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Inside Scott Street CDP NEWS

process underway Plan aims to guide growth, land use in area for coming decades Steph Willems

steph.willems@metroland.com

Thanks to an influx of cash from the city, Fisher Park is set to become a more dynamic, usable community space. – Page 5

CITY HALL NEWS

A new gallery at the Canadian Museum of Nature looks at the wonders of the geological world. – Page 12

COMMUNITY NEWS

EMC news - The city has moved forward on the Scott Street Community Design Plan, with bidding on the consultation phase set to close later this month. The plan covers both the north and south sides of Scott Street from Northwestern Avenue in the west to Bayview Avenue in the east. The neighbourhood of Mechanicsville, the northern part of Hintonburg and Wellington Village, Tunney’s Pasture and a small part of Champlain Park make up the area. The process was expedited by the city at the request of the Mechanicsville and Hintonburg Community Associations and Kitchissippi Coun. Katherine Hobbs. A number of factors led to this request. First, the area of Parkdale north of Scott, and to a lesser extent south of Scott, has recently come under intense pressure from developers looking for spot rezonings for highrise buildings. Second, the federal government announced a

See CONDO, page 9

Jessica Cunha/Metroland

A spinning success Britannia resident Lucas Nguyen, a member of the Glen Carin Skating Club, made the podium recently at a competition held in Kingston, Ont., on Nov. 9 to 11. To read more about his performance, turn to page 18.

Presto changes prompt bus driver retraining Laura Mueller

laura.mueller@metroland.com

The city has revealed two art installations that will adorn Bronson Avenue once redevelopment work is complete. – Page 17

long-term redevelopment plan for Tunney’s Pasture. Lastly, the city is poised to begin construction on its light rail project with the western terminus planned for Tunney’s. The city’s Official Plan calls for intensification around mass transit and employment hubs. “We are looking at something that will happen a lot faster to get ahead of the development occurring here,” said Hobbs, discussing the need to expedite the process. “Right now there is a lot of housing in the area. A decision needs to be made on what happens here.” A community design plan would serve as a guide for the community’s near and longterm future, laying out what land uses would be acceptable and in what locations. It would serve to provide a planning context with which to put an end to spot rezonings. Ultimately, the community members want their wishes and needs to be reflected in the final plan, which is expected to be completed within a year.

EMC news - Technical glitches aren’t the only issue plaguing OC Transpo’s Presto card system. With so many changes and new procedures resulting from bugs in the system, operators are having trouble keeping up. An overhaul of the drivers’ Presto display screens is set to hit buses at the beginning of January – only weeks before 10,000 more people are set to get Presto cards – meaning OC Transpo is getting ready

to train all of its operators how to use Presto all over again. The cost of the retraining hasn’t been finalized, city spokeswoman Jocelyne Turner wrote in an email, but the tab will be picked up by Metrolinx, the provincially funded agency in charge of Presto. At a driver’s average hourly wage, sending all the operators back for an hour and a half of training costs about $65,000 said Craig Watson, the president of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 279. “We’re allowing them to go outside our contract and make

a special concession to get all the operators in and retrained on Presto because there have been so many issues that have developed,” Watson said. “So yeah, there (are) some problems, but we’re going to move them out in a really fast process. All of the drivers are going to be brought in for training. Everybody needs it.” It’s not that the drivers didn’t get training the first time, Watson said. The system has changed so much the original training barely applies. When the Presto system more or less stopped working in the summer and the driv-

ers didn’t use that knowledge, they lost it, Watson said. “The technology hasn’t worked,” he said. “When the drivers were trained, you’ve got to remember, they were trained a long time ago (in the spring). If the technology had worked right away, they would have been using it all the time. But when you don’t have it work for six months, you don’t remember how.” Not to mention, there was at least one error in the training program and it wasn’t discovered until almost all drivers had been trained, Watson

said. The issue came to a head for Capital Coun. David Chernushenko after he received error messages for the fifth day in a row while trying to board the bus. “It’s infuriating,” Chernushenko said. “It’s not living up to the advertising,” he said. “I am not feeling good that it’s just a matter of a couple more tweaks.” The councillor was ready to give up on Presto entirely and advise OC Transpo to do the same, but he credits the transit agency for tracking down the issue and fixing it before he threw in the towel. See DELAY, page 7

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news

Your Community Newspaper

Bayshore children’s fundraiser gives shoppers luxury perks steph.willems@metroland.com

EMC news - Do you hate searching for shopping mall parking spots, only to forget where you parked when it’s time to leave? Bayshore Shopping Centre wants its weekend shoppers to unburden themselves of that holiday stress. As part of their Holiday Rejoice campaign, free valet parking awaits weekend shoppers between now and

Christmas Eve. To keep the cars rolling, Bayshore recruited part-time Scotiabank Place staff who have been idled due to the NHL work stoppage. As this is an agreement between the mall and the Sens Foundation, a contribution to the charity in place of a tip is appreciated. The service will be managed by the Ottawa-based Responsible Choice. “We had the idea as part of our Christmas campaign to of-

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fer additional services to our customers,” said Bayshore general manager Denis Pelletier. “Christmas is a busy time and parking at any mall at Christmas is a challenge.” Pelletier said the initiative adds “a level of convenience that isn’t being offered anywhere, at least not in the Ottawa region.” The Sens Foundation is a charitable partner of the Ottawa Senators Hockey Club.

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Spartacat, left, Sens Foundation president Danielle Robinson, former Senators playerTodd White, Bay Coun. MarkTaylor, Santa Claus and Bayshore Shopping Centre general manager Denis Pelletier announced the Holiday Rejoice campaign at the mall on Nov. 29.

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news

Your Community Newspaper

Crowdsourcing targets west-end improvement ideas Campaign gathering input for projects in Woodpark, Woodroffe North communities Steph Willems

steph.willems@metroland.com

EMC news - Residents living in the Woodpark and Woodroffe North neighbourhoods have until Dec. 9 to put their community improvement ideas into writing. An online “crowd sourcing” campaign, organized by the city’s Neighbourhood Connections Office and IT solutions provider Ideavibes, wants to know what residents would like to see happen in their community. When the most popular ideas are drawn from the responses, the city will fund as many as three small-scale projects up to a total of $30,000 The Woodpark and Wood-

roffe North surveys are the first to be held under as part of an online ideas campaign, a pilot initiative of the Neighbourhood Connections Office. The new department chose Ideavibes after the city had used their crowd sourcing services for their 2011 Have A Say campaign, with pleasing results. “(The city) got a better response than they were hoping for,” said Paul Dombowsky, chief executive of Ideavibes. “It’s an approach to citizen engagement that makes it easier to get the word out.” Residents of those west end neighbourhoods can log on to ottawa.ca/neighbourhoods to offer their ideas on what improvements their

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communities could benefit from. Dombowsky said the approach is becoming more popular given the wider range of people who can be reached electronically, leading to a greater response than what can be achieved through a public meeting. The main themes of the online ideas campaign were guided by an earlier questionnaire. It found the main themes to be streets and parks, social and recreational opportunities, community beautification and development issues. While the potential funding available to the projects isn’t that significant, Bay Coun. Mark Taylor said the process is valuable in that it serves to identify issues that could be corrected by other city departments. “It’s really tailored to fo-

cus on the little fixes, strategic things that can be addressed to make the community better,” said Taylor. “This (process) will help us in older neighbourhoods who don’t benefit from a community design plan, like in a new neighbourhood in South Nepean. “

Taylor said he had been in talks with city staff for the past year about this new process, which is why Bay Ward communities were quick to get their name on the waiting list for the online ideas campaign. Like this one, subsequent campaigns will run for a three week period.

Already, residents from the Pinecrest-Queensway community have applied, as well as Queensway Terrace North. Based on feedback, projects for Woodpark and Woodroffe North will be decided upon over the course of the winter and implemented next spring.

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news

Your Community Newspaper

Fisher Park getting $1M upgrade Steph Willems

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Starting next spring, Fisher Park in Ottawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s west end will be the site of a renewal project worth nearly $1 million. Funded through the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parks and recreation department and Kitchissippi Wardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cash-in-lieu-of-parkland fund, the project will see the installation of new play structures, two new basketball courts, upgrades to the tennis court, as well as new seating, lighting and pathways. ties. Because of the number of new amenities added to the original plan, a considerable amount of geographical rearranging had to be done to accommodate it all. Hobbs sees a one-time revamp incorporating all desired elements as a good way to proceed, rather than adding features one at a time.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our parks and recreation staff are committed to the life cycle project, but it seemed important to do everything at once,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This will make the park viable for a long time. I felt it was a really good community effort to build something that could be enjoyed by all ages.â&#x20AC;? Hobbs said the city will send out a request for pro-

curement in January, meaning spring construction will be the likely result. Given the extent of work that needs to be done, construction is expected to last about two months and limit full use of the park. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will be better in the long run, but residents can expect some upheaval in the summer,â&#x20AC;? said Hobbs.

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EMC news - A life-cycle renewal for Fisher Park has turned into a $1 million revamp that will make the Holland Avenue public space a more enjoyable place for everyone in the community. Following consultation with residents in the surrounding area, numerous upgrades to landscaping, play structures and recreation infrastructure are planned for park. The renewal received a large funding boost when Kitchissippi Coun. Katherine Hobbs added $750,000 from her officeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cash-in-lieu-ofparkland fund to the $220,000 already pledged by the city. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The park was ready for a life cycle upgrade ... but the existing life cycle funds would have halved the size of the play structure,â&#x20AC;? said Hobbs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the time I said whatever structure residents want, I would pay the difference with cash-in-lieu-of-parkland funds.â&#x20AC;? The improved amenities planned for the park include a new splash pad, two new basketball courts, improvements to the Elmdale Tennis Club, new benches, tables, lighting and a walkway corridor. The features will ensure that community members of all ages will be able to use the park space for different activi-

1122.R0011753896

steph.willems@metroland

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You are invited to attend the

Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 12th Annual Christmas Celebration Saturday, December 8, 2012 3 - 7 p.m. NEW LOCATION Ottawa City Hall, 110 Laurier Avenue This fun-filled celebration will include ice skating on the Rink of Dreams, hot chocolate and horse-drawn wagon rides outside on Marion Dewar Plaza. Inside City Hall meet Santa and Mrs. Claus, create a craft in Santaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s workshop, have your face painted, and enjoy live performances. As a special treat, enjoy scrumptious BeaverTailsÂŽ and savour chocolate by Lindt!

To help those in need and to share in the spirit of the holiday season, admission to this sponsored event is a non-perishable food donation to the Ottawa Food Bank.

Ottawa Food Bank

OC Transpo will offer free bus rides on all routes to and from City Hall from 2:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. to children 11 years and under when accompanied by a fare-paying adult. Please advise us of any accessibility-related accommodation. A very special thank you to our many corporate sponsors who make this annual celebration possible.

Thank you to our â&#x20AC;&#x153;Evergreenâ&#x20AC;? Sponsors And our â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hollyâ&#x20AC;? Sponsors â&#x20AC;˘ Decisive Technologies â&#x20AC;˘ Mattamy Homes Ltd. â&#x20AC;˘ Richcraft Group of Companies â&#x20AC;˘ Stantec

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Media Sponsors ottawa.ca Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012

5


news

Mayor’s Report

Your Community Newspaper

No big changes to city budget Average homeowner will see extra $67 on 2013 property tax bill Laura Mueller

laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - Despite an attempt to put more money into planning parks and cycling

facilities, the city’s 2013 budget was unanimously accepted with no major changes on Nov. 28. The council vote means the owner of an average $314,500

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IntegrIty Update: transparency and Openness at cIty Hall http://www.JimWatsonOttawa.ca

On November 28th, City Council passed Budget 2013 with a tax change of 2.09% which is the lowest in six years. After having tabled the budget on October 24th, my council colleagues and I fanned out across the city to hear input from residents and answer their questions. As with the consultations leading up to the tabling of the budget, these sessions helped us better understand the needs of Ottawa’s residents as we crafted a budget that helps to improve our city in the present and invest in an even brighter future.

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Some highlights from the budget include: • A continued freeze on parks and recreation fees that benefits families across the city. • A continued freeze on Mayor’s and Councillor’s office budgets.

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• $3.5 million in staffing cost reductions. • An 11% reduction in the garbage fee. • Transit fare increase capped at 2.5% for the third year in a row. • $14 million of continued funding for Council’s poverty and homelessness initiative. • $5.5 million to increase the annual contribution to Capital Funding for infrastructure maintenance and renewal. • $4.9 million for new traffic signals and intersection control measures to improve pedestrian safety and mobility.

