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Local Foodie Kids Summer Fun Cottage Grove Scoop New Business in Creswell Local Events

ISSUE 5


South Lane County Fire & Rescue Save Money. Save Lives.

Call 541-942-4493 for info FOR

EMERGENCY DIAL 911

Ground Ambulance Memberships $65 per year Air & Ground Ambulance Memberships $110 per year

Serving Creswell & Cottage Grove 2

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Everyone Loves

Dan’s Plants! FLOWERS • VEGGIES • PRODUCE

Dan & Peg Grousbeck, Owners Don’t forget to grab some of Dan’s famous soil!

82243 Davisson Road, Creswell • 541-953-3661 E M E RALD VALLEY MAGAZ I N E – SOUTH E R N LAN E COU NTY

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COME PLAY IN CRESWELL! CRESWELL COMMUNITY

WIDE YARD

FRIDAY & SATURDAY May 10th & 11th Maps Available at CreswellChamber.com (After 8 pm on May 9th) Pick Up Your Map at the Chamber & Local Businesses Creswell Chamber of Commerce 95 West Oregon Ave., Creswell, OR 97426 www.creswellchamber.com • 541-895-4398

the with FRIENDLY CITY JULY 4TH, 2019

PANCAKE BREAKFAST 7 - 10 am at Holt Park

INDEPENDENCE PARADE 2019

11 am - (maps available on website in June)

2ND ANNUAL FIRECRACKER CAR SHOW

8:30 am - 4 pm - Vintage Cars at the Emerald Valley Golf Resort - FREE shuttle from downtown Creswell to Emerald Valley Golf Resort.

VENDORS & FOOD 10am - 4pm LIVE MUSIC IN HOLT PARK 1-4pm FIREWORKS - DUSK AT CRESWELL HIGH SCHOOL

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Editor’s Letter... Please enjoy our 5th edition of the Southern Lane County Emerald Valley Magazine! This spring issue features new local businesses, some trending locally owned restaurants, southern Lane County summer events, exciting things to do with the kids and good information on how to support and live a strong, local lifestyle. The Slow Food story, which is running in both our Springfield and southern Lane County magazines brings about the importance of buying and eating from local food producers. Our decision to run the story in both area magazines was intentional, stressing the value of spending your dollars with our local farmers, ranchers, and local food producers is a big part of our local culture and communities Local supporting local, buying local, eating local, shopping local, the theme remains the same in all of the Emerald Valley Magazine publications as this has been its mission from the start. It has been one heck of a winter, and spring has not been kind to our local business community. It s now or never when it comes to spending your hard-earned dollars at our area business establishments. Please take out our local story book and support away! Let our featured businesses know you read all about them in our southern Lane County magazine. You will be glad you did and the businesses you supported will be here another day.

On the cover... Local business is growing in Creswell! Our cover image was taken in the newly remodeled Creswell Wellness Center, formally Creswell Chiropractic. Chelsea Pisani, owner of Creswell Wellness Center and Rachel Magnuson, manager, are featured in the photo on the couch. Marc and Jen Taylor, the owners of the new Roadrunner Rock Hounds, are the couple at the top of the photo. See the story about both on page 7.

Cover photography by Andrew J. Breig

PANACEA BARBERSHOP & LOUNGE Great Service, Quality Cuts Trending and Artist ♦ Barber Techniques Color, Men, Women & Children

Noel Nash Publisher

Aliya Hall Staff writer

155 E. Oregon Ave Creswell Open Mon-Sat 8 am till 6pm ♦

THE

Cheryl Richard Editor

Michael Rothgeb Staff Writer

Book your appointment online at www.panaceabarbershop.com

Serving Creswell, Cottage Grove and Springfield communities

Creswell Chronicle

Andrew von Engel Graphic Designer

Erin Tierney Graphic Designer

www.thecreswellchronicle.com Publisher: Noel@thecreswellchronicle.com Sales Manager: Cheryl@thecreswellchronicle.com

Julie Biacchi Graphic Designer

Ashley Clark Contributing Writer

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Business is thriving in SOUTHERN LANE COUNTY

CRESWELL WELLNESS CENTER: Guide to a Healthier Life If a little TLC is needed, Creswell Wellness Center also has an esthetician available to provide facials, microdermabrasion and waxes. For a more relaxing touch, massages are available by the half or full hour, along with acupuncture.

The goal of Creswell Wellness Center is to change the way clients feel and empower them to attain a new level of health and wellness — and the staff wants to make it attainable for everyone. That’s why it will also offer nutritional, aromatherapy and other wellness classes on the website soon.

C

Whether looking for a cure to an ailment, a reprieve or wanting a resource to assist on a journey towards better health, Creswell Wellness Center is there to guide. • By Aliya Hall •

reswell Wellness Center is the community’s one-stop shop for every wellness need. For those looking to relieve pain, manage stress, prevent an illness or just seeking a healthier life, its staff and quality products can help give clients the tools to lead them on their journey. The center has a rich inventory of vitamins, supplements, self-care items and homeopathic remedies that are of high quality and from trusted brands. Talk with a trusted staff member to find what fits any lifestyle.

Creswell Wellness Center would like to welcome Dr. Blair Wilkinson-Steiner to the team in mid-May. 24 W. Oregon Avenue, Creswell creswellwellness.com • 541-895-4464 facebook.com/creswellwellness/ Hours: Mon- Fri 9AM - 5PM Saturday 9AM - 12PM AND BY APPOINTMENT

Dr. Blair Wilkinson-Steiner

ROADRUNNER ROCKHOUNDS —Leave no stone unturned By Aliya Hall

If God has made it and man can pull it out of the ground: Roadrunner Rockhounds can find it. With a collection of over 1,700 different minerals, there is something for everyone who is passionate about rocks, fossils and minerals at Roadrunner Rockhounds’ Creswell pop-up. If the Taylor Family can’t dig it out themselves, they have a network of dealers throughout the country to bring enthusiasts and collectors the highest quality material that can be found in the world. Although they carry a variety of specimens, Roadrunner Rockhounds specializes in amethyst, which it brings from Uruguay and Brazil. The shop does custom cuttings of cabochons as well as lapidary work, and they have all the supplies for jewelry and wire wrapping. Roadrunner Rockhounds has everything under the sun from home decor, small trinkets, substantial rock formations and jewelry. The shop is more than just family owned, the collecting itself is done as a family. Marc and Jen Taylor involve their children in the treasure hunt, as they manage the stores and dig up the rare beauties. “I just have a huge passion and love for all things gems, rocks and minerals,” Marc Taylor said. Roadrunner Rockhounds’ pop-up shop isn’t going to be around forever. Come on in and pick out a unique, natural piece of the earth to take home and cherish.

“I just have a huge passion and love for all things gems, rocks and minerals,” Marc Taylor said. 298 E. Oregon Ave., Creswell 541-653-3548 • RoadRunnerRocks.com facebook.com/roadrunnerrocks/ OPEN: Wednesday - Sunday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. CLOSED: Monday & Tuesday

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BREWSTATION AWAITS ITS ‘OUTSIDE’ CHANCE By Jon Stinnett

CheerTsO OUR 6 YEAR ANNIVERSARY!

