning Crescent

Pisces Waning Crescent

4

Aries Waning Crescent

National Egg Day

Gemini Waning Crescent

National Gardening Exercise Day

10

Gemini New Moon

Aries Waning Crescent

World Environment Day

Food for Lane County Youth Farmers Market, Thursdays, 2-6p, through October, 3311 Riverbend Dr., Springfield

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5

Free fishing today in Oregon

11

Cancer Waxing Crescent

Herbs & Spices Day

12

Cancer Waxing Crescent

Red Rose Day National Jerky Day

Free fishing today in Oregon

13

Cancer Waxing Crescent

Weed Your Garden Day

14

Leo Waxing Crescent

15

Leo Waxing Crescent

Flag Day

16

Virgo Waxing Crescent

17

Virgo Waxing Crescent

Fresh Veggies Day

18

Libra First Quarter

National Go Fishing Day 2020 U.S. Olympic Team Trials, Hayward Field June 18-27

20

Scorpio Waxing Gibbous

First Day of Summer

27

21

Scorpio Waxing Gibbous

28

Father’s Day Aquarius Waning Gibbous

Aquarius Waning Gibbous

22

Scorpio Waxing Gibbous

World Rainforest Day

29

Pisces Waning Gibbous

23

Sagittarius Waxing Gibbous

30

Pisces Waning Gibbous

24

Sagittarius Full Moon

25

Capricorn Waning Gibbous

19

Libra Waxing Gibbous

Grill up your favorite protein today & make some Oregon blackberry BBQ sauce to go with it

26

Capricorn Waning Gibbous

Food for Lane County Youth Farmers Market, Saturdays, 10a-2p, through October, 705 Flamingo Ave, Eugene.


EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

summiting

Pisgah WITH RON HARTMAN

A

thletic activities aren’t always easy to find during the “Age of Covid.” Fortunately, you can always go for a hike. And there might not be a better hiking spot in Lane County than Mount Pisgah, located just southeast of the Eugene/Springfield area. Mount Pisgah’s summit extends 1,531 feet above sea level, and is 1,000 feet above the Willamette River’s Coast and Middle Forks, which circulate below. “Our visitor numbers are higher than ever since Covid,” said Brad van Appel, executive director of the Mount Pisgah Arboretum. “You can feel safe here and get some great exercise. It’s been a real blessing

9

for the community. “Our car counter numbers, which normally put us somewhere around 400,000 people a year, have spiked up to about 600,000 in the past year.” The trails are for hikers–and horses–only. No bicycles or motorized vehicles. Some of the trails are challenging, particularly Trail No. 1, Beistel’s West Summit Trail, a steep 1.4-mile trek that gets easier after you reach the midpoint. “If you’re an athlete, you might want to try Trail 1,” van Appel said. “It offers some of the best scenery. There’s a great view of the West Valley as you climb that trail.” Mount Pisgah’s west slope is a 210-acre arboretum that is a virtual kaleidoscope of colors with its vast array of plants. “There are eight different ecosystems and habitats for people to explore,” Van Appel said. The arboretum itself offers seven miles of trails, but the remainder of the Howard Buford Recreation Area features another 22 miles of trails, so there’s no shortage of ways to scale the summit. Whether you’re there for a workout or to enjoy the beautiful arboretum as the seasons change, there’s something for everyone at Mount Pisgah. So the next time you hear someone state that there’s nothing to do nowadays … Tell him to go take a hike.

PHOTO SOURCE: EUGENEOUTDOORS.COM


SATURDAY FARMERS MARKET APRIL– NOVEMBER

10

8th and Oak St, Eugene 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

SATURDAY FARMERS MARKET NOVEMBER 8th and Oak St, Eugene 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. WINTERAPRIL– FARMERS MARKET SATURDAY FARMERS MA FEBRUARY – MARCH

NOVEMBER Oak St, Eugene 8th and Oak St,APRIL– Eugene 10local a.m.8th- and 2 p.m. Enjoy

9a

food trucks and craft beverages

SATURDAY FARMERS MARKET NOW OFFERING THE

GROWING COUPON

APRIL– NOVEMBER

8th and Oak St, Eugene 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Follow us on facebook for event 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. MAY – OCTOBER 8th and Oak St, Eugeneschedule! 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. MAY – OCTOBER 8th and Oak St, Eugene @CBBGBrewing

TUESDAYTUESDAY FARMERS MARKET FARMERS MARKET

TUESDAY FARMERS MAR

926 St, Cottage MAYE.–Main OCTOBER 8th andGrove Oak St, Eugene 10 a.m 541-649-1419

SPEND $25 – SAVE $5 SPEND $50 – SAVE $11 SPEND $75 – SAVE $17.50 SPEND $100 – SAVE $25 Valid on all regular priced gift & garden merchandise, boutique clothing, accessories & jewelry

OFFER VALID UNTIL MARCH 31, 2021. REDEEM BY BRINGING THIS AD INTO OUR STORE.

(541) 942-0505

10

F E S T I V A L

ADKINS BLUEBERRY

119 S. SIXTH STREET, COTTAGE GROVE

TH

LIVE

MUSIC

U-PICK

BLUEBERRIES

PICKED

BLUEBERRIES

OUTDOOR

FUN!

SATURDAY FARMERS MARKET APRIL– NOVEMBER

8th and Oak St, Eugene 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

TUESDAYHOLIDAY FARMERS FARMERSMARKET MARKET

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. MAY – OCTOBER 8th and St, Eugene November 16th–Oak December 22nd HOLIDAY FARMERS MAR Lane Events Center (Fairgrounds), Eugene

HOLIDAY FARMERS MARKET

SATURDAYS 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. November 16th– December 22nd SUNDAYS 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Lane Events Center (Fairgrounds), Eugene SATURDAYS 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. SUNDAYS 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Location may change this22nd summer November 16th– December

Lane Events CenterWe(Fairgrounds), EugeneLocation may change this summer accept EBT/Credit/Debit

SATURDAYS 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. LaneCountyFarmersMarket.org We accept EBT/Credit/Debit SUNDAYS 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. LaneCountyFarmersMarket.org

TUESDAY FARMERS MARKET MAY – OCTOBER

8th and Oak St, Eugene 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Location may change this summer

We accept EBT/Credit/Debit HOLIDAY FARMERS MARKET

LaneCountyFarmersMarket.org November 16th– December 22nd Lane Events Center (Fairgrounds), Eugene

SATURDAYS 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. SUNDAYS 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Reading is dreaming with eyes wide open!

Location may change this summer 702 Main St.,

Grove We accept EBT/Credit/Debit HOLIDAY FARMERSCottage MARKET (541) 942-7414

LaneCountyFarmersMarket.org November 16th– December 22nd Lane Events Center (Fairgrounds), Eugene

SATURDAYS 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. SUNDAYS 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Lane County Administration Public Service Building Location may change this summer 125 East Eighth Avenue Eugene, OR 97401 We accept EBT/Credit/Debit

CALL FOR MORE INFO 541-953-4872

J U LY 1 7

8AM-5PM

F R E E EVENT

This is a k id and f am ily f r ie n d l y e v e n t . T h e r e w i l l b e n o dogs , s m ok ing or v aping allo w e d o n t h e g r o u n d s . N o o u ts ide, adult dr ink s allowed. F e e l f r e e t o b r i n g a p i c n i c a n d enjoy t he ev ent . W e encour a g e f a m i l y u n i t s t o c a r p o o l . This ev ent is put on by v ol u n t e e r s , w h o a r e g r a c i o u s l y giv ing t heir t im e. W e ar e enc o u r a g i n g a t t e n d e e s t o d o n a t e all t hey can t o CASA. The m o n e y w i l l h e l p p r o v i d e a v o i c e t o f os t er k ids .

LaneCountyFarmersMarket.org

HEATHER BUCH

Lane County Comissioner

www.LaneCounty.org Heather.Buch@LaneCountyOr.gov

541-682-4203


EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

11 SPONSORED BY

Don’t forget the herbs

Dan’s Plants

Farming by the stars

• Oregon grows more than 30% of the nation’s peppermint, and much of it is in the Willamette Valley.

J uly·

• Peppermint has greenish-purple lance-shaped leaves while the rounder leaves of spearmint are more of a grayish green color. The taste of both peppermint and spearmint offer a flavor that can be described as a cross between pepper and chlorophyll, with peppermint’s flavor being stronger and spearmint being a little cooler and more subtle.

·

Throughout history, farmers have used moon phases and zodiac signs to know when to plant certain crops. Like humans, plants are affected by the moon phases. And each zodiac sign belongs to one of four elements: air, earth, fire, and water. AIR SIGNS: Aquarius, Gemini, and Libra

• Between the new and full phases, the moon is waxing. All aboveground crops such as lettuce, spinach, and celery should be planted in this phase.

EARTH SIGNS: Capricorn, Taurus, and Virgo FIRE SIGNS: Aries, Leo, Sagittarius

• Its characteristic smell has made mint a popular perfuming herb and in many cultures mint has come to symbolize hospitality. In ancient Greece mint leaves were rubbed on the dining tables to welcome the guests. During my travels years ago amongst the Bedouin tribes of Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula, I was often welcomed into my hosts’ tent for a drink of refreshing sweetened mint tea.

WATER SIGNS: Pisces, Cancer, and Scorpio

• After the full Moon, it is waning. Root crops like potatoes, beets and fruit trees do best when the moon is waning.

THE MOON GOES THROUGH FOUR BASIC PHASES: New, full, and two quarter phases.

• During the last quarter phase, it’s best not to plant anything at all. Instead, focus on improving soil, weeding, and mulching.

• Peppermint contains the constituent rosmarinic acid, which has several actions that are beneficial in asthma. In addition to its antioxidant abilities to neutralize free radicals, rosmarinic acid has been shown to block the production of pro-inflammatory chemicals. It also encourages cells to make substances called prostacyclins that keep the airways open for easy breathing. Extracts of peppermint have also been shown to help relieve the nasal symptoms of allergic rhinitis. • Research has shown that the essential oil of peppermint, which is used widely as a food flavoring, also stops the growth of many different bacteria. These bacteria include Helicobacter pylori, Salmonella enteritidis, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

From my garden, with love

• Local health food stores feature an expansive selection of dried herbs and spices that are of superior quality and freshness compared to those offered in regular markets.

