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YOUTH HOSTEL EMELIA RISNER

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Dedications:

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MOM;

You’re the strongest person I know,,thank you for being my inspiration and my best friend.

Dad;

You're the reason your Brown Eyed Girl was able to follow her dreams. Thank you.

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CONTENTS: INTRODUCTION 6 Section 1

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History of Travel Section 2 The Pod 51 Section 3.1

Generator Berlin 26 Section 3.2 Hostel Conii 34 Section 3.3

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Generator London, Section 3.4

Technical Criteria, 50 Section 4

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COLOR THEORY 56 Section 5.1


62 HUMAN Behavior Section 5.2

66 Beer & Young Adults Section 5.3

72 Existing Site Section 6 78 Program Develop ment Section 7

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building analysis Section 8

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Project Summary Section 9

98 Citations Section 10

108 Bibliography Section 11

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Fig1

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Introduction Section 1

Fig 2

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Introduction:

Whether you’re traveling or exploring your city, Philadelphia Pennsylvania is known for many things, including the food, skyline and historical attractions. If you’re not fortunate enough to be one of those people, there’s a solution. The city has many hotels welcoming guests, shockingly over 11,200 rooms in Center City alone.1 Reported by Philadelphia CBS, an average night’s cost in Philadelphia is $173. “In 2014 Center city’s occupancy rate was at 76 percent. The last time that happened, in 1949, Harry Truman was president”2 This percentage is higher than usual. As additional people come and visit the city, the prices of hotels rise. Young adults need another alternative. “The millennials want something inexpensive, but they want it to be cool.”3 How are young adults supposed to travel the world on a budget with prices like that? The answer is hostels. Some people might associate hostels

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with horror stories, however, according to The New York Times writer, Seth Sherwood, “these new accommodations are striving to raise the standard of an institution that was once the lodging equivalent of a Greyhound bus”.4 Hostels can provide all of the things young adults are looking for, low prices, entertaining spaces and places to interact with people from all over the world.

General Design Goals: The overall goal for this project is to design a safe space that will promote traveling and new connections. This hostel will feature spaces, including a beer garden, where young adults can create and maintain these connections. An additional goal for this project is to explore sustainable design while keeping this building cost effective for the travelers.

Reported by Philadelphia CBS an average nights cost in Philadelphia is $173.,


Fig 3

Research Goals , Methods:

To assist with is this project extensive research will be completed. Some of the topics researched will include modern hostels and studies on young adults between the ages of 18-25. The studies will inform what this age group desires in a space. Research of how beer can reduce stress and bring people together socially, will also be investigated. The goal is to employ this information to merge all of the needs of the users into one successful project.

The Role of the Designer: The role of a designer is to maintain the health and safety of the users. The designer must create a hostel that is not only secure but also benefits the well being of the consumer. Traveling is an impressive way to reduce stress. Jeff Grabmeier from Ohio State University states that seventy percent of students are stressed out just regarding finances alone.5 Hostels create a way for young adults to travel on

a budget. Additionally this hostel will feature a beer garden. “Alcohol can relieve stress when consumed in limited amounts.”6 Having a few drinks with new or old friends can be an extraordinary stress reliever.

Sustainability Objectives: A further proposal for this building is that it will be sustainable. The building will have adaptive reuse, having exposed brick and structures, this method uses less materials. The designer will also reuse materials including metals, woods and other items found on site. This hostel will have remarkable indoor air quality and contribute to water conservation. The client and designer strive for Leed Certification, of at least Bronze. “As humans, we spend 90% of our time indoors. That time should be spent in spaces that allow us to breathe easy, give us views of nature and daylight, and make us healthier and more productive.”7

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Fig4


Client: The client is a businesswoman who owns multiple luxury hotels in the United States, looking to create a new inexpensive option for travelers. This businesswoman wants the hostel to be compatible with her hotels, modern and impressive. This will affect the project by having a reputation that matches the client’s typical luxury hotel.

Users:

The client expects the users of this hostel to be generally youth between the ages of 18-25 however some older adults may be traveling for work and are still looking for a discounted option. Since the main objective of a hostel is to be inexpensive, the designer will have to consider a small budget while designing. Some travelers may look for single rooms that are still at a reasonable price, this hostel will offer solitary rooms that fit the price range. The staff will also most likely be between the ages of 18-25. Thus offering young adults the option to move to a new city from all over the world and live where they work. This need will impact the design of the hostel by having few long term staff accommodations available.

Socio,Economic Conditions: The main users of this hostel will be primarily budget travelers. This will impact the design budget in which the designer will have to choose inexpensive materials, furniture, fixtures and equipment. This does not mean the overall design will be lacking in style or safety. “The hostel model typically relies on high room occupancy and lower costs, such as providing only light housekeeping in the

,The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page., -St. Augustine

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shared rooms. It also counts on strong food and beverage sales”.1 This is one factor that keeps hostels so inexpensive.

Demographics:

One of the astonishing things about a hostel is that the people visiting can be in any age group, gender, race, and ethnicity. They can have any religion, ability and come from all over the world. Hostels are diverse places. Most of the young adults come solely to meet new people from around the globe. It’s a valuable part of traveling. Although people from all over may find friendship, they may not all speak English or have the same customs as people in America. This hostel will have gadgets, possibly kiosks, to aid the language roadblock. This hostel is going to be a barrier-free zone that is universally designed.

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Fig 1

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History of Travel Section 2

Fig 2

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There are many reasons to why people throughout time have traveled. From religion to conquering lands to leisure people from all over the world have traveled for many motives.1 Thousands of years ago people of the Neolithic Age traveled simply for food. They would look for certain types of plants and animals. As years pass people became more civilized. The first sight of traveling for leisure came with the wealthy Romans and Greeks.2 Roman Government officials would stay in extraordinary mansions that offered accommodations, baths and food.3 The wealthy Romans and Greeks might have traveled for leisure, however many other people from all around the world still traveled for other reasons. From 800-1066, the Vikings would travel to invade areas. They did this by sailing. “The lure of the raid was thus more than booty; it was about winning and preserving power through the enchantment of travel and the doing of deeds‌ the act of acquiring silver was as important as the silver itself.â€?4 During this time, people did not travel solely to conquer areas. In the Medieval Times, from 476-1500, Missionaries and Pilgrims would travel to spread their religion. Shortly after, during the 16th Century, Aristocrats and wealthy men would travel to Europe for education.5 People have traveled for many reasons, including hunting, conquering, religion and education. About a century later this all changed.

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The Industrial Revolution altered the typical way of traveling. New, faster machinery gave middle class workers more money and time off to travel for leisure. Many people visited major cities, since it was easier to get to these places by train. This was not enough for the upper class. Post World War II, expilots wanted to fly again so the wealthy were able to travel by air for vacation.6 Everyone wanted to travel, especially around the 2000s. Mass tourism of all classes are traveling for leisure and not just the typical hotel on the beach. People want something new and different, these include ice hotels and hostels. Hostels are a remarkable option for budget traveling because it is a modern take on the typical hotel. Thus being said, young adults want this space to be trendy and affordable. According to Cerys Wilson, author of HighDesign Hostels, hostels should be designed in a building that has history, including fire stations or old warehouses. Travelers want to experience the memories these buildings store.7 On the other hand, these buildings should be modernized and modified to meet the standard of the millennials. Young adults want a place where they can meet new people that are traveling the world just like they are, that is why public areas are valuable in hostels, ranging from lounges to bathrooms. This method forces you to interact with other people. On the other hand, travelers also need their rest so this building type should balance the public and private areas well enough to accommodate this need. Hostels would work better with a building that has more then one or two levels as well.

Fig 3

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,Traveling - it leaves you speechless,then turns you into a storyteller -,Ibn Battuta

This would be an easier way to separate public and private areas. These buildings are typically located in urban areas. They could also be located in suburban or rural areas too, depending on what the explorer wants to do or see such as hiking or visiting small towns. Materials and lighting can really affect the atmosphere of a hostel. Nobody wants to walk into the place they’re staying at a dark and unpleasant space. A style that works well with hostels is an industrial style. This allows the designer to have the preexisting space show through a bit. Younger crowds often favor this style as well. Some materials include wood, steel, concrete and brick.8 These materials should not all just be reused material some should be new to contrast from the reclaimed items but also to be in a good, clean condition for the occupants. Lighting is also a crucial choice when designing a hostel. The rooms should all have a vast amount of natural lighting, plus the view of the city wouldn’t hurt.

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Since this type of accommodation is typically for budget travelers, the materials will have to be less expensive then a typical luxury hotel which would not affect the overall design. A guest of one of the Generator Hostels, a chain of popular luxury hostels, claimed, “Inside, the décor is industrial modern – IKEA with attitude.”9 Inexpensive furniture, materials and lighting can go a long way if designed right. Since people from all over the world stay at hostels, it is a good idea to have options. There could be alternatives to have more expensive rooms that are just for people traveling together, single rooms, gender separated rooms, and the typical rooms with no restrictions fitting 4+ people in them. In addition to that, hostels should be universally designed if people from all different countries will be staying there. From caves to thermal baths to hotels and finally the modern day hostel, accommodations have completely changed over the thousands of years. What will be next?


Fig 4

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Fig 1

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The Pod 51 Section 3.1

Fig 2

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Overview:

Pod 51 is located in Manhattan, New York only a mile from Times Square. It is a budget hotel, similar to a hostel. Vanessa Guilford, Design Director at BD Hotels designed this 14 story building in 2007. There are 345 bedrooms starting at 100 square foot each. This building’s construction budget was presumably mid-ranged, considering the location and use. The owner of this hotel and many other accommodations is BD Hotels led by Ira Drukier and Richard Born. The users are typically international people from the age of 18-45. This urban neighborhood houses many offices, hotels, restaurants and retail stores. Manhattan is in a temperate and cold climate, which influenced the idea of having a roof top lounge.