SPRING AND SUMMERTIME SEATING BRINGS OUT THE BEST IN COTTAGE GROVE PUB. When the weather warms and the sun finally shines, it’s nearly impossible to sit inside at the Brewstation. “In the summertime, there pretty much is no ‘inside,’” explains owner Emily Rinck. “The entire pub is outside seating. Even if you’re sitting inside, you’re still outside.” As temperatures begin to climb each spring, Rinck and company throw open several doors that have provided months of winter warmth, and locals and visitors arrive in droves to claim their share of the best outdoor seating in Cottage Grove.

For those dropping by for dinner, it’d be worth showing up earlier than originally planned, as prime outdoor seating goes first. But once arrived, the sunshine’s available in endless supply. Well-behaved pets are also welcome.

It’s a fun time of year for us, just bring your sunglasses. It’s the epitome of being an Oregonian — just being outside.

“We try and make it very comfortable,” she says. Here, there are plenty of plants making shade, vegetables that could find their way in to the kitchen and even (water) misters when it gets super-hot. Photos from the Brewstation’s early years — about six years ago now — show the pub already taking advantage of the sunshine, with patrons and musicians sharing space and making memories on warm, beautiful evenings. Since then, outdoor seating has expanded in response to the demand for a sunny spot to sip suds. Opening up the pub doubles its seating, filling much of the space at the corner of Sixth and Washington streets with customers taking in the rays. Hours on the weekends expand, and bands are free to project their sound out into the night air. This year, Rinck said she’s especially thrilled because the onset of summer will coincide with the opening of Coast Fork Brewing, which is scheduled to take off in the warehouse space that serves both the Brewstation and Coast Fork Feed. A summer menu featuring lighter fare such as Cobb salads, a hummus pizza and more vegan options is also in the works. Lighter, European-style beers will make their way onto an already eclectic tap list. Specially themed “Nostalgia Nights,” which feature a different era of music, and “Bingo for a Cause” will highlight the first Saturday of each month. 8

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- Emily Rinck, Owner


Here to Help:

Coast Fork Feed

Gets You Ready TO GROW Maybe the soil isn’t quite ready yet, or those with green thumbs are not sure exactly what it’s going to take to get a garden going out back. Perhaps some have noticed that spring has indeed sprung, and gardeners are already feeling left behind. OR maybe some have been anticipating the season for months, and have been making ambitious plans they can’t wait to get started. Whatever the mindset as the weather warms, Coast Fork Feed Store’s Dale Smith has a reassuring message. “It’s not too late,” Smith says. “We’re here to help people plan and be successful. If you have questions about getting your garden space ready this spring, we’re there for you.” Coast Fork boasts a full line of organic soils and mixes, in addition to powdered and liquid fertilizers and all types of amendments. Heirloom seeds from Baker Creek Seed Company and starts from Coast Fork Nursery help ensure a beautiful beginning. In fact, lettuce, broccoli, onion and potato starts and bare root starts such as blueberries and strawberries are already available. Compost and nutrients can be tailored to fit specific needs. But it’s really the expertise that can be found among the staff at Coast Fork Feed Store that keeps folks coming back each spring.

We’ll help you plant ” “ WHATEVER MAKES YOU HAPPY.

“We can help answer any questions, regardless of how your soil has been used in the past,” Smith says. “We’ll help you plant whatever makes you happy.” Of course, with a full line of beekeeping products, brewing, pet and small farm supplies, Coast Fork has a lot to offer beyond the garden. The second annual Bee Day, scheduled for Saturday, April 20, will feature advice from beekeeping experts in addition to “nucs” from Bear Mountain Honey that include several thousand bees and a bred queen for those itching to get started. Pre-orders for nucs are being taken now by calling the Feed Store at 541-942-8770. Returning beekeepers can also find everything they need there. New needs, challenges and opportunities can crop up throughout the year; in the Cottage Grove area, those in the know choose Coast Fork Feed Store and the decades of gardening and do-it-yourself knowledge that come complementary with each visit.

The Brew Station & Coast Fork Feed Healthy Feed - Local Flavors - Homegrown Fun

106 S 6th St Cottage Grove, OR | 541-942-8770 | CoastForkFeed.com E M E RALD VALLEY MAGAZ I N E – SOUTH E R N LAN E COU NTY

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a z z i P s y o B y M A Staple of the

Birthday boys and girls receive a two-topping, Baby Boy Pizza on the house!

BY Mike Rothgeb

There are no reservation fees, but My Boys Pizza encourages customers to call ahead to reserve the rooms. A 10 percent off pizza discount is available for the person who sets up the reservation.

Creswell Community

Every Wed. from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., My Boys Pizza offers all you can eat pizza and salad bar for only $8.95. Customers can choose from a variety of pizza and add a drink for only $1.00 more.

the back dining area to seat up to 50 additional guests. Both rooms offer privacy for parties, meetings, family get-togethers and more!

For birthday parties, families can bring their

own cake and ice cream, and My Boys Pizza can store the desserts until the festivities begin. Their chefs

Dino the Dinosaur has called My Boys Pizza home for thirty-five years.

All pizza is made fresh daily in their gas-fired slate ovens and features high-quality ingredients, a crispy crust and original, handmade pizza sauce. Daily lunch specials such as sandwiches and calzones are also available, as well as savory sides like fries, jalapeno poppers, wings, and more!

Owned and operated by the Taylor family,

My Boys Pizza in Creswell has been the community pizza parlor for the past forty years. Formerly known as Mr. Machos, the restaurant was re-branded in 2013 but remained in the Taylor family. The Taylors care about the community and their customers, and all their employees feel like family, too. Two of their biggest attractions for local families are their party room and children’s play area. The play area, titled Kid Power, is a 2,000 square-foot room that has everything toddlers to adolescents can enjoy.

Their famous 13-foot salad bar offers fresh and healthy

With a full-sized indoor playground, children can enjoy burning off excess energy while parents can grab a bite to eat.

can even accommodate certain diets and allergies if parents bring the ingredients and give advance notice. Parents are encouraged to put their artistic side to the test by decorating for parties. “It’s always neat to see how creative the moms can be,” Cathryn Rowdon said, remembering an underwaterthemed party. A lot of mothers schedule playdates and meet-ups at My Boys Pizza. The children can enjoy the delicious kids’ meals and stimulating activities while moms can visit and socialize.

Basketball hoops, coin-operated kiddie rides, and other games are available in Kid Power.

For younger children, Kid Power features a playground and the Creswell famous Dino the Dinosaur. Candy crane games, toy machines and coin-operated kiddie rides are also on site. Older children are sure to enjoy their video and basketball hoop games and full-sized air hockey table. My Boys Pizza also features a designated party room which can seat up to 36 people. For larger groups, customers can reserve

And what’s My Boys Pizza without mentioning their pizza? With four sizes to choose from and a variety of tasty toppings, customers will always have something new to try.

All pizza is made fresh daily in their gas-fired slate ovens.

ingredients, all day, every day. My Boys Pizza offers the only salad bar in town and features unique and everchanging options. A lot of customers come in solely for the salads.

Coming this spring, customers can look forward to the return of the strawberry spinach salad, honeydew, cantaloupe and other seasonal items. My Boys Pizza is so much more than a run-of-the-mill pizza place. With a variety of dining options, ample seating, a party room and full-sized play area, there’s bound to be something for every family member. Check out their Facebook page and website for specials and reservation information. My Boys Pizza: putting the family in family fun.