“My garden is my sanctuary, my meditation, my place of surrender and plodding. Since I was very young, I have made a garden everywhere I lived. As I am, my garden is ever-changing, a place of transition. There is death and life in the garden. An entire cosmos. I am in every piece of dirt, bee’s wing, bird’s song, flower and fruit. My ancestors have fertilized the Earth and the seeds that birds carry into my garden, their ashes join the clouds bringing rain. Nowhere else do I feel more a part of this divine planet, the connection to all things, and I am mindless when I am weeding. The garden is an endless opportunity to paint with nature, evolving every moment, like each of us.

Planting by phase

• To store fresh mint leaves, carefully wrap them in a damp paper towel and place inside of a loosely closed plastic bag. Store in the refrigerator, where it should keep fresh for several days. Dried mint should be kept in a tightly sealed glass container in a cool, dark and dry place, where it will keep fresh for about nine to twelve months. A couple of drops of essential oil of peppermint added to your favorite body wash will keep you cool on hot days.

Water & Earth signs (Cancer, Scorpio, Pisces, Taurus, Capricorn): These are said to bring moist, fertile conditions. Fire & Air signs (Aries, Leo, Sagittarius, Gemini, Aquarius): Known as “barren” periods. *Note: Exceptions are the earth sign Virgo, which is said to be barren. And the air sign Libra is said to be a relatively fertile sign to plant crops under.

Noteworthy Dates Thank you to our page sponsor Dan’s Plants (541) 953-3661 82243 Davisson Rd. Creswell

4

Taurus Waning Crescent

Independence Day

11

Aries Third Quarter

2

Aries Waning Crescent

3

9

Virgo Waning Crescent

10

National Postal Worker Day

Aries Waning Crescent

– RALPH WALDO EMERSON

5

Taurus Waning Crescent

HERB OF THE MONTH: Aloe relieves sunburn and can be beneficial to skin issues like psoriasis or acne. Magical intention: protection and luck

Gemini Waxing Crescent

1

The Poets habit of living should be set on a key so low and plain That the common influences should delight him His cheerfulness should be the gift of sunlight The air should suffice for his inspiration and he should be tipsy with water

-TINA STEWARD, CROW, VETERINARIAN

12

Cancer Waxing Crescent

6

Gemini Waning Crescent

National Fried Chicken Day

13

Cancer Waxing Crescent

National Simplicity Day

7

Gemini Waning Crescent

8

Leo Waning Crescent

National Sugar Cookie Day

Shop for an aloe vera plant today

14

Leo Waxing Crescent

15

Virgo Waxing Crescent

16

Libra Waxing Crescent

Virgo New Moon

Plant an herb garden this weekend

17

Libra First Quarter

National Tattoo Day

Local painted rocks Facebook groups: CreswellRocks #CPR

Adkins Blueberry Festival

Cottage Grove, Oregon “Rocks!”. #CG Rocks Lane County “Rocks” #LCR!

18

Scorpio Waxing Gibbous

National Ice Cream Day Shop local for cool treats

25

19

Scorpio Waxing Gibbous

26

20

Sagittarius Waxing Gibbous

27

National Parents’ Day

Aquarius Waning Gibbous

Pisces Waning Gibbous

Pisces Waning Gibbous

21

Sagittarius Waxing Gibbous

22

Capricorn Waxing Gibbous

National 28 Hot Dog Day

Aries Waning Gibbous

29

Aries Waning Gibbous

23

Capricorn Waxing Gibbous

30

Friendship Day

Aries Waning Gibbous

24 Aquarius Full Moon

31

Taurus Third Quarter


12

EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

hy·per-lo·cal adjective

relating to or focusing on matters concerning a small community or geographical area. 1. The Chronicle is a trusted hyper-local, multi-platform, news-and-information source for Springfield, Creswell, Cottage Grove and Pleasant Hill.

EDUCATION MEALS PROVIDED BY BUS DELIVERY, PICKUP

CRESWELL — Creswell School District is still providing meals at Creslane Elementary from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. daily, and has added bus routes to its service locations. To be added to the meal delivery pick up location, call 541-8956009. ROUTE 1: • 10:45-10:55 2nd & F Street/West parking lot • 11:00-11:10 Creswell Mobile Home Park/area behind the laundromat building

A class of its own

STATION

WELL SCHOOL DISTRICT MEALS:

• 11:15-11:30 Riverwood Trailer Park (Main entrance by mailboxes) • 11:40-11:50 Pull out across from Cloverdale Chapel on Danstrom Road • 12:00-12:10 Bear Mountain/Bear Creek pull out • 12:15-12:25 Village Drive/Melton Road ROUTE 2: • 10:45-10:55 Cobalt bus stop • 11:00-11:06 Sister’s View apartments • 11:10-11:20 Creswell Court/Front parking lot by basketball hoop • 11:30-11:40 Deberry Road at the bottom gravel pull out • 11:55-12:05 Camas Swale Fire Station

369 CHROMEBOOKS, 59 IPADS IN STUDENTS’ HANDS

CRESWELL — The district has checked out 163 Chromebooks and 59 iPads to elementary students, 105 Chromebooks to middle school students and 101 Chromebooks to high school students. Initially, 350 families indicated a need for a Chromebook, but parents are still reaching out about devices. The district hasn’t encountered any issue supporting additional requests.

2020

ALIYA HALL, EDUCATION REPORTER

CONTACT HER AT ALIYA@CHRONICLE1909.COM

New middle, high school principals hired BY ALIYA HALL THE CHRONICLE

DISTRICT LAUNCHES NEW RESOURCE PAGE

CRESWELL — A new resource page, creswell.k12.or.us/wp/portal, put out by the Creswell School District is designed to help parents and students through COVID19. The site includes resources for parents and students with education questions for those looking for health, safety and support. “We hope students, their families and our community will find this new webpage to be helpful and supportive as we navigate these new waters,” Joel Higdon, director of Technology Services and Facility Operations, said. “We are all in this together – students, families, staff and community – all of us engaging and learning.” The site also has access to the google classroom login, and supports for students and parents navigating the platform. Health safety and support links include ways to support mental health and cope with stress during the crisis, and methods of how to talk with children about COVID-19.

SPRINGFIELD, CRESWELL SUPPORT STUDENTS WITHOUT INTERNET

To support children without access to wifi, Springfield Public Schools is dropping wifiequipped buses at 11 different locations for students and families to engage with free internet hotspots. The buses will be available Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., and families are asked to continue to observe physical distance protocols while utilizing the locations. The district has also ordered individual hotspots to help assist families, however, those have not yet arrived. Locations include: Centennial Elementary, Eastside Baptist Church, Guy Lee Elementary, Maple Elementary, Mt. Vernon Elementary, the old SPS administration building, Page Elementary School, Ridgeview Elementary, Riverbend Elementary, Silke Field parking lot and Walterville Elementary. Creswell also has options for students to access school wifi by parking in the Creslane east parking lot, Creswell Middle School front parking lot and the Creswell High front or back parking lot — although the back parking lot has better connectivity.

CR ESW ELL — Creswell Middle and High schools will each have a new principal starting in July. Julie Johansen was selected to fill the position of middle school P r i ncipa l Sh i rley Burrus, who will be retiring in June, and Jennifer Jesch Collins will be replacing high school Principal Adam Watkins. Johansen is currently a middle school principal from Fortuna, Calif.

She said her strongest attributes as a school leader are genuinely caring about all kids, and that she works with both staff and parents to promote the highest level of learning for students. Jes ch C ol l i n s is from Oakridge but is a current K-12 principal in Dufur, Ore. Collins sa id she prefers a “shared decision-making approach” including perspectives from all stakeholders, and

was described by past supervisors as an “efficient and effective team player.” Burrus said this is “not how I wanted to go out” but it’s been a huge joy of what they made happen in four weeks. Watkins added that he and Burrus have had emotional moments about not being able to see the kids in person again this year, which has been another challenge on top of trying to figure out credits and a

plan for graduation. “We’re not done celebrating kids,” he said. “A lot of people when they finish a career start to wind down and I have not seen that in Shirley,” Creswell School board member Lacey Risdal said. Check back in a later edition of The Chronicle for profiles on the new and departing principals.

Springing into the future

Julie Johansen

Featuring Springfield pg 19-24 Academy for Arts & Academics pg 25 Thurston pg 26-30

Jennifer Jesch Collins

District works to keep connected BY ALIYA HALL THE CHRONICLE

CRESWELL — The closing of schools and i mplement ation of distance learning is like “thousands of moving pieces,” Creswell School District superintendent Mi ke Johnsons said during the virtual April 22 school board meeting. In connecting with families since COVID19, the dist r ict has reached most of its students. At the high

s c h o ol l evel, o n ly THU SD A Y, hJ a Usn’t LY 2 , one stRud ent responded; at the elementary school 619 out of 625 have been reached, and the middle school also has a few that haven’t been contacted. Johnson said the challenge has been getting in touch with homeless students, because they don’t know where they’re at. The point of contact with the student is made at the school;

however, they are work2 0 2with 0 | V O L U M Eon5the 8 | ISSU E 27 ing agencies best way to get in touch with this population. “I couldn’t be i n a better place with a better team of leaders and better staff,” Johnson said. “They just completely killed this thing. They rocked it and they’re not done. It’s nothing shy of a huge accomplishment that we’ve been able to get SPRINGFIELD DEVELOPMENT done and it keeps getting better every day.” Board member Lacey R isdal asked about how the district is handling students The Lane County Sheriff’s wit h I nd ividua l i zed BY Office welcomes three depuE ducat ion PALIYA r og r aHALL m Gordon, Marilee Woodrow, Joe THE Johnson CHRONICLE plans in place. Pishioneri and Christine Lundberg ties to its Creswell operation. said 3 that in his talks with voted in favor, and Board Members PAGE SPRINGFIELD – A heated Steve Moe, Sheri Moore, Leonard superintendents across Nibblett video program precededIsabella a 4-4 vote at the watches the country,debate no school Stoehr andaJoe Bernie voted against lesson. Photo provided by Anna Nibblett Springfi Economic Development has been able to “geteld this the recommendation to purchase Agency on teaching June 29 –accoma vacantthose dialed in 100%” butmeeting he their parcel. settings fell into result that effectively killedwith efforts has found the elemenSEDA last met on March modations lessonsWhen place easily. to purchase a North Glenwood tary school level to be that can be applied 9,atthe board requested SCDC Johnson said that themove property for ahome, proposed “more complex” because forward with the property in order suchindoor as cooking district is now in what track and field venue. of the individualized or making slime. he calls “phase four” to answer questions that of board Sean Van instruction. Board Members “ C o m p r e h e n s i o n its COVID plan, which Amy Aguero, direc- lessons that are fun is perfecting See DECISION the delivery– 13 Cousins Reese and ReeganLemieux Dockery distance tor of special services, a nd engagi ng,” she of instruction and helplearn with their cousins Piper and James said that they are start- explained, adding that ing with technology. Horvath. Photo provided by Jennifer Docker ing to get creative in on the secondary level,

INSIDE

Proposed indoor track falls after heated debate

On duty ...