R0011758526/1129

By Jim Watson

home in the urban area will pay about $67 more in taxes a year, while rural homeowners will pay around $50 more per year. The 2.09 per cent municipal tax levy increase for urban homeowners and 1.98 per cent for rural residents are the smallest tax hikes in six years, Mayor Jim Watson said. The only somewhat substantial change made to the draft version of the budget came from the community and protective services department, which transferred $250,000 from a daycare fund to pay for service for Ottawa’s neediest citizens. The city had already tried to shore up a $7-million reduction in provincial social services funding by finding $4.5-million. The extra quarter million shifted away from daycare was in response to residents who came out to argue the city should try to do more to lessen the impact of provincial cuts to things like funeral services for low-income residents, top-ups for food and clothing allowances, and prosthetics and hearing aids. Capital Coun. David Chernushenko wanted to take $200,000 out of the corporate communications budget to

L L A  M 

    

    

• $500,000 for the Older Adult Plan coming out of last year’s Seniors Summit. • $975,000 combined operating and capital funding to increase the forest cover and combat the Emerald Ash Borer, bringing total investment to $1.8 million. • New and expanded parks and recreation facilities across the city. • $1 million combined capital and operating funding for the Arts, Culture and Heritage Plan. In addition, Budget 2013 continues the $340 million Ottawa on the Move program that was approved in Budget 2012. This program is in the midst of improving our sidewalk, road, cycling, water, and sewer infrastructure across our city to ready ourselves for the coming of the Light Rail Transit system to Ottawa. With the lowest tax rate change in six years, Budget 2013 is a fiscally responsible and thorough plan that adheres to my election promise of not increasing taxes above 2.5% and I look forward to its implementation in the New Year. R0011786899-1206

HINTONBURG

PARKDALE MARKET

WELLINGTON VILLAGE

0         For locally-owned shops, friendly shopkeepers, and special one-of-a-kind finds, visit Wellington West this holiday season.

Jim Watson, Mayor

110 Laurier Avenue West Ottawa ON K1P 1J1 Tel: 613-580-2496 • Fax: 613-580-2509

www.JimWatsonOttawa.ca 6 Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012

Download our free business directory app for iPhones

www.wellingtonwest.ca 1122.R0011726462

put an extra $100,000 into the parks and recreation budget and $100,000 into the transportation budget for planning cycling facilities. Most councillors agreed there is a pressing need for another parks planner to deal with the backlog of work. The city has a lot of money sitting in ward-specific cashin-lieu of parkland funds that can’t be used because there isn’t enough manpower to plan and oversee the projects. The money comes from developers who must pay to boost park facilities in areas new residents will live. But those councillors didn’t have a chance to support Chernushenko’s motion because the councillor was convinced to withdraw it by a promise that staff will look into how money could be shifted around within their departments to address the needs Chernushenko brought up. “First of all, I wanted to highlight these issues,” Chernushenko said. “I had not been successful in getting much attention to them until now. It was a festering frustration and in the past week … it became so clear that the staff I have been counting on … they’re just overworked.” The only controversial element of the budget was $2 million for the detailed design work for a proposed pedestrian bridge near Lansdowne Park, spanning the Rideau Canal from Fifth Avenue in the Glebe to Clegg Street in Old Ottawa East. There was little discussion on the issue, but several councillors, including Stephen Blais (Cumberland), Rainer Bloess (Innes), Jan Harder (Barrhaven), Allan Hubley (Kanata South), Bob Monette (Orléans) and Doug Thompson (Osgoode), asked to have their dissent recorded for the bridge spending. After the meeting, Bloess explained that he’s wary of going down a road towards spending a projected $17 million on a new bridge when the city has a long list of smaller cycling projects that should be completed first. “I’m a big fan of linkages … But this is setting the first stage for an unknown expense,” Bloess said. “Two million for just the (environment assessment study) is way too rich for my blood. I think we should take care of the current needs in our cycling network first.” Two new city plans approved last year – the older adult plan and the arts, heritage and culture plan – will get $500,000 and $1 million respectively towards their implementation. Community design plans promised for areas around future light rail stations are being funded to the tune of $300,000. The city will boost funding to fight the emerald ash borer by $975,000, bringing annual funding for pesticide treatments and replanting to $1.8 million. There is also money for 16 new crossing guards.


Your Community Newspaper

NEWS

Auditor general slams OC Transpo, hidden temp jobs Report recommendations could save city $800,000 Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - A post-2009 bus strike deal giving OC Transpo the power to schedule drivers is â&#x20AC;&#x153;less efďŹ cientâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;more costlyâ&#x20AC;?, according to the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s auditor general. Despite claims made by the city and former transit chief Alain Mercier at the time, auditor general Alain Lalondeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s report indicates that the city was not on the winning side of the arbitration that ended the winter strike. OC Transpo expected to save between $3.1 million and $4.5 million a year after the strike, but that money didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t materialize, said Ray Kostuch, deputy auditor general. Craig Watson, president of the local transit union, was quick to say â&#x20AC;&#x153;I told you soâ&#x20AC;? at the tabling of the audit on Nov. 29, but he added that scheduling has improved since an

OC Transpo-ATU Local 279 scheduling working group was established earlier this year. The audit also slammed OC Transpoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s archaic system for booking bus drivers on routes. The booking is done four times a year and requires drivers to pile into a room and manually write their selections on papers posted on the walls. The scale and complexity of booking for a large transit system demands a move to an online system, the report states. That would save around $350,000 per year. OC Transpo also got a slap on the wrist for its faulty notiďŹ cation system for letting riders know when buses have been cancelled. Auditor general staff signed up for text message, email and web alerts for all 141 routes for one week last November. Of the 55 actual bus cancellations during that week, audit staff received only seven complete and consistent notiďŹ cations.

Although riders can sign up for alerts for all 141 routes, only 126 of them had actually been added to the system, meaning 15 routes that riders thought they would get updates for were never actually putting out notiďŹ cations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The quality of OC Transpoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s communications to its ridership makes an impression and inďŹ&#x201A;uence public perception of the systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efďŹ ciency and effectiveness,â&#x20AC;? the report states. OC Transpo has already ďŹ xed the system to ensure alerts can be sent for all routes, and the transit agency will continuously monitor to ensure the notiďŹ cations are consistent. The city could save approximately $800,000 per year by implementing all of Lalondeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suggestions. Other audits included: the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corporate communications, procurement practices, occupational health and safety, human resources

Delay means early summer rollout Finding and ďŹ xing these sorts of problems is the reason an extended testing phase is a good thing, said transit commission chairwoman Diane Deans. The problem? A driver hit the wrong button to approve the balance on Chernushenkoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s card the ďŹ rst time he used it, rendering his card always in the red. OC Transpo thought Chernushenko owed it money for the one â&#x20AC;&#x153;grace periodâ&#x20AC;? trip regular riders will be allowed, in case they forget to top up their card. The grace trip is deducted after the rider adds more money to their card. But Chernushenko never added money because he has a monthly pass, not a cash balance, so the Presto machine kept asking him for money. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In this case, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an ongoing training issue with our operators,â&#x20AC;? said OC Transpoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s manager of business and operational services, David Pepper. Just like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taking a while

for drivers to learn how the new system works, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to take some time for riders to adjust. Presto will mark a seachange in how we pay to ride the bus. The passes are transferable, meaning you can share a card â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as long as you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ride at the same time. Pepper explains the massive effort involved in explaining

the nuances of the new card to a lineup of people at transit stations when they are handed out in small batches â&#x20AC;&#x201C; never mind the 200,000-card dump the city initially planned to do on June 10 for a Canada Day launch. Now, the full rollout has been tentatively delayed until May or June. Transit commissioners will

governments, city manager Kent Kirkpatrick said, and city managers have authority to authorize how money is spent in their departments. That in itself isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a problem, Lalonde said, but the issue is that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not clear to elected ofďŹ cials how often temp positions are created and ďŹ lled, in which departments and why it is necessary. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You should be able to know exactly how many persons or (full-time equivalents) are working within a unit,â&#x20AC;? Lalonde told councillors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right now you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know that. You know how much the program is costing.â&#x20AC;? This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the ďŹ rst time the issue of budgeting for vacant jobs has come up recently. While introducing the budget on Oct. 24, city treasurer Marion Simulik applauded the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to slash another 139 unďŹ lled full-time positions from its payroll, but later clariďŹ ed that only 42 of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 14,489 jobs were cut this year. The rest were eliminated pre-

viously, but were tracked in terms of dollars, meaning the jobs themselves remained on the books. A homeowner stealing water, misuse of city resources by an employee moonlighting as a real estate agent and a city contractor illegally picking up animal waste are a few of the issues discovered through the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s waste and fraud hotline. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fraud and waste hotline, which launched in 2005, received 182 tips of suspected fraud or waste by city employees in 2011. Sixty eight of those reports came from city employees, while 114 were ďŹ led by members of the public. Among the issues investigated were a city employee who was found to be using the Internet and email to moonlight as a real estate agent when they were supposed to be working for the city. The person had been warned previously about moonlighting and this time was given a two-day suspension with no pay.

decide in April whether the ďŹ xes and testing are enough to give them conďŹ dence to forge ahead with the smart cards. Despite the complications, to his knowledge, Pepper says no one has turned in their Presto card. Still, OC Transpo has no way of tracking how many

people are actively using their cards. There are currently 2,000 cards in the hands of people like city councillors, OC Transpo staff and their families, but the transit agency can only monitor the number of taps â&#x20AC;&#x201C; not how many cards those taps are coming from, Pepper said.

With the planned release of another 10,000 cards in January, Pepper says OC Transpo is hoping at least 50 per cent use the cards regularly.

    3%,2-%%$%$ R0011520143

Continued from front page

master plan, performance measurement and budgeting for growth. The reports are available on the auditor general section of ottawa.ca. The audit identiďŹ ed the city still has the equivalent of 21 full-time positions with salaries totaling $1.8 million on its books, even though no one has ďŹ lled those jobs for two years or more. Combined with positions still considered necessary even though staff was temporarily reassigned, the city has 123 vacant or unoccupied positions worth $10.5 million on its books. That money is often reallocated to pay the salaries of temporary employees who work on short-term projects. At the time of the audit, there were 1,065 temporary positions that councillors had not been made aware of, 684 of which were ďŹ lled at an annual cost of $58 million. Salaries for about half of temporary workers are paid by the federal and provincial

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012

7


Your Community Newspaper

OPINION EDITORIAL

Craft fairs the lifeblood of community Christmas

C

hristmas without craft fairs is like peanut butter searching for its

jelly. It just wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel like the holiday season without them. Craft fairs are festive events that bring together hundreds of people who find unique ways to celebrate the holiday season. They attract all who love the holiday season â&#x20AC;&#x201C; everyone from closet Martha Stewarts

searching for the perfect wreath to match the paint of their front door to all-out Griswolds embarking on their annual quest to turn their homes into the equivalent of a 20,000-volt explosion of Christmas lights. Most of us, thankfully fall somewhere in between. Craft fairs simply burst with creativity. Every year, just like clockwork, dozens of communities across the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital schedule shows during the

weeks leading up to Christmas. You see them in churches. You see them in schools, housing co-ops, apartment buildings, health centres, community centres â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in some cases they even shut down streets so residents can check out their wares. Looking for a macramĂŠ Christmas elf or a Santa Claus made from macaroni? Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a craft fair near you â&#x20AC;&#x201C; somewhere â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with the gift to satisfy your holiday yen.

Ornaments, tree decorations, felt elf slippers, cereal box houses, twine snowmen, clothesline wreaths, Christmas tree bunting, a quilted advent calendar â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Christmas trees made out of everything from felt and fabric to yarn and recycled magazines. The variety is astounding, representing an explosion of ideas, a fermenting of pentup creativity. Every year our reporters are treated to literally hundreds of craft fairs, ranging from a small event

held in the lobby of an apartment building to the megasales that fill the hallways, lobbys and gymnasiums of Ottawa schools. This month one of our reporters visited the 39th annual Craft Christmas Gift Sale at the Nepean Sportsplex, which featured more than 140 artists, designers and food vendors at the unique community shop. We witnessed the work of Tom Reasbeck, a self-taught artist, who creates hand-

carved wooden Santas and other festive items. Another artist, Ria Smith, the founder of Simply Perfect, showed us her homemade bird baths. Craft fairs are a wonderful venue for the hundreds of artists in our city, ranging from the professional painters, sculptors and watercolourists to the amateurs, who enjoy spending a few weeks of the year making unique crafts. They are also a great opportunity for people to load up on decorations for their homes or simply a pleasant way to while away an afternoon with the kids. Isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that the true meaning of Christmas?