96 N. Mill Street ■ Creswell ■ 541-895-4505 ■ myboyspizza.com ■ Facebook.com/MyBoysPizza Sun-Thurs: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Fri & Sat: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. E M E RALD VALLEY MAGAZ I N E

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Splendid Seating Hilltop Bar & Grill brings Taste and Atmosphere By Aliya Hall

As the weather warms up, there is no better place to be than the patio of Hilltop Bar and Grill in Pleasant Hill. Known for having some of the best outdoor seating in Southern Lane County, Hilltop Bar and Grill offers a fun and relaxing patio experience no matter the party’s size. With seven tables that fit a mixture of four to eight people, Hilltop Bar and Grill can accommodate 40 people sitting down. The variety of table sizes allows for friends of all group sizes to find the perfect fit for them. The space is perfect for catching up, celebrating or having meetings. With the area partially covered and set away from the restaurant, it’s perfect for people to reserve for birthday parties or high school reunions. The picnic tables are made from Redwood Northwest, which prioritizes attractive and durable Redwood material. While lounging and enjoying the atmosphere, Hilltop Bar and Grill has new summer menu items to satisfy any hunger. For a light but filling meal, the new taco salad is a fun and tasty way to enjoy salad greens. For meat lovers who want an extra kick, Hilltop’s new green chili burger is a twist on an American favorite, with a whole roasted green chili on top of the 8-ounce patty. When it comes to lighter fare, Hilltop’s buffalo cauliflower bites have became a game changer for vegetarians and non-vegetarians alike. These breaded cauliflowers are tossed in buffalo sauce and served with blue cheese crumbles — and they’re going like crazy. And, of course, Hilltop is known for it thirst-quencing brews. It’s releasing a new fruity beer for summer while keeping staples like the Blue Pool Pilsner, which is now available in 12-ounce cans along with the 22-ounce bottles. For something stronger, Hilltop recently updated its cocktail menu to include drinks with tropical flavors, cucumber and lavender notes. From a Bahama Mama, Bourbonale, Falling in Lavender, Cucumber Fizz, Kentucky Red, Pear Martini, The Remington or Rosa Blanco Margarita — there is something for any drink connoisseur to sip on at Hilltop Bar and Grill while drinking in the atmosphere of premium outdoor seating.

Mark NeariNg PLUMBING

SERVICE Free Estimates

CCB# 190822

cell 541-556-3869 home 541-895-2335

Residential • Commercial Licensed • Bonded • Insured

Local Eating Local Dining Local Shopping Local Gifts Local Power

Address: 35831 OR-58 #2 541-746-9619 www.planktownbrewing.com/hilltop facebook.com/PlankTownHilltop/ Hours: Mon - Sun 11:30 a.m. - 10 p.m. E M E RALD VALLEY MAGAZ I N E – SOUTH E R N LAN E COU NTY

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Rock Nest Training & Pet Care

, LLC

• Dog Walking • Pet Visits • Group & Private Dog Training Cheri Spaulding CPDT-KA-CTP

541.895.3162

www.rocknestpetcare.com

TAXES

Thomas E. Ellis

65 West Oregon Ave. Creswell, Oregon 541-895-5000 phone 541-895-5020 fax tellisltc@gmail.com

Round Up Saloon Wrangles Daily Specials By Aliya Hall

A

pproaching Round Up Saloon’s ninth anniversary this July under its current ownership, this neighborhood pub is creating a sense of community with its atmosphere and daily meal specials.

This historic pub has actually been serving the community for over 85 years, and it’s important to owner Kelly Coughlin to keep the historical authenticity of the bar by maintaining its rustic and eclectic integrity. Along with providing a clean and cozy atmosphere, Round Up Saloon provides outstanding service, with staff members who love their job and the customers they provide for. The space is welcoming to everyone.

Specializing in Small Business Income Tax Preparation

R .C .’s AT V R E PA I R SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

• ATVs • MOTORCYCLES • LAWNMOWERS • SMALL POWER TOOLS AND MORE! OPEN TUESDAY – SATURDAY • 541-515-1822

ROYCE COX 195 N MILL STREET #1, CRESWELL, OR 97426 www.rcsatvrepair.com

Live and breath the local lifestyle and purchase from locally owned businesses in southern Lane county.

Although known for its taps and spirits, Round Up Saloon doesn’t shy away from offering delicious dinner and lunch options. Beyond its full menu, the bar has daily meal specials that customers can enjoy in house or pick up to enjoy at home. Sunday kicks off with the Bloody Mary Bar from 10 am. to 2 p.m. The bar staff can either make the drink or pour the liquor to let customers customize it themselves; the Bloody Mary Bar has tomato juice or a mix, as well as a variety of vegetables to choose from pickled veggies, onions, celery, cheese sticks or sausages. From 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., there’s a dinner special of spaghetti and homemade garlic bread.

! Yum

Monday is an open face turkey sandwich meal, loaded up with gravy and mashed potatoes and green beans, and Tuesday is chili dog or chili burger night. Wednesday is a full taco bar, where customers can choose between beef or chicken proteins and can load up on lettuce, tomato, onion and jalapeños; a taco salad can also be supplemented.

THURSDAY

Whatever the craving is: with a side of coleslaw & baked beans! food, friends ! or drinks — Yum FRIDAY Round Up Saloon BURGER & A BREW! can deliver with a smile.

PULLED PORK SLIDERS

! Yum

SATURDAY PIZZA & A PINT!

COME VISIT US!

13 N Front St. Creswell | 541-895-2002 facebook.com/rounduptavern/

HOURS

Sunday - Thursday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. | Friday - Saturday 10 a.m. to 12 a.m. 12

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South Valley Farmers Market COTTAGE GROVE MAY 2 - OCTOBER 31 THURSDAYS 4-7pm

F OO W O SL IN THE D NORTHWEST

LOCATION

Heart of Downtown Cottage Grove 7th & Main Street

A local community & food gathering place. PLANT & VEGGIE STARTS - ORGANIC FRUIT & VEGGIES

Capturing the Hearts and Flavors of the Willamette Valley | By Ashley Taylor |

FARM FRESH EGGS - BAKED GOODS - GRASS-FED BEEF

FREE RANGE CHICKEN - PREPARED & FERMENTED FOODS HAND-CRAFTED GOODS

SNAP MATCH - Senior & Wic Farm Direct Nutriton Voucher

Connect with your Local Farms!

Local Liquor

The slow food movement is a global initiative committed to bringing “good, clean and fair” food to communities around the world. By encouraging the production and usage of locally-sourced, high-quality ingredients, slow food advocates hope to create a society in which people embrace better nutrition and environmental sustainability while engaging more with their community through its local farmers and small businesses. As suggested by its name, the slow food movement acts as the friendly alternative to fast food: Favoring local sourcing to mass production and dedicated food preparation to large-scale efficiency. It promises its participants a better experience with their food through the flavors of fresh, seasonal ingredients and the improved nutrition that comes from selecting products from passionate local artisans. The movement is also dedicated to helping its members not only through stimulation of the local economy, but also through the promotion of the dignity of labor for agricultural work and the belief that good food and better eating should not be limited access — any interested farmers can get involved with their local chapter, regardless of the size of their community. The slow food movement reaches across 160 countries, with 500 chapters in the United States alone. The local Corvallis chapter helps members to work with the flavors and farms of the Willamette Valley while embodying the

Please drink responsibly & be safe!

169 E. Oregon Ave. , Creswell • 541.895.5229

Slow Food mission.