L OC A L LY

OW N E D

SI NCE 19 0 9

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A class of its own

ON E DOL L A R

2020

SOUTH LANE COUNTY FIRE & RESCUE

Wooten ‘sorry’ for posts, residents torn on outcome BY ERIN TIERNEY THE CHRONICLE

COTTAGE GROVE — South Lane County Fire & Rescue Chief John Wooten was reinstated June 18 after being placed on paid administrative leave while the board investigated posts on his personal Facebook page, which was not publicly available. “I am truly sorry for all the divisiveness and negativity the

comments released from my personal Facebook page created for the community,” Wooten told The Chronicle on June 24. The posts, revealed by KEZI weeks ago, stated that rioters should be shot and that the Coronavirus was a hoax. “While I firmly believe that every human is created equal, and my responsibility as your fire chief is to serve every person in our community equally,

Unique and never forgotten

THESE SHAKES

Nixon

70 EMER AL D PKWY C R E SWEL L OR 9742 6

Thomas

... On target

Creswell’s Bryce Wortman, a 22-year-old senior at San Jose State University, dominated the Oregon State Amateur. PAGE 5 MAIL ING L ABEL BELOW

2020

See WOOTEN – 9

Front-porch 4th

Sponsered by:

TAKEFeaturing THE CAKE Pleasant hill pg 16-18 Creswell pg Cottage Grove pg

new

The Chronicle delivers hyper-local news and information – and potential new clients for advertisers. We serve southern Lane County with two locations – Springfield and Creswell – and our reach continues to grow. Our goal is to super-serve readers with meaningful, useful and entertaining content, while also shining a spotlight on our local businesses. Our unique-and-differentiating content attracts both readers and shoppers!

TIRAMISU CAKE SHAKE

STRAWBERRY CAKE SHAKE

CHOCOLATE CAKE

SHAKE

EMMA ROUTLEY/PHOTO

Sharon Norman, 53, at 693 Creswood Drive in Creswell, said that while she can’t celebrate the Fourth of July in the usual “Friendly City” style, she’s still decorating and plans for a small family gathering this weekend. BY ERIN TIERNEY AND EMMA ROUTLEY THE CHRONICLE

This Fourth of July weekend having to be spent in a pandemic may have canceled the traditional celebratory events in South Lane County, though alternative activities that both encourage the celebration of holiday and adhere to social

distancing requirements have been scheduled. And in the days leading up to the Fourth, local officials are preparing to possibly deal with an anticipated increase in illegal fireworks and ignorance of social distance and gathering measures. Lane County Sheriff Sgt. Scott

See HOLIDAY – 9

CRESWELL: LOTS TO DO

✧ Patriotic Rock Art Hide and Seek on July 3 ✧ Look to the skies – jet flyover around 11-11:30 a.m. Local aviators will be soaring over town all morning. ✧ Kona Shaved Ice will serve free shaved ices in neighborhoods 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. ✧ Holt Park Light Display the evenings on July 3 and 4

SAVE MONEY. SAVE LIVES. Ground Ambulance Memberships . . Ground/Air Memberships . . . . . . . . . Serving South Lane County

Coming up Springfield date Creswell pg Cottage Grove pg

$65/yr $124/yr

Call 541-942-4493 for info. FOR EMERGENCY DIAL 911

Be a part of hyper-local coverage!

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your business in The Chronicle and reach over 7,000 readers people every week!

Contact Jordan@chronicle1909.com and Denise@chronicle1909.com today.


EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

Homemade pet food & snacks

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It’s no surprise that your dog likes treats as much as you do. Homemade dog treats are healthier, tastier and less expensive than manufactured treats. Here are recipes and ideas for treats your dog will love. Special/Prescription Diet

Chicken Liver Treats

For dogs on a special diet for medical reasons, you can use their canned prescription diet spread on a cookie sheet. Bake at 350F for 20-30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 350F. Line a large baking sheet with a silicone baking mat or parchment paper. Finely chop chicken livers in a food processor. Mix in one box of Jiffy corn muffin mix. Pour into a foil lined, greased sheet pan.

Ko n g To y s

Bake at 350 for 10-15 minutes. Let cool and cut into appropriately-sized pieces with a pizza cutter or sharp knife.

• Kongs are traditionally a red, beehive-shaped rubber ball with holes on both ends, come in various colors and great for aggressive chewers. They are an investment. I have several Kongs that are 20 years old.

CAUTION: These essential oils can be harmful to dogs. Tea tree oil

• For each dog, I like to buy three Kongs so I have one stuffed Kong ready in the fridge or freezer, one Kong my dog is happily unstuffing on his bed or in his crate, and one Kong in the dishwasher or soaking to be cleaned.

Pennyroyal Oil of wintergreen Pine oils

SOURCE: ROCK NEST TRAINING & PET CARE LLC OFFERS GROUP CLASS AND PRIVATE CONSULT FOR DOGS AND CATS. YOU CAN FIND ROCK NEST TRAINING & PET CARE LLC AT FACEBOOK.COM/ROCKNESTPETCARE/, ROCKNESTPETCARE. COM OR CALL CHERI SPAULDING AT 541-895-3162.

DIRECTIONS

1 cup pumpkin puree

Preheat oven to 350F. Line a large baking sheet with a silicone baking mat or parchment paper.

2 eggs 1/3 cup peanut butter natural, NO Xylitol or sugar substitutes

2 cups whole wheat flour, all purpose can be Add in flour and pumpkin pie spice (or cinnaused instead mon) - stirring just until combined. 1/2 tsp pumpkin pie spice or cinnamon (check your pumpkin pie spice or make your own - Lightly flour a flat surface and roll out dough to one quarter inch, using flour as needed to NO nutmeg, can be toxic to dogs) keep dough from sticking.

Sweet potato Dog Chews Preheat oven to 250F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Use a knife or mandoline to cut the sweet potato into slices. I slice mine into coins because my dog is small, but if you have a bigger dog you could slice them lengthwise for larger chews. You don’t want the pieces to be too thin, or they will just get crispy and not chewy, so make sure they are no

Noteworthy Dates 3

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In a large bowl, combine pumpkin, eggs, and peanut butter. Stir until completely combined.

Remove treats from oven and let cool on a cooling rack. Store in an airtight container for up to 1 month in the refrigerator or 6 months in the freezer.

• A larger Kong is easier to stuff and easier to clean. Start off with the Kong loosely packed so your dog quickly gets the idea of how to get the food treats out. As your dog gets faster at unpacking the Kong, put more food in the Kong.

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thinner than ¼ inch. Arrange them in a single layer on the baking sheets and bake for 2½-3 hours flipping once halfway through until they are shrunken, dried out, and some pieces are a bit crispy, while others are a bit chewy. Let cool, then store in an air-tight container in the fridge for about 3 weeks.

Cancer Waning Crescent

International Beer Day

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Leo New Moon

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Leo Waxing Crescent

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Virgo Waxing Crescent

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Virgo Waxing Crescent

Libra Waxing Crescent

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Libra Waxing Crescent

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Scorpio Waxing Crescent

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Aquarius Waxing Gibbous

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Aquarius Waxing Gibbous

The executive editor of The Chronicle is left-handed.

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Capricorn Waxing Gibbous

World Honey Bee Day

Check out Creswell First! and the organizations it supports Web: creswellfirst.com

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Aquarius Full Moon

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Taurus Waning Gibbous

National Disc Golf Day

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National Nonprofit Day

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Leo Waning Crescent

National National Garage Left-handers Day Sale Day

Grab a book from Kalapuya Books or the Bookmine in Cottage Grove Scorpio First Quarter

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Go play at Garden Lake Park, Creswell

(541) 689-1503 88530 Green Hill Rd. Eugene

National CBD Day National Book Lovers Day

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INGREDIENTS

Thank you to our page sponsor Greehill Humane Society

Sisters’ Day National Friendship Day

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Homemade Peanut Butter Dog Treats

Bake for 20 to 40 minutes – depending on desired level of crunchiness.

Im p o r t a n t !

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Cut shapes out of dough and place on prepared baking sheet. (Use small-bone cookie cutter or a shot glass)

It’s best to supervise your dog while they are chewing kongs or treats to avoid choking hazards. Discuss the treats you plan to give your dog with your veterinarian.

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SPONSORED BY

Pisces Waning Gibbous

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National Trail Mix Day Gemini Third Quarter

Gemini Third Quarter

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Aries Waning Gibbous

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Aries Waning Gibbous

National Dog Day

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Wanna make Pickles? EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

SPONSORED BY

Creswell Food Pantry

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We relish the idea

·S epte

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g yo ur G n i v ar r e

The sea salt will help pull the juices from the cabbage and keep it crisp.

Let’s Kraut it out

es

Make a brine by dissolving 5 tablespoons sea salt in 2 quarts of chlorine-free water. In a half-gallon jar add a couple of the tannin-containing leaves, a few cloves of garlic, the heads of dill, and ⅓ of the spices. Pack half of the cucumbers tightly on top of the spices. Repeat a layer of leaves, garlic, and spices. Add another tightly packed layer of cucumbers and top them off with more garlic and spices. Pour the brine over the pickles, leaving 1-2 inches of headspace. Place another tannin-containing leaf on top of the pickles as a cover between the pickles and the surface of the brine. Use a fermentation weight to keep the pickles under the liquid, if necessary. Cover the jar with a tight lid, airlock lid, or coffee filter secured with a rubber band. Ferment at room temperature until desired flavor and texture are achieved. If using a tight lid, burp daily to release excess pressure. The brine should turn cloudy and bubbly, and the pickles should taste sour when done. Eat right away, or store in a refrigerator or root cellar for months and enjoy them all winter long.

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1 quart “mason” jar with plastic or spring lid 1 cabbage, medium sized 1 level tablespoon sea salt 4 tablespoons of cultured whey 1 tablespoon of caraway seeds or fresh chopped dill In a large bowl, mix chopped cabbage with caraway seeds (or dill), salt and whey.

The addition of whey will support the growth of beneficial organisms that will support improved colon inner-ecology. A great source of cultured whey is to save the liquid that accumulates in your yogurt containers.