COLUMN

Not a slam dunk, but it could work CHARLES GORDON Funny Town

T

here is no shortage of gifts being showered on us and Christmas is still weeks away. The latest offering is the promise of a professional basketball franchise for the city. For many of us, basketball is never a bad idea. As has been noted in the coverage of Ottawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s franchise in the National Basketball League of Canada, there will be lots of sports competition in the city. In addition to the National Hockey League, there will be a DoubleA baseball team, a professional soccer team and a new Canadian Football League franchise. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good for us. This may be a hockey town, but it was once a football town and could be again. Remember, though, that in the last few years of the Rough Riders and Renegades in the CFL, fan support was less than overwhelming. Similarly, baseball flourished in the early years of the Ottawa Lynx then somehow faded away. We are a sports town, but we can be a fickle town too. Basketball hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really been tested. Carleton and University of Ottawa games are well-attended and Carletonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s incredible success in recent years has probably created many new basketball fans. The university championships, when they were held at Scotiabank Place, drew good crowds. Hundreds of men and women, boys and girls either play or have played basketball in high school. You notice that whenever you attend a game in the city: there are more tall people in the crowd than usual. None of this adds up to surefire success. There were a lot of people who had played

baseball in Ottawa, there were major league teams down the highway in either direction and there was a high calibre of ball being played at the Triple-A level here. There was a friendly and well-designed stadium. In the long run, none of that was enough. What would be enough? Well, hockey succeeds here because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best hockey in the world and Canadians breathe hockey. Plus, the team wins, but even when they stop winning the fans still turn out. Another factor worth mentioning, though, is the extent to which Senators players have involved themselves in the community, partly by making themselves visible in charitable activities, partly by being residents and neighbours. The same formula was at play in the most successful years of the Rough Riders. Before the age of mega-buck contracts, the players lived here throughout the year and were active in the community. So the city felt, as it does now with the Senators, that the team belonged. That wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t true in later years, nor was it true with the Lynx. Even in this sophisticated age where we have no end of entertainment options, we still like the idea of a team being our team, not just a group of well-paid mercenaries who happen to perform here and leave as soon as the season is over for warmer climes. Despite beginning play at the remote Scotiabank Place, a venue far too cavernous to be ideal for basketball and too remote for many potential fans, the new basketball team does have an opportunity to capture the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heart. One odd advantage is that the player salaries will not be high. So this will not be a group of guys who jet in and jet out. It appears also that at least part of the team will consist of people who have played here at high school or university level. That will help. Friends and relatives buy tickets too. It probably doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make much difference one way or the other that basketball was invented just down the road in Almonte. What does matter is that basketball is a game that is growing in popularity the world over. Handled properly, it could work here.

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Published weekly by:

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DISTRIBUTION INQUIRIES Traci Cameron 613-221-6223

57 Auriga Drive, Suite 103 Ottawa, ON, K2E 8B2 613-723-5970 Vice President & Regional Publisher: Mike Mount Group Publisher: Duncan Weir Regional General Manager: Peter Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary Publisher: Mike Tracy mtracy@perfprint.ca Regional Managing Editor: Ryland Coyne

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THE DEADLINE FOR DISPLAY ADVERTISING IS MONDAY 12:00 NOON 8 Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012

THIS WEEKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S POLL QUESTION

PREVIOUS POLL SUMMARY

Do you like to visit community craft sales and bazaars during the holiday season?

After the latest Presto card delay, should the city continue with the program?

0%

tradition.

A) Yes. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve already put a lot of time into this â&#x20AC;&#x201C; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be a waste to quit now.

B) Sometimes Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll accompany older relatives to browse for festive knick-knacks.

B) For now, but if there are any further glitches, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to reconsider.

30%

C) I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hard to miss. Maybe Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll check one out this year.

C) No. Metrolinx has continually dropped the ball and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to move on.

60%

A) All the time â&#x20AC;&#x201C; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part of our family

D) Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not really my thing.

The Ottawa West EMC welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at www.yourottawaregion.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to theresa.fritz@metroland.com , fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to Ottawa West EMC, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa, ON, K2E 7L2.

OTTAWA WEST

Web Poll

D) Who cares? I drive my car or cycle everywhere I need to go â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take transit. To vote in our web polls, visit us at www.yourottawaregion.com/community/cityofottawa

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Adrienne Barr - 613-623-6571 EDITORIAL: Interim Managing Editor: Theresa Fritz 613-221-6261 Theresa.fritz@metroland.com NEWS EDITOR: Matthew Jay, 613-221-6175 MATTHEWJAY METROLANDCOM REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER: Steph Willems steph.willems@metroland.com - 613-221-6161 POLITICAL REPORTER: Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com - 613-221-6162

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10%

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NEWS

Condo influx feared Continued from front page

“I think the consultant who takes on (this) CDP will have their work cut out for them – it’s complex area, and for that reason you have to be careful,” said Mechanicsville Community Association president Guy Lachapelle. “There’s a lot of things going on and things are moving very quickly … . We have at heart the future of this community. We don’t want to be kicked out for sake of condos and wish to be engaged in the process and have our voices heard.” Lachapelle said that Mechanicsville saw very little change for a long time, but is now experiencing “unprecedented” change that can be detrimental to the existing community if it’s not done right. Currently the neighbourhood has few amenities and a growing traffic problem. Lachapelle said he and the rest of the community are fine if a restrained commitment to the city’s intensification policy is reflected in the CDP, as long as it also preserves recreation opportunities, improves park space and secures services for current and future residents. “With the coming influx from new (residents) ... there will be a need to address these issues,” he said. “There’s the issue of traffic, our need for a grocery store, maybe a com-

munity centre, and the redevelopment of Laroche Park. We need a clear vision of where we are going.” The terms of reference for the Scott Street CDP lists much of the area covered as a mixed-use centre, the extent of which stands to be challenged during the consultation process. An unknown element of the process concerns what final form the Tunney’s Pasture redevelopment will take. “There are a number of factors like this that are going to be a challenge to whomever takes on this CDP,” said Hobbs, who admits that ideally the process should have gotten underway long before the current flurry of development activity. “Mechanicsville and Champlain Park are small neighbourhoods that are very much affected by development and traffic, and a lot of things must be thought about for the transportation needs in this area ... . As well, what kind of services can we put there for existing and new residents? Where will they go for groceries? These are all things we want to consider. If you build a bunch of highrises and there’s nothing in the way of shopping or recreation, that’s a problem.” With the city likely to choose a contractor in January, the consultation process is expected to get underway in late winter or early spring. The Mechanicsville associ-

ation and Hintonburg Community Association have a close relationship and plan to work together in this file, as it affects the future of both of their communities. Jeff Leiper, president of the Hintonburg association, said the plan is “certainly overdue,” but that doesn’t mean it can’t have meaningful results. “Some of these big developments will be approved before this takes effect, but the development potential for Scott Street is very large,” said Leiper. Leiper, like Lachapelle and other members of the community, plans to work hard to see the mixed-use centre designation for large parts of lowrise residential areas changed to preserve the current nature of those neighbourhoods. He worries that the language used in the CDP’s terms of reference indicate the designation will not be changed. “There is a possibility we could come out of the CDP with taller buildings than are currently allowed,” said Leiper. Leiper, who congratulates the city for speeding up the process to allow the community to get to this point, said he hopes the process will reflect both the wishes of the community as well as the need for a fast conclusion to the process. “Speed and consultation is not an easy balance to achieve,” said Leiper.

The looming debt crunch

A

s we bid farewell to Bank of Canada governor Mark Carney last week, Canadians across the land celebrated a man who has steered our fiscal ship well in rough waters. Despite the near collapse of the global economy, Canada and Canadians have been sitting pretty. Our unemployment rate is stable. Inflation is stable. House prices are on the up and up. But perhaps we popped the champagne cork too soon. For one thing, Carney won’t take up his new post as governor of the Bank of England until the summer. For another, consumer debt being what it is, Canadians may not have seen the worst of this financial cycle. In fact, if experiments in behavioural economics are anything to go by, Canada may be in a bubble in more ways than one. Earlier this fall, I interviewed Richard Deaves, a professor of finance and economics at McMaster University in Hamilton and bubble expert. Deaves says the tricky thing about bubbles is that people don’t recognize when they’re in the middle of one. Human nature being what it is we’re far more likely to find ways to justify overpriced stocks or exorbitant growth in housing prices than we are to look at it objectively. Just before the housing bubble burst in Flor-

BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse ida, for example, real estate agents blamed demographics – specifically, baby boomer demand – for driving prices to unprecedented levels and they saw no end in sight. In other words, people trick themselves into believing values will climb forever and when the bubble is about ready to burst? Well, Deaves likens it to musical chairs. “When the music stops, everyone rushes to the exits at the same time,” he says. The result, of course, is a plummet of values and often recession in the market where the bubble occurred. Deaves and his colleagues have done a number of experiments on bubbles to examine conditions that perpetuate them. One of the most interesting findings is that people who have access to borrowed funds are likely to buy things at a higher value than they’re actually worth. Put simply, having access to loans, lines of credit and mortgages causes people to purchase things at higher amounts than they would if it

were their own money. And under what conditions are people most likely to borrow rather than save? When interest rates are low, of course. You can hardly turn on the TV or radio these days without hearing federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty at the Canada Club or a Bay Street luncheon lambasting Canadians for taking on big mortgages and running up consumer debt. But, frankly, delivering this punishing message while supporting The Bank of Canada’s prolonged low-interest rate policies is like telling your kids they’re too fat, while offering them freshly baked chocolate chip cookies. If experiments in behavioural economics are anything to go by, Canada’s fiscal policies may have created the perfect conditions for a bubble in the Canadian economy. Let’s see if Flaherty and the next bank governor can offer up something other than empty rhetoric to keep it from bursting.

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NEWS

Economic development tops Bay Ward town hall discussion steph.willems@metroland.com

EMC news - A new pilot project proposed for Ottawa’s west end could see employment opportunities improved for young people living in the area, residents were told last week. The new economic development project targeting a stretch of Carling Avenue in Bay Ward was among issues discussed at a town hall meeting organized by Bay Coun. Mark Taylor on Nov. 27. The event served to highlight many local improvement projects while eliciting feedback on larger issues or ongoing concerns. Joining Taylor was Ottawa police Const. Ian Matyas and Ian Scott, economic development officer with the city. The Carling Avenue economic development plan is being organized to look at ways of bringing much-needed services and job opportunities to the west end. A concurrent plan will be implemented for a much larger area in Orléans. “Over the next two months (we will) put together a framework on how to accomplish these goals, with an associated timeline,” said Taylor. “That will have to be approved by committee and city council.” The plan covers the area of Carling between Pinecrest Road and Bayshore Drive and includes areas of the adjacent communities of Michelle Heights and Britannia Heights. The area is home to a large population of young people,

in many cases from lower-tomiddle income families. With this pilot project, the city would like to see the creation of multiple tiers of local jobs that put an emphasis on youth, while also adding amenities to a community where many residents don’t own vehicles. The act of encouraging businesses to set up shop in certain areas of the city is constricted by legal considerations, meaning quick incentives are not immediately forthcoming. “To encourage that investment (in a community), you would have to give a grant, an inducement and the province says that would be illegal,” said Scott, adding that community improvement plans offer a way around the provincial legislation. Scott said the one thing the city can do is offer a property tax freeze as an incentive, but only if a business has expanded on the property. In that sense, a business that expands a current building would, under the pilot program, only pay the property taxes attributed to the original building’s footprint. “It doesn’t hurt the taxation department because that’s money they weren’t going to get,” said Scott. Both Scott and Taylor stressed that they desire extensive community input on what jobs should be targeted before moving into the by law process. Another matter concerning the public at the town hall was the redevelopment of the Ron Kolbus Lakeside Centre, which is moving towards a second draft plan

STEPH WILLEMS/METROLAND

A stretch of Carling Avenue between Bayshore Drive and Pinecrest Road near Michelle Heights will be the focus of a community improvement pilot project aimed at promoting business growth. based on public feedback. Many residents worried the city’s desire to accommodate all community uses within the expanded building would negatively affect its ability to accommodate existing uses, such as dinner-dances and community theatre. Several questions posed to Taylor during the town hall focused on the segmenting of the large, first-floor meeting space with a hallway to allow easier access to other rooms.