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T

angled Orchard Farm believes that quality food comes from quality care. Founded

on the principle that good nutrition should be for everyone, Tangled Orchard participates in the slow food movement with the belief that locally-sourced products offer a level of quality that simply isn’t present in supermarkets. Local sourcing also allows them to interact more personally with their customers, proving to visitors that the difference in their eggs comes from the difference in the way their chickens are raised. In order to guarantee that their customers are provided with the best possible eggs, Tangled Orchard strives to ensure that their chickens are provided with the best possible life. Their feed is sourced from Brownsville and made with non-GMO ingredients grown in the Pacific Northwest. Each flock is free-range, given warm and secure shelter while still being provided with constant outdoor access to several pastures that are just contained enough to protect from predators. They eventually hope to officially obtain organic certification, holding off until they can guarantee that doing so will still be cost-effective for their customers. For the time being, however, they still practice organic processes with their feed and pride themselves on the health of their chickens and the lack of GMOs in their products. Tangled Orchard Farm regularly donates excess products to Cresswell Food Pantry, including eggs and no-lay chickens. Contact Us: TangledOrchardFarm.com | 541-554-1862

F

or Bear Mountain Honey, community is second only to their bees. Nick and Wendy Vander Sys believe that the slow food movement introduces a level of engagement and accountability within the community that can be attributed to better business practices and environmental sustainability. Through local sourcing, producers and consumers can stimulate the local economy and support local businesses while reaping delicious benefits of their own. Bear Mountain Honey prioritizes the health of their bees by coordinating with other farms and beekeepers in the area to ensure that any environment where the bees are placed is clean and in no danger of overpopulation. The Vander Sys family ensures that each beehive is visited every ten days and given the specific care that it needs, guaranteeing quality honey through the health and happiness of the bees.

The slow food movement is a global initiative committed to bringing “good, clean and fair” food to communities around the world.

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Their honey is created purely with the flavors of Willamette Valley wildflowers, and each barrel produced can be sourced back to the exact property where the honey was made. Each step in the production process is designed to provide customers with the best quality product — raw and unfiltered honey made by and for the community. Buyers should keep an eye out for Bear Mountain’s other bee products including chapstick, wax, pollen and propolis. Contact Us: 541-744-2250 Visit Us: BearMountainHoney.com

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TJ’s

Big Horse Farm is more than big

the community the options of buying quality

horses. Co-owner Jennifer Saldaña has what

pork by the whole hog, half hog or even

she calls “a passion for pigs.” She has been

individual cuts that are vacuumed-packed

working with pigs for over fifteen years. With

and have passed USDA inspection.

the help of her husband Johnny and her

The hogs that are raised at TJ’s to market

parents Tom and June Harvey, the farm rais-

weight have a happy healthy life. They are

es pigs from birth to market to benefit the lo-

free range and provided quality, natural feed

cal community with top quality hogs and pork.

free of antibiotics.

Most of the pigs born at TJ’s Big Horse Farm

While still a small business, they’re looking

are sold as weaner pigs for customers to

to make their hogs and pork cuts more avail-

raise their own meat. TJ’s also sells quality

able for new and returning customers. Pork

piglets to kids for 4-H projects. Not everyone

cuts may be purchased directly from the

can raise their own pork so the farm also

farm by appointment and at The Farmer’s

raises hogs throughout the year to provide

Wife in Pleasant Hill.

Pork dire poin Wife

Contact Us: 541-913-1682 | View Us: Facebook.com/tjsbighorsefarm

CK Farm is a small, family farm owned by Craig and Katie Leonard.

A

The picturesque estate is located in Creswell and puts the environment first. ll of the produce grown at CK Farm is grown without the use of any chemicals, pesticides or herbicides, keeping the food as clean as possible. The farm also raises grass-fed lamb and free range chickens, both the egg laying and meat varieties. The lamb is 100 percent grass fed and their chickens are 100 percent free range, making the meat sustainable as well as delicious. The Leonards offer weekly Community SUpported Agriculture (CSA) farm bags from early spring until late fall. CK Farm offers two size bags to fit the need of small and large families, as well as flexibility to their CSA program, which allows for bi-weekly members and monthly payment plans. A dozen of eggs can also be added each week to the produce bag for an additional $5. In the fall, CK Farm does a Stock Your Pantry special where customers can purchase large quantities of potatoes, onions, squashes and so forth. There are also other value-added products to purchase, like homemade jams, grape juice and pickles, as well as other yummy, healthy slow food goodies.

Slow food is not only a great alternative that supports local farmers and the Earth — it’s good for bodies too!

To make it easy for customers to find, CK Farm is also at the Creswell’s Farmers’ Market every Tuesday from 4 p.m. to 6 pm. Contact Us: ckfam@me.com | View Us: Facebook.com/ E M E RALD VALLEY MAGAZ I N E – SOUTH E R N LAN E COU NTY

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Twin Rivers Classic

Dressage Competition Twin Rivers

August 17 & 18, 2019 Recognized by USDF, USEF and ODS

Twin Rivers Chapter of the Oregon Dressage Society

Artwork by Kimry Jelen

Silver Tail Farm 33331 Howe Lane Creswell, Oregon

twinriversclassic@gmail.com

Many thanks to our generous sponsors Performance Equine Therapy Provided by Gene Cramptom

Interested in getting involved? Contact Laura Park laura@silvertailfarm.com 16

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33331 HOWE LANE CRESWELL, OREGON

Silver Tail Farm is located on

60 prime acres in Creswell, Oregon, 10 miles south of Eugene in the lush, scenic Willamette Valley. Our European-style facilities consist of a resident horse barn, an oversized, covered arena with safe, Master’s Blend footing from Premier Equestrian and Oregon coast beach sand and spectator seating; and 10 fully equipped stables to accommodate guest horses during events. All are designed with a premium on the safety, health, development, and welfare of the horses. Silver Tail Farm’s breeding program is designed to create opportunities for successful matches – resulting in spectacular horses suitable for the professional but also amateur-friendly, solid- minded, and with good character. Our breeding practices encompass artificial insemination with embryo transfer or Oocyte Recovery supported by a team of talented veterinarians and embryologists. Silver Tail Farm’s foals draw on the genetic heritage of our European imported performance mares and top international sires from Europe. Silver Tail Farm also serves the regional community as a state-of-the-art venue for training and education for equestrians of all ages and sponsored competitive and promotional events. Our focus is

541.510.9865

on dressage, the equestrian discipline commonly described as “horse ballet.” Dressage traces its roots to ancient Greece, where horse and rider trained to execute athletic, evasive maneuvers for the battlefield. Today, dressage has become popular with audiences, especially the musical freestyles, as seen in the Olympics where riders choreograph their own routines to music. Silver Tail Farm proudly serves the local equestrian community by sponsoring an ongoing series of clinics taught by worldclass dressage trainers. These skilled and experienced trainers work with a variety of riders and horses, offering them the opportunity to develop their skills in an atmosphere of insightful evaluation, sensitive and constructive critique, and supportive, practical, and effective instruction.

SILVERTAILFARM.COM

splash with magazine and newspaper articles as well as television coverage by Eugene and Roseburg CBS and NBC affiliate stations. Riders from Oregon and Washington competed in classes from Training Level to Grand Prix. The highlights of the show were the musical freestyle classes enjoyed by standing-room only crowds. Preparations are underway for the second annual Twin Rivers Classic, scheduled for Aug. 17-18, 2019.