5 Tbsp. sea salt 2 quarts chlorine-free water 4-6 grape, oak, horseradish, or bay leaves 6-9 cloves garlic, peeled 2 large heads of dill Spices to taste: black peppercorns, red pepper flakes, mustard seeds, etc. Enough pickling cucumbers to fill a Half-gallon jar

Pound with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer for a few minutes to release juices. Transfer a little at a time to the jar, pressing down firmly with the pounder. The top of the cabbage should be at least one inch below the top of the jar to allow for some expansion.

Follow the slaw!

Cabbage is another garden staple enjoyed long after harvest.

Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about three days before transferring to your fridge. The sauerkraut may be eaten immediately, but the flavor improves with age.

Cabbage is very high in Vitamin C, a great ally in a great ally in mitigating viruses

Fermen-tip Cucumbers are kind of a big dill

Foods preserved via lacto-fermentation can last several months in airtight containers in your refrigerator. The shelf-life can be extended dramatically by canning the sauerkraut but the heat involved in the canning process destroys much of the vitamin C and live “colon-loving” cultures.

From my garden, with love

Author Sally Fallon’s book, “Nourishing Traditions,” provides excellent instructions and background on the fermentation of vegetables and fruits, grains, nuts, seeds, fish and meat.

“As I wandered around, I wondered again what the heck my purpose is on this planet. Do I love my garden? I don’t know, but I love the things that I end up finding in it. Every new critter in it gives me a small mental fist pump. It’s where I can build what I want to see, and if the critters can expand into that universe, that’s a moment of peace in my body.”

A garden staple that can be fermented to preserve and enjoy long after harvest.

Fermented cucumbers – also known as pickles – are loaded with probiotics to support a healthy and robust immune system.

- SALLY DIETRICH. SPRINGFIELD. CEMETERY SEXTON

Noteworthy Dates 1

National Cheese Pizza Day

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Sagittarius Waxing Crescent

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Virgo Waning Crescent

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Virgo New Moon

Libra Waxing Crescent

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Libra Waxing Crescent

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Scorpio Waxing Crescent

Rosh Hashanah begins

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Sagittarius First Quarter

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Leo Waning Crescent

World Beard Day

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Scorpio Waxing Crescent

National Day of Service and Remembrance

Labor Day

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Capricorn Waxing Gibbous

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Capricorn Waxing Gibbous

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Capricorn Waxing Gibbous

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Aquarius Waxing Gibbous

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Yom Kippur begins

oregonfoodbank.org #VoteOutHunger

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Pisces Full Moon

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Aries Waning Gibbous

Gemini Waning Gibbous

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Aries Waning Gibbous

Gemini Waning Gibbous

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National Coffee Day

The Chronicle’s Birthday!

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National Good Neighbor Day

National Pancake Day Gemini Waning Gibbous

Cancer Waning Crescent

How to donate: Community Food for Creswell, PO Box 351, Creswell, OR 97426 Drop off at 364 Cobalt Lane … Call 541-246-9117

Food for Lane County 770 Bailey Hill Rd. 541-343-2822 foodforlanecounty.org Pisces Waxing Gibbous

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National Food Bank Day

Grandparents’ Day

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Cancer Waning Crescent

Bay leaves in tea form are good for migraines, and promote general health when cooked with other foods. Magical intention: protection, good fortune, success

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Herb of the month:

Thank you to our page sponsor Creswell Food Pantry (541) 246-9117 364 Cobalt Lane Creswell

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Cancer Waning Crescent

Cancer Third Quarter

Cancer Waning Crescent

Taurus Waning Gibbous

National Hunting & Fishing Day Creswell Library’s Birthday


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Fly fishing charts

Fig. 1 - Oregon Fly Fishing Species Calendar

Fig. 2 - Willamette Valley Riparian Insect Hatch Chart

A summer dessert BLUEBERRY COCONUT CREAM DELIGHT Ta ke s o n l y 5 m i n u t e s t o p r e p a r e !

INGREDIENTS 1 (13.5-ounce) can organic original coconut milk 1 16-ounce bag of organic blueberries (*or strawberries, raspberries or mixed berries)

Optional sweeteners: erythritol, stevia, maple syrup (try unsweetened first!) Optional toppings: nuts (pecan pieces, walnut pieces or almond slivers), seeds (sunflower, pumpkin, hemp or flax), shredded coconut, cacao nibs, cocoa powder, cinnamon powder, coriander powder or nutmeg

DIRECTIONS Pour the coconut milk into a mixing bowl; if it has separated, whisk until it is fully combined. Add the frozen berries. Stir until well combined and add sweetener of your choice to desired sweetness. Divide into six serving dishes and add toppings of your choice. Before serving, let the berries and coconut milk sit for a few minutes; the coconut milk will freeze around the berries. SOURCE: KAREN FALBO @ NATURAL GROCERS NUTRITION INFORMATION FOR 1 SERVING WITHOUT SWEETENER: 148 CALORIES; 10 G FAT; 12 G CARBOHYDRATES; 1.5 G PROTEIN

See MAY - 7 for more information on fly fishing

Some blueberry farms in our area CRESWELL BLUEBERRIES 34030 Orchard Ave., Creswell 541-895-8907 Facebook: Creswell Blueberries

SAGINAW VINEYARD DELIGHT VALLEY FARMS

80247 Delight Valley School Road, Cottage Grove 541-942-1364 Saginawvineyard.com

PURCELL’S BLUEBERRIES

1537 Hayden Bridge Road, Springfield 541-746-0040

EDEN VALLEY FARM

(no U-pick) 77698 Mosby Creek Road, Cottage Grove 541-942-2216

HERRICK FARMS

(no U-pick) 88088 Millican Road, Springfield 541-741-1046

BLONDIE’S BLOOMS & BERRIES 83404 Rodgers Road 541-0912-0931

ADKINS BLUEBERRY FARM 85995 Gossler Road, Eugene 541-953-4872


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EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

MY BROTHERS’ FARM – CONTINUED

also generates a continuing discussion on how best to do things. John said he never dreamed all of his sons would come back and take on farming the land. A Small farms have been facing economic challenges for decades. The U.S. Department of Agriculture research in 2018 stated that family farms remain a key part of U.S. agriculture, making up 98% of all farms and providing 88% of production. Most farms are small family farms, and they operate almost half of U.S. farmland, while generating 21% of production. While fewer in number, midsize and large-scale family farms account for about 66% of production. It makes this story all the more incredible. The sense of family is immediate upon arrival to the farm. Visitors likely would encounter an enthusiastic pack of farm dogs. They dutifully notify the farm staff that strangers are present, rather convincingly, but with tails wagging. Are these “working dogs?” Ben Larson let us know: “Not really, but they are definitely members of the farm team.” In fact, they have their own bios on the company website. One of the things that differentiates My Brothers’ Farm is its diverse leadership team. The array of viewpoints make the farm operation as organic as its products. So is its commitment to try and make the operation sustainable, or to say it another way – “regenerative” agriculture. Instead of fighting the land and its natural ecosystem, MBF is building up soil health, regenerating natural habitat, and doing everything as organically as possible. At the same time they are also growing natural, healthy food. Importantly, they are getting that food to consumers as directly as possible. Piece-by-piece the family has been taking areas that were formally planted for rye grass seed production and converting them into rich pastureland. They now have a herd of bison who graze in the paddocks and rotate between them as forage gets low. Restoring the pasture has involved adding organic nutrients, reseeding with a diverse mix of deep-rooted grasses, legumes and forbs. The Bison can subsist almost entirely on the forage and convert that fodder into meat that is nutritious and healthy.

They have one of the only bison herds in Oregon, with 45 head. Eventually, they hope to have 100 head. The farmers have established two orchards. One is an apple orchard with 16 varieties of cider and four eating varieties of apples. The other is 20 acres of filberts/hazelnuts. MBF also leases another 30 acres of hazelnuts near the farm. (Author’s aside: I understand the ongoing debate on what to call this delicious nut, so I will use filbert and hazelnut interchangeably.) MBF uses pigs in the pasture and other places on the farm. Instead of being penned up they can move about the pasture and get to lay in dirt, living the dream of a free pig. In a cooperative experiment with the University of Oregon, MBF is helping conduct a study on breaking the lifecycle of the dreaded filbert worm. This pest bores into young hazelnuts and ruins them. Worm-infected nuts fall to the ground early and the larvae inside can develop into an adult. By running the pigs through the hazelnut orchards they act like vacuum cleaners to suck up the still tasty but infected nuts. Jays, squirrels, and deer also like to take a crack at hazelnuts and a few of the nuts go to the friends in the neighborhood. The pigs also get to graze on acorns of the surrounding oak hamlets. This is a good example of regenerative agriculture. The native oak habitat in Oregon is about 5% of its original range. The filbert moth feasts on acorns, too, so to raise filberts next to oak trees is inviting trouble. By getting the pigs to eat up the acorns is another way to help break the cycle. Feasting on acorns and filberts gives the pork a rich taste before the pigs are harvested. All of MBF hazelnuts are organically grown (only about 1% of Oregon’s filbert harvest is organic). Most conventional hazelnut growers spray with insecticides for the filbert worm and use herbicides to keep the ground around the trees bare to facilitate nut harvest. Filbert harvest is another area of cooperative research that MBF has participated in. The standard sweep harvest of fallen nuts requires a clean, level orchard floor. That is often where herbicides come in. MBF has been working some research on shake harvesting through a Western SARE Farmer/Rancher Grant. Using an expanding net-and-catch bucket, trees are encircled and

“They have one of the

THE STATION IS USED TO VACCINATE, IMMUNIZE, AND WEAN BISON CALVES. MY BROTHERS’ FARM WAS ABLE TO BUY IT FROM A BISON FARM THAT WAS GOING OUT OF BUSINESS.

ONLY BISON

HERD S

in Oregon, with

4 5 he a d.”

WHEN MOVING THE BISON FROM ONE PASTURE TO ANOTHER, THEY PASS THROUGH TUNNEL BRIDGES LIKE THIS ONE. WINDOWS HAVE BEEN CUT THROUGHOUT THE TUNNEL, BECAUSE BEN SAID THE BISON “DON’T LIKE THE DARK.”

THE SQUIRRELS AND WILDLIFE ARE OFTEN THE FIRST ONES TO HELP THEMSELVES TO HAZELNUTS - THEY LEAVE THE EMPTY ONES ON THE GROUND.


EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

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gently shaken. This allows natural floor under the trees. There were some findings that might limit this approach to hazelnut harvest. One is the nuts usually ripen during a two-week window. Shake harvest is labor- and machine-intensive and has to be done one tree at a time. Plus a sudden wind can take the job off one’s hands and land most of the nuts on the ground where they would have to be swept. There is promising new technology that may provide a way forward for having a healthy orchard floor and an easy harvest too. Recent collaboration with a local artist and manufacturer led to a compostable brown paper packing for their organic filberts. Taylor is a farm team member who leads the connectivity with local farm organizations and conservation groups. He is

Find this story online to get a fuller picture of the farm owners’ operations and goals. chronicle 1909.com • mybrothersfarm.com

president of the Oregon Organic Hazelnut Cooperative and is working as a staff member with the Coast Fork Willamette Watershed Council (CFWWC). A partnership between the farm and CFWWC is helping with river health. MBF is strategically located between two state greenway parks on the Coast Fork Willamette river. Along the half-mile river frontage containing the farm, this partnership using state and local grants has planted nearly 50,000 native trees and shrubs to start to rebuild the natural riparian habitat. Traditional farming practice has been to plow right up to the edge of the river or allow livestock to graze it. This leads to sedimentation, raising water temperature and losing water absorption, and loss of wildlife habitat. Connecting the two greenway pieces with native plantings, including the farm portion, will create 295 acres of floodplain forest. Another area of research is through Oregon State University to explore using sap from the native Big Leaf Maple. While having only about half the sugar content of the sugar maple, it does produce a tasty syrup or a pleasant maple water drink. By linking a tap system and a gravity-collection system of tubes there may be a sweet future in the Willamette Valley. True to their plan of figuring it out along the way, some ideas from the MBF team never took root, so to speak. The plan to grow organic hops didn’t pan out because the damp climate spoils the flowers with mold and cost of production compared to market return. There are, of course, other ideas in the works. As the apple orchards mature there are plans to turn a portion of the harvest into hard cider. A 24-foot by 100foot greenhouse is being laid out and winter crops of tomatoes, winter greens and less hardy vegetables will be grown in-ground in the space. One popular harvest has been the pumpkin patch and that will continue. During a walking tour of the farm with brother Ben and the friendly farm dogs, I asked him about the farm’s vision. He unhesitatingly replied: “We are out here trying to grow food.” Simple and sincere. Their goal is our gain. The Coronavirus has dealt a few curveballs to the farm. The meat-processing industry severely interfered with processing their pork this year. Since they are a small operation they are not that attractive to the processors and have to take the slots they can get. The virus has also put some of their usual farmers markets and sales events on hold. They are looking ahead when things can be safely reopened. MBF is selling food at the Lane County Farmers Winter Market on Saturdays from 10 a.m.-2 p.m., which is at 8th & Oak in Eugene. You can also make an appointment for farm pickup or arrange a pickup at their Springfield drop site. With an eye to the future, a respect for the land they tend, and a burning desire to grow food for the people who live around them, My Brothers’ Farm is a family that is farming as a way of life.

PHOTOS STARTING TOP LEFT, CLOCKWISE: HAZEL HAS A REPUTATION FOR FALLING INTO THE COAST FORK RIVER, SO BEN HOLDS HER WHEN THEY WALK CLOSE BY; DOUBLE PLANTING ROWS IS AN EXPERIMENTAL STYLE OVER AT THE FARM. BEN SAID THEY’RE TRYING DIFFERENT PLANTING STYLES TO SEE WHAT WORKS, SEE WHERE THE PLANTS ARE HAPPY; NOT ONLY DO BISON STOMP ON MBF GROUNDS, EEYORE THE DONKEY WILL SHOUT FOR HEAD SCRATCHES IF HE SEES AVAILABLE HANDS.

M.B.F. HAS THE MEATS! ORGANIC BUFFALO, PORK A SPECIALTY

T

he animals whose meat ends up on your table are taken humanely from well-caredfor animals that have a chance to range on chemical-free pastures. Customers have many options to choose from. My Brothers’ Farm pork comes from pigs who are purchased as weaners in the spring. They get moved through a series of over 20 paddocks in a rotational grazing system. The pigs get to forage in both pasture and forest settings. By doing what pigs do best they help remove pests and rework the terrain, not to mention living a happy life in the dirt. In addition to what they graze on in fields and forests they get a high quality non-GMO ration from Mosaic Farms in Pilomath, Ore. The pigs are normally harvested in late fall after finishing on fallen acorns and culls from the hazelnut harvest. Part of the meat is sent to Taylor’s Sausage in Cave Junction and turned into various smoked products like Landjager and Bratwurst sausages, ham, bacon, and cured salami. Customers can buy pork by the cut, an assortment box, or go in for a pork share. The share is buying a future in a half or whole pig. By paying a $100 deposit you have bought into a pig. In the fall the pigs are sent to Farmer’s Helper in Harrisburg, for processing. “Shareholders” are contacted to alert them of

the dates and also put them in contact with the butcher so they can tell them how to cut up their share. A whole hog is around 200 pounds hanging weight. A half hog is the smallest that Farmer’s Helper can handle so MBF suggests finding another family to go in on sharing a half hog if you are interested in less than a half. The other meat choice at My Brothers’ Farm is Bison (Buffalo), the original red meat of the Plains. Nutritionally, bison meat is a bit better for you than beef. Pound-for-pound bison meat has less fat, slightly more protein, B vitamins, and minerals. Additionally it tends to be more tender and also has the huge advantage of never being raised with growth hormones or antibiotics. MBF’s bison herd is grass fed and rotated through roomy paddocks where they can romp and run. The pastures are organically managed and “no spray, no till.” Additionally the bison get minerals and supplements to keep them healthy and happy. Bison meat can be bought in an assortment bison box or by the cut. Some of these cuts are already sold out this year. Pork and bison orders of a minimum of 25 pounds can be safely shipped frozen without thawing. Appointments can be made by phone for pickup of meat at the farm or at MBF dropoff site in Springfield.

84674 CLOVERDALE ROAD, CRESWELL, OR 97426 MYBROTHERSFARM.COM 541-632-3071


EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

SPONSORED BY

Crystal Clear Remedies

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BY EMMA ROUTLEY

calming crystal typically used to promote restful sleep. They come from all over the Amethyst: Aworld, which explains their vast range of purple shades and formations. for helping with professional career matters, increasing productivity and proCitrine: Known moting solutions in interpersonal relationships. protector. This stone keeps unwanted negativity away, and is great to keep Black Tourmaline: Ainpowerful one’s pocket. used to improve mood and boost mental clarity. Known as a healer crystal, Clear Quartz: Commonly it is easy to find and fairly inexpensive. used to attract new love or refresh old love. Keeping Rose Quartz in the heart Rose Quartz: Typically of the home is said to strengthen family bonds and soothe relationships. known as Fool’s Gold, the go-to crystal for manifesting financial abundance. Bring Pyrite: Also this crystal to the office with you to bring success. in a variation of different colors such as red, blue, and yellow. The gem is used Tiger’s Eye: Comes for increasing self-understanding and brings perspective to chaotic situations. stones are typically used for channeling courage. Use this stone to attract posiCarnelian: These tive decision-making and motivation. for being a powerful cleanser, use this to cleanse your other crystals of any Selenite: Known negative energy they absorbed. green crystal used for healing. Holding Green Aventurine in the palm helps soothe Green Aventurine: Anegative emotions and is associated with luck. your head with this crystal. It’s used for leaving the past behind and refreshing Obsidian: Clear one’s thoughts. Keep it in your pocket during a busy day to stay on track. those creative juices flowing with this blue stone. It’s said to encourage self-expression Lapis Lazuli: Get and reveal inner truths to bring honest communication and personal morality.

Did you know that “astronomers” once meant “astrologer?” We know Galileo Galilei for being an astronomer, famous for his improvements to the telescope in the 17th century. However, he was also the first to point them at the stars. Galilei was also a heliocentric astrologer.

ZODIAC BIRTHDATES

Astrology has been in practice for centuries, far earlier than Galilei’s practices. The Ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans all used astrology in their cultures.

Aries: March 21 - April 19 Taurus: April 20 - May 20 Gemini: May 21 - June 20 Cancer: June 21 - July 22 Leo: July 23 - August 22 Virgo: August 23 - September 22 Libra: September 23 - October 22 Scorpio: October 23 - November 21 Sagittarius: November 22 - December 21 Capricorn: December 22 - January 19 Aquarius: January 20 - February 18 Pisces: February 19 - March 20

SOURCES: URANIATRUST.ORG; FARMERSALMANAC.COM

Herb of the month: Marshmallow root is used for skin irritation, mucus relief and has mild laxative properties. Magical intention: protection and psychic powers.

Noteworthy Dates

From my garden, with love

“I like to eat and grow healthy, locally-grown food that is chemical-free. The only fertilizer I use is from my horses,” and she shares “the best” of what she grows – vegetables, fruit and eggs – with others. Every Tuesday and Thursday we take the best of what I grow to The Rural Oregon Project in Cottage Grove, where it is disbursed to those in need. I don’t mess in their business; I just bring them good food. I also share food with Peggy’s Primary Connection, a program in the Cottage Grove Schools helping those in need. My favorite things to grow are melons. My father was a big gardener, but he didn’t grow melons. I love to grow cantaloupe, musk and watermelons. I also love growing dry beans that I shell while watching television.”

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Leo Waning Crescent

National Homemade Cookies Day

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Leo Waning Crescent

Eastern Oregon Controlled Buck Deer opens

- DEANNA EISSINGER, LORANE. RETIRED TEACHER

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Virgo Waning Crescent

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Virgo Waning Crescent

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Libra New Moon

Libra Waxing Crescent

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Scorpio Waxing Crescent

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Scorpio Waxing Crescent

National Taco Day

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Sagittarius Waxing Crescent

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Sagittarius Waxing Crescent

World Mental Health Day

Indigenous Peoples Day

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Pisces Waxing Gibbous

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Capricorn Waxing Crescent

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Capricorn First Quarter

National Farmers’ Day

Aries Waxing Gibbous

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Aries Waxing Gibbous

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Aquarius Waxing Gibbous

Virgo Waning Crescent

Halloween

20

21

Aries Full Moon

27

Taurus Waning Gibbous

Cancer Waning Gibbous

Cancer Waning Gibbous

16

Pisces Waxing Gibbous

Global Cat Day

22

Taurus Waning Gibbous

National Nut 29 28 Day

23

Gemini Waning Gibbous

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Oregon is the hazelnut capital of the world

Rocky Mountain Bull Elk opens Gemini Waning Gibbous

Aquarius Waxing Gibbous

National Dessert Day

Gemini Waning Gibbous

31

15

Leo Third Quarter

Leo Waning Crescent

Leo Waning Crescent


EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

Simple Baked apples

INGREDIENTS: 3 cups blanched almond flour 1 teaspoon celtic sea salt 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg 5 large eggs ½ cup honey ¼ cup coconut oil or palm shortening 3 cups carrots, grated 1 cup raisins 1 cup walnuts

DIRECTIONS: In a large bowl, combine almond flour, salt, baking soda, cinnamon, and nutmeg In a separate bowl, mix together eggs, honey, and oil Stir carrots, raisins, and walnuts into wet ingredients Stir wet ingredients into dry Transfer batter into 2 well-greased 9-inch cake pans Bake at 325°F for 35 minutes Cool cake for 3 hours, then remove from pan and apply frosting

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Carrot Cake

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INGREDIENTS: 4 medium baking apples 1 tablespoon bulk shredded coconut 3 tablespoons bulk pecans or walnuts, chopped 2 tablespoons bulk raisins, coarsely chopped 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 pinch sea salt 2 tablespoons maple syrup, optional 1 1⁄2 tablespoons butter or coconut oil

DIRECTIONS:

m b e r·

Usher in fall with these wholesome, nutrient-dense baked apples. They make a great after-school snack or can be a part of a healthy breakfast.