As well, questions about whether the centre really needs a fitness or weight room were raised. Taylor responded by saying the initial draft presented to the community was simply

an example of what the centre could look like, as public feedback from an open house, as well as this meeting, would being incorporated into a second, more specific draft plan. That plan will be unveiled

at a later date. “We want to add capabilities, not take them away,” said Taylor.

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Steph Willems

www.ottawalightrail.ca

www.trainlegerottawa.ca R0011791716-1206

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012

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Your Community Newspaper

NEWS

Shining a light in deep, dark places underground New Museum of Nature gallery takes look at Earth’s geological history Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - The latest gallery at the Canadian Museum of Nature invites patrons to don a miner’s cap, dream of diamonds or shake things up with an earthquake or two at the sparkling new Vale Earth Gallery. The museum officially opened its mineral and geological exhibit on Nov. 30, offering the opportunity to learn about Earth and its minerals presented as a journey through time. According to museum president Meg Beckel, this latest gallery collects both the museum’s best geological and mineral specimens and pairs them with new content and engaging

interactive activities. “Visitors will get the chance to learn first hand about the Earth,” Beckel said. “... the museum has made minerals and geology real and relevant.” Vale, a Sudbury-based mining company, donated $1 million in 2009 to help make this exhibition possible. Cory McPhee, vice president of corporate affairs at Vale, attended a preview of the exhibition on Nov. 28. “On behalf of Vale we are pleased to be a part of this new exhibit,” McPhee said. Renovations were made to the original mineral and geology exhibition to make the new, larger gallery possible. “We are extremely grateful for Vale’s support, which has allowed us to complete

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this project that will inspire and connect visitors with our collections and the mineralogy research of our scientists,” Beckel said. The exhibit is filled with 14 oversized mineral specimens, crystals, gems and diamonds among others. The gallery boasts many of Canada’s best samples of minerals and crystals. There is also the chance to see a meteorite that is almost as old as Earth – 4.57 billion years old. Children and parents alike can build a volcano, control a two-metre diametre animated globe, cause an earthquake or explore a limestone cave, if they can brave the depth and all the bats in the cave. McPhee said he was surprised at the realism and attention to detail with the limestone cave. A piece of Saskatchewan is also on display. A replica of a sedimentary rock face with embedded fossils from around 65 million years ago is in the middle of the gallery. There is also a Mining Hall of Fame, which features the biographies of 153 of Canada’s mining and geology pioneers. Entry to exhibition is included with regular museum admission. For full details, including fees and hours, visit nature.ca.

MICHELLE NASH/METROLAND

Nigel Bowers of Eastern Museum Services places a titanite crystal into the crystals case at the new Vale Earth Gallery on Nov. 28. The gallery opened on Nov. 30 and features many Canadian cut crystals and gemstones as well as a miner’s hall of fame and a lifesize limestone cave.

PLANNED WORK

IN YOUR COMMUNITY Investing today, powering tomorrow

Hydro Ottawa is committed to delivering the highest levels of customer service and safety. To achieve this goal, Hydro Ottawa regularly evaluates, replaces and upgrades equipment in your area. Investing in infrastructure is essential to the delivery of reliable electricity service for the future. Over the next several weeks, Hydro Ottawa will be conducting a pole replacement and relocation project in the Bronson Ave area in conjunction with the City of Ottawa’s Bronson Ave rehabilitation work. This initiative is scheduled to be completed by the end of January 2013.

Project Duration: December 3, 2012 to January 31, 2013

Should a power interruption be necessary in order to complete this work, you will receive advance notification by mail.

Bronson Ave. between Gladstone Ave. and Somerset St. W.

Hydro Ottawa will take steps to mitigate any power disruptions, construction noise and traffic concerns. Your patience is appreciated. We apologize for any inconvenience this vital work may cause.

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R0011754559

Affected Area:

hydroottawa.com/plannedwork 12 Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Protesters denounce provincial cuts to social assistance ACORN members rally to urge Ontario government to reverse its decision on start-up benefit Steph Willems steph.willems@metroland.com

STEPH WILLEMS/METROLAND

Members of ACORN protest outside the Employment Ontario service centre on Catherine Street on Nov. 30. The group wants the Ontario government to reinstate the home repair and community start-up and maintenance benefits. canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get out of the system because they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get out of poverty,â&#x20AC;? said Fortin, describing those who do find employment have to pay 50 per cent of their income back

to the province, leaving nothing left for anything besides rent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It puts you back into poverty â&#x20AC;&#x201C; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;claw back.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; We want to recoup

what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve lost.â&#x20AC;? The group has also protested earlier alterations to the provinceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s special diet allowance. Though legislature is pro-

rogued until which time the Ontario Liberal party replaces McGuinty as leader, the ACORN members are determined to have their voices heard.

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EMC news - Members of the advocacy group ACORN Ottawa voiced their opposition to the Ontario governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision to remove certain social assistance benefits during a Nov. 30 protest. Holding banners and signs, the group assembled at the Employment Ontario service centre at 370 Catherine St. and made the cold march to the Ontario Disability Support Program offices at Preston Square. The focus of the protest was the decision made by the province earlier this year to remove the home repairs benefit and reduce the community start up and maintenance benefit by half starting in January 2013. The province has stated it intends to create an integrated program using combined funding from social assistance programs and other sources in order to deliver similar services. Members of ACORN, which stands for Association of Community Organizers for Reform Now, have said the start-up benefit helps 16,000 residents receiving Ontario Works or ODSP access stable

housing if they need to pay first and last monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rent to leave a shelter situation, to connect with hydro or to add accessibility devices to their home. It also allows new shoes or clothing to be acquired for job interviews or employment. With the benefit ending at the end of the year, the members - who have been fighting a number of provincial decisions during the past year -- donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see an immediate replacement option for users of this benefit. Kathleen Fortin, head of the ACORN board, uses a wheelchair and has made good use of the benefit in the past. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I used it to find employment a couple of years ago â&#x20AC;&#x201C; transportation to find jobs, and shoes and clothing for interviews,â&#x20AC;? said Fortin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here to tell the provincial government we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want them to cut the community start up.â&#x20AC;? Fortin said by not having the benefits in place and by not reversing the social assistance rate cuts of the Harris government, Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty is removing avenues that lead away from poverty. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People are stuck -- they

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Your Community Newspaper

NEWS

West-end co-operative nets accolades for legacy project Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

EMC news â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Owl Maclure is building a lasting legacy in Nepean. The co-operative centre nabbed a Spirit of Co-operation Award from the Ontario Association of Co-operatives on Nov. 30. Hugh Nelson, the co-operatives executive director, travelled to Milton, Ont., to accept the award. He said a legacy project to celebrate the organizations 30 years of service was responsible for netting them the award. The legacy project â&#x20AC;&#x201C; called Pillar of the Community â&#x20AC;&#x201C; was made with a pipe that was be decorated with mirrored tiles and marbles. The tiles represent adults and marbles represent the children. It was designed to introduce the organization to the community. Once completed, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;pillarâ&#x20AC;? will have a permanent home at Morrison Park. The art commemorates the United Nations International Year of Co-operatives (IYC) and was made possible courtesy of a grant from the Community Foundation of Ottawa The co-operative centre provides support services for teens and adults with developmental disabilities.

The support services include things like job placement and a social group for teens and adults with autism. The accolades are a result of the leadership role Yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Owl Maclure has taken within the Ottawa co-operative cluster. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The project is a fitting tribute to Yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Owl Maclure and IYC as it represents people as pillars of their communities and reflects the IYC theme of co-ops building a better world,â&#x20AC;? said nominator Cynthia Mitchell â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who is also a member of the Ottawa co-operative cluster. Nelson said there have been huge developments in the organization over the 30 years since its founding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am proud to say that over this time our membership has grown from the initial 16 to 250 active members,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Owl Maclure continues, through its mission to work with our members towards their goals of inclusion, development of a strong co-operative business and building hopeful lives for our members.â&#x20AC;? The Ontario co-operative movement is composed of more than 1,300 co-ops with locations in 400 communities. Co-operatives employ 15,500 people and are supported by a network of 49,000 volunteers.

SUBMITTED

Hugh Nelson, the executive director of Yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Owl Maclure Co-operative Centre, went to Milton on Nov. 30 to accept a Spirit of Co-operation Award on behalf of the Nepean organization.

Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open data on the menu for learning, hacking Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - When it comes to crunching city-hall data, a local group wants to move beyond apps. Advocacy group Open Data Ottawa has held four events

mainly focused on bringing citizens and software developers together to create applications or â&#x20AC;&#x153;appsâ&#x20AC;? using city data for mobile devices, but its Dec. 8 event is looking to get a bit more creative. The fifth Open Data Ottawa Hackathon will have as much

learning as it does â&#x20AC;&#x153;hacking,â&#x20AC;? said Mary Beth Baker, one of the organizers. Organizers hope the event will discover how the city can see itself in new ways and how citizens can solve problems in creative ways using data. With another edition of

the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open data app contest scheduled for the new year, the Dec. 8 Learn Hack YOW event is a good way to warm up, Baker wrote in an email. The event will begin at 10 a.m. in the Champlain Room of city hall at 110 Laurier

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Ave. W. Partnering with Ladies Learning to Code and the city, Open Data Ottawa will kick off the event with a series on hands-on tutorials to teach participants about data entrepreneurship, mobile web usability, information visualization, Google charts and Google fusion tables. In the afternoon, the group of entrepreneurial and techsavvy citizens will come together to create projects such as apps or new ways to view and interpret the information the city makes available as

open data. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The city has released to citizens many rich data sets, encouraged us to see our city in new ways, and enabled us to solve problems in creative ways using data. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s keep learning and hacking together,â&#x20AC;? Baker wrote in an email. The event is scheduled to wrap up at 5 p.m. Participants are encouraged to pre-register for free online at http://learnhackyow. eventbrite.com. For $11 participants can also sign up for lunch.

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A make-or-break day

O

nce a year, farmers from far and wide converged on the town of Renfrew for what they all hoped would be a prosperous day – the turkey fair. Ideally, all the fowl would be sold and that would mean a brighter Christmas at a time when money was scarce. Of course it wasn’t only turkeys that were taken into town: geese, eggs, butter, fresh cream and Mother’s sticky buns, usually the first thing to be sold. Turkey fair day was also on a Saturday, so there were many hands to help with getting everything loaded on the sleigh, preparing a hearty lunch and making sure everyone had gone to the outhouse at the last minute and was well wrapped up for the long, freezing day ahead. There was no sleeping in on turkey fair day. We were roused before dawn, because Father wanted to claim a good spot on the main street. Sales depended on where you parked the sleigh. Too far down Raglan, in either direction, meant you would be lucky to get rid of everything you had brought in from Northcote. The people who lived in town weren’t about to walk beyond the main core. Once we claimed our spot, Father would unhitch the team, walk it down to the drive shed at the south end of town and we were ready for business. The stores opened early that day, which delighted my sister Audrey and me because we didn’t want to hang around the sleigh, we wanted to start at one end of the street and work our way through every store. We went into stores we would never dream of entering any other time. Who could afford a store like Fraser’s? Just the rich people of Renfrew, that’s who. So Audrey and I would go in and the store always smelled of lemons for some reason and of the newness of clothes and there was always

Holiday Energy Conservation Tips

MARY COOK

The winter holiday period can be a time of heavy electricity use, with the family at home and lots of entertaining. Here are some simple yet helpful tips on how to conserve energy this holiday season:

Mary Cook’s Memories sickly green and smelled of strong disinfectant. Audrey and me used the bathroom as quickly as possible, so that we could head back to the main street. My sister always went to the counter and said thank you, but the station agent never raised his head. That afternoon, the turkey fair was coming to an end. I was too scared to ask Mother if everything she had brought in on the sleigh had sold. But I could usually tell from the look on her face. Everett would be sent to bring the horses from the drive shed and Father would hitch them up to the sleigh and we would pile onto the blankets, which had been laid out over a straw bed. They would be covered with white flour bag sheets at the start of the day so that everything offered for sale would look its best and look meticulously clean. Audrey would fold up the sheets and with Mother and Father on the one seat on the sleigh, and we five crowded onto the bed, we would head out for Northcote. It didn’t take long for the sun to fade and by the time we reached the Northcote Side Road the daylight would be gone. Father would light a lantern and hang it on the post at the front of the sleigh. Only then would Mother tell us what kind of day it had been. If it was a good one, we would sing all the way home. If things hadn’t gone as well as expected, we were all very quiet. But whatever was realized at the turkey fair, it was enough to tide us over for another spell and Mother would say “it’s more than we had yesterday.”

a big bowl of peppermints on the counter by each register. These candies were little round discs, dusty with peppermint powder and my sister and I always grabbed one each after we had circled the store looking at the beautiful clothes. At the “rich people’s stores,” as Audrey and I called them, they seemed to know we weren’t there to buy anything, because no one ever came up to us to offer help. That suited us just fine. By the time noon rolled around, we were ready for lunch and ready to head over to the Canadian Pacific Railway station to go to the bathroom. I never saw Mother or Father eat. I have no idea if they did, but we five kids were each handed a brown paper bag (saved of course from a purchase at Briscoe’s General Store) just as the town clock struck noon. Through the generosity of one of the town’s restaurants, we were allowed to eat our lunch in one of the booths inside where it was warm. After we had eaten our jelly sandwich, we were ready to visit the station to use its facility. This was the one point in the day I dreaded. I’m sure it was my imagination, but I always thought the station master didn’t approve of us farm children coming in just to use the bathroom. He wore a cap with a green celluloid piece in the front and he peered out from under it, scowling. We tried to be as quiet as possible and stomped the snow off our feet when we went in so as not to leave a wet mark on the floor. The whole place was painted a

Claus!