Last year, the Twin Rivers Classic dressage competition hosted by the Twin Rivers Chapter of Oregon Dressage Society, and held at Silver Tail Farm, was the area’s FIRST nationally recognized dressage competition in over 20 years. The Twin Rivers Classic made a media Silver Tail Farm’s first foal – Sir Primo, Age 2

EE MM EE RR AA LLDD VVAA LLLLEE YY MM AAGG AA ZZ II NN EE –■ S O U T H E R N L A N E C O U N T Y

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By Cindy Weeldreyer There are lots of reasons why Bohemia Mining Days has survived for six decades and is recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tradition. In all those years, for festival-goers, it has always been a jam-packed weekend of parades, Old West shootouts and train robberies, carnival rides, a multitude of contests, a miner’s high-country breakfast, 5K Run/ Walk, the occasional famous person’s visit, favorite bands, favorite vendors who return year after year, and seeing old friends and neighbors strolling through “Bohemia City” in Coiner Park.

BMD HISTORY In 1959, organizers of the local observance of Oregon’s Statehood Centennial had so much fun they decided to continue an annual celebration focused on local history. The Prospectors and Gold Diggers Club created the Bohemia Days Festival. In 1964, the Club established its popular Miners’ Break18

fast on the Mountain in the heart of the Bohemia Mining District, 40-miles southeast of Cottage Grove. Starting in 1968, the 15-member Lemati Gang, a Wild West performing troupe, often “kidnapped” prominent citizens to promote the upcoming festival. In partnership with the Cottage Grove Riding Club, gang members staged robberies of the excursion train (The Goose) that provided a free three-hour round trip ride up to Culp Creek in the 1960s and 1970s.

AN AFFORDABLE FAMILY AFFAIR For four days, Coiner Park transforms into “Bohemia City” using Old West façade walls and buildings. BMD strives to provide something for everyone, especially those on a budget, by offering free admission and parking. Enjoy free live music and theatre on two stages. The Slabtown vs. Lemati Feud conducts free mining-themed and

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Americana-style contests for individuals and teams with cash prizes. A free train transports festival-goers to off-site venues such as the Carnival and Zip Line in Bohemia Park, Friday’s Quilt Show and Ice Cream Social, Saturday’s Chicken BBQ and to the Historic Downtown District to enjoy its beautiful murals, shops, eateries and watering holes.

CULTURAL HERITAGE On Saturday, the Cultural Heritage Stage features two Native American presentations. A Historic Treasure Hunt on Friday and Saturday afternoon sends treasure seekers to downtown businesses and three museums to find answers to clues. Completed treasure maps are entered for a $100 daily cash drawing. Families will love the large Kids Zone, Living History Village, panning for real gold with real miners and sipping root beer in the infamous (Under-21) Helena Saloon.


BOHEMIA CITY IN COINER PARK offers four days of continuous

FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS

activities. This includes 80+ vendors, kids zone, pony rides, live music, amusements such as a zip line and carnival, food, games and contests, beer and wine garden, as well as cultural heritage demonstrators.

PARADES

Visit BohemiaMiningDays.org for a full schedule of events.

Everyone loves a parade, and Bohemia Mining Days has three! On Thursday at 6 p.m., bloomer-clad ladies strut their stuff down Main Street through the historic district to Bohemia City to celebrate the festival’s opening. The Kiddie Parade on Friday morning at 11 a.m. has more than 100 pint-sized participants marching through the historic district. Saturday’s Grand Miners Parade at 10 a.m. showcases many of Cottage Grove’s businesses, organizations and families.

FOOD Chuckwagons are the original food carts and BMD’s Chuckwagon offers three festival fund-raising meals. On Thursday evening enjoy a Miner’s Steak and Beans dinner from 6 p.m.-7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, early risers enjoy Chuckwagon Breakfasts from 7a.m.-10 a.m. The nearby Food Court features a variety of cuisine. A beer and wine garden offers something for 21+ folks to wet their whistle.

THURSDAY, JULY 18 4pm to 10pm

• • • • • • • • •

FRIDAY, JULY 19

THE FEUD A unique chapter in Cottage Grove’s history tory is a feud that legally split the town in two in the late 19th Century. The original Oregon Trail settlers and the newcomers (flush with wealth from nearby gold mines) couldn’t get along very well at first. In 2012, BMD transformed the historic Slabtown vs. Lemati Feud into a fun and friendly competition between Slabtowners dwelling on the west side of the Coast Fork River and Lematians on the east side. All ages are encouraged to stop by The Feud Headquarters to sign up for contests such as best costume and beard, the Two Towns Tug-O-War, Pie Eating, Cherry Pit-Spittin’, Twenty Miles by Wheelbarrow, Candlestick Run and Bohemia Deputies.

MUSIC & THEATRE Bohemia City’s Main Stage showcases local and regional performers singing country, pop, folk, Americana and rock music. Entertainers Buck & Elizabeth return for their 18th year to delight both kiddos and grownups. Magician Jay Frazier works his magic all day Saturday doing close-up magic with festival-goers. The Cultural Stage shines a spotlight on the Bohemia City Players, under the direction of Jennifer Mandeville-Shultz. The play highlights the 2019 theme: “Diamonds in the Rough” and explains the impact Opal Whiteley and Eva Davenport had on the community in their time.

10am to 10pm

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

JOIN US! “The BMD Board of Directors and Festival Coordinator Cindy Weeldreyer invite individuals and families who love history to celebrate our Diamond Jubilee’ with us. As Cottage Grove’s largest event of the year, you don’t want to miss all the festival has to offer because BMD is the place where history lives and new memories are made!” said BMD Board President Cathy Simmons.

Bloomer Parade Miners Dinner Feud Games Carnival & Zip Line Bohemia City Players Theme Play Living History Demonstrations Kid Zone & Helena Saloon Buck & Elizabeth Main Stage Headliner Band: The Huckleberrys

Chuckwagon Breakfast Kiddie Parade Quilt Show Ice Cream Social Carnival & Zip Line Gold Rush 5K Twilight Run/Walk Kid Zone & Helena Saloon Feud Games Living History Demonstrations Bohemia City Players Theme Play Historical Treasure Hunt Time Travelin’ Train Main Stage Headliner Band: Men from S.U.R.F.

SATURDAY, JULY 20 10am to 10pm

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Chuckwagon Breakfast Kids 500m Gold Dash Grand Miners Parade Chicken BBQ Carnival & Zip Line Kid Zone & Helena Saloon Feud Games Living History Demonstrations Bohemia City Players Theme Play Historical Treasure Hunt Time Travelin’ Train Main Stage Headliner Band: Bull Run Country

SUNDAY, JULY 21 6am to 1pm

For more information go to www.BohemiaMiningDays.org. To volunteer or donate call 541-942-5064.

55th Annual Miners Breakfast on the Mountain Bohemia Mining District 40 miles SE of Cottage Grove

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C

Opal Center for Arts & Education By Cindy Weeldreyer

ottage Grove’s Opal Center for Arts and Education provides a creative home for regional artists and performers and offers a diverse mix of programs, classes and events. The genesis of the nonprofit organization came when pipes burst and flooded the inside of the historic Lawson Building at 513 E. Main Street, scattering members of the original artists’ collective.