Preheat oven to 375° F. Cut each apple in half and trim away the stem and blossom ends. Using a small spoon, scoop out the center of the apples where the seeds are, and discard. Then scoop out some of the apple flesh into a bowl, leaving about a quarter-inch of apple to create a “bowl” from each half. Set apple bowls cut-side down in a baking dish. To make the filling, coarsely chop the apple pulp you scooped out and combine it with the coconut, nuts, raisins, cinnamon, salt, and maple syrup. Mix well. Divide the filling among the apple bowls, using a spoon to gently press the filling into each bowl. Use all the mixture, heaping it up if necessary. Place the filled apple bowls carefully into a baking dish. Top each with a thin slice of butter or about half a teaspoon of coconut oil. Cover the dish with foil and bake for 20 minutes. Carefully remove the foil from the baking dish (watch out for hot steam!) and return the apples to the oven to bake for another 10 to 15 minutes, until apples are soft and the topping is just browned. SOURCE: HEATHER PRATT AT NATURAL GROCERS

Cream Chee se F rosti ng INGREDIENTS: ¾ cup heavy cream 1 cup cream cheese ¼ cup maple syrup 1 tablespoon vanilla extract

RECIPE ADAPTED FROM ELANASPANTRY.COM

1 Thank you to our page sponsor The Bookmine (541) 942-7414 702 E. Main Street Cottage Grove

7

Sagittarius Waxing Crescent

Virgo Waning Crescent

National Vinegar Day

Noteworthy Dates 2

Libra Waning Crescent

General Election

Capricorn Waxing Crescent

Libra Waning Crescent

4

Scorpio New Moon

5

Scorpio Waxing Crescent

National Sandwich Day

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Capricorn Waxing Crescent

10

Aquarius Waxing Crescent

Daylight Saving Time ends

6

Sagittarius Waxing Crescent

West Cascade Bull Elk opens

Check out the monthly specials at Farmlands Market deli

National Cinnamon Day 8

3

INSTRUCTIONS: Whip heavy cream until stiff In a separate bowl, whip cream cheese until smooth, then blend in maple syrup and vanilla With a rubber spatula, gently fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture

Rockey Mountain Bull Elk opens (2nd season)

11

Aquarius First Quarter

12

Pisces Waxing Gibbous

Veterans Day

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Pisces Waxing Gibbous

World Kindness Day Coast Bull Elk opens

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Pisces Waxing Gibbous

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Aries Waxing Gibbous

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Aries Waxing Gibbous

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Taurus Waxing Gibbous

America Recycles Day

21

Gemini Waning Gibbous

28

22

Cancer Waning Gibbous

29

Cyber Monday Virgo Waning Crescent

Hanukkah Libra Waning Crescent

18

Taurus Waxing Gibbous

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Taurus Full Moon

National Rural Health Day

23

Cancer Waning Gibbous

30

24

Cancer Waning Gibbous

25

Leo Waning Gibbous

Gemini Waning Gibbous

Coast Bull Elk opens (2nd season)

26

Leo Waning Gibbous

Thanksgiving

27

Virgo Third Quarter

Small Business Saturday

Giving Day Libra Waning Crescent

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Free fishing today in Oregon

Free fishing today in Oregon

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EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

A nostalgic travelogue

Exploring Yellowstone A

s spring and summer open up and we consider taking a oneor two-week vacation with social distancing in mind, we are blessed in the Northwest with many national parks. Oregon has Crater Lake, while Washington state has three – Mt. Rainer, Olympic, and North Cascades. Let us consider Yellowstone as a destination, too. Yellowstone is one of 63 premier national parks. There are 423 national parks in the United States, Puerto Rico, Guam, Virgin Islands and Samoa. Along with that, there are 129 national monuments. Yellowstone National Park is 96% located in Wyoming. 3% in Montana and 1% in Idaho. It borders a second national park, the Tetons, located in Wyoming. The first white man to discover Yellowstone was John Colter, a fur trapper. He traveled with the Lewis and Clark Expedition to the Pacific. On the way back, he left the group and followed the Missouri River back up to the eastern edge of Montana, where the Yellowstone flows into the Missouri. Colter followed the Yellowstone River up into what we know today as Yellowstone National Park. When he returned to what was then civilization and told everyone what he had seen – boiling mud pots, geysers, steaming hot emerald pools – his peers felt he was delusional. This is where Colter’s Hell originated. President Ulysses S. Grant signed the papers making Yellowstone the first U.S. National Park on March 1, 1872. The park consists of 2,219,791 acres. It is debatable among historians of the exact route that John Colter took entering Yellowstone 1807-08. Half the world’s hydrothermal is present in Yellowstone National Park. More than 10,000 hydrothermal features, such as mud pots, geysers, and emerald pools, are present. On a one-day drive through Yellowstone a visitor can see many of the highlights. But so many of the features are viewed only by trail. Yellowstone is a hiker’s paradise. Most of the hiking trails are in excellent shape and are easy walking. For instance, most people view the Falls of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone from Artists’ Point. It is most common to see painters’ easels and photographers at this point. There are many hiking trails that go around and

with Don Williams

up above the falls. You must take a lynx, deer, elk, and some moose. Fishroad up to the large parking lot at the ing is abundant. There are many fine south rim and a short trail to the Upper campsites. If you are traveling on a Falls of the Grand Canyon. budget, camping is the way to go, parIf you walk down the trail, past the ticularly July, August, and September. Upper Falls, you come to the Middle This area is over 8,000 feet elevation. Falls. Another trailhead is Uncle Tom’s The nights may be chilly. Point. These are easy trails, and the colWhen camping, we would spend a ors are brilliant and beautiful. few days outside, then get a motel or The Grand Canyon of Yellowstone cabin so we could have a shower and is 1,000 feet deep and varies in width get cleaned up. The Old Faithful Lodge from 1,500-4,000 feet wide. It is 20 is one of the most rustic in the National miles long, and is the headwaters for Park system. It is all log, and the masthe Yellowstone sive grandfather River. You will clock in the main often see deer, lodge is two eagles and othstories tall. The er birds and aniLodge is booked The most-visited national parks mals. Occasionfar ahead. of 2020 in millions: ally some of the If you have trails are closed plans for cabins, Great Smoky Mountains due to bear sightmotels, or the National Park, 12.1 ings, but that is lodge, it is best rare. to go online and Yellowstone National Park, 3,8 The falls drain make reservaZion National Park, 3.6 into Yellowtions. stone Lake, and Grocery proRocky Mountain National Park, 3.3 the outlet of the visions are Grand Teton National Park, 3.3 lake is at Fishing mostly available Bridge, in the throughout the Grand Canyon National Park, 2.9 central part of park and at each Cuyahoga Valley National Park, 2.8 the park, where of the five enthe Yellowstone trances Acadia National Park, 2.7 River continues. While visiting Olympic National Park, 2.5 The YellowYe l l o w s t o n e , stone flows you must reserve Joshua Tree National Park, 2.4 through the enat least a day to tire state of Monvisit the Grand tana, along the Tetons National eastern border and joins the Missouri. Park. It is 25 miles from Yellowstone The Missouri River is formed at Three Park to Teton Park. Forks, Mont., by three rivers coming We in the Northwest enjoy beautitogether, the Jefferson, the Madison, ful mountain ranges of different shapes and Gallatin. (We will discuss Madi- and colors. The Grand Tetons are toson River Valley in a future article.) tally different than we have here in the These three rivers are all formed in Cascade Range. A beautiful lush valley the western part of Montana, east of and some of the largest elk herds are the Continental Divide, and are just a found in the Jackson Hole/Teton area. few miles from Yellowstone country. If you have time, go east from JackI’ve been through Yellowstone many son Hole down through some of the times, and as a youngster, with lots of most beautiful grassland in the world. family; we spent time hiking many Near the eastern border, turn north to trails, and getting a feel of the country. Devils’ Tower, a national monument. In the mid 1940s there was an abun- The motion picture, “Close Encounters dance of deer and elk, many black of the Third Kind,” was filmed at Devbears, and it was not uncommon to see ils’ Tower. From there, head northwest a grizzly or cinnamon bear each day. and take in Custer’s Battlefield at Custer, Buffalo were rare at that time. Today, Mont. From there, double back to Bigit is the other way around – you see horn Lake and Recreation area on the few bears, but lots of buffalo. highway to Cody, Wyo. Bighorn CanYellowstone is famous for wolves, yon National Recreation Area and Big-

POPULAR PARKS

horn Lake, Fort Smith, Mont., is famous for its wildlife, wild horses, beautiful towering cliffs, miles of hiking trails, mountain sheep, recreational boating, all located on a beautiful lake with many dude ranches and vivid colors. Of course, you want to spend a couple of days in Cody and visit the Buffalo Bill Museum. There is so much history of the Indian Nations and the movement west headed by the fur trappers, Hudson Bay, frontiersmen, and the railroads. It is a magnificent world-class museum, complete with Native American villages. There are several shows a day, one of them with live raptors. There are so many things to see and do in this town. There are plenty of stories of John Colter connected with Cody in his fur-trapping days. In our trips to Yellowstone, we have encountered many bears – all good meetings. In a trip my father and I took in 1954, we pulled off at a turnout – there were several bears in the area. We had a sack of small apples, and my dad rolled an apple across the parking lot and the bear chased it – we emptied the bag of apples feeding the bear – something we absolutely DO NOT DO TODAY. In Sept. 1958, my wife Jean and I were traveling with my folks in a four-door Pontiac. We pulled into a trailhead parking lot, and there was a mother black bear with three cubs. There were several garbage cans – one 55-gallon can did not have a cover. One of the cubs was standing on top of the rim, looking down in the can. The mother bear was looking at the other cans, and the cubs were looking on. There were several cars with people and cameras, taking pictures. I had about 10 feet of film left on my movie roll. I got movies of the four bears when my film ran out. I had the camera on the trunk, changing film. At the same time, a woman two parking spots over, also ran out of film, and she sat in the front passenger seat, looking down, changing film, when the mother bear walked over to her car, stood up on its hind feet, put paws on window ledge, and when the lady looked up, their noses were about five inches apart. She screamed, and I think the car had power windows – because it went up fast, and the bear jumped down and ran back to her cubs! And, of course, I did not get movies of this scene!


EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

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HOT TEAS CAMBODIA

5 tips to beat winter ailments

Boil water and add powdered or fresh ginger. Let it steep before drinking.

• MEDITATE: Keep stress at bay so your body can focus on keeping your immune system in check. Daily meditation breaks can ease stress and help you stay calm: Just close your eyes and focus on your breathing for a few minutes (or longer if you can swing it!).

MEXICO In rural Mexico, families prepare a hot beverage, like lemon tea, and add lots of onion or garlic. It doesn’t taste the best, but it does fight infections.

• BREATHE IN STEAM: The next time you have a cold that gives you a stuffy nose, try sitting in the bathroom with a warm shower running. You can also breathe in steam from a bowl of hot water. Inhaling warm (not hot) steam can make the mucus thinner, which will help your mucus drain better.

In urban Mexico, a standard treatment for colds is hot water mixed with cinnamon and honey. INDIA “Golden milk” – Bring a cup of milk to a simmer, then add a teaspoon of turmeric. Mix before drinking.

• ADJUST SLEEPING POSITION: When you lie horizontally, your mucus will be at a standstill. This can result in congestion and cough. When you go to bed, try propping your head up with pillows to help gravity work better for you. Sleeping at a sloped angle allows the fluid in your sinuses to keep flowing to avoid congestion and other cold symptoms.

PHILIPPINES Lugaw is a rice porridge cooked with ginger and chicken and is the comfort healing food of the Philippines. ZAMBIA Basically a chicken-and-vegetable soup. This “Go, Grow, Glow” soup can be made vegetarian but either way offers protein and foods to boost energy and protect from disease.

NATURAL ALTERNATIVES Apply shea butter on the nose of a child to relieve congestion. This can especially be helpful for sick babies and is a favorite remedy in multiple African countries.

In a blender, mix radish, watercress, and honey, preparing a couple cups at a time. Give a tablespoon at a time to help clear a cough and fight a cold.

SOUPS CHINA Congee is a traditional Chinese soup made from water or stock and rice,

ZAMBIA Using an herb called Mayani – it smells like mint and is known for its expectorant qualities – sit under a blanket with a pot of recently boiled Mayani leaves and let the steam mist over the face and chest. You could also substitute eucalyptus oil or menthol in hot water. GHANA Peel an onion, cut it in two, and place on either side of a child’s bed. The onion absorbs toxins and germs and is thought to purify the air.

Noteworthy Dates 1

Thank you to our page sponsor Creswell Wellness Center (541) 895-4464 24 W. Oregon Ave., Creswell

5

Capricorn Waxing Crescent

Scorpio Waning Crescent

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Scorpio Waning Crescent

Make half your plate veggies: A simple hack for healthy eating (and portion control) is to make half your plate veggies at each meal. Fill your home with houseplants: Houseplants help to cleanse indoor air and research even shows they improve mood, creativity and problem solving. Sweat every day: Aim to sweat in some way each day – whether that’s via running, biking, dancing, hot yoga, or any other physical activity you enjoy.

Mushrooms to the rescue Agarikon – the cough-, sneeze- and sniffle-fighter – offers powerful immune support. Agarikon contains a spectrum of unique nutrients that support a healthy microbial and bacterial balance – a great ally during the cold and flu season – and for supporting an overactive immune system as well.

3

Scorpio Waning Crescent

4

Sagittarius New Moon

National Cookie Day

Get yours by visiting dfw.state.or.us

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12

Aries Waxing Gibbous

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19

Cancer Full Moon

20

Capricorn Waxing Crescent

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Aquarius Waxing Crescent

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Aquarius Waxing Crescent

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Aquarius Waxing Crescent

Aries Waxing Gibbous

Cancer Waning Gibbous

27

14

21

Taurus Waxing Gibbous

Cancer Waning Gibbous

Winter Solstice

28

15

22

10

Pisces Waxing Crescent

Taurus Waxing Gibbous

Leo Waning Gibbous

29

16

23

Taurus Waxing Gibbous

Leo Waning Gibbous

30

17

24

Gemini Waxing Gibbous

Virgo Waning Gibbous

Christmas Eve

31

New Year’s Eve Libra Third Quarter

Libra Waning Crescent

11

Pisces First Quarter

Human Rights Day

Kawanza Virgo Waning Gibbous

Drink a glass of water first thing in the morning: Hydrating first thing in the morning helps aid digestion, enhance skin health and boost energy.

First day to order 2022 fishing license

National Brownie Day

26

Small tasks, big payoffs

Take the stairs: Good cardio, and it also strengthens and tones your legs and core while you’re at it.

SOUTH INDIA

Fill a glass jar with honey and sliced or whole peeled shallots. Let it sit for a while to absorb. Then, eat a tablespoon of the honey three to four times a day. Some even eat the onions.

• GARGLE SALT WATER: You can gargle with water containing salt to get relief for a sore throat from a cold. The recommended measurement is ¼ to ½ teaspoon of salt dissolved in an 8-ounce glass of warm water. The high-salt barrier can pull out a lot of fluids from the tissues in your throat.

A simple broth with vegetables and a little spice.

WEST AFRICA

THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

ec e m ber

CAMBODIA

HONEY SNACKS Sprinkle powdered ginger and black pepper on a spoonful of honey. Lick the spoon clean.

• DRINK WARM LIQUIDS: Hot liquids help relieve congestion, soothe the membranes of your throat and nose, and keep your body hydrated, which is necessary to fight viral infections. Here are some variations on soothing tea to fight colds and coughs.

but with the option to add many different ingredients. Most people eat it for breakfast, but it is believed to be a healing food any time of a day.

D

A trip around the world

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Scorpio Waning Crescent

Scorpio Waning Crescent

Sagittarius Waning Crescent

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25

Gemini Waxing Gibbous

Virgo Waning Gibbous

Christmas Day


mber 16th– December 22nd

ents Center (Fairgrounds), Eugene

DAYS 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. YS 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

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EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

SPONSORED BY

n may change this summer

cept EBT/Credit/Debit

CountyFarmersMarket.org

ry

a u Jan

Herb of the month:

Parsley is The Herb Society of America’s Herb of the Month for January and the International Herb Association’s Herb of the Year for 2021. Pick leaves any time of year, by picking the outer, oldest leaves.

Homemade Bread Tips

1

USE A DIGITAL SCALE Weighing out ingredients—particularly flour—is far more accurate than using volumetric measurements (i.e. your imprecise measuring cups). “Exact measurements are an absolute must,” says Chef Dominique. “A milligram here or there can be a disaster.”

AVOID OVER- OR UNDER-KNEADING YOUR DOUGH It sounds obvious, but this is a huge mistake many make when baking bread from scratch. Here’s a simple way to check that you’ve contributed enough elbow grease: you should be able to stretch your dough out 2 to 4 inches without it breaking apart.

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WATCH YOUR OVEN Make sure the internal temperature is exact by enlisting an oven thermometer, and keep an eye on your bread while it’s baking to make sure it doesn’t start to burn.

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SEASON IT WELL Salt’s not just important for flavor: it has many chemical interactions with flour and yeast that give good structure and texture to bread. “Don’t be afraid of salt,” Chef Dominique says. “You want just enough so that the bread isn’t bland, but taste the dough to make sure you’re not using more than you need.”

USE THE RIGHT YEAST—AND STORE IT PROPERLY Most bread machines require ‘fast-acting’ yeast, so double check what the recipe requires before you start baking. Make sure the yeast has not expired, too, as old yeast will not work as well.

USE THE POKE TEST WHEN PROOFING THE DOUGH Proofing is the final resting of a loaf of bread before it goes into the oven. Over-proofing dough can limit the rise on the bread if left for too long, because eventually the bread will sink back down. Under-proofing will have a similar effect. Make sure you get it at the right time by giving your loaf a soft poke with your fingertip: it should leave a small indentation and very slowly spring back.

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4 Did you know?

6

Before the Eraser was invented people used soft bread crumbs to erase pencil marks.

ALWAYS WARM YOUR MILK Only slightly, but just enough so that the yeast isn’t slowed down by the fat in the milk.

Noteworthy Dates

SOURCE: REALSIMPLE.COM

From my garden, with love

Thank you to our page sponsor Lane County Farmer’s Market (541) 431-4923 8th Ave & Oak Eugene

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Capricorn New Moon

“We enjoy sharing our harvest and gardens with neighbors, friends and the Creswell Food Pantry, and seeing children pick pumpkins or their first carrot from out of the ground. The garden has been a place for us to go from our seclusion at home during the pandemic. We love watching things grow, both edible and beautiful, surprised at how fast plants grow, especially weeds, the various bees and butterflies arriving, hummingbirds visiting the fuchsias and fireweed, chickadees harvesting sunflower seeds, fruits, vegetables, flowers, gladiolus blooming,

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Capricorn Waxing Crescent

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Aquarius Waxing Crescent

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the surroundings wildlife and forest and the peace. We marvel at the color of the Red Flowering currants, the deep red of Crape Myrtle, the purple of the fall crocus, the taste of the first ripe blueberry, watching goldfinches harvest fluffy fireweed seeds, lavender with its flotillas of bees, the parade of various bulbs starting with snowdrops in February, grapevine greening on our canopy to bring summer shade.”