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Use LED holiday lights instead of incandescent. LED lights use up to 95 percent less energy than traditional lights and last for many years without needing to change a bulb.

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The peaksaver PLUS program offers participants with central air conditioning a free professionally-installed programmable thermostat. Visit www.peaksaverplus.net for details.

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Spiced pork with ginger strawberry sauce tasty, sweet EMC lifestyle - Pork is a wonder addition to any diet. All trimmed pork cuts, except ribs, qualify as lean or extra-lean. Lean cuts contain 10 per cent of fat or less. These in-

clude all trimmed fresh, cuts (excluding ribs), including pork chops, roasts, schnitzels, kabobs, cutlets, cubes and strips.Extra-lean cuts contain 7.5 per cent fat or less. These include pork tender-

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a healthy body, including six essential vitamins, four important minerals, protein and energy. An average 100 gram cooked, trimmed serving of lean pork provides 191 calories, 29 grams of protein and 7.5 grams of fat. Pork is an excellent source of thiamin: 100 grams provide 65 per cent of the daily recommended intake. It is also a source of riboflavin, niacin, vitamins B6 and B12, phosphorous, magnesium, iron and zinc. The following recipe offers a hint of Middle Eastern flavours complementing both the succulent pork and the sweet strawberries. Preparation Time: 12 minutes. Cooking Time: N/A. Grilling Time: 25 minutes. Standing Time: 10 minutes.

Servings: four to six. Ingredients

• 1 tbsp (15 ml) vegetable oil • 1.5 tsp (7 ml) each of ground cumin and coriander • 0.5 tsp (2 ml) ground cinnamon • pinch of cayenne pepper • 750 g pork tenderloin Ginger strawberry sauce

• 0.75 cup (175 ml) apple jelly • 2 tbsp (25 ml) lemon juice • 1.5 tsp (7 ml) grated fresh gingerroot (or 0.5 tsp/2 ml ground ginger) • 2 cups (500 ml) sliced hulled strawberries Preparation

In small bowl, mix together oil, cumin, coriander, cin-

namon and cayenne; brush all over pork tenderloin. Let stand for 20 minutes. Place on grill over medium heat; close lid and cook for 18 to 25 minutes or until just a hint of pink remains, turning halfway through. Remove to cutting board; let stand tented with foil for 10 to 15 minutes before diagonally slicing into one centimetre-thick slices. Ginger strawberry sauce: Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan, heat the jelly, lemon juice and ginger, stirring to melt the jelly. Turn off the heat and stir in the strawberries. Spoon some sauce onto plates and arrange the meat slices over top. Drizzle the remaining sauce over the meat. Tip: cook the meat to 160 F (70 C) on a thermometer. Courtesy Foodland Ontario

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Art chosen for Bronson Avenue renewal Two public works to be installed by autumn of 2013

River Ward City Councillor @CouncillorMcRae Conseillère, quartier Rivière River Ward Flu Clinic Wednesday, December 12 - 3:30 to 8:30 p.m. Jim Durrell Recreation Centre (1265 Walkley Road) For more information please visit ottawa.ca/flu, watch for daily updates on Twitter (@ottawahealth) and Facebook, or call Ottawa Public Health Information at 613-580-6744 (TTY:613580-9656).

Steph Willems

steph.willems@metroland.com

City Council Approves 2013 Budget On Wednesday, November 30, 2012, City Council unanimously approved the 2013 budget, which includes a 2.09 per cent tax increase and allows City Council to continue to invest in the municipal services and infrastructure that matter most to residents. The 2013 Budget includes efficiencies through a reduction in the City’s staffing costs. ServiceOttawa will also deliver additional savings by providing residents with more efficient ways to access many City services online 24/7.

Submitted

The two proposals selected by the city’s public art program were Community Channel by Andrew O’Malley, top, and Sit for a While, In the Garden, and Watch the Parade by Tim desClouds. O’Malley’s art will be installed at the entrance of the Bronson Centre, while desClouds’ art will adorn the southern fenceline at the northeast corner of the Bronson Avenue/Gladstone Avenue intersection.

UPPER CANADA VILLAGE

Alight at Night FESTIVAL

River Ward Resident and Community Volunteer, Frank J. Licari, Receives Mayor’s City Builder Award I was honoured to join Mayor Jim Watson at City Council on Wednesday, November 28, 2012 to present the Mayor’s City Builder Award to Frank J. Licari for his many years of volunteering with a variety of organizations and for his exceptional service to the Ridgemont Community and the citizens of Ottawa. Frank is recognized for his 30-year commitment to the Ridgemont Community Association in various capacities, culminating as president. He was honoured by the City of Ottawa in 2010 when Ridgemont Park was renamed the Frank J. Licari Park in recognition of his achievements in community building, preserving green spaces, and improving local recreation facilities and programs, including wonderful upgrades to the play structure at the park. Frank is known for his enthusiasm, commitment and also his modesty. He has inspired many with his volunteer work and dedication to many causes and organizations: Villa Marconi, Little Italy, Ottawa’s Dragon Boat Festival, St. Anthony’s Soccer Club, the Bank Street Redevelopment Plan, the Winter Park Skating Program, Saro’s Softball Team, Clifford Bowey Public School, the United Way, Ridgemont’s hockey and skating programs and much more. He also worked with his colleagues and neighbours to initiate the Neighbourhood Watch Program and has organized numerous social functions for area residents, including street dances, community garage sales, and winter carnivals to name a few. On behalf of the residents of River Ward, thank you Frank for your tremendous contributions which have made our city a better place.

River Ward City Councillor • Conseillère, quartier Rivièr

November 30 to January 5

Congratulations to Order of Ottawa Recipients On November 22, 2012, fifteen of Ottawa’s most outstanding residents were inducted into the Order of Ottawa. I am proud to F A L L 2 0 1 1 congratulate River Ward resident Paul Benoit on his selection as an inaugural recipient of this award. As President and CEO of the • Canada derives its name from the Iroquois word kanata, Ottawa International Airport Authority since 1996, Paul’s countless meaning “village” or “settlement”. contributions to our community are paralleled by his successes in putting Ottawa on the map of the international aviation industry. • James Naismith invented basketball in 1891. @CouncillorMcRae River Ward by City Please join me in celebrating country Congratulations to Paul and to all our Order magnificent of Ottawa recipients! • Canada’s official colours – red and white – were proclaimed by King George V in 1921. proudly displaying our flag in your Rink of Dreams Open from the 2012 to 2013 Season F A L L 2 0 1 1 • Canada’s “Maple Leaf” flag was first flown on • Canada derives itsof name from the Iroquois opened word kanata, On November 30,home 2012, the Rink Dreams officially or business. February 15, 1965. meaning “village”The or “settlement” . for the 2012-2013 winter season. 12,500 square foot oval • James Naismith invented basketball 1891. @CouncillorMcRae ice surface is a refrigerated outdoor skating facilityinsituated on • Terry Fox inspired millions of Canadians during his 1980 Pl Marion Dewar Plaza• Canada’s at Ottawaofficial City colours Hall, 110 Laurier Avenue West. – red and white – were cross-country run to raise money and awareness for proclaimed by King George V in 1921. The rink features LED lighting, a heated change hut and picnic cancer research. tables and benches.• Canada’s “Maple Leaf” flag was first flown on

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ee a 19th century village adorned in almost a million lights! Experience horse-drawn • Canada est romantic un termecarriage dérivé du mot kanata, qui rides; a iroquois lifewagons and signifie « village » ou « colonie ». size Toy Train, holiday music, festive dining, and shopping. Now in its 12th ayear, the Alight at Nighten 1891. • James Naismith inventé le basketball Festival has become a favourite family tradition! • Les couleurs officielles du Canada – le rouge et le blanc – ont été proclamées par le roi George V en 1921.

closuresàdue to inclement weather or for specialmerveilleux events. Joignez-vous moi pour célébrer notre pays en

• Le drapeau arborant la feuille d’érable a été hissé pour la première fois le 15 février 1965. • Terry Fox a inspiré des millions de Canadiens et de Canadiennes lors de son marathon transcanadien en 1980 en vue de collecter des fonds pour la recherche sur le cancer et de sensibiliser la population àAVAILABLE cet égard.ONLINE. TICKETS AND OVERNIGHT PACKAGE INFORMATION MORRISBURG, ONTARIO

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• Terry Fox inspired millions of Canadians during his 1980 to raise and awareness for The Rink of Dreams cross-country is open fromrun8:00 a.m.money to 11:00 p.m., seven research. for regular updates on rink days a week. Please cancer visit ottawa.ca

affichant avec fiertéYour notre drapeau dans votre résidenceJoig Strong Voice at City Hall • Canada est un terme dérivé du mot iroquois kanata, qui

« village » « colonie ». As always, I appreciate hearing fromouyou and encourage you to ousignifie votre entreprise. a inventé le basketball en 1891. keep in touch with • James me as itNaismith allows me to serve you better. It is an honour and a privilege your strongduvoice at –City Hall.et le • Lesbeing couleurs officielles Canada le rouge

a

blanc – ont été proclamées par le roi George V en 1921.

• Le drapeau arborant la feuille d’érable a été hissé pour la première fois le 15 février 1965. R0021767689

EMC news - Two artists have been selected to help make the renewed Bronson Avenue a more dynamic place to be. As part of the two-year construction project to replace the roadway’s critical infrastructure and upgrade the streetscape, a call went out earlier this year for proposals for two planned public art installations. In October, residents attending an open house were asked to provide feedback on the assembled ideas, one for the entrance to the Bronson Centre and another for the fence line on the northeast corner of the intersection of Bronson and Gladstone avenues. On Nov. 29, the city issued a release announcing Andrew O’Malley as the winner for the Bronson Centre entrance. The city lauded his “bold and forward-thinking light-based installation,” titled Community Channel, which is comprised of larger-than-life translucent figures illuminated by LED lights of alternating colour. This work will be placed above the entrance to the centre, located at 211 Bronson Ave. Tim desClouds’ design for the Gladstone fence, titled Sit for a While, In the Garden, and Watch the Parade, will be comprised of a large, threedimensional silhouette of a maple tree. The branches of the stylized tree will form an arch over the McNabb Park entrance, while other cut-outs will show figures “depicting the diversity of individuals and activities in the community.” Under the city’s public art program, one per cent of funding for municipal infrastructure projects is diverted towards the creation of public art installations. The $30 million Bronson Avenue renewal project began in the spring of 2012 and covers the area between Arlington Avenue and Laurier Avenue. In addition to upgraded sewers and sidewalk improvements, the resurfaced roadway will feature cycling infrastructure. The project is expected to wrap up in 2014. Melissa Black, project coordinator for the public art program, confirmed that the artwork will be installed at both locations in the fall of 2013.