Design Concept AND, Style:

The existing brick building was constructed in the 1930s, distinctive from the interior, which is a retromodern style. The concept of this design is “quirky yet contemporary”. Pod 51 has 14 floors, 13 of which are organized around an “H” shaped circulation. The public spaces are located on the ground floor and the rooftop, the floors in between is considered private space. The elevators and fire stairs are located towards the center of each floor for easy access. Each floor is color-coded which is used for wayfinding in addition

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to exit indicators and other signage. The public areas have central air dissimilar to each room, which has a built in airconditioning unit. The units are less predictable than central air. However, each room has operable windows thus making it more controllable. The designer considered sustainability when remodeling this 1930’s building. She intentionally installed tile carpeting for minimal waste if stained and kept most rooms identical spatially, thus minimizing waste and materials in construction. A number of small bedrooms use communal bathrooms, which can help save water.

Interior Design:

There are many unique materials used in this hotel, some of these include wood, wallcoverings, metal, glass and concrete. Pod 51 uses phenolic furniture, which has lasted ten years and still looks brand new. The materials of the seating in the public areas are dependable and still appear brand new. The public area of this hotel provides numerous furniture options, which are modular and remarkable for multiple groups of people. A few chairs and table have a more industrial feel to them as well. In the private rooms, the furniture is designed to hold as many things as possible in the little space provided. These include safes inside the walls, drawers below the beds and hooks that fold back into the wall.


Fig 3

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ELCOME TO A NE GENERATION O B DGET HOTELS IN MANHATTAN, NYC. O T ITH THE E CESSI E AND THE NNECESSARY. E,RE ALL ABO T S RPRISING D ETAILS, INTELLIGENT D ESIGN AND BEING CONNECTED --- ALL ON A B DGET

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Fig 4


Pod 51’s color pallet is generally primary colors, with some of these colors, like blue, vary in shade including teal. Typically these colors are associated with retro looks however the designer executed it to be sophisticated as well. It relates well with retro-modern. Most hostels were designed to have welllit spaces to accommodate people comfortably. Pod 51 does not have a sufficient amount of natural daylight, causing the space to feel darker, even with artificial lighting. The artificial lighting fixtures used in the space are extraordinary, including pendant, chandeliers and neon lights. The art that is featured is mostly multiple Pop Art-esque murals on each level, this goes well with the Retro-Modern style this hotel has. Not much art is used in addition to the murals, which might satisfy the younger travelers.

accomplishes. Every floor features a mural created by a New York resident that ties in with the style of this building. I personally am fond of the retro-modern style however my hostel will have an industrial design. Although this hotel has many assets, it also has weakness that can help me design my hostel to be remarkable. Pod 51’s wifi did not continue to the roof or outdoor café, this is a huge problem if someone is traveling for business or even pleasure. Many people want wireless connection especially in spaces with great views and relaxation areas. I also agree with Simone Stevens, the corridors unquestionably need natural lighting. Pod 51’s corridors were dark and unpleasant which made them look smaller as well.

Post Occupancy Survey: The user interviewed is a designer at The Pod Hotels. Pod 51’s Simone Stevens believes this budget hotel has many strengths including an excellent atmosphere and materials. The location and price are competitive as well. Some weakness Simone considers is the lighting, she would prefer more natural daylight and more windows in the lobby and corridors. The communal bathrooms are also disliked. Evaluation: This budget hotel meets many of the needs essential for the design of a youth hostel. I would like to design a hostel where the public areas are enjoyed as the private areas, I want people to interact with each other like this hotel

Fig 5

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Fig 6 Fig 7

Spaces, Rooms & Adjacencies:

Floor 8:

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Diagrams:

Circulation Diagram

Fig 8 Fig 9

Public vs Private

Public Vertical Circulation Private Circulation

Vertical vs Horizontal Circulation

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Fig 1

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GENERATOR Berlin Section 3.2

Fig 2

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Fig 3

OVERVIEW: Generator Berlin Mitte is located in the center of Berlin City. It is part of a chain of hostels of twelve more locations in many different European cities including Rome, Paris, London and Barcelona.1 This specific hostel has a total of 59,200 square feet, spread out into multiple floors. It includes shared rooms, small private rooms and even apartments. Ester Bruzkus and the DesignAgency designed Generator Berlin Mitte in 2007.2 This project most likely had a mid-range budget considering it is a high-end hostel which uses cost-effective materials. This hostel is designed to correspond with its location, urban and industrial. According to Word Travels, “Berlin has a continental climate with cold winters, hot summers and fairly mild autumns and springs”3, this would affect the way Brukus and the DesignAgency had to create this project.

D ESIGN CONCEPT ,AND STYLE: Brukus and the DesignAgency “transformed two 19th century office buildings with the artistic character of Berlin’s streetscapes and the variety of experiences they

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offer”.4 The concept of this design is to “transform the interior into an unpredictable experience through layers of art, materials and textures.”5 The building is organized in a way that it has immense public space with some private areas as well for the guests to relax. The public areas are on the ground floor, which include a lobby, lounge, café, library, bar and breakfast room. The private rooms are located on the floors above. Assisting travelers to find their way to certain areas, the designers added wayfinding systems. Each floor has a unique color scheme that includes the murals on the walls and lights lining the circulation. Some of these colors include blue, green, and orange. In addition, there are appealing decals that point you in the way you are going. This building also contributes to being sustainable. Many things are left exposed, creating an industrial style but also eliminating the need for supplies to conceal them. There are numerous areas that use the existing concrete floors as well. The bar area features lighting from recycled fire extinguisher tubes and car headlights as well.36


Fig 4

Interior Design: Many of the materials used in Generator Berlin Mitte are typically associated with an industrial style. Some of the successful materials used include, concrete, copper, metal, wood, and leather. Some of these materials are sustainable as explained in the Design Concept & Style Section. Also explained, “the theatrically dark bar, lined with black walls and raw copper panels and playfully lit with recycled fire extinguisher tubes by Castor and car headlights by PSLAB, creates a dramatic stage set for illusion and fantasy.”7 The designers used unique materials for each space to create a distinct feeling for each room. For instance the bar has contrasting materials and lighting compared to the cafe. The furniture is also dissimilar in all the spaces however the designers wanted each space to “provide flexible seating and inject liveliness”.8 This is a typical goal for hostel designers. The overall color schemes of this hostel are neutrals, including white and black, and an assortment of neon colors, including pink and orange. These colors connect with the goal of injecting liveliness. 4

,"Generator style is contem porary, unpretentious and at the same time somewhat elusive., exPlained Anwar Mekhayech. ,It,s both fun and functional.", The colors continue onto the murals in each of the spaces. The “famed Berlin street artist Theirry Noir created three-metre high faces, colour coded for each floor, reminiscent of his poetic murals on the Berlin wall [sic].”9 The spaces are contrasted with natural and artificial lighting depending on the room. The bar has hardly any natural lighting because the designers wanted that space to look theatrical. However the café and bedrooms have immense natural daylight, thus creating a cheerful environment.

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Evaluation: This luxury hostel meets all of my needs essential for the design of a youth hostel. I would like to design a space that is an unpredictable experience. I want people to interact with other travelers with the help of my design. The design of this building is the style I would like to create as well. The spaces in this hostel provide travelers with many options including a cafĂŠ, bar and library. I also enjoy the murals on the wall, especially because a local artist created it. Although this hostel has many impressive qualities, it also has some weaknesses that can assist me in designing my youth hostel to be distinguished. I personally would like the hallways to have more natural daylight, so guests would feel more comfortable traveling through the corridors. Another issue I have with this hostel is the air quality in the bedrooms, I would like to create an atmosphere where guest are comfortable all year round.

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Fig 5


“,Generator Hostels aren,t like any other hostel. That,s because we combine affordable luxury rooms with unique social events for the travelers and locals of Europe’s coolest cities,,.,”

Fig 6

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Fig 7 Fig 8 8

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Spaces, Rooms & Adjacencies:

14%

5% 9%

3%

19%

6%

30%

SPACE PERCENTAGE

Ground FlooR

1,000 s.f. 500 s.f. 300 s.f. 800 s.f. 200 s.f. 800 s.f. 300 s.f. 1.500 s.f.

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19% 9% 6% 14% 3% 14% 5% 30%


Fig 9

Diagrams:

Circulation Diagram

Fig 10

Eatery vs Lounge

Lounge Vertical Circulation Eateries Circulation Vertical vs Horizontal Circulation

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Fig 1

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Hostel Conii Section 3.3

Fig 2

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Fig 3

Overview:

Estudio ODS designed Hostel CONII located in Quarteira, Portugal in 2016. In 1896, “the building was erected to dwell the workers from the fish canning industry that was expanding in the region in the last quarter of the XIX century [sic]”.1 This 7,500 square foot building originally contained two floors however the designers added a third floor.2 Estudio ODS perhaps had a low to medium budget for a few key reasons. The original layout remains on the first two floors and minimal materials were used to create a clean look.3 Each of these examples are why the budget could have been a low to medium range. This hostel is located in the center of a tourist city, close by to a beach.4

Design Concept , Style:

The concept of this hostel is “inspired by the sea and the walls are full of history… guests enjoy the simplicity of the design and relish the natural light that shines throughout the hostel [sic]”.5 The façade was restored to its original state and all sides are exposed,

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which is uncommon in a city. Two sides of the façade face the street and the other two sides face a courtyard.6 This building contains three floors. The first floor is the public areas including the reception area, café and lounge. The second floor includes the shared rooms and the third floor consists of the suites. The suites, being the most expensive rooms, were likely placed on the third floor for better daylight and views. Almost every room includes small decals on items that explain what the function is, areas including bathrooms, storage, food areas and hallways. This hostel uses materials to contribute to sustainability and cost efficiency. Only three finishing surface materials were used in this hostel, geometric patterned floor tiles, small tiles and wood paneling which is located in every public area.7 Each floor has operable windows as well has a vast amount of natural daylight. These two features also contribute to sustainable design principles.