In 2006, Ivan and Opal DelSol purchased the downtown building to realize their dream of a “community” arts center offering opportunities for creative expression. The Center’s name honors one of The Grove’s most famous residents, Opal Whiteley, an author and gifted naturist, whose famous childhood journal from 1920 has drawn fans from around the world to visit her hometown. A board member for many years, DelSol is quite proud of the community-run organization he helped create. “I’ve worked with a lot of community arts centers and Opal is really special, both in quality and with its amazing grass-roots culture.” DelSol said. “It offers a wide variety of programs and classes to serve the artistic needs of young and old, able-bodied and alter-abled indi-

viduals, and across all creative disciplines.” This year opens a new chapter in Opal’s leadership as long-time board member, Michele Rose, takes the helm. She succeeds Leah Murray, who successfully wrote grants to upgrade the sound and lighting systems and to replace

which features developmentallychallenged actors. Rose says they are excited to see that vision realized by scheduling interesting and diverse one-day events and by creating the Opal Young Performers (OYP). “OYP is a new youth program serving students 5-to-18 years-old by providing training in all aspects of theatre,” Rose said. “The Summer Camp workshops focus on acting, playwriting, backstage management, make-up, costuming, and musical score writing.” Honored members of Cottage Grove’s vibrant theatre community, Hal Holbrook, Carmen Dowell and Howard Hummel will work with Camp Director CJ Cramer to conduct the two camps. The first one, July 22 through 26, is for students in grades K through sixth. The second, July 29 through Aug. 9, is a two-week camp for students in grades seventh through 12. For more information on upcoming events and to purchase tickets the seating in the small “black box” online visit www.opalcentercg.org. theatre (while retaining the comfy, Tickets may also be purchased next door at The Crafty Mercantile. well-loved front row couch). “To engage individuals from the For years, the board vision has local and surrounding communibeen to expand the center’s offerties who seek cultural enrichment, ings beyond the weekend shows, personal development, and commusuch as the annual “Trashion Show” nity connections.” and “Halloween Movie Mash-Up”, and the new Creative Chaos troupe,

513 E Main St, Cottage Grove, Oregon 541-623-0513 • opalcentercg.org 20

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Support Southern Lane County and the Arts Plan to attend the next Cottage Grove Art Walk!

A

By Cindy Weeldreyer

RT WALKS are now common throughout America in communities, large and small. The goals are to engage the public with the arts, regardless of the form, and to get them in tune with the art that is going on in their community. This includes both visual arts and performing arts. Additionally, those attending the event are introduced to a participating business they may not otherwise go in and their discovery is often pleasant enough to make them return as a customer.

Strolling down the sidewalks of Cottage Grove’s historic district on the last Friday of the month is a great way to meet local performing and visual artists and to see friends and neighbors. Participating businesses display a yellow Art Walk flag and stay open late to provide light refreshments and to showcase a musician or artist from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The popular Eugene’s First Friday Art Walk was the inspiration in 2002 to create one in Cottage Grove. Not wanting to compete with Eugene, local Art Walk organizers selected the last Friday of the month. Springfield now has its own on the second Friday. Michele Rose owns The Crafty Mercantile at 517 E. Main St. She welcomed the opportunity to host a performer and to draw people into the historic downtown district. She’s delighted that 15 businesses are now participating.

“It’s a family-friendly event that has been great for my business,” Rose said. “We have a planning committee that strives to provide a venue to serve as an incubator for up-and-coming artists and to feature new artists each month.” Rose said for the past 17-years it’s been held from April through October. For the first time they are considering a year-round format this year. “We hear from other Art Walk organizers their attendance increases during the winter months because there’s less competing events,” she added. Rose said the process for selecting each month’s performers and artists involves business owners, Music Money 501c3 Coordinator BJ Jones, and Art Walk Committee members who select from a list of artists interested in participating. Highlights for 2019: Showcasing Elkton artists and having Opal Center’s DanceAbility performers featured in July.” “We enthusiastically invite all lovers of art and music to come out for a delightful evening and enjoy the richness and diversity of our local performers and artists,” Rose said. “Follow us on Facebook for details of what we’re planning this year.”

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Exciting things happening with the

COTTAGEGROVE

CAROUSEL

Follow the dream.

Follow the transformation.

The Friends of the Cottage Grove Carousel Commitee is working hard

to develop a building fund to purchase land and an appropriate building to house the1929 Hershall Carousel and other antique items.

The carousel will be completed and ready to operate by late spring 2019. The plan is to temporarily erect the carousel in the Brad s Chevrolet car lot in Cottage Grove early to mid-summer 2019. The timing depends a great deal on fundraising to support a temporary covering for the carousel and security fencing.

Want to Donate?

Many thanks to the sponsors who sup-

plied the materials to rebuild the 1929 Hershall Carousel, and to those who have contributed well over 4,000 volunteer hours to make this dream come true.

Please make checks payable to: Friends of the Cottage Grove Carousel. PO Box 883, Cottage Grove, OR, 97424. More info: Don Williams, 541-942-4752 or email cgcarousel@gmail.com. Online at cgcarousel.com

This is an all-volunteer effort up to this point and will not happen or be completed without your support and your contributions, so please, join in our up-

coming fundraising events!

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Tea Parties All tea events are on Saturday, May 11 at The Cottage Events Venue, 2915 Row River Road, Cottage Grove.

carousel Princess Tea Party

9 a.m. Come dressed in your best princess dress. Five tickets for $1, or 25 cents each. Eat like royalty. Support the carousel. $6 a child; $10 adult. carousel Pre-Mother’S Day Tea

Noon. Dress in your best. Enjoy traditional English tea. Bring your mother, grandmother, or come to enjoy our fundraiser carousel luncheon tea. $25 before April 26; $30 after April 26. carousel Dinner tea

5 pm. Traditional tea, with meat. Bring your mother or favorite person. Five course meal. $35 before April 26, $40 after April 26.

Show & Tell

Oregon Carousels Thursday, May 2, 2 to 3:30 p.m. at Willamalane Adult Activity Center, 215 W. C St., Springfield. Wendy Kirby, founder/director

of Albany carousel; Darrel Jabin, carousel historian; and Friends of the Cottage Grove Carousel will speak on the Trail of Carousels along Interstate 5, and the rebuilding of the Cottage Grove Carousel.

Rummage & Plant Sale June 7, 8 & 9

from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the WOE fairgrounds, 2000 N. Douglas Ave., Cottage Grove.

Will start taking donations May 1. Please, no high chairs,

car seats, or strollers. More info: Ellen, 541-674-9228.

Golf Tournament Help support the carousel building fund on Sept. 21 at the Middlefield Golf Course, 91 Village Dr, Cottage Grove. $10,000 hole in one. Many prizes, such as golf packages at the coast. More info: Linda, 541-946-1750.