• Terry Fox a inspiré des millions de Canadiens et de Canadiennes lors de son marathon transcanadien en 1980 en vue de collecter des fonds pour la recherche sur le cancer et de sensibiliser la population à cet égard.

Maria McRae

River Ward City Councillor Conseillère, quartier Rivière

City of Otta Tel./Tél.: 613-580-2486 Tel/Tél. : (613 Maria.McRae@ottawa.ca 311 www.Maria MariaMcRae.ca City of Ottawa/Ville d’Ottawa, 110, avenue Laurier Avenue West/ouest, Ot @CouncillorMcRae R0011785177

Tel/Tél. : (613) 580-2486 Fax/Téléc. (613) Maria.McRae@ottaw Ottawa :West EMC580-2526 - Thursday, December 6, 2012 17 www.MariaMcRae.ca @CouncillorMcRae


SPorts

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2012 - 2013 SEASON

THE GIFT THAT'LL BE MUSIC TO THEIR EARS Jessica Cunha/Metroland

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Lucas Nguyen, left and Brooklyn McCormick claimed podium finishes at the eastern Ontario Skate Canada Sectionals, held in Kingston, Ont., from Nov. 9 to 11.

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Jessica Cunha

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petition earlier this month. Brooklyn McCormick and Lucas Nguyen, both members of the Glen Cairn Skating Club, finished in the top two at the eastern Ontario Skate

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gram. With a final score of 26.19, she beat out second place Téodora Skiljevic, of the Nepean Skating Club, by 0.22 points. Brooklyn, an 11-year-old Jean Paul II French Catholic elementary school student, has been with the Glen Cairn club for three years. Lucas, a Britannia resident, placed second in the pre-juvenile men’s free program with a final score of 14.71, 4.36 points behind first-place finisher Alec Guinzbourg from the Quinte Figure Skating Club. Lucas, 11, attends Terredes-Jeunes French Catholic elementary school and has been with the Glen Cairn club for three years. Glen Cairn Skating Club member Ysabele Rivard nabbed a 16th place finish at the sectionals with a final score of 16.23.


news

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Spread cheer: Be Santa to a Senior Program provides gifts, company to older adults across Ottawa

Dear friends, With winter upon us and the busy holiday season just around the corner, I’d like to take this opportunity to share some tips on winter driving that are important for us all to keep in mind. With the hustle and bustle of the season, it is easy to forget driving conditions can be unpredictable and we may need just a little bit more time to get where we are going.

Jessica Cunha

jessica.cunha@metroland.com

Ontario’s roads are ranked as the safest in North America. Our experienced highway maintenance contractors are ready to respond quickly to winter weather conditions, and work hard to make sure our roads are salted, sanded and cleared of snow. Crews are out on our roads within 30 minutes of the start of a winter storm, and highways are plowed when 2 centimetres of snow or slush have accumulated on the roadway.

Submitted

The Home Instead Senior Care organization launches its annual Be a Santa to a Senior program, which provides gifts and companionship to seniors throughout Ottawa.

Remember, roads covered in snow or ice can be dangerous. The most important elements to keep in mind when driving in winter weather are to slow down, stay alert and stay in control. Make sure your vehicle is winter-ready, and keep a winter survival kit in your car. Ensure your vehicle is mechanically ready for the rigours of winter, keep your fuel tank sufficiently full, and make sure you have adequate windshield washer fluid that is rated a minimum of -40C temperature range. Consider winter tires for your vehicle, as winter tires in good condition can shorten braking distances by as much as 25%. Give yourself plenty of time when traveling. Take an extra moment to clear the snow and ice from all windows, lights and mirrors – and don’t forget the roof! Be prepared to slow down, and be patient when encountering winter maintenance vehicles. Stay well back from snowplows and never attempt to pass. It is extremely dangerous to pass either between or around snowplows. You can also check driving conditions by calling 511 or by visiting www.ontario.ca/511 before you head out on the road. As always, please do not hesitate to contact my constituency office at 613-721-8075 or bob@bobchiarelli.com with any questions or comments you may have.

For more winter safety tips, visit www.ontario.ca/winterdriving. http://www.bobchiarelli.onmpp.ca

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012

1206.R0011791711

Sincerely, Bob Chiarelli, MPP Ottawa West-Nepean 1206.R0011785744

EMC news - People can spread some joy to the world by providing isolated seniors with a special holiday surprise. The Home Instead Senior Care organization launched its annual Be a Santa to a Senior program on Nov. 19, which provides gifts and companionship to older adults throughout the city without family or loved ones. “They’re truly alone on Christmas,” said Lesley Sullivan, owner of the Home Instead Senior Care office located in Kanata. “(Be a Santa) is probably the only Christmas contact that they have.” The senior care organization partners with local charities, agencies and community resource centres to identify isolated seniors who are in need of some holiday happiness. “Many seniors are faced with having to spend the holidays alone,” said Sullivan. “As one gets older social circles become smaller, health concerns become greater and many seniors become isolated.” The program isn’t necessarily for financially needy seniors, Sullivan said. “It’s for seniors who have no one to share Christmas with.” The organization has set up Christmas trees at four locations throughout the city where people can choose an ornament with a senior’s name and a gift idea from the tree: • Carlingwood Shopping Centre. • Shoppers Home Health Care 420 Hazeldean Rd. • Shoppers Home Health Care 1309 Carling Ave. • Shoppers Home Health Care 1675 Tenth Line Rd. “The public is encouraged to pick up (an ornament), purchase a gift and leave the gift under the tree, unwrapped,” said Sullivan. Last year saw 650 gifts provided to seniors throughout Ottawa, said Sullivan. “Be a Santa to a Senior is another way to say thank you to the many seniors who have made such important contributions to our community throughout the years,” Sullivan said. “Helping a needy older adult can bring fulfillment to the giver as well as the receiver – it does make a difference.” Dymon Self Storage in Kanata has volunteered space to store the gifts, as well as space for the gift wrapping party, which will take place on Dec. 17 from 1 to 4 p.m. Home Instead Senior Care will deliver the wrapped gifts to the agencies, which then give the presents to the clients. Anyone interested in volunteering time to wrap gifts is asked to call 613-599-6906. For more details, visit beasantatoasenior.ca.

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20 Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012


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Electric car roadshow arrives in town Businessman going coast-to-coast to prove trek doesn’t need a gas-guzzler Michelle Nash

michelle.nash@metroland.com

Creating Jobs and Economic Growth The number one priority for our Conservative Government remains economic growth and job creation. Canada emerged from the global recession in a better economic position than most countries. However, we face a potential skilled-labour shortage of up to 1,000,000 unfilled jobs in the next decade due to an aging workforce. Our government is taking decisive action to minimize the impact of this shortage on our economy in the years to come. A key component of long-term economic prosperity is immigration. We are committed to creating an immigration system that works for all Canadians. The aim of our sweeping immigration reform is to ensure that Canada welcomes the hardworking skilled workers our economy requires, while at the same time excluding those who try to abuse the system.

Michelle Nash/Metroland

Sun Country Highway president Kent Rathwell is travelling across Canada in a Tesla Roadster to help educate Canadians about the benefits of driving an electric car. stops while in Ottawa. On Nov. 30 he visited Diffraction Limited on Grenfell Crescent and Algonquin College on Woodroffe Avenue. before heading west to Peterborough. The Sun Country Highway

charging stations, including a new station at the museum, are free of charge for any electric vehicle owner. This is made possible because of partnerships between more than 80 businesses across Canada.

The chargers charge most electric vehicles within 90 minutes. To follow Rathwell’s journey or to find out more about electrical vehicles visit www. suncountryhighway.ca.

For example, we are introducing reforms to the Federal Skilled Worker Program, Canada’s largest economic immigration program. In order to be selected, newcomers now need to pass an updated screening system that rewards education, work experience and official language abilities. Research has consistently shown that these factors are important in ensuring successful integration into Canadian society. We are also creating a new skilled trades category. For too long, it has been nearly impossible for hardworking tradespeople, whose skills are increasingly in demand in Canada, to navigate our skilled worker program with its outdated requirements. Citizenship and Immigration Canada is currently finalizing details for the new category, and is expected to start receiving applications in early 2013.

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Our Conservative Government also introduced the Canadian Experience Class (CEC), now the fastest-growing economic immigration program. It offers a pathway to permanent residency for international graduate students and skilled workers who have already demonstrated that they can succeed in Canada’s economy.

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And finally, our government has taken several steps to improve the recognition of foreign credentials. For example, we created the Foreign Credentials Referral Office, which has helped many internationally-trained individuals begin the process of credential recognition in Canada well before they arrive. A framework has been introduced to recognize the credentials for certain professionals within one year of application, such as pharmacists, engineers and nurses. It is crucial that Canada continues to attract top talent from around the world. By recruiting people with the needed skill sets, we are able to fast-track worthy applicants and meet the demands of our labour market. As a result of our improvements to Canada’s immigration system, immigrants will see their outcomes improve, jobs will be created, and our economy will grow. Our government’s immigration reforms are good for all Canadians.

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EMC news - One man is driving across the country in an effort to prove to Canadians that there is an option to driving a gas-guzzling car. By the end of Sun Country Highway president Kent Rathwell’s trip, he will have travelled almost 10,000 kilometres in an electric vehicle. This initiative will commemorate both the milestones of Thomas Wilby’s first motor car tour across Canada in 1912 and the opening of the Trans Canada Highway in 1962. But this trip is also about promoting electric cars and the company’s free public access network of electric vehicle charging stations across the country. Sun Country Highway has close to 200 charging stations across Canada, but Rathwell said he will reveal the actual total when he reaches Victoria on Dec. 21. “It’s all about announcing a new world when it comes to driving ... an electric world,” he said. Rathwell is driving a Tesla Roadster, a sports car that can go from zero to 100 kilometres per hour in 3.7 seconds. The reason he is making this trip in December? Rathwell said it is to debunk the number one myth he hears when it comes to electric cars. “I always hear that they don’t work in the winter,” Rathwell said. “Well we are proving those people wrong.” The car is tiny and expensive at around $60,000, but so far Rathwell has driven close to 3,000 kilometres and it hasn’t cost him a cent and he has left no emissions in his wake. While in Ottawa, Rathwell and his posse of electric cars stopped to get a charge at the new charging station at the Canada Science and Technology Museum on Nov. 29. Ellen Burack, general director of the energy initiative Let’s Talk Energy at the museum welcomed the travellers. Harry Smith, who owns the Tesla Model S sedan and Ottawa resident Doug George, who owns a red roadster, joined Rathwell at the museum.. “This is a great initiative and very similar to what the museum is trying to do to get people to think about their energy use,” Burack said. The program she works on showcases Canadian’s relationship with energy, the environment and the economy. Museum exhibitions, workshops and online tools are used to teach the importance of energy consumption and use. Burack said she finds the electric vehicle tour another great way to promoting the cause. Rathwell made a few more

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012

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New program aims to help residents balance budgets Consumer Agency of Canada, Ted Gordon, ex-member of the task force on financial literacy, and Adam Fair, the chief executive of the Canadian Centre for Financial Literacy, attended the event.

Michelle Nash

michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - Understanding home budgets and the best way to stretch a dollar has become a little easier for Ottawa’s most vulnerable with the launch of a new organization dedicated to raising awareness about financial literacy. The Financial Literacy Action Network Ottawa celebrated its official launch at Entraide Budgetaire, Ottawa’s largest financial literacy organization, on Nov. 28. Helene Menard, executive director of Entraide Budgetaire Ottawa said she was extremely proud of the network and what it is accomplishing in the community. “The financial literacy resourcing is becoming increasingly vast, and it’s great to see everyone coming together and working as one. I would invite anyone from the community who is interested in financial literacy to join our network.” Financial literacy is the ability to understand one’s finances. This organization is the first network in Ottawa of its kind and has brought together financial organizations and individuals from the community to help promote and educate people on household budgets and spending practices. The organization network

The centre is open to all organizations and community members who are involved in promoting financial literacy and will focus on strengthening the population’s understanding of financial choices

to achieve measurable success. For more information on the new network, visit 300 Olmstead St. in Vanier or contact Entraide Budgetaire at 613-746-0400 or online at www.ebottawa.org.

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The Financial Literacy Action Network Ottawa was officially launched at Entraide Budgetaire on Nov. 28. will focus on helping low-income individuals and families in Ottawa and will act as a hub full of information and

activities for those seeking help or education. Ursula Menke, the commissioner of the Financial

R0011787767

Active or Artistic – Give the gift of choice!