Sagittarius Waning Crescent

New Year’s Day

-Kathy and Jeff Kelly, Creswell. Scientists

Aquarius Waxing Crescent

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Pisces Waxing Crescent

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Pisces Waxing Crescent

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Aries Waxing Crescent

Gemini Waxing Gibbous

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Gemini Waxing Gibbous

National Spaghetti Day

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10

Aries First Quarter

Aries Waxing Gibbous

11

Taurus Waxing Gibbous

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Taurus Waxing Gibbous

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Gemini Waxing Gibbous

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20

Leo Waning Gibbous

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National Milk Day

Capricorn Waning Crescent

16

Cancer Waxing Gibbous

Aquarius Waning Crescent

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Cancer Full Moon

23 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day

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Libra Waning Gibbous

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Leo Waning Gibbous

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Leo Waning Gibbous

National Popcorn Day

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Virgo Waning Gibbous

National Hugging Day

28

Libra Waning Gibbous Scorpio Third Quarter

Scorpio Waning Crescent

Sagittarius Waning Crescent

Sagittarius Waning Crescent

22

Virgo Waning Gibbous

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National Seed Swap Day Capricorn Waning Crescent


EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

23 SPONSORED BY

Visit Linda’s website at YourMoonSign.com

2022

TRAITS OF THE TIGER • Strong, smart, energetic, and relentless to win.

1950, the first successful demonstration of a polio vaccine was introduced by Hilary Koprowski, with a live attenuated virus that people drank.

The new year will bring the water element to this Tiger year. Amazing innovations in science, medicine, and commerce are introduced during the Year of the Water Tiger.

• Kind hearted, love and respect nature, trees, farming, animals, and little children.

The Moon’s gravitational effects on Earth lean toward excitement, adventure, speed, risky events and interactions, whistleblowing, and complicated political relationships.

• Hard workers. • They speak their minds, and do not step away from a fight or an argument.

Traditions • Honoring and thanking ancestors

Athletic records are broken, world-changing businesses are launched, life-saving medicines are invented and administered, fierce warriors and dynamic people are born, and the world wakes up with energy during this lunar year. The World Athletics Championships are scheduled in the southern Willamette Valley in 2022, which historically offers us a year of record-breaking speed.

• Becoming self-aware and softening delivery could benefit Tigers. OREGONIAN TIGERS Sportscaster: Neil Everett Athlete: Erik Ainge

College basketball coach: Mark Few

Noteworthy Dates Aquarius New Moon

2

Pisces Waxing Crescent

3

Pisces Waxing Crescent

Aries Waxing Crescent

7

Taurus Waxing Crescent

8

Taurus First Quarter

9

Gemini Waxing Gibbous

4

Pisces Waxing Crescent

National Homemade Soup Day

Chinese New Year Groundhog Day

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• It is considered lucky to have a well-stocked pantry during the lunar transition to inspire abundant blessing throughout the new year.

• Cleaning the house two weeks before the new year will clear out bad luck lurking and welcome good luck to move in.

The Year of the Water Tiger runs Feb. 1, 2022-Jan. 21, 2023

1

• It’s lucky to join together on new year’s eve with plenty of food, family, and friends to celebrate, and it is customary to decorate with red and gold, to wear red clothes, and buy fresh new clothes for good luck.

• Red envelopes containing money are given to unmarried children.

The Chinese New Year 2022 is the Lunar Year of the Tiger

Runner: Steve Prefontaine

r ua ry

“Tiger Year” in History

Forecast

• Tiger children are lively and talkative. Let them play outdoors, explore, and breathe fresh air.

eb

F

By Linda LaZar

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Gemini Waxing Gibbous

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Gemini Waxing Gibbous

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Aries Waxing Crescent

12

Cancer Waxing Gibbous

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Libra Waning Gibbous

National Inventors Day

Donate / Volunteer at “The Hub” • Caring for Creswell Kids • Creswell Food for Kids • Hope Restored

• CreswellChurchofChrist.com

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Cancer Waxing Gibbous

14

Leo Waxing Gibbous

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Leo Waxing Gibbous

Valentine’s Day

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Libra Waning Gibbous

27

Capricorn Waning Crescent

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Scorpio Waning Gibbous

Presidents’ Day

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Aquarius Waning Crescent

16

Leo Full Moon

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Virgo Waning Gibbous

Fat Tuesday

22

Scorpio Waning Gibbous

23

Scorpio Third Quarter

18

Virgo Waning Gibbous

National Drink Wine Day

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Sagittarius Waning Crescent

National Chili Day

25

Sagittarius Waning Crescent

26

Capricorn Waning Crescent


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EMERALD VALLEY ALMANAC

2021 Creswell Services Listing

GOVERNMENT

UTILITIES

FAMILY SERVICES

PARKS & FACILITIES

State of Oregon www.oregon.gov

Emerald People’s Utility District 541-746-1583 33733 Seavey Loop Road, Eugene

Family Relief Nursery 541-943-4835 720 N. 14th St., Cottage Grove, OR 97424

Lane Electric Cooperative 541-484-1151 787 Bailey Hill Road PO Box 21410, Eugene

COMMUNITY FOOD RESOURCES

Cobalt Building 364 Cobalt Lane, Creswell Call City Hall for information 541-895-2531

Lane County www.lanecounty.org City of Creswell 541-895-2531 13 S. 1st St., PO Box 276, Creswell info@creswell-or.us www.ci.creswell.or.us

Pacific Power 1-888-221-7070 4025 Old Highway 99 S., Roseburg www.pacificpower.net

Law Enforcement Lane County Sheriff ’s Office Creswell line: 541-895-2025 Non-emergency line: 541-682-4150 For emergencies: 911

WASTE DISPOSAL & RECYCLING

FIRE • MEDICAL • RESCUE South Lane County Fire & Rescue (SLCF&R) For non-emergencies, call 541-942-4493.

LIBRARY Creswell Library 541-895-3053 64 W. Oregon Ave. PO Box 366, Creswell

SCHOOLS Creswell School District 541-895-6000 988 W. A St., Creswell www.creswell.k12.or.us Creswell High School 541-895-6020 33390 East Niblock Lane, Creswell Creswell Middle School 541-895-6090 655 W. Oregon Ave., Creswell Creslane Elementary School 541-895-6140 996 W. A St., Creswell Creswell Christian Academy 541-729-7345 597 S. Front St., Creswell

Sanipac Inc. 541-736-3600 1650 Glenwood Boulevard PO Box 10928, Eugene www.sanipac.com

WATER & SEWER City of Creswell 541-895-2531 13 S. 1st St., PO Box 276, Creswell info@creswell-or.us www.ci.creswell.or.us

NATURAL GAS Northwest Natural 541-342-3661 1405 SW Hwy 101, Lincoln City www.nwnatural.com

INTERNET CenturyLink 1-866-820-6522 Spectrum/Charter Communications 1-800-314-7195

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Lane Transit District Routes to Eugene & Cottage Grove 541-687-5555 www.ltd.org

SENIOR SERVICES Meals on Wheels 541- 895-2338

Community Food for Creswell Food Pantry 541-246-9117 364 Cobalt Lane, Creswell Community Sharing Program 541-942-2176 SERVICE CLUBS Coast Fork Kiwanis Club 541-895-4309 PO Box 1047, Creswell

DOG PARKS Garden Lake Park 390 Melton Road, Creswell Cinderella Park 34275 E. Cloverdale Road, Creswell Lynx Hollow Park 80998 Davisson Road, Creswell

PHARMACIES Bi-Mart 150 Melton Road, Creswell 541-895-9810 Health Mart 175 E. Oregon Ave., Creswell 541-895-2413

RECREATION Emerald Valley Golf & Resort 541-895-2174 83301 Dale Kuni Road, Creswell www.evgolfresort.com Eugene Skydivers LLC 541-895-3029 93505 Melton Road, Creswell Hobby Field – Creswell Airport 541-895-2913 83501 Melton Road, Creswell Airport manager, Shelley Humble shumble@creswell-or.us

Creswell Community Center 99 S. 1st St., Creswell Call City Hall for information 541-895-2531

Lucky Paws Rescue A Springfield nonprofit created by animal lovers and advocates to rescue animals in danger of euthanasia, and to save their lives. Donate: facebook.com/Luckypawssites More info: 541-246-8070

FOOD, CLOTHING & SHELTER

Farmlands Market 204 W. Oregon Ave. 541-895-3500

South Lane Wheels A public transportation system connecting people with where they want to go in South Lane County including Cottage Grove, Creswell, Dorena, Culp Creek, Saginaw, London and Lorane. More info: 541-942-0456

GAS COMPANIES

HISTORY, ART & CULTURE

76 Station 66 N. Mill St., Creswell 541-895-4847

Creswell Heritage Foundation Nonprofit that collaborates within the Creswell community to enrich the lives of current and future generations by protecting and preserving Creswell’s physical and cultural heritage. Donate: creswellheritagefoundation.org/donate and 541-895-3726

GROCERY MARKET

ARCO am/pm 305 E. Oregon Ave., Creswell 541-895-3584

ANIMAL RESCUES Red Barn Rabbit Rescue Nonprofit in Creswell committed to the care of its rescued domestic rabbits with the intention of providing permanent sanctuary. Dedicated to reducing the number of unwanted, neglected, and abused rabbits through education. Donate: redbarnrabbitrescue.org/donate. More info: 541-214-0808 Blue Barn Farm & Sanctuary Nonprofit in Creswell committed to spreading kindness and acceptance among the people of our communities while preventing the abuse of local animals. Donate: bluebarnsanctuary.org Welcome Home Animal Sanctuary: A Creswell nonprofit sanctuary offering refuge to abused, unwanted, injured, and abandoned farm animals. Donate: welcomehomesanctuary.com/donate More info: 541-870-9952 Humane Society of Cottage Grove Donate: facebook.com/humanesocietycg and 541-942-3130

Creswell Area Historical Society Nonprofit that CAHS owns and operates, the Creswell Historical Museum is where exhibits celebrate the aspects of life in the local area from the early pioneers to recent times through actual items, photographs, displays, and more. Call 541-895-5464

EDUCATION & ATHLETICS Creswell Education Foundation Supports the educational programs for both students and staff of the Creswell School District. CEF supports educational excellence to enhance student achievement, to recognize exemplary staff efforts, and to foster community support and involvement with our schools. Donate: creswell.k12.or.us Creswell Booster Club Supports Creswell Athletics. Donate: chsbooster-club.square.site and 541-895-6020

CRESWELL’S HOBBY FIELD AIRPORT A LOCAL RESOURCE ... ALL YEAR LONG • One of Oregon’s busiest General Aviation Airports. • Activities/businesses available on the field are skydiving, flight instruction, aircraft maintenance, Chapter 31 of the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA), aerobatic rides/ lessons, and a flight simulator. • The City-run pilot’s lounge is open daily for the aviation enthusiast and offers a variety of services; 100 LL and Jet A aviation fuel from a 24-hour card lock system, pilot supplies, aircraft tie downs, hangar rentals, and commercial land leases. • It recently completed taxi-lanes 1A and 1B, with finishing touches scheduled during warmer weather. THE AIRPORT IS OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE CITY OF CRESWELL.