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ROGERS & SON YOU’LL BE FLOORED BY THEIR SELECTION By Mike Rothgeb

Owned by David and Carol Rogers since 1977, Rogers & Son has carpeted most homes in Southern Lane County. Licensed, insured and bonded, these professionals provide superior quality flooring products to both homes and businesses. Rogers & Son also provides expert installation to businesses and families in both Douglas and Lane County. Compared to most stores, Rogers & Son features an extraordinary product line to choose from, all at competitive prices. Carpeting, hardwood, luxury vinyl, cork and stone, they have it all! The wood coverings are imported and domestically sourced, ensuring only the best quality. Rogers & Son works with a variety of distributors and features the most sought-after products. Right now, luxury vinyl planks are the hottest trend for customers in Lane County. COREtec Plus, by USFloors, offers both vinyl planks and high-quality tile

flooring to choose from. These products are 100 percent waterproof and snap into place for easy installation, perfect for DIY summer projects. USFloors even offers a lifetime residential warranty for both products. Rogers & Son also features an extensive Shaw Floors collection. These floors are protected by LIfeGuard, which features an amazing warranty against everyday wear, tear, spills and odors! Not only are these floors perfect for families with children, but they also are ideal for homes with pets. Rogers & Son even offers countertop coverings made of high-quality laminate, stone and glass. Granite tile is always a popular material for their customers, as many appreciate the look, feel and lifespan. Customers can even choose from a selection of window coverings. Mini-blinds, vertical blinds and wood blinds also are available, as well as curtains, drapes and shutters. Rogers & Son also is happy to help with custom and more involved projects. Their experienced and knowledgeable professionals offer design consultations to help their customers utilize their space and direct them in selecting the ideal flooring for their home or business. Additionally, Rogers & Son’s store on East Main Street in Cottage Grove sells White’s metal detectors. These metal detectors are of the highest quality and work great for finding lost jewelry, coins and other treasures in the backyard or beach. A pool and hot tub section, full of supplies, chemicals and accessories is also on site at their store. Whether their customers need to perform maintenance on their existing tub or pool, or they’re planning on purchasing a brand new one, Rogers

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& Son is the place to shop. Spas are also available for purchase, and customers are encouraged to stop by or call for more information. This springtime, while going through the extra boxes under the bed and the coats in the closet, clean up that dingy old carpet, too! What better way to celebrate spring cleaning than by visiting Rogers & Son and buying a brand new floor this year?

VISIT US: 1324 E. Main Street - Cottage Grove rogersandsonfloorcovering.com CONTACT US:

541-942-0500 • 541-942-0750 1@rogersandsonfloorcovering.com

HOURS: Mon-Fri: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sat-Sun: Closed Weekend and evening appointments available upon request.


Oregon’s forests are extremely valuable resources, not only for the health of communities, but also for the planet as a whole. At Forest Floor Organic Soils, they believe

Forest Floor Organic Soils, putting the Organic back in Oregon.

in supporting the soil beneath to create a happier, healthier and better life up above. Forest Floor Organic Soils does far more than provide the surrounding communities with organic plant growers. They provide everything for homeowners working on DIY projects in their backyards and gardens, to businesses needing to create beautiful, healthy and professional landscapes. Forest Floor Organic Soil offers only the highest-quality organic products, along with conventional grow mediums, just as Mother Nature intended. Using environmentally friendly aging processes with advanced chemical analysis, their soils provide superior

New Spring HOURS Monday - Friday 8am to 5pm Saturday - Sunday 9am to 3pm

and stunning results. Because of this process, their soils, compost and growers are full of microorganisms and other nutrient-dense ingredients that allow flowers and plants to flourish and reach their full growth potential. Their full-sized retail yard also features a variety of products, including Nu-Fiber Manure, compost, coco coir, forest humus, hemlock bark, medium and super coarse fir bark, quarry rock, river rock, topsoil, potting soils and more! They also accept yard debris for recycling, such as brush, dirt, sod, concrete and rock. Decorative rocks and gravel for driveways and walkways are also available. During the wet months especially, rock, gravel and bark mulch is important for erosion and

For the springtime, Forest Floor Organic Soils has expanded their store hours and is now open seven days a week. Also, just in time for spring, Forest Floor Organic Soils has lowered the prices on all of their products. These new prices will allow home and business owners to do more with their properties than ever before! Customers are always welcome to pick up their products at the retail yard themselves, but Forest Floor Organic Soils also offers delivery to customers all across the state. For Creswell, Cottage Grove, Pleasant Hill and Goshen, Forest Floor Organic Soils offers a flat rate of $25 for 4 cubic yards or less. For larger deliveries, call their retail yard for pricing. Customers are encouraged to call, visit their website or stop by their location on South Mill Street in Creswell for more information on products, pricing and delivery. - By Mike Rothgeb

mud control. Forest Floor Organic Soils even accepts yard debris, concrete and rocks to help clean up cluttered lawns, and help pave the way for new and exciting projects. Customers can deliver these debris directly to their retail yard, and feel good knowing they are recycling and giving back to the community.

82898-2 South Mill Street • Creswell, OR 97426 800-955-1910 | ForestFloorOganicSoils.com Facebook.com/forestfloororganicsoils

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541-743-1331

Eugene Track Town Realtors LLC 2295 Coburg Rd., Ste. 203 Eugene, Oregon 97401

SusanBennettRealEstate.com susan@susanbennettrealestate.com

Building Stronger Communities Through Home Ownership

Building Friendships and Living Life after

Amputation PowerOnWith LimbLoss.com

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My life changed, as I knew it, on May 16, 2004.

I

t was the first beautiful spring day that year; the sun was shining, birds were singing, flowers were blooming: What a day for a motorcycle ride. My husband, Rod, and I had chosen to ride a country road that day and stopped for Sunday brunch. Continuing our journey, we crested a hill; about 60 feet ahead a car was stopped and I remember thinking, “This is going to hurt.” We collided with the car where I sat as the passenger; the bike, my husband and I went down. Rod didn’t get hurt; I, on the other hand, sustained several injuries including a crushed foot, broken back and broken arm. If it weren’t for my husband’s ability to be the best rider ever, the crash would have been much worse. After seven years and six surgeries, I chose to have my foot amputated. The fear and anxiety about being an amputee were relieved by a peer visitor who challenged me to keep moving. I want to make sure every amputee has the experience of a peer visitor to talk to, ask questions of and be empowered. I went from finding a few amputee friends to run 5k mud runs with, to finding amputee events with 1,000s of amputees on the other side of the United States; nothing locally. Sooooo! I founded the nonprofit Power On With Limb Loss because I saw a huge need for local ■

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support and comradery. Since I became an amputee, I’ve been very active — even more so than before I became one. I’ve challenged myself with several 5k runs and rockwall climbs with other amputees. One of my accomplishments is that, at the age of 64, I completed the Eugene Half Marathon. We have planned several events, such as our third annual Discover Your Potential With Limb Loss and Physical Challenge Conference, which will be held April 27 at the Bob Keefer Center in Springfield, Ore. Power On With Limb Loss has held several fundraisers for kids in our community with limb loss. The first year we were able to purchase a wheelchair designed for basketball playing for one child, Jaya Mattes, and helped send him to camp. We are currently working on a 3D printed arm with the Biomechanics Club at the University of Oregon for Joseph Horton. We are planning our third Raffle Ride Fundraiser, on June 22, at Saginaw Vineyard. Power On With Limb Loss also provides monthly support meetings in Eugene. Our goal is to launch more meetings around the state of Oregon. I am a certified Peer Visitor with Amputee Coalition and Ampower, two national amputee resource centers. I invite you to visit our website at PowerOnWithLimbLoss. com and/or our FaceBook page at Power On With Limb Loss, to learn more about us or contribute to Power On With Limb Loss.