Suzie wants to skate; Nicholas wants karate; Maryam loves to swim; Natasha wants help with her oil painting; Zaynab relaxes with yoga; Karim lifts weights!

You can give your loved ones exactly what they want this year and it is available right here in Ottawa. Give them a sport, a hobby, a fitness membership or a swim lesson. Give them a City of Ottawa Recreation and Culture gift certificate. You don’t need to decide which of the hundreds of activities and classes is perfect for everyone on your list. When you give them a City of Ottawa Recreation and Culture gift certificate, you’re giving them the gift of choice! Gift certificates can be purchased in convenient $5, $10, $20 and $50 denominations and are available at your neighbourhood recreation and culture facility.

Gift certificates can be used for memberships or classes or activities including fitness, pottery, ballroom dance, swimming, skating, basketball, martial arts, aerobics and playgroups. They can be used at local recreation centers and at multi-facility complexes. They can be used right away for a winter program, or saved for a summer day camp adventure. The options are limitless and fun is guaranteed! Visit ottawa.ca/recreation to view all the classes that are possible this winter. March Break registration opens January 16. Spring and summer activities are being planned now and will be available for viewing on February 20. Recreation and culture classes and activities are lead by qualified instructors who love passing on their skills and knowledge to all ages. Their enthusiasm for teaching and organizing adventures makes City of Ottawa programs the best, affordable and fun gift everyone will want.

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012

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24 Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012


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Your Community Newspaper

A stAr studded skAting event

A portion of proceeds will go to D.I.F.D.and the Youth Services Bureau of Ottawa.

Michelle Nash/Metroland

Tayo Olaf said the entire team at the non-profit organization Jaku Konbit has been working around the clock for this year’s market and Kwanzaa celebration on Dec. 16.

Jaku Konbit celebrates Kwanzaa Fair, celebration together for first time Michelle Nash

michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - Whether it’s shopping or celebrating this holiday season, one downtown organization is inviting the public to enjoy the best of both worlds this year. Jaku Konbit, a non-profit community organization, will hold its annual Ujamaa Market and Kwanzaa celebration together for the first time. The day-long event will feature both a business and shopping fair with the traditional celebrations of Kwanzaa at the Ukrainian Orthodox Cathedral Hall on Dec. 16. Jaku Konbit’s mandate is to foster educational and cultural experiences for the community through events. Tayo Olaf, operation man-

ager for the organization, is co-ordinating the event and said the market and festive event will be both educational and fun. “We wanted to harness everything about Kwanza and Jaku Konbit into one event,” Olaf said. Kwanzaa is a week-long celebration that honours African heritage in African-Canadian and African-American culture. In the past, the two events have been held separately in the month of December, but this year Olaf said it made sense to combine the events. “One of the principles behind Kwanzaa is economic empowerment and creativity. The market, with its local vendors is just that.” One principal of Kwanzaa

is Ujamma, which translates to co-operative economics and represents the building and maintaining of community businesses. The Ujamma Market will open at 1 p.m. featuring local vendors from the African and Caribbean communities as well as local businesses. Solange Tuyishime, Miss Galaxy 2011, will be the master of ceremonies with musical performances by local musicians. The first day of Kwanzaa celebrations begins on Dec. 16 at 5 p.m. with the lighting of candles. Food and drinks will be part of the Kwanzaa festivities. “Everyone can take part in this celebration, whether it is to shop, meet new people or learn more about Kwanzaa,” Olaf said. Admission is free, but Olaf said the organization will be accepting donations.

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R0011736949

Your Community Newspaper

26 Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012


CLASSIFIED

Self-Storage, Lime Bank and River Road area. For small business or general goods. 10x20, $150/monthly. Smaller sizes available. Also outside car storage. (613)521-1245.

Disability Products. Buy and Sell stair lifts, scooters, bath lifts, patient lifts, hospital beds, etc. Call Silver Cross Ottawa (613)231-3549. ELLIPTICAL FOR SALE

FIREWOOD

ARTS/CRAFT/FLEA MRKT

in great condition. Has a timer, 10 levels of resistance, keeps track of calories burned, distance covered and pulse. If interested please make an offer @ 613-485-2835. Must come and get it.

Walter Baker Christmas Craft Show November 17th and December 8th 10am - 4pm. Free Admission. 100 Malvern Drive. Over 50 local Crafter’s and Artisans. www.goldenopp.ca

*HOT TUB (SPA) Covers-Best Price. Best quality. All shapes and colours. Call 1-866-652-6837. www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper

FIREWOOD FOR SALE. All Hardwood. 613-839-1485

BUSINESS SERVICES $$$NEED MONEY$$$ Do you have a pension plan form an ex-employer? (LIRA) or (lock in RRSP) Call NOW! 1-416-357-9585

FARM Ford 4610 4x4 Loader, Case 1190 Loader, MF 165 Loader, Ford 7700 Cab, Case IH 5300 Grain Drill 21x7. 613-223-6026.

FITNESS & HEALTH Fitness Hour Strength & Conditioning for ALL Fitness Levels. Coupon: 5 group classes, $35. 3 personal classes, $50 (call to register) 613-552-9216 or www.fitnesshour.ca 1800 Bank Street (Dance with Alana Studio)

FOR RENT

HELP WANTED

KANATA RENTAL TOWNHOMES

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100 Varley Lane

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World Class Drummer From Five Man Electrical Band, is accepting new students for private lessons. Call Steve 613-831-5029. www.stevehollingworth.ca

NOTICES

Apples, cider and apple products. Smyths Apple Orchard, 613-652-2477. Updates, specials and coupons at www.smythsapples.com. Open daily til April 1st.

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

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CANCEL YOUR TIMESHARE. No RISK program. STOP Mortgage and Maintenance payments today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Free Consultation. Call us NOW. We can help! 1-888-356-5248

VEHICLES GREAT WINTER CAR 2003 Pontiac Grand Prix SE 4 door, 195,000kms. 6 cylinder 3.1, full load. Lady Highway Driven. Has GT look. $2100.00 or OBO as is. Kevin 613-485-6680

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Looking for persons willing to speak to small groups, 1 on 1 presentations. A car and internet necessary. Diana (866)306-5858.

REMOVE YOUR CRIMINAL RECORD 100,000+ have used our service since 1989. BBB A+ rating. US Waiver allows you to travel to the US, or apply for a Record Suspension (Pardon) - professional & affordable Call 1-8-NOW PARDON (1-866-972-7366) www.removeyourrecord.com

WEDDING

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Weddings, Baptisms & Funerals, location of your choice. Also available small weddings, my home, weekdays. The Rev. Alan Gallichan. 613-726-0400.

Bachelor from $995 Inclusive 1 bedroom from $1095 Inclusive 2 bedroom from $1195 Inclusive 2+ bedroom from $1395 Inclusive

WORK WANTED

PERSONAL TRUE PSYCHICS 4 Answers Call Now 24/7 Toll Free 1-877-342-3032 Mobile #4486 www.truepsychics.ca

Send A Load to the dump, cheap. Clean up clutter, garage sale leftovers or leaf and yard waste. 613-256-4613.

CARD OF THANKS PETS DOG SITTING Experienced retired breeder providing lots of TLC. My home. Smaller dogs only. References available. $17-$20 daily Marg 613-721-1530

Income Properties: Brand new semi-detached, leased, $199,000. 1200 sq/ft bungalow, 6 years old, leased, $229,000. Triplex, fully leased, 5 years old, $449,000. Call Jim Barnett 613-217-1862.

THANK YOU Many thanks to each and every one who helped celebrate our 50th Wedding Anniversary. Your cards, gifts and best wishes are all treasured memories. We have been blessed by love, health and happiness. George and Bea Francis

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

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FOR SALE

CAREER DEVELOPMENT

FOR SALE

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Half Price Sale Nov. 29 & 30, Dec. 1, 6, & 7

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Assistant Director of Nursing Sherwood Park Manor Long Term Care Residence Brockville, Ontario Organization Background Sherwood Park Manor is a not-for-proďŹ t long term care home for 107 residents. The home is located in the amazing St. Lawrence River/1000 islands region of Eastern Ontario, one hour south of Ottawa. Position Summary In partnership with the Director of Nursing, the ADON ensures the provision of high quality care for residents and their families. This responsibility includes monitoring and directing compliance with relevant legislation and regulatory requirements, maintenance of a safe & healthy environment for residents and staff, and promotion of an enlightened resident focused approach to the provision of care. QualiďŹ cations: > BScN/BN minimum, with Mastersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; preparation preferred. > Nursing management/ supervisory experience of 3 years or more. > Experience in the long term care sector, gerontology, or mental health services. > Experience with human resources in a unionized environment > Demonstrated excellence in nursing leadership, team building, communication & inter-personal relationships. > Demonstrated ability to achieve goals for quality care and compliance with standards of nursing practice. > Computer literacy required. Knowledge of Point click care, MDS-RAI desirable Salary Competitive salary and beneďŹ ts, including enrollment in HOOPP. Other Current certiďŹ cate of competence with the College of Nurses of Ontario. A current Criminal Reference check with Vulnerable Sector clearance is required. Please submit expression of interest with curriculum vitae by December 17, 2012 to: Denise Fraser, BN 1814 County Rd 2 East, Brockville, ON K6V 5T1 dfraser@sherwoodparkmanor.com website: www.sherwoodparkmanor.com



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Human Resources Deptartment Attention: Mrs. Susan Poirier, Director of Nursing 533 Clarence Street P.O. Box 970 Winchester, ON K0C 2K0

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$ $ $ $ $$ MONEY $$ 1st, 2nd & 3rd mortgages for any purpose Â&#x2021;'(%7&2162/,'$7,21 Â&#x2021;%$'&5(',7 Â&#x2021;7$;250257*$*($55($56 Â&#x2021;'(&5($6(3$<0(176 8372 Â&#x2021;6(/)(03/2<(' Â&#x2021;123522)2),1&20( Ontario-Wide Financial Corp.  www.ontario-widefinancial.com /LFHQFH

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Connect with Ontarians â&#x20AC;&#x201C; extend your business reach! www.networkclassified.org 28

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012

29


BUSINESS DIRECTORY

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Your Community Newspaper

1206.R0011791019

BASEMENTS

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Seniors Especially Welcome

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Golden Years

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CALL SHARON AT 613-688-1483 or email srussell@thenewsemc.ca CALL KEVIN AT 613-688-1672 or email kevin.cameron@metroland.com

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Read Online at www.emconline.ca 30 Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012

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We come to you!

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AIR CONDITIONING


Your Community Newspaper

ST. GEORGEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Catholic Church 415 Piccadilly Ave. (near Island Park) 613-728-0201 www.saintgeorges.ca

Real God. Real People. Real Church.

Season of Advent (Dec.2-24)

R0011292988

Join us Sundays at 10:30 7275 Parkway Rd. Greely, ON 613-821-1056

www.parkwayroad.com

Watch & Pray Ministry Worship services Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

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Sunday Masses Sat., at 5pm., Sun., at 8:30am. & 10:30am. Weekday Mass 9am. (Mon. to Sat. inclusive) Parish Penitential Service Monday, Dec. 10th, at 7:30pm. Special Advent Service â&#x20AC;&#x153;Remembering Our Loved Ones at Christmas Timeâ&#x20AC;? Thurs., Dec. 13th, at 7:30pm. We invite anyone who is grieving to come

Gloucester South Seniors Centre 4550 Bank Street (at Leitrim Rd.) (613) 277-8621 Come for an encouraging Word! R0011292837

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Service Time: Sundays at 10:30 AM

7Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; -VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\Ă&#x17D;ä>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;

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Location: St. Thomas More Catholic School, 1620 Blohm Drive

We are a small church in the city of Ottawa with a big heart for God and for people. newhopeottawa.co

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Celebrating 14 years in this area!

613.247.8676

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Rideau Park United Church

Our area houses of worship invite you to rejoice this Christmas season with praise, reflection, song and prayer. Their doors are always open, so please join them in celebrating the true meaning of the season.

(Do not mail the school please)

St Aidanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Sunday worship - Holy Eucharist 8:00 am & 10:30 am 10:30 am - Play Area for Under 5 Christmas Eve at 7:30pm - Holy Eucharist Christmas Day at 10:30am - Holy Eucharist

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934 Hamlet Road (near St Laurent & Smyth) 613 733 0102 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; www.staidans-ottawa.org

Bethany United Church

265549/0605 R0011293022

Sunday 7 pm Mass Now Available! Only south Ottawa Mass convenient for those who travel, work weekends and sleep in!

Sunday Worship - 10:00 a.m. Nursery and Sunday School

.FUDBMGF)PMJOFTT$IVSDI 1584 John Quinn Road Greely ON K4P 1J9 613-821-2237

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at lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ĂŠglise Ste-Anne Welcomes you to the traditional Latin Mass Sunday Masses: 8:30 a.m. Low Mass 10:30 a.m. High Mass (with Gregorian chant) 6:30 p.m. Low Mass For the Mass times please see www.st.-clementottawa.ca 528 Old St. Patrick St. Ottawa ON K1N 5L5 (613) 565.9656

429 Parkdale at Gladstone Ministers Rev. Dr. Anthony Bailey Barbara Faught - Pastoral Care Melodee Lovering - Youth and Children Worship Service - 10:30 am 613-728-8656 Sunday School for all ages pdale@trytel.com www.parkdaleunitedchurch.ca Nursery Available

Les Services de lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;aumĂ´nerie des Forces canadiennes Services du dimanche de la chapelle militaire

The Canadian Forces Chaplain Services Military Chapel Sunday Services

Rideau Park United Church

St. Clement Church/Paroisse St. ClĂŠment

NOT YOUR AVERAGE ANGLICANS

Parkdale United Church

Come to Worship - Sunday 10:30 Bible Preaching, Hymn Singing & Friends

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St. Michael and All Angels Anglican Church 2112 Bel-Air Drive (613) 224 0526 Join us for regular services Beginning September 9 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sundays at 8:00 & 10:00 a.m. Church school and youth group Rector: Rev. Dr. Linda Privitera â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Everyone welcome â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Come as you are â&#x20AC;&#x201C; www.stmichaelandallangels.ca

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613-737-5874 www.bethanyuc.com

in Metcalfe on 8th Line - only 17 mins from HWY 417

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Minister: James T. Hurd Everyone Welcome

Join us for worship, fellowship & music Nursery, children and youth ministries Sunday Service at 10:30 am Rev. Kathryn Peate

St Catherine of Siena Catholic Church

December 9th: Major preparation

613-722-1144

off 417 exit Walkey Rd. or Anderson Rd.

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10 Chesterton Drive, Ottawa (Meadowlands and Chesterton) Tel: 613-225-6648 parkwoodchurch.ca

Email: admin@mywestminister.ca

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355 Cooper Street at Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor 613-235-5143 www.dc-church.org

470 Roosevelt Ave. Westboro www.mywestminster.ca

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Sunday Services Worship Service10:30am Sundays Prayer Circle Tuesday at 11:30 10:30 a.m. Rev. James Murray

Minister - Rev. William Ball Organist - Alan Thomas Nusery & Sunday School, Loop audio, Wheelchair access

3150 Ramsayville Road

ALL WELCOME Sundays at 10:30 a.m. The Salvation Army Community Church Meeting at St. Andrew School 201 Crestway Dr. 613-440-7555 Barrhaven www.sawoodroffe.org

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Dominion-Chalmers United Church

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Worship 10:30 Sundays

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Service protestant avec lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ĂŠcole du dimanche 09:30 Messe Catholique romaine avec la liturgie pour enfants 11:15

Protestant Worship with Sunday School 09:30 Roman Catholic Mass with Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Liturgy 11:15

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Come Join Us: (Located corner of Breadner Blvd. and Deniverville Pvt.)

Venez-vous joindre Ă  nous (SituĂŠe au coin du boul. Breadner et Pvt. Deniverville)

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Riverside United Church 3191 Riverside Dr (at Walkley)

ǢČ&#x2013;Ĺ&#x2DC;_É´ǢsÇ&#x2039;É&#x161;Ă&#x17E;OsÇŁ Çź ˨ŸÇ&#x2039;Ë Ë Ĺ?

Refreshments / fellowship following service www.magma.ca/~ruc (613)733-7735

43 Meadowlands Dr. W Ottawa

613.224.1971 email: pastormartin@faithottawa.ca website: www.faithottawa.ca

www.knoxmanock.ca

For all your church advertising needs email srussell @thenewsemc.ca Call: 613-688-1483

OUR LADY OF THE VISITATION PARISH

December 17th through 23rd: 5:30 pm Contemplative Vespers December 24th: Family Christmas Service 4 pm Carol Singing 9:30 pm Christmas Eve Choral Eucharist 10 pm December 25th Choral Eucharist 10 am â&#x20AC;&#x153;All are welcome without exceptionâ&#x20AC;? 760 Somerset West

613-235-3416

5338 Bank Street, Ottawa 613-822-2197 www.olvis.ca Masses: Saturday 5:00 pm Sunday with Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Liturgy: 9:00 & 11:00 am Weekdays: Wed. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Fri. 9:00 am Now open for rentals: www.avisitationbanquetcentre.com 613-822-1777

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City View United Church 6 Epworth Avenue, Nepean (613) 224-1021 www.cityviewunited.org Ministers: Rev. Neil Wallace Margie Ann MacDonald

Sunday Worship 10:30 am Blue Christmas Dec 9th 7:00 pm

St. Timothyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Presbyterian Church 2400 Alta Vista Drive (613) 733 0131 Sunday Worship at 10:00 a.m. Sunday School; Ample parking; OC Transpo route 8 A warm welcome awaits you. Minister: Alex Mitchell sttimothys@on.aibn.com www.sttimsottawa.com

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program provided (Meets at the 7th Day Adventist Church 4010 Strandherd Dr.) Tel: 613-225-6648, ext. 117 Web site: www.pccbarrhaven.ca

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Sunday December 16th, 7pm

www.stlukesottawa.ca

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Emmanuel Celebrang Heavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Child

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Join us for a Special Evening with : Knox Choir and Worship Team

Two blocks north of Carlingwood Shopping Centre on Lockhart Avenue at Prince Charles Road.

Worship - Sundays @ 6:00 p.m.

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Dec. 9th - Advent II: Commitment and Consequences

All are welcome to come hear the good news in a spiritually uplifting mix of traditional and forward looking Christian worship led by the Reverend Richard Vroom with Sunday morning services at 8:30 and 10.

BARRHAVEN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Anglican Church of Canada

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Sunday Service 10am Nursery and Church School provided

Ministry: Rev. Andrew Jensen, BA, MDiv 25 Gibbard Ave., Ottawa, Ont. K2G 3T9 Near Knoxdale & Greenbank (613) 829-2266 www.magma.ca/~knox Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. (Nursery Available) Tuesday Craft Group: 9:00 a.m. Youth Group: every second Sunday evening Dec. 2 White Gift Sunday 10:00 am Dec. 9 Family Christmas party and potluck 4:00 pm Dec. 16 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Musical: The Journey 10:00 am Dec. 23 Lessons and Carols service 10:00 am Dec. 24 Christmas Pageant 6:30 pm and 8:00 pm Christmas Eve Candelight and Communion Service 10:00 pm Dec. 30 Informal Service 10:00 am

5533 Dickinson St., Manock, ON

Pastor: Rev. Kelly Graham Knox church ofďŹ ce: 613-692-4228

KNOX UNITED CHURCH Welcomes You

December Highlights

KNOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH â&#x20AC;&#x153;A friendly church with a warm welcomeâ&#x20AC;?

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Sunday Services: 8am and 10am Thursday Eucharist: 10am Nearly New Shop/Book Nook Open Thursday, Fridays 1pm - 3:30pm and ďŹ rst Saturday of each month: 10am - Noon 8 Withrow Avenue 613-224-7178

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A warm welcome awaits you For Information Call 613-224-8507

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Tel: (613) 276-5481; (613) 440-5481 1893 Baseline Rd., Ottawa (2nd Floor) Sunday Service 10.30am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12.30pm Bible study / Night Vigil: Friday 10.00pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1.00am Website: heavensgateottawa.org E-mail: heavensgatechapel@yahoo.ca

meets every Sunday at The Old Forge Community Resource Centre 2730 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K2B 7J1

Sunday Services: Bible Study at 10:00 AM - Worship Service at 11:00 AM

Come & worship with us Sundays at 10:00am Fellowship & Sunday School after the service

Heb. 13:8 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and today, and forever

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Invites you to our worship service with Rev. Dean Noakes Sundays at 11am 414 Pleasant Park Road 613 733-4886 pleasantparkbaptist.org

Heavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gate Chapel

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The West Ottawa Church of Christ

Pleasant Park Baptist

The Redeemed Christian Church of God

St. Richardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church

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Sunday Worship at 11:00am

ËĄË&#x;ˤÂľÇ&#x2039;ssĹ&#x2DC;EĹ&#x2DC;Ĩ Ç&#x160;Ÿ_Ę°šǟǟÉ  ɠɠɠʳɠŸŸ_É&#x161;ÄśsʳŸĹ&#x2DC;ĘłO ʚ˼ˠˢʺ˧˥˨Ë&#x161;˥ˢ˼˥ NĂ&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Äś_OÇ&#x2039;sĆźÇ&#x2039;ŸÉ&#x161;Ă&#x17E;_s_ĘłƝĜsÇŁsOĜĜŸÇ&#x2039;É&#x161;Ă&#x17E;ÇŁĂ&#x17E;ÇźČ&#x2013;ÇŁŸĹ&#x2DC;Ë&#x161;ÄśĂ&#x17E;Ĺ&#x2DC;sĘł

Choir Candlelight Service Dec 16th â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:00 pm Christmas Eve â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dec. 24th - 7:00pm

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012

31


Your Community Newspaper

NEWS

Inquest into toddler’s drowning hears from key witnesses Brier Dodge brier.dodge@metroland.com

JENNIFER MCINTOSH/METROLAND

Read on Cindy Babyn, a Glebe resident and author, showcases her book Moving Out! A Young Adults Guide to Living on Your Own, at the Ottawa Authors and Artisans Fair. Creative residents from across the city came together at the event at the Jack Purcell Community Centre on Dec. 2.

Youths!

Adults!

Seniors!

Earn Extra Money! Keep Your Weekends Free!

ROUTES AVAILABLE! We’re looking for Carriers to deliver our newspaper!

• Deliver Right In Your Own Neighbourhood • Papers Are Dropped Off At Your Door • Great Family Activity • No Collections • Thursday Deliveries

Call Today 613 613.221.6247 .221.6247 Or apply on-line at YourOttawaRegion.com

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32 Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012

EMC news – The third day of the inquest into the drowning death of a two-year-old Orléans boy at an unlicensed daycare saw two pivotal witnesses take the stand on Nov. 28. Both Wendy Lapierre, the owner of the residence and daycare site, and Cynthia McLellan, the boy’s daycare provider, said they had no idea how Jérémie Audette gained access to the daycare’s above ground pool, which was kept closed with a latch at all times. “I don’t know how he got in,” said Lapierre during her testimony. “I really don’t. I have no idea. After the incident it’s all I thought about, and I have no clue.” McLellan brought Jérémie to the Lapierre residence for a play date on July 28, 2012. Later that morning, the boy was found dead in the pool. McLellan and Lapierre’s testimony conflicted over several details, such as the number of children and child-care providers present at the Lapierre residence the day of the drowning and whether it was a spur-of-the moment get-together or an event planned for in advance. It was estimated in court that there were 29 children playing in the backyard, which housed the above-ground pool, a small wading pool, and a number of children’s toys. The plan was for several child care providers and their children to come to Lapierre’s residence on July 28 for a play date, a regular occurrence. There ended up being between four and five child-care providers with about five children in their care each. The child-care providers also brought their own children; a former client of Lapierre’s and her two children were also present. Both McLellan and Lapierre testified they didn’t know how Jérémie found his way into the outdoor pool. The large pool had stairs

leading up to the deck, which were blocked by a gate constructed by Lapierre’s brotherin-law several days after she purchased the home. The gate had a padlock and a latch handle, which was spring loaded to fall into place. Photos taken by the Ottawa police showed that only one screw was holding the latch to the door on the day Jérémie drowned. Photos of the lock on the gate, which could use an additional padlock, but was spring loaded to fall into place, showed that only one screw was holding the latch to the door. Lapierre said that to properly close the door, someone would have had to manually put the lock in place, as the missing screw meant it would not line up with the latch. The door was also not level, and would have had to be lifted to fit properly. She said she didn’t know how long the gate had been broken, but she had been made aware that morning. OPEN POOL

When her daughter, eightyear-old Chloe, asked to go in the pool, she