Fig 4

Interior D ESIGN:

The materials used for this hostel were specifically chosen to symbolize the sea. The designers chose to use simplicity for a fresh look. Using only three finishing materials, geometric patterned floor tiles, small tiles and wood paneling, Estudio ODS successfully created an airy, clean feel. The furniture and lighting used in this space also contributes to this style. The stools and chairs are all made of wood and a cork like product, some with fabric-covered cushions. The tables are also made out of wood. The lighting fixtures almost camouflage into the space since the fixtures are white and the walls and ceiling are also white. Everything in this space, from furniture to the walls and floors, are all the same three colors: white, black, and blue. The only other “color� you see in the space is the wood paneling. There are no accessories or art anywhere in this building, presumably to also add to the minimalist design. Most of the lighting in this space is natural lighting. This works with the materials to create an even more fresh and

open look. The roof also has two clerestory windows to let in indirect lighting as well.8

EVALUATION:

This project meets most of the needs for the hostel I would like to design. I enjoy the sustainability aspect of this design, from the materials, to the furniture, to keeping the original layout of the space. The way Estudio ODS created such a light and airy space is also something I would like to design in my youth hostel. I additionally admire the attractive decals that are used as a sort of wayfinding throughout this hostel. Although I believe this space is extremely appealing, the overly simplified look of this hostel is not my to my preference. I believe the furniture could look more high-end and still remain on a lower budget however the choices of furniture in this space may appear to be poor quality. Some people need a relaxing place to rest while traveling and this building might not be perceived as a comfortable place since it is so bright.

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Fig 5

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A Hostel with an ancient name, whose people made these lands their home before the Romans or the Portuguese, A I century building with I century Internet and a timeless good mood: Conii Hostel opened its doors to the sea.", 39


Fig 6 Fig 7

Spaces, Rooms & Adjacencies:

17.7%

20.6% 61.7%

SPACE PERCENTAGE

Floor 2:

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Fig 8

Diagrams:

Circulation Diagram:

Fig 9

Public vs Private: Circulation Vertical Horizontal Public Private

Vertical vs Horizontal:

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Fig 1

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GENERATOR LONDON Section 3.4

Fig 2

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Fig 3

Fig 4

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"At Generator Hostels, you get boutique style without breaking your budget.” Overview:

Generator London is located in St. Pancras, which is a central London, England neighborhood.1 This six-story hostel was designed by DesignAgency and Orbit Architects in 1997.2 This was the first of a chain of thirteen locations from Generator Hostels. Typically hostels have a low budget since the lodging is so inexpensive however Generator Hostels usually provide a striking experience, which is why it may be a mid-range budget. It may also be more expensive since this city has “one of the largest city economies in the world”.3 This area also has a temperate climate which is overall enjoyable for year round traveling. “London is a dizzying mix of world-class culture, fashion, food and frolics. It’s a city where two thousand years of history can stand side-by-side with shimmering new skyscrapers”.4

Design Concept , Style:

This hostel was designed in a former stone police station. The interior concept “plays with bold graphics, rich patterns, and British cultural icons to convey the spirit of London’s streets, weaving strands of history, culture and styles within Generator London’s diverse social and intimate spaces”.5 These include a life-size Double Decker bus projecting out of a wall and graphics of Queen’s Guards.6 The interior and exterior correspond to the city of London since it also ties new and old together. This six-story building includes shared and private accommodations, a lounge, a movie screening room, a game and bar area, a breakfast room and even a travel shop.7 The public areas are on the ground floor and the

rooms are on the floors above. This hostel has countless wayfinding systems. These range from signs on the wall to paths on the floor. Not only does this project have numerous systems, they are also graphically appealing. This hostel was designed with sustainability in mind. Some areas are designed with mainly plywood and concrete. Many things are left exposed which would call for less construction, demolition and materials. The designers also restored old extinguishers into new lamps.8

Interior Design:

This hostel has various types of materials ranging from brick and wood to glass tile and metal flooring. The range of materials is consistent to London, busy and a mixture of historical and modern. The furniture is mainly modern and sleek. Some of the pieces are amusing as well, for example, this hostel has stools that look like push pins. The lighting is also modern, including neon and led lighting. Natural lighting is also decent in some areas however several rooms are lacking. The color palette is similar to the materials, hectic and intense. It seems that every room has a unique style and palette. Like most of the Generator Chain Hostels, this building does not hold much artwork, however, the designers created their own art through the wayfinding graphics and interior structures. “Generator London is the essence of this new brand of hostels, with industrial, classic, modern, graphic, mod design styles and a subtle homage to the history of London and its local flavor”.9

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Evaluation:

This specific hostel meets many of the needs essential for the design of my youth hostel. This hostel includes a bar, game room, lounge, reading area, movie screening room and a cafĂŠ. Having all of these areas will appeal to more people since some travelers want to relax and some want to meet new people. Another excellent quality this hostel has is the graphics. Not only do they help guests locate rooms and spaces, they also are very attractive and add personality to the space. I want my space to be reminiscent of this. Although this hostel has many great qualities, it also has bad qualities. Personally, I am not fond of all of the diverse styles of all the rooms. I think it could be confusing to guests and not as appealing. I would like to design my space with one style that flows throughout the space. This would give it a more collective look. I would also like more natural air and operable windows. I want my guests to feel as comfortable as possible.

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Fig 5


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Fig 6 Fig 7

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Spaces, Rooms & Adjacencies: Spaces, Rooms & Adjacencies:

4% 15%

4% 4%

7% 22%

2% 2%

11% 7% 11%

11%

SPACE PERCENTAGE

Ground Floor:

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Fig 8

Diagrams:

Circulation Diagram

Fig 9

P UBLIC VS PRIVATE:

Public Circulation Private

Eatery Eatery

EATERY VS LOUNGE

Lounge Lounge

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Fig 1

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TECHNICAL CRITERIA Section 4

Fig 2

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Restaurant ERGONOMICS

Fig 3-6

Furniture Materials & Equip ment Hostels can hold many diverse spaces in addition to accommodations. Some of these include cafes, bars, lounges, game rooms, movie screening rooms and even libraries. Since these spaces can vary, the furniture, materials, and equipment are also going to vary throughout each area. Hostels are high-traffic buildings so all of the furniture, materials and equipment should be durable and easily maintained. Since hostels typically have a lower budget, designers may forgo sustainable materials for more durable, cheaper alternative. Each bedroom will consist of different sized beds, from queens to singles, to bunks, however, all rooms should contain arrangements that are stable and comfortable for each guest. The rooms with bunks will need to be dense with beds but still relaxing enough to get rest. The bunks could additionally possess individual curtains that guests could close for more of a private sleeping arrangement. The public areas should also include

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comfortable seating so guests feel able to lounge and spend time with other travelers. Given that the general age group of a youth hostel is around twenty to thirty, the seating options do not need to obtain the ease of getting up easily. That being said there could be a variation of seating from floor cushions to standard chairs, to barstools.

Ergonomics:

Hostels are designed to accommodate multiple persons to a room and this should be done with appropriate dimensions. Travelers need space for their belongings while staying at the hostel. The designer should either provide under bed storage or some type of locker for all of the guests. This will help clear walkways and create a safer environment. The private rooms with multiple beds should be spaced out enough for a comfortable sleeping occurrence. Most of the restrooms will be communal which can feel uncomfortable to some people. Having toilet and shower stalls that are notably larger than most public restrooms


BAR&Back-Bar ERGONOMICS

Fig 7-9 will help make the guests feel relaxed. The public areas vary from formal to intimate spacing depending on what type of room it is. The bar and eating areas should also have appropriate distances between seats for guests to feel comfortable and have enough space to eat and drink. Lounges can have seating areas that are flexible. This provides the travelers to arrange the seating to have an intimate or more of a formal feel. The choice of seating arrangements will help guests feel comfortable regardless of their culture or habits. Every area in the hostel should be compliant with ADA requirements.

Lighting:

Lighting in hostels can also vary from space to space. Restaurants and bars may have more dim lighting however cafes and bedrooms should be well lit. Hostels should have an abundance of natural lighting. Well-lit spaces can help make guests feel safe. Natural lighting is not reliable so the designer also needs to have efficient artificial lighting. An additional place lighting could assist guests

would be in individual bunks. This way if the majority was sleeping, guests would have the option of having their own light fixture.

Sustainable Design:

Designers are striving for sustainable projects more now than ever. Younger adults also are more interested in green products. Considering this, a Hostel should be designed with sustainability in mind. This can range from materials and finishes, dual-flush toilets, solar panels, and even construction methods. Leaving HVAC and piping exposed will require fewer materials during construction. This is a sustainable and an industrial style choice of design.

Acoustic Control:

Hostels have public and private spaces, which mean the acoustics need to be controlled. This could be managed with softer materials used in the space that absorb sound or by using acoustical panels. Typically these panels have a bad reputation, however, today there are many modern and attractive choices.

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Fig 10

Visual Control & Security: The use of visual control in a youth hostel is important whether it is opening views or concealing them. Having the front entrance visible from the reception desk is perhaps desirable for the staff. This helps guests orient themselves as soon as they walk into the building. It also can assist the receptionist and security to observe everyone entering or leaving the building. More visibility might also be preferred by the guests for them to feel safer. Security cameras and surveillances will also help guests feel secure in the building. In addition to surveillance, each locker or storage container for traveler’s belongings should have some type of lock attached. Private areas of the building should also be concealed, including the shared bathrooms and bedrooms.

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WAYFINDING & SIGNAGE:

Wayfinding is necessary in all hospitality designs. Guest’s should be able to locate desired spaces without having to ask an employee. This includes social areas, staircases and most significantly; emergency exits. Youth hostels are typically designed with wayfinding and signage, so much that it became a design choice. Wayfinding is graphically pleasing and is located on every surface of the building, including the floors. In addition to wayfinding system, hostels also typically use signage to illustrate everything from a toilet to a refrigerator to storage. It is like informational artwork.


Hospitality Ergonomics

Single 13 FT wide w/ Roll in Shower

Double 13 FT wide w/ Roll in Shower

Americana Hotel -Typical Room

Loews NY Motel - Typical Room

Fig 11-14

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Fig 1

56


COLOR THEORY Section 5.1

Fig 2

57


Fig 3

“Vision is a person’s most important sense. Studies show that about eighty percent of what we assimilate is visual.”1 One of the first things hostel guests see is the furniture, finishes and materials of the space. This includes color. Color is not usually portrayed with meaning from an individual, however colors have specific theories when designed in a space. Various spaces use unique color choices to help cause the users to feel a certain way. “Colors have emotional meanings; however, these meanings may be similar or dissimilar from one person to another. For example, red represents danger as well as warmth and passion, and therefore, one person may be uncomfortable with

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red and another may enjoy its feelings of warmth and excitement”.2 This is the reason designers need to propose a color scheme that will attract all types of users.

A designer does not need to choose either a warm color palette or a cool one, using both could enhance the project. The proximity of warm and cool colors can be used to increase the illusion of a space.3 Since a hostel is typically an energetic place where comfort should also be present, using both warm and cool colors may be ideal. Warm colors that could provide these feelings are orange, yellow, and red. Cool colors could consist of blue, green and purple.


Fig 4

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Fig 5

60

"all colors are the friends of their neighbors and the lovers of their oPposites,�


Fig 6 Given that some users feel uniquely towards certain colors, a hostel could be designed with neutral colors like white, black and gray with an added energy vibe through pops of colors.4 An industrial styled space fits all the criteria for this example. Bedrooms could have colors that are more calming like blue and green, since travelers need rest. The private spaces may vary in color from the public spaces.5

Color can also be added for wayfinding systems. “Wayfinding must accommodate foreign travelers, and therefore, the use of color, icons, and names of locations along with directional signage are extremely helpful.”6 All wayfinding used for safety purposes need to be designed with specific colors in mind. The color red-orange holds attention the best so emergency exit signs should be this color.7 These signs should also be larger then other signs and

repeated about every one hundred and fifty feet.8 If a designer wanted to have a neutral color palette, wayfinding could be the ideal way to add pops of colors. Wayfinding can add charisma to a space as well as being informational. The amount of lighting in a space correlates to the color in a space. Depending on the amount of light, colors may be seen completely different then intended. Designers need to consider the changes in natural lighting and balance out artificial lighting. “The conceptual approach assumes a stable luminous state as desirable – that the room reads the same way day and night, winter and summer”.9 Millennials, the main group to visit hostels, “are more likely than older generations to choose bold and bright color schemes... Millennials are more likely to take risks with dramatic colors.”10

61


Fig 1

62


HUMAN BEHAVIOR Section 5.2

Fig 2

63


Fig 3 Fig 4

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Hotels and hostels are similar in many ways however the human behavior in each of these varies notably. “Human behavior refers to the full range of physical and emotional behaviors that humans engage in.”1 Hostel guests want an unique experience that a hotel does not offer. This includes the materials, lighting and close proximity.

Materials:

Young adults are typically fond of colorful and unique products. Millennials also enjoy natural materials, black stainless steel and wallpaper, a more industrial style.2 Hotels presumably have designed spaces that would appeal to more of a broad range of ages whereas hostels are designed from ages around eighteen to thirty. This allows the hostel design to be more appreciated by the travelers since it connects with their style.

“human behavior flows from three main sources desire, emotion and knowledge” - P LATO

Lighting:

Similar to the materials of a hostel, the lighting can also vary from a hotel. Hostels can range from vast natural light to a dim setting depending on the room type. Seventy percent of young adults drink alcohol, so a bar would be an notable example. Bars typically have dim lighting to set a certain atmosphere. “The mood in the bar sets the tone for how long people are going to sit there and feel comfortable there, which of course then dictates how many drinks they’re going to order.”3 In the other spaces, natural lighting would be preferred by most. Since most travelers do not know one another, more lighting can help make everyone comfortable.

Spatial Effect:

Young adults prefer hostels to hotels for a few distinctive reasons. The prices would be number one. Another is the spatial effect and how it is used. Being close to other people could be considered an invasion of one’s privacy. However it is used in a positive way, people get to know each other better. Hostel bedrooms are dense, for the same two reasons; cost and this effect. Hotels are almost the complete opposite. Hotels are typically designed to give each guest enough space to relax, typically with someone they already know. The spatial effect in hostels is the main reason millennials choose hostels over hotels.

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Fig 1

66


BEER & YOUNG ADULTS Section 5.3

Fig 2

67


Fig 3

“Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happY” 68

–Benjamin Franklin


Alcohol has been around for as long as people can remember. From the ancient Greeks drinking wine to the prohibition era, alcohol has traveled a long way. But how far back did alcohol really first establish? “Luckily, from time to time, our ancestors, like other animals, would run across fermented fruit or grain and sample it. How this accidental discovery evolved into the first keg party, of course, is still unknown. But evolve it did, perhaps as early as 10,000 years ago.”1 “Human beings are social animals. But just as important, we are socially constrained as well.”2 This could be why over seventy percent of young adults in America drink alcoholic beverages such as beer and liquor.3 Drinking beer in moderation can have some serious benefits, these include being more social and being more confident about sex.4 Beer in moderation can also help people with anxiety.5 Drinking beer socially has become a popular occurrence. Examples include Oktoberfest and sporting events. Almost every holiday has even turned into a drinking celebration. Oktoberfest alone brings in “six million people, which consumes almost two million gallons of beer each year”.6 Americans alone drink over six billion gallons of beer yearly.7 Hostels and beer go hand in hand. Young adults travel to see the world and meet new people. Beer can Fig 4

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help these travelers be more social when staying at a hostel. Some opportunities to serve beer in a hostel could include a bar or a beer garden. Combining drinks, nature and friends; beer gardens are a modern place for all beer drinkers to enjoy. The “biergarten” or beer garden originated in Germany, of course. Brewers needed an underground cellar to hold their beer in the summer months to remain cool.8 “Down in these cellars, beer barrels were covered in ice; to further ensure cool temperatures, breweries planted broad-leafed chestnut trees above the cellars for shade. Gradually, breweries began to scatter gravel and place tables underneath the trees. These areas, in turn, became popular drinking spots.”9

“Whoever drinks beer, is quick to sleep. Whoever sleeps long, does not sin. WhoeVer does not sin, enters Heaven! Thus, let us drink beer!” 70

-Martin Luther Fig 5


Fig 6 Fig 7

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Fig 1

72


Existing Site Section 6

Fig 2

73


Fig 3

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Philadelphia Pennsylvania possesses over one and a half million people.1 It is the largest city in the state, the sixth in the United States and the forty-ninth in the World.2 This city is a melting pot of races, and even has over twelve percent of foreign born people.3 Some outstanding features this city holds are the Liberty Bell, the Philadelphia Zoo and the oldest art museum in the United States; The Philadelphia Art Museum.4 Philadelphia has a temperate climate with an average temperature of fifty-four degrees and nine and a half miles per hour wind speed.5 The average rainfall is about forty-one inches along with a 20 inch average snowfall.6 The climate has affected the evolution of architecture. Philadelphia was founded in the seventeenth century, so it holds many

74

styles of architecture. Two styles that were constructed in the early eighteenth century include Georgian and Federal style.7 Later Greek revival styled buildings were built, following Victorian architecture.8 The twentieth century brought Art Deco and Modern architecture.9 The city’s plan was designed by Thomas Holme in 1682. “It was organized into a rectangular grid pattern with lettered and numbered streets perpendicular to each other and broader civic-oriented streets for commerce and transportation forming the grid’s main axes.”10

"William Penn named the city PhiladelphiA, which is Greek for brotherly love”


Fig 4

Washington square west The project building is located in Washington Square West. This Square is “a thriving enclave that includes Midtown Village and Gayborhood. Running roughly from 7th to Broad streets and Chestnut to South streets, the buzzed about neighborhood is increasingly a go to spot for trendy restaurants and owner operated boutiques.”11 This neighborhood has a broad range of building types. Including residential, retail, and healthcare and hospitality. There are only two hotels in Washington Square West, Morris House Hotel and the Double Tree by Hilton Hotel. There are no budget hotels or hostels in this neighborhood. Many of the former office buildings have been transformed into residential buildings.12 These houses are typically Georgian styled row homes since the median year they were built was around 1939.13

The average age in Washington Square West is between twenty-six to thirty-two.14 There is one area which the average is 61 however is not located on the block the project building is on.15 Seventy-eight percent of the people in the neighborhood are college educated as well and the median income is fifty-three thousand, five hundred and ninety-eight dollars.16 This neighborhood features Washington Square Park, which houses the only Moon Tree in Philadelphia.17 This moon tree was “carried as a seed by Astronaut Stuart Roosa on Apollo XIV, the Moon Tree (a sycamore) was planted in Washington Square on May 6, 1975.”18 In this park is also the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers. Washington Square West includes part of Gayborhood, a LGBT welcoming nightlife scene, including bars, clubs and jazz establishments.19

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47

40

= BUILDING SITE = SUN PATH = WINTER WINDS = SUMMER WINDS = ONE WAY TRAFFIC = BUILDING SITE = SUN PATH = WINTER WINDS = SUMMER WINDS

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= ONE WAY TRAFFIC = POOR VIEWS

= POOR VIEWS = GOOD VIEWS = HOSPITALS =TRANSIT


Fig 5

330 South 9th Street "this Historic neighborhood is an eclectic combination of both buyers and renters, open green space and urban charm"

South 9th Street is a sidewalk lined one-way street including a pizza shop, frozen yogurt and Starbucks. The Italian Market is also located on this street. This street also includes The Gallery at East Market, a shopping center. The average age on this street is thirty-one. The buildings that surround the project building are commercial, residential, retail and healthcare. There are two hospitals located adjacent to this street; Thomas Jefferson Hospital/ University and the Pennsylvania Hospital. The typical residential building styles are traditional, row homes that are three to four stories high. There are four parks within a two block walking distance; Washington Square, Louis I Kahn Park, Seger Park, and Star Garden Park.

77


Fig 1

78


Program DeveloPment Section 7

Fig 2

79


80

Name

Qty

S.F.

Total S.F.

Adjacencies Privacy Lighting

Vestibule

1

100

100

Reception, Lobby

Public

Natural, Artificial

Lobby

1

300

300

Reception, Vestibule

Public

Natural, Artificial

Reception

1

200

200

Vestibule, Lobby

Public

Natural, Artificial

Lounge

1

1,000

1,000

Café

Public

Natural, Artificial

Beer Garden

1

3,000

3,000

Rooftop Lounge, Guest Bathroom

Public

Natural, Artificial

Café

1

1,000

1,000

Lounge

Public

Natural, Artificial

Kitchen

1

500

500

Café, Lounge

Private

Artificial

Back of the House

1

2,000

2,000

Laundry, Electrical, Mechanical

Private

Artificial

Laundry

1

500

500

Back of House, Mechanical

Private

Artificial

Offices

2

150

300

Reception

Private

Natural, Artificial

Electrical Room

1

200

200

Mechanical, Electrical

Private

Artificial

Janitor Closet

5

25

125

Mechanical, Electrical

Private

Artificial

Mechanical Room

1

200

200

Electrical Room, Janitor Closet

Private

Artificial

Vending Areas

1

50

50

Employee Lounge and Bath

Private

Artificial


Equipment/ Furniture

Finishes

Acoustics

Perception

Remarks

Signage/ Wayfinding

Durable Finishes

Medium Need

Welcoming

Located on Ground Floor

Seating

Durable Finishes

Medium Need

Welcoming

Located on Ground Floor

Signage/ Wayfinding, Desk

Durable Finishes

Medium Need

Welcoming

Located on Ground Floor

Seating, Tables

Durable Finishes

High Need

Friendly, Exciting

Located on Second Floor

Beer Taps and Equipment

Water-Resistant, Durable Materials

Medium Need

Warm, Exciting

Located on Roof

Seating, Tables

Durable, Easily Cleanable Materials

High Need

Friendly, Exciting

Located on Second Floor

Dum-Waiter, Appliances, Storage, Surfaces

Non-Slip, Durable, Cleanable Materials

High Need

Private

Located in Basement

N/a

Standard Materials

Medium Need

Private

Located in Basement

Washers, Dryers, Folding Surface

Cleanable, Standard Materials

High Need

Private

Located in Basement

Desks, Filing

Carpet, Standard Materials

Medium Need

Comfortable

Located on Ground Floor

Equipment

Standard Materials

Low Need

Private

Located in Basement

Equipment

Standard Materials

Low Need

Private

Located in Basement

Equipment

Standard Materials

Low Need

Private

Located in Basement

Equipment

Standard Materials

Low Need

Private

Located on Ground Floor

81


Name

Qty

S.F.

Total S.F.

Data Room

1

100

100

Mechanical, Electrical

Private

Artificial

Public Guest Bathrooms

4

100

100

Lounge, Beer Garden, CafĂŠ

Public

Artificial

1 person bedroom & Private Bathroom

2

100

200

Community Toilets and Bath

Public

Natural, Artificial

2 person bedroom & Private Bathroom

10

150

1,500

Community Toilets and Bath

Public

Natural, Artificial

6 person bedroom

6

250

1,500

Community Toilets and Bath

Public

Natural, Artificial

12 person bedroom

6

500

3,000

Community Toilets and Bath

Public

Natural, Artificial

Employee Lounge

1

300

300

Employee Bath and Vending

Private

Natural, Artificial

Employee Toilet Room

2

100

200

Employee Lounge and Vending

Private

Artificial

Community Toilets

4

250

1,000

1,2,6,12 Person Bedrooms

Public

Artificial

Community Showers

4

250

1,000

1,2,6,12 Person Bedrooms

Public

Artificial

Rooftop Lounge

1

2,000

2,000

Beer Garden, Guest Bathroom

Public

Natural, Artificial

Storage

3

500

1,500

CafĂŠ, Back of House, Bedrooms

Private

Artificial

30%

11,285

11, 285

Public, Private

Natural, Artificial

Circulation

82

Grand Total

21,875

Adjacencies Privacy Lighting


Equipment/ Furniture

Finishes

Acoustics

Perception

Remarks

Equipment

Standard Materials

Low Need

Private

Located in Basement

Toilets, Lavatories

Cleanable Materials

Medium Need

Privacy

Located on Multiple Floors

Beds, Storage

Durable, Cleanable Materials

High Need

Safe, Comfortable

Located on Multiple Floors

Beds, Storage

Durable, Cleanable Materials

High Need

Safe, Comfortable

Located on Multiple Floors

Bunk Beds, Locked Storage

Durable, Cleanable Materials

High Need

Safe, Comfortable

Located on Multiple Floors

Bunk Beds, Locked Storage

Durable, Cleanable Materials

High Need

Safe, Comfortable

Located on Multiple Floors

Seating, Tables

Durable, Cleanable Materials

Medium Need

Comfortable, Warm

Located on Ground Floor

Toilets, Lavatories

Cleanable Materials

Medium Need

Privacy

Located on Ground Floor

Toilets, Lavatories

Cleanable Materials

Medium Need

Privacy

Located on Multiple Floors

Showers

Cleanable Materials

Medium Need

Privacy

Located on Multiple Floors

Seating, Tables

Water-Resistant, Durable Materials

Medium Need

Warm, Exciting

Located on Roof

N/a

Standard Materials

Low Need

Private

Located on Multiple Floors

Signage/ Wayfinding

Durable Finishes

Medium Need

Inviting, Exciting

Located on Multiple Floors

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Adjacency Chart Vestibule Lobby Reception Lounge

Major Adjacency

Beer Garden

Secondary Adjacency

Cafe Kitchen Back of House Laundry Offices Electrical Room Janitor Closet Mechcanical Room Vending Areas Data Room Guest Bathroom 1 Person Bedroom 2 Person Bedroom 6 Person Bedroom 12 Person Bedroom Employee Lounge Employee Bathroom Community Toilets Community Showers Rooftop Lounge Storage Circulation

84


Test Fit:3rd floor

Circulation 12 Person Room 6 person room

6 person room 2 person room 1 Person Room Communal Bath

85


Fig 1

86


Building analysis Section 8

Fig 2

87


Fig 3 The Neurological Institute at Pennsylvania Hospital sits on South 9th Street in center city Philadelphia. It is a five-story building, including a basement, ground floor, and a second, third and fourth floor. This building also includes a rooftop that can be accessed in a new design. The total square footage of this building is 31,345 excluding the rooftop. The rooftop would add an additional 6,269 square feet. HLM (Healthcare Logistics Management) Design of Philadelphia created this 30,000+ square foot building. The exterior of this building has a Georgian style. This can be seen in the materials and the detailing. Georgian style ranged from the 1700s to the 1830s and is known for its “symmetrical design, classic proportions and decorative elements.”1 The exterior materials of this building are red brick, tan concrete and

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black iron railings. The façade is a full city block in length. The interior of this building is not of a typical Georgian style. It actually has a modern healthcare style. The palette is white and other neutrals. The materials used are durable and easily cleaned including tile and painted drywall. The front lobby has curves presumably used to calm patients and their families. The buildings structural system is six columns that are located in a line about halfway of the width of the building. When designing the new building, preexisting stairways and elevators may be utilized to create less waste/new product making the project more sustainable. All floors will be used in this project, including the basement and roof.


Fig 4 Fig 5

FRONT ELEVATION

GROUND FLOOR STRUCTURE DIAGRAM

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Building Code, Regulation ,Standards Analysis: PROJECT DATA Project Name: Neurological Institute at Pennsylvania Hospital Address: 330 S 9th Street, Philadelphia, Pa 19107 Date of Completion of Original and Additions: 1998 Total Gross Sq. Ft: 37,600 s.f.

APP LICABLE BUILDING COD E INFORMATION Zoning Ordinance: City of Philadelphia Fire Code: IFC 2009 Building Code & Date: IBC 2012 Energy Code: International Energy Code 2009

USE GROUP CLASSIFICATION Type: Residential Group R-2

MEANS OF EGRESS Sprinklered: Assume Protected/Sprinklered Dead End Limit: 50’-0”

FIRE PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS Fire Exit Enclosures: 2 Hours Shafts and Elevators Hoistways: 2 Hours Tenant Spaces Separations: 2 Hours Smoke Barriers: Assume 30 Minutes Corridor Fire-Resistance Rating: 30 Minutes Incidental Use Areas: Laundry Room, Storage Room

BUILDING LIMITATIONS N/a

90


RESID ENTIAL Gross Sq. Ft: 1,800 Gross s.f. S.f. / Occupant: 200 Gross s.f. Number of Occupants: 9 Occupants

DORMITORIES Gross Sq. Ft: 4,500 Gross s.f. S.f. / Occupant: 50 Gross s.f. Number of Occupants: 90 Occupants

Minimum Corridor Width: 44 Inches Number of Exits: 2 Per Story Exit Access Travel Distance: 250 Feet

Minimum Corridor Width: 44 Inches Number of Exits: 2 Per Story Exit Access Travel Distance: 250 Feet

Male/Female % Split: Assume 50/50 WC Male: 3 WC Female: 5 Urinals Male: 2 Lavatories Male: 5 Lavatories Female: 5 Showers Male: 5 Showers Female: 5 Drinking Fountains: 1

Male/Female % Split: Assume 50/50 WC Male: 3 WC Female: 5 Urinals Male: 2 Lavatories Male: 5 Lavatories Female: 5 Showers Male: 6 Showers Female: 6 Drinking Fountains: 1

COMMERCIAL KITCHEN Gross Sq. Ft: 500 Gross s.f. S.f. / Occupant: 200 Gross s.f. Number of Occupants: 3 Occupants

LOBBY/RECEPTION Gross Sq. Ft: 600 Gross s.f. S.f. / Occupant: 100 Gross s.f. Number of Occupants: 6 Occupants

Minimum Corridor Width: 36 Inches Number of Exits: 2 Per Story Exit Access Travel Distance: 250 Feet

Minimum Corridor Width: 36 Inches Number of Exits: 2 Per Story Exit Access Travel Distance: 300 Feet

Male/Female % Split: Assume 50/50 WC Male: 1 WC Female: 1 Urinals Male: 1 Lavatories Male: 1 Lavatories Female: 1 Drinking Fountains: 1

Male/Female % Split: Assume 50/50 WC Male: 1 WC Female: 1 Urinals Male: 1 Lavatories Male: 1 Lavatories Female: 1 Drinking Fountains: 1

91


Fig 1

92


Executive Conclusion Section 9

Fig 2

93


94


While research youth hostels immensely, a few things were established. The first fact is that young adults are starting to travel more and more. This is why youth hostels are highly desirable at the moment. Another craze is bright colors and unique designs. This can include neon lights, exceptional materials and a design mixture between industrial and modern. The third factor is some youth like to be out of their comfort zone in a sense by having such a close proximity to unknown people. One more reason is that youth like to save money, since they have not established themselves yet.

This research will influence the design of this project. This youth hostel in particular will be designed for young adult travelers in mind. It will have an industrial look with touches of modern colors and materials. In doing this, the building will be more sustainable and many travelers will appreciate the design. Since some travelers are looking for that close proximity factor, there will be rooms with bunks available to house up to twelve people. Some travelers do not feel comfortable sharing a room with people they do not know, so there will be single and double rooms available as well. Another aspect is a smaller budget. This can affect the hostel but does not mean it will lack in design. Materials can be recycled or reclaimed. The designer will need to propose a plan for low resources.

Fig 3

One main conceptual inspiration can include Philadelphia. Some appealing aspects of the city are the history, the cuisine and the skyline. These examples can be used together or apart. This could be seen in one room or throughout the whole building including wayfinding, colors schemes, furniture and materials. Since this hostel is located in the city it could also have a more urban vibe compared to a country/rural conceptual design.

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96


“Discovery consists not in seeking new lands but in seeing with new eyes� - Marcel Proust Fig 4

97


98


Citations Section 10

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SECTION 1: SOURCES:

1. “Facts + Figures.” DiscoverPHL. N.p., n.d. Web. Aug. 2016. <http://www.discoverphl.com/meet/choosephiladelphia/facts-and-figures/>. 2. Karmin, Craig. “Boutique Bohemian: High-End Hostels Come to America.” The Wall Street Journal. N.p., 26 May 2015. Web. <http://www.wsj.com/articles/boutique-bohemian-high-end-hostelscome-to-america-1432670969>. 3. Sherwood, Seth. “Haute Hostels Put to the Test.” The New York Times. N.p., 26 Apr. 2013. Web. <http:// www.nytimes.com/2013/04/28/travel/haute-hostels-put-to-the-test-in-europe.html?_r=0>. 4. “Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design.” Interior Design + Construction. Leed, n.d. Web. Aug. 2016. <http://leed.usgbc.org/id-c.html>. 5. Grabmeier, Jeff. “70 Percent of College Students Stressed about Finances.” News Room. Ohio State University, 01 July 2015. Web. Aug. 2016. <https://news.osu.edu/news/2015/07/01/financialwellness/%C2%A0>. 6. Barnett, Bob. “Does Drinking Reduce My Stress?” CNN. Cable News Network, 24 Sept. 2013. Web. <http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/24/health/drinking-reduces-stress-upwave/>.

IMAGES:

1. Figure 1. Beautiful Bathroom, Digital Image, Interior Home Decor Ideas Blog August 17th 2016. https:// interiorhomedecorideasblog.wordpress.com 2. Figure 1. Hotel Amsterdam 600, Digital Image, Pinterest, January 15th 2015. http://www.pinterest.com 3. Figure 1. Amazing City Skyline, Digital Image, Snyder Sales Group, May 15th 2014. http://www. snydersales.com 4. Figure 14. YHA Cambridge, Digital Image, The Hostel Girl, May 15th 2014. http://www. thehostelgirl.com

SECTION 2: SOURCES:

1. Byttebier, Lucia. “A History Of Why People Travel.” Matador Network. Matador Network, 17 Sept. 2007. Web. <http://matadornetwork.com/bnt/a-history-of-why-people-travel/>. 2. Ibid. 4. Ashby, Steven P. 2015. “What really Caused the Viking Age? the Social Content of Raiding and Exploration.” Archaeological Dialogues 22 (1): 89. 5. Byttebier, History of Why People Travel 6. Ibid. 7. Wilson, Cerys. “High-Design Hostels.” The Canadian Architect 59. N.p.: n.p., 2014. 24. Print. 8. Ibid., 25 9. “More than a Hostel – Design-led Hostels.” Generator. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Sept. 2016. <https:// generatorhostels.com/en/>.

IMAGES:

1. Figure 1. Marco Polo Caravan, Digital Image, University of British Columbia, June 7thth 2015. http:// www.artsone.arts.ubc.ca 2. Figure 4. Teens Traveling, Digital Image, Lonely Planet, June 7thth 2015. http://www.lonelyplanet.com 3. Figure 23. Backstay Hostel, Digital Image, ArchDaily, December 2nd 2014. http://archdaily.com 4. Figure 1. Xcaret Signpost, Digital Image, Pinterest, November 22nd 2016. http://pinterest.com

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SECTION 3.1: IMAGES:

1. Figure 1. Custom Stainless Steel Bunk Beds in Pod39 Hotel in NYC, Digital Image, Neo-Metro, Accessed September 16, 2016. http://www.neo-metro.com 2. Pod Rooftop, Personal photograph by Emelia Risner, August 15, 2016 3. Figure 4. The Pod Café at Pod 51 Hotel, Digital Image, New York Smash, Accessed September 16, 2016. http://newyorksmash.com 4. Figure 2. Custom Stainless Steel Bunk Beds in Pod39 Hotel in NYC, Digital Image, Neo-Metro, Accessed September 16, 2016. http://www.neo-metro.com 5. Figure 1. From Pickwick to Pod, Digital Image, Overnight New York, February 3, 2011. http://blog. overnightnewyork.com 6. Figure 2. Lobby, Digital Image, Hotels.com, Accessed September 16, 2016. https://www.hotels.com 7. Figure 6. Pod 39 Queen Teal High Res, Digital Image, Unique Hotels, Accessed September 16, 2016. http://www.uniqhotels.com 8. Figure 9. Pod 39 Rooftop, Digital Image, Unique Hotels, Accessed September 16, 2016. http://www. uniqhotels.com 9. Figure 1. Pod 51, Digital Image, Cool Cities, Accessed September 16, 2016. http://www.cool-cities.com

SECTION 3.2: SOURCES:

1. “Berlin Mitte.” Generator. Accessed September 24, 2016. https://generatorhostels.com/en/destinations/ berlin/mitte/. 2. “Generator Berlin Mitte / Ester Bruzkus + DesignAgency” 07 Mar 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 22 Sep 2016. http://www.archdaily.com/483366/generator-berlin-mitte-ester-bruzkus-designagency/ 3. “Berlin Climate and Weather.” Berlin Climate and Weather. Accessed September 24, 2016. http://www. wordtravels.com/Cities/Germany/Berlin/Climate. 4. Generator Berlin Mitte, ArchDaily 5. Ibid. 6. Ibid. 7. Ibid. 8. Ibid. 9. Ibid.

IMAGES:

1. Figure 1. GEN Web Reception, Digital Image, Generator Hostels, September 26th 2016. https:// generatorhostels.com 2. Figure 5. GEN Web Reception 2, Digital Image, Generator Hostels, September 26, 2016. https:// generatorhostels.com 3. Figure 6. Haus 2, Digital Image, Generator Berlin Apartments, September 26, 2016. http://www. generatorberlinapartments.com 4. Figure 2. GEN Web Private Room, Digital Image, Generator Hostels, September 26, 2016. https:// generatorhostels.com 5. Figure 6. Berlin Mitte 02, Digital Image, ArchDaily, March 7, 2014. https://archdaily.com 6. Figure 4. GEN Web Corridor, Digital Image, Generator Hostels, September 26, 2016. https:// generatorhostels.com 7. Figure 4. Berlin Mitte 09, Digital Image, ArchDaily, March 7, 2014. https://archdaily.com 8. Figure 3. Berlin Mitte 12, Digital Image, ArchDaily, March 7, 2014. https://archdaily.com 9. Figure 12. Berlin Mitte 08, Digital Image, ArchDaily, March 7, 2014. https://archdaily.com 10. Figure 3. Featured Image, Digital Image, Expedia, September 26, 2016. https://www.expedia.com

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SECTION 3.3: SOURCES:

1. “Hostel CONII / Estudio ODS.” ArchDaily. N.p., 26 June 2016. Web. 02 Oct. 2016. <http://www.archdaily. com/789909/hostel-conii-estudio-ods>. 2. Ibid. 3. Ibid. 4. The Story.” Conii Hostel. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Oct. 2016. <http://www.coniihostel.com/en/conii/>. 5. Ibid. 6. Hostel CONII 7. Ibid. 8. Ibid.

IMAGES:

1. Figure 15. JM Hostel CONII 028, Digital Image, ArchDaily, June 26th 2016. http://www.archdaily.com 2. Figure 29. JM Hostel CONII 134, Digital Image, ArchDaily, June 26th 2016. http://www.archdaily.com 3. Figure 13. JM Hostel CONII 107, Digital Image, ArchDaily, June 26th 2016. http://www.archdaily.com 4. Figure 5. D6176, Digital Image, Hostel Conii, October 3rd 2016. http://www.hostelconii.com 5. Figure 20. JM Hostel CONII 083, Digital Image, ArchDaily, June 26th 2016. http://www.archdaily.com

SECTION 3.4: SOURCES:

1. “Generator Hostel London.” Generator. Accessed October 11, 2016. https://generatorhostels.com/en/ destinations/london/. 2. Wilson, Cerys. “High-Design Hostels.” Canadian Architect. March 01, 2014. Accessed October 11, 2016. https://www.canadianarchitect.com/features/high-design-hostels/. 3. “The Development of London’s Economy.” London’s Economic Plan. Accessed October 11, 2016. http://www.uncsbrp.org/economicdevelopment.htm. 4. Generator Hostel 5. Himmelblau, Coop. “Generator London.” Archello. September 15, 2014. Accessed October 11, 2016. http://us.archello.com/en/project/generator-london. 6. Canadian Architect 7. Ibid. 8. Ibid. 9. Coop Himmelblau

IMAGES:

1. Figure 1. Dining Seating Area, Digital Image, HeadBox, October 2016. https://www.headbox.com 2. Figure 1. Slick Reception Desk, Digital Image, Canadian Architect, March 2014. https://www. canadianarchitect.com 3. Figure 2. No Name, Digital Image, Acrylicize, October 2016. http://www.acrylicize.com 4. Figure 1. Generator Hostel London Dorm Room, Digital Image, Suitcase, October 2016. https:// suitcasemag.com 5. Figure 1. Double Decker Bus, Digital Image, Archilovers, March 2014. http://www.archilovers.com 6. Figure 3. Generator Hostel London Bar and Seating, Digital Image, Generator Hostels, October 2016. https://generatorhostels.com 7. Figure 2. Generator Hostel London, Digital Image, Agoda, October 2016. https://www.agoda.com 8. Figure 1. Exterior Generator Hostel London, Digital Image, Hipmunk, October 2016. https://www. hipmunk.com 9. Figure 19. Guestroom, Digital Image, Expedia, October 2016. https://www.expedia.com

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SECTION 4: SOURCES:

1. Bloomsbury.com. “Human Factors in the Built Environment.” Bloomsbury Publishing. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2016. <http://www.bloomsbury.com/us/human-factors-in-the-builtenvironment-9781609015039/>.

IMAGES:

1.Figure 1. Vitruvian Man, Digital Image, Daily Chiefers, August 13th 2015. http://www.dailychiefers.com 2. Figure 1. Charts, Digital Image, Pinterest, May 5th 2016. http://www.pinterest.com 3-6. Watson, Donald, and Michael J. Crosbie. Time-saver Standards for Interior Design: Technical Data for Professional Practice. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2005. Print. 7-9. Ibid. 10. Figure 16. New York Loft Signage, Digital Image, Federico Rozo, January 2nd, 2016. http://www. federicorozo.com 11-14. Time-saver Standards for Interior Design

SECTION 5.1: SOURCES:

1. Locke, Amy. “The Vocabulary of Color: What Colors Mean & How They Affect Your Guests.” Hotel Business Reviews. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Oct. 2016. <http://hotelexecutive.com/business_ review/2147/>. 2. Nussbaumer, Linda L. “Environmental Considerations.” Human Factors in the Built Environment. New York: Bloomsbury, 2014. 222. Print. 3. Drew, John T., and Sarah Meyer. “Color Legibility: Designing With Warm and Cool Colors.” Graphics. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Oct. 2016. <http://www.graphics.com/article-old/color-legibility-designingwarm-andcool-colors>. 4. Razza. “Psychology of Color/Color Scheme Links.” EBHS Interior Design. N.p., 21 Apr. 2016. Web. <http:// ebhsinteriordesign.weebly.com/blog/psychology-of-colorcolor-scheme-links>. 5. Ibid. 6. Nussbaumer 220. 7. Ibid. 221. 8. Ibid 220. 9. Ibid 220.

IMAGES:

1.Figure 1. Psychology of Colours, Digital Image, Visually, September 10, 2012. http://www.visually.ly 2.Figure 1. Super Shield Standard Color Chart, Digital Image, Vadeck, May 10, 2011. http://www.vadeck. com 3. Figure 1. Hallway, Digital Image, Pinterest, June 12, 2015. http://www.pinterest.com 4. Figure 1. Masquespacio, Digital Image,Curbed, August 31, 2016. http://www.curbed.com 5. Figure 2. W Verbier, Digital Image, Defgrip, January 1st, 2014. http://www.blog.defgrip.com 6. Figure 2. Blue Room, Digital Image, Superbude, July 21st, 2016. http://www.superbude.com

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SECTION 5.2: SOURCES:

1.”Human Behavior.” Psychology Definitions. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. <http://www.alleydog.com/ glossary/definition.php?term=Human%2BBehavior>. 2. Salimpour, Sormeh. “Top 5 Interior Design Trends for 2016.” MiLLENNiAL MAGAZiNE RSS. N.p., 13 Apr. 2016. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. <http://millennialmagazine.com/top-5-design-trends-for-2016/>. 3. HASSON, BERNADETTE. “Getting Lit: How Lighting Can Impact Patrons.” Nightclub & Bar. N.p., 24 Feb. 2015. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. <http://www.nightclub.com/product-watch/lighting/getting-lithow-lighting-can-impact-patrons>.

IMAGES:

1. Image 2. IMRS, Digital Image, Michelle Deigo, November 2nd 2016. http://eigoessei.seesaa.net 2. Image 1. Behaviour 2, Digital Image, Smarter People Planning, November 3rd 2015. http://www. smarterpeopleplanning.com 3. Image 1. Bar, Digital Image, AZ Central, November 3rd 2015. http://www.azcentral.com 4. Image 22. Unnamed, Digital Image, ArchDaily, November 2nd 2016. http://www.archdaily.com

SECTION 5.3: SOURCES:

1. Kahn, Jeffrey P. “How Beer Gave Us Civilization.” The New York Times. The New York Times, 16 Mar. 2013. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. <http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/17/opinion/sunday/how-beer-gave-uscivilization.html>. 2. Ibid. 3. “NIAAA Publications.” U.S National Library of Medicine. U.S. National Library of Medicine, n.d. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. <http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa68/aa68.htm>. 4. Pesce, Nicole Lyn. “Science Confirms Beer Makes People Social, Less Shy about Sex.” NY Daily News. N.p., 19 Sept. 2016. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. <http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/scienceconfirms-beer-people-social-shy-sex-article-1.2798342>. 5. Kahn “How Beer Gave Us Civilization” 6. Conforti, Kaeli. “15 Things You Didn’t Know about Oktoberfest.” TODAY.com. TODAY, 26 Sept. 2012. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. <http://www.today.com/food/15-things-you-didnt-know-about-oktoberfest1B6112878>. 7. Gwyn-Williams, Jr. | December 3, 2012 | 1:53 PM EST, Gregory. “Americans Consumed 6.3 Billion Gallons Of Beer Last Year - 43 Gallons Each In NH!” CNS News. N.p., 30 Apr. 2013. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. <http://www.cnsnews.com/blog/gregory-gwyn-williams-jr/americans-consume-63-billion-gallonsbeer-annually>. 8. Sopher, Philip. “How the Beer Garden Came to Be.” The Atlantic. Atlantic Media Company, 23 Apr. 2015. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. <http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2015/04/how-thebeer-garden-came-to-be/391343/>. 9. Ibid.

IMAGES:

1. Figure 1. Beer Cheers 600, Digital Image, Self, January 27th 2015. http://www.self.com 2. Figure 1. Gray Jumbo, Digital Image, The New York Times, March 15th 2013. http://www.nytimes.com 3. Figure 1. International Beer Garden, Digital Image, Philadelphia Beer Garden, November 2nd 2016. http://www.phlbeergarden.com 4. Figure 2. How Beer Saved the World, Digital Image, Huffington Post, May 2nd 2013. http://www. huffingtonpost.com 5. Figure 2. How Beer Saved the World, Digital Image, Huffington Post, May 2nd 2013. http://www. huffingtonpost.com 6. Figure 1. Lead Large, Digital Image, The Atlantic, April 23rd 2015. http://www.theatlantic.com 7. Figure 1. Benefits of Drinking Beer, Digital Image, News 247, April 23rd 2015. http://www.news247.com

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SECTION 6: SOURCES:

1. “Philadelphia USA!” Information about USA, City of Pennsylvania Holidays and Travel Info. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. <http://www.inventpa.com/>. 2. Ibid. 3. “Philaelphia County, Pennsylvania.” Philadelphia County Pennsylvania QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. <http://www.census.gov/quickfacts/table/ INC910214/42101>. 4. Philadelphia USA! 5. “Climate Information for Philadelphia - Pennsylvania - Mid-Atlantic - United States.” Climate Zone. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. <http://www.climate-zone.com/climate/united-states/pennsylvania/ philadelphia/>. 6. Ibid. 7. “Different Styles in Phila Architecture.” Philadelphias Architectural History. N.p., 22 Apr. 2010. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. <https://philaarchitecture.wordpress.com/different-styles-in-phila-architecture/>. 8. Ibid. 9. Ibid. 10. “William Penn’s Philadelphia Plan.” The Cultural Landscape Foundation. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. <http://tclf.org/landscapes/william-penn%E2%80%99s-philadelphia-plan>. 11. “Washington Square West.” Philadelphia Neighborhood. Visit Philly, n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. <http:// www.visitphilly.com/philadelphia-neighborhoods/washington-square-west/#sm.000172t9amku1d0 txyn13uri17xiw>. 12. “Washington Square.” National Parks Service. U.S. Department of the Interior, n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/inde/learn/historyculture/places-washingtonsquare.htm>. 13. “Demographics of Washington Square West.” Community Info for Washington Square West, Philadelphia, PA. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. <https://www.trulia.com/real_estate/Washington_ Square_West-Philadelphia/9878/community-info/>. 14. Ibid. 15. Ibid. 16. Ibid. 17. Washington Square 18. Ibid. 19. “20+ Awesome Bars In Philadelphia’s Gayborhood.” Visit Philadelphia. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. <http://www.visitphilly.com/articles/philadelphia/bars-and-nightlife-in-philadelphias-gayborhood/ #sm.000172t9amku1d0txyn13uri17xiw>.

IMAGES:

1. Figure 1. Philadelphia Skyline Sunset, Digital Image, Balyeat Photography, April 8th 2016. http://www. davidbalyeat.com 2. Figure 1. Boathouse Row Lights, Digital Image, UWISHUNU Philadelphia, September 19th 2016. http:// www.uwishunu.com 3. Figure 1. Moment, Digital Image, Reference, August 9th 2014. http://www.reference.com 4. Figure 51. Washington Square Park, Digital Image, Mountain Soft Travel Photos, August 9th 2014. http:// www.mountainsofttravelphotos.com 5. Figure 1. Gallery at Market East, Digital Image, Philly, January 18th 2015. http://www.philly.com

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SECTION 7: IMAGES:

1. Figure 18. Bangkok, Digital Image, D-Box Hostel Bangkok, September 7th, 2016. http://www. bangkokshotels.com 2. Figure 4. Purple Room, Digital Image, Superbude, July 21st, 2016. http://www.superbude.com

SECTION 8: SOURCES:

1. “Georgian Style (1700-1830).” Georgian Style Architecture Facts and History. Wentworth Studio, 29 June 2015. Web. 12 Dec. 2016. <http://www.wentworthstudio.com/historic-styles/georgian/>.

IMAGES:

1. Figure 1. 9th Street, Screenshot, Google, December 12th 2016. http://www.google.com 2. Figure 2. Lobby, Digital Image, Penn Medicine, August 26th 2014. http://www.uphs.upenn.edu 3. Figure 2. 9th Street, Screenshot, Google, December 12th 2016. http://www.google.com 4. Figure 1. Lobby, Digital Image, Penn Medicine, August 26th 2014. http://www.uphs.upenn.edu 5. Figure 3. 9th Street, Screenshot, Google, December 12th 2016. http://www.google.com

SECTION 9: IMAGES:

1. Figure 7. Run Away, Digital Image, Travel Dose, June 7th 2016. http://traveldo.se 2. Figure 10. Run Away, Digital Image, Travel Dose, June 7th 2016. http://traveldo.se 3. Figure 13. Lounge, Digital Image, Travel Dose, June 7th 2016. http://traveldo.se 4. Figure 5. Hallway, Digital Image, Travel Dose, June 7th 2016. http://traveldo.se

106


CAPSTONE COMMITTEE: Capstone Research and Programming Professor: Lisa Phillips, IIDA phillipsl@philau.edu| 215.518.3535 Associate Professor at Philadelphia University Capstone Professor: Alexander Messinger, AIA, AEE, IES, RA messingera@philau.edu | 610.613.2959 Professor of Interior Design at Philadelphia University Advisors: Simone Stevens sstevens@thepodhotel.com |212.355.0300 Designer at The Pod Hotels Anne Weimer aweimer@skiliberty.com | 717.642.8282 Marketing Director Megan Murray-Walter and Bill Walter Family Friends | Travelers

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108


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109


Ashby, Steven P. 2015. “What really Caused the Viking Age? the Social Content of Raiding and Exploration.” Archaeological Dialogues 22 (1): 89. Barnett, Bob. “Does Drinking Reduce My Stress?” CNN. Cable News Network, 24 Sept. 2013. Web. <http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/24/ health/drinking-reduces-stress-upwave/>. “Berlin Climate and Weather.” Berlin Climate and Weather. Accessed September 24, 2016. http://www.wordtravels.com/Cities/ Germany/Berlin/Climate. “Berlin Mitte.” Generator. Accessed September 24, 2016. https:// generatorhostels.com/en/destinations/berlin/mitte/. Bloomsbury.com. “Human Factors in the Built Environment.” Bloomsbury Publishing. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2016. <http://www.bloomsbury. com/us/human-factors-in-the-built-environment-9781609015039/>. Byttebier, Lucia. “A History Of Why People Travel.” Matador Network. Matador Network, 17 Sept. 2007. Web. <http://matadornetwork. com/ bnt/a-history-of-why-people-travel/>. “Climate Information for Philadelphia - Pennsylvania - Mid-Atlantic United States.” Climate Zone. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. <http://www.climate-zone.com/climate/united-states/ pennsylvania/philadelphia/>. Conforti, Kaeli. “15 Things You Didn’t Know about Oktoberfest.” TODAY. com. 26 Sept. 2012. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. http://www.today. com/food/15-things-you-didnt-know-about-oktoberfest-1B6112878. “Demographics of Washington Square West.” Community Info for Washington Square West, Philadelphia, PA. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. https://www.trulia.com/real_estate/Washington_Square_ West-Philadelphia/9878/community-info/.

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“Different Styles in Phila Architecture.” Philadelphias Architectural History. N.p., 22 Apr. 2010. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. https:// philaarchitecture.wordpress.com/different-styles-in-philaarchitecture/.


Drew, John T., and Sarah Meyer. “Color Legibility: Designing With Warm and Cool Colors.” Graphics. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Oct. 2016. http:/ www.graphics.com/article-old/color-legibility-designing-warmand-cool-colors. “Facts + Figures.” DiscoverPHL. N.p., n.d. Web. Aug. 2016. http://www. discoverphl.com/meet/choose-philadelphia/facts-and-figures/. “Generator Berlin Mitte / Ester Bruzkus + DesignAgency” 07 Mar 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 22 Sep 2016. http://www.archdaily .com/483366/generator-berlin-mitte-ester-bruzkus-designagency/ “Generator Hostel London.” Generator. Accessed October 11, 2016. https://generatorhostels.com/en/destinations/london/. “Georgian Style (1700-1830).” Georgian Style Architecture Facts and History. Wentworth Studio, 29 June 2015. Web. 12 Dec. 2016. <http://www.wentworthstudio.com/historic-styles/georgian/>. Grabmeier, Jeff. “70 Percent of College Students Stressed about Finances.” News Room. Ohio State University, 01 July 2015. Web. Aug. 2016. https://news.osu.edu/news/2015/07/01/ financial-wellness/%C2%A0. Gwyn-Williams, Jr. | December 3, 2012 | 1:53 PM EST, Gregory. “Americans Consumed 6.3 Billion Gallons Of Beer Last Year - 43 Gallons Each In NH!” CNS News. N.p., 30 Apr. 2013. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. http://www.cnsnews.com/blog/gregory-gwynwilliams-jr/americans-consume-63-billion-gallons-beer-annually. HASSON, BERNADETTE. “Getting Lit: How Lighting Can Impact Patrons.” Nightclub & Bar. N.p., 24 Feb. 2015. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. http:// www.nightclub.com/product-watch/lighting/getting-lit-howlighting-can-impact-patrons Himmelblau, Coop. “Generator London.” Archello. September 15, 2014. Accessed October 11, 2016. http://us.archello.com/en/ project/generator-london “Hostel CONII / Estudio ODS.” ArchDaily. N.p., 26 June 2016. Web. 02 Oct. 2016. http://www.archdaily.com/789909/hostel-conii-estudio-ods

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“Human Behavior.” Psychology Definitions. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. http://www.alleydog.com/glossary/definition. php?term=Human%2BBehavior Kahn, Jeffrey P. “How Beer Gave Us Civilization.” The New York Times. The New York Times, 16 Mar. 2013. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. http://www. nytimes.com/2013/03/17/opinion/sunday/how-beer-gaveus-civilization.html Karmin, Craig. “Boutique Bohemian: High-End Hostels Come to America.” The Wall Street Journal. N.p., 26 May 2015. Web. http:// www.wsj.com/articles/boutique-bohemian-high-end-hostelscome-to-america-1432670969 “Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design.” Interior Design + Construction. Leed, n.d. Web. Aug. 2016. http://leed.usgbc.org/ id-c.html Locke, Amy. “The Vocabulary of Color: What Colors Mean & How They Affect Your Guests.” Hotel Business Reviews. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Oct. 2016. http://hotelexecutive.com/business_review/2147/ “More than a Hostel – Design-led Hostels.” Generator. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Sept. 2016. https://generatorhostels.com/en/ “NIAAA Publications.” U.S National Library of Medicine. U.S. National Li brary of Medicine, n.d. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. http://pubs.niaaa.nih .gov/publications/aa68/aa68.htm Nussbaumer, Linda L. “Environmental Considerations.” Human Factors in the Built Environment. New York: Bloomsbury, 2014. 222. Print. Pesce, Nicole Lyn. “Science Confirms Beer Makes People Social, Less Shy about Sex.” NY Daily News. N.p., 19 Sept. 2016. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/science-confirmsbeer-people-social-shy-sex-article-1.2798342 “Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.” Philadelphia County Pennsylva nia QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. http://www.census.gov/quickfacts/table/INC910214/42101

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“Philadelphia USA!” Information about USA, City of Pennsylvania Holidays and Travel Info. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. http://www.inventpa. com/


Razza. “Psychology of Color/Color Scheme Links.” EBHS Interior Design. N.p., 21 Apr. 2016. Web. http://ebhsinteriordesign.weebly.com/ blog/psychology-of-colorcolor-scheme-links Salimpour, Sormeh. “Top 5 Interior Design Trends for 2016.” MiLLENNiAL MAGAZiNE RSS. N.p., 13 Apr. 2016. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. http://millen nialmagazine.com/top-5-design-trends-for-2016/ Sherwood, Seth. “Haute Hostels Put to the Test.” The New York Times. N.p., 26 Apr. 2013. Web. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/28/travel/ haute-hostels-put-to-the-test-in-europe.html?_r=0 Sopher, Philip. “How the Beer Garden Came to Be.” The Atlantic. Atlantic Media Company, 23 Apr. 2015. Web. 02 Nov. 2016. http:// www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2015/04/howthe-beer-garden-came-to-be/391343/ “The Development of London’s Economy.” London’s Economic Plan. Ac cessed October 11, 2016. http://www.uncsbrp.org/economicde velopment.htm. The Story.” Conii Hostel. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Oct. 2016. http://www.conii hostel.com/en/conii/ “Washington Square.” National Parks Service. U.S. Department of the Interior, n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. https://www.nps.gov/inde/learn/ historyculture/places-washingtonsquare.htm “Washington Square West.” Philadelphia Neighborhood. Visit Philly, n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. http://www.visitphilly.com/philadelphia-neigh borhoods/washington-square-west/#sm.000172t9amku1d0txy n13uri17xiw “William Penn’s Philadelphia Plan.” The Cultural Landscape Foundation. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. http://tclf.org/landscapes/wil liam-penn%E2%80%99s-philadelphia-plan Wilson, Cerys. “High-Design Hostels.” Canadian Architect. March 01, 2014. Accessed October 11, 2016. https://www.canadianarchi tect.com/features/high-design-hostels/ “20+ Awesome Bars In Philadelphia’s Gayborhood.” Visit Philadelphia. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Nov. 2016. http://www.visitphilly.com/articles/ philadelphia/bars-and-nightlife-in-philadelphias-gayborhood

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