Virtual

environmentalism: Online LCC programs promote saving Earth By Aliya Hall

Lane Community College

is not just helping connect students to illustrious and high-paying careers, but it’s even helping students change the world. Through the Energy Management Program and Water Conservation Program, students can be involved in important environmental courses without hardly leaving the house. To cut back on the world’s energy consumption, LCC understands that the world needs to reduce the need to produce energy by taking harmful electricity generators, such as coal and fossil fuel fire, offline. This program is pointing the world in the right direction by reducing the global climate change profile — and students can be part of it in just two years. The Energy Management Program is a two-year degree program that started in the 1980s; however, as of Fall 2018, students all across the Pacific Northwest can get the education online. The program partners with

field-work mentors who are practitioners who will work with students to help them receive the necessary hands-on experience to understand the fundamentals of the industry. There is no other program in the Western United States like LCC’s, and now it is piloting the mentoring concept and expanding its reach to the rest of the West.

Another program soon to be made available online is the Water Conservation Program. Established seven years ago, LCC is putting it up in the Fall of 2019. Already focusing on the West, LCC is looking to expand the program to the rest of the country too. Similar to the Energy Management Program, the Water Conservation Program works with the same concept of field-work mentors, as well as provide an introductory level of understanding so students can graduate being eligible for a position in the field.

Energy Management Program www.lanecc.edu/science/ energy-management

With the “silver tsunami” washing over the industry, there is a shortage of workers in the industry, and professionals are needed to continue this essential work. With a starting salary of around $45,000 a year and the ability to change the world: Why not get involved? LCC is even offering scholarship money to prospective students. With the Energy Management Program, 50 percent of a student’s tuition can be paid for through a scholarship; as for the water program, LCC is currently soliciting for monies to be made available. For those who are passionate about energy and water conservation but aren’t sure how to get involved or don’t know what jobs are available for them, LCC can point them in the right direction. These programs are more than just important tools to a hardworking student, they are the resources that keep life going.

Water Conservation Program ROG E R E BBAG E 541-4 63-616 0

WE B B A G E R@L A N E C C.E D U

www.lanecc.edu/science/waterconservation-technician

Energy Management Students gathering heating system data!

Water Conservation Students assembling a rainwater harvesting system.


EVERYBODY’S FAVORITE! CHECK OUT THE NEW SUMMER FLAVOR LINE UP! SUPPORT LOCAL AT CRESWELL’S DAIRY QUEEN 70 Emerald Parkway | 541-895-3051

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DOUBLE THE DOUBLE FUN!

Creswell Library Doubles Size with Expansion Project

the next phase which includes a new “front porch” and parking lot upgrades that are required by the City. She hopes to complete that in the next couple of years. After completing the property purchase two years ago, the library focused on getting the interior part of this project done because we know that will have the biggest impact on the community. Library Staff can’t wait to start using the new space for additional programs and services.

“SHHHH!” By Aliya Hall A hissing shush carries farther than you’d expect and can be heard nearly every afternoon in Creswell Library. But this shushing doesn’t come from librarians—rather it emanates from the large group of teens playing board games around a table in the reading area. They are shushing each other because they want to be allowed to continue playing there every day, as there’s no other convenient place to do so. Occasionally an adult will glare at them, but most people understand that they’re good kids who are doing their best to be quiet. On an especially exuberant day library staff might visit the table several times to ask them to keep it down. But most people smile when they see a group of teenagers having fun without either getting in trouble or having their face up to a screen.

“We hope everyone will come in to see the new space and will get a library card if they don’t already have one,” said Liudahl. The Lane Library District serves all who live within the Creswell School District and there is no additional charge to get a card. In addition to over 30,000 books, the library offers DVDs, games, puzzles, learning kits, and audiobooks, as well as free access to downloadable ebooks and audiobooks.

For more information about the myriad programs and services for all ages, visit the library or its website at: www.creswell-library.org.

In the very near future, teens will have their own room in the library to gather for reading, games, and events—part of the Creswell Library Expansion Project that has been under way since January of this year, a project that will nearly double the size of the current library. The remodel is nearly complete on the West Wing (former PeaceHealth clinic) and the library will close for a week in early May to move all materials to the new space so the current library space can be remodeled (mostly paint and flooring—but also the addition of a glass door on the teen room). The entire project should be completed by early July. “We know some people were frustrated that it’s taken us this long to get this project started,” Su Liudahl, Creswell Library Director explained, “but we are very proud of the fact that we are accomplishing it without asking taxpayers for additional funds. We’ve been able to save over $300,000 out of our operating revenue over the years and the rest is coming from grants and donations. This couldn’t have happened at all without the amazing support of our community.” She went on to explain that additional funds are needed for 30

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Summer Programming a at the He lth Hub!

If you are looking for fun Summer activities for kids, families, and everyone else, check out the Health Hub in Cottage Grove. Started in 2017, the Hub is a center for community recreation with a mission to provide low cost fitness and health education for all ages. This summer we will have a regular class schedule with gymnastics and tumbling for ages 3 and up on Monday/Wednesday/Friday. Kids work on different floor and tumbling skills like forward and backward rolls, handstands, cartwheels, backbends, handsprings, and more, as well as some basic elements of artistic gymnastics on the bar and beam. For kids who are more interested in the tumbling and dance

1133 E. Main Street Cottage Grove 541-915-6349

side of things, we have a Capoiera for ages 4 and up. This class incorporates martial arts, dance, tumbling, music & singing. Little ones are welcome in our Roly Poly and Dance with Me classes, where we focus on following directions, motor skills development, and interactive play. Parents are welcome to stay for all classes, and we also offer a few family classes where everyone can be involved! On Tuesday and Thursday afternoons, we will have additional special activities in the afternoons, including open gyms, arts & crafts, special guest instructors, and more. On the last Friday of each month, we hold Parents’ Night Out from 7-10pm with pizza, games and activities, and a movie. Check out our schedule at: www.healthhubcg.com

is a family friendly, family owned and operated business in Creswell, Oregon. The owners, Daniel and Jeanet, have been married for 16 years. They have 4 children, Asher, Diaae, Xander, and Gracen. They moved to Creswell over 2 years ago. Elite Game Spot opened to bring a local party and events venue to Creswell and the surrounding areas. The gaming center holds open gaming hours, similar to stepping in a modern-day arcade! These gaming hours will provide something fun and different to do this summer! There are 7 Ps4's, Play Station VR, Oculus VR, 7 XboxOne's, Wiiu, Nintendo Switch, NES and SNES classic, and Sega. Systems also feature online gaming! There are cozy couches you can sink into while playing, or simply watching others game, as well as 20 reclining gaming chairs. Gamers are free to switch consoles and games as often as they like, trying some of the newest and hottest games they may not yet have at home! Hold your next party at Elite Game Spot! The party room in the back includes tables and chairs for you to set up food and drinks, or you can purchase snacks and beverages from Elite Game Spot. There is a 90-inch projector with the ability to play movies, karaoke, or game with an XBoxOne on a large screen. Your party will be one to be remembered for years to come!

287 S. Front Street • Creswell 541-658-5327 www.elitegamespot.com

E M E RALD VALLEY MAGAZ I N E – SOUTH E R N LAN E COU NTY

S PR I NG 2019

31


THE SELECTION IS

THE PRICING IS

Inspiring

Surprising

The

Flower Basket

and

E TIQU BOU GIFT So much more than flowers!

Home Decor Delectable Treats Blooming Plants

Alluring Jewelry Boutique Clothing Fresh Flowers

119 S. 6th Street | Cottage Grove, OR / 541.942.0505 / M-F: 9-5:30 | Sat: 9-4 | Sun: Closed

Profile for Emerald Valley Magazine / The Creswell Chronicle

Emerald Valley Magazine - Southern Lane County No. 5  

Emerald Valley Magazine - Southern Lane County No. 5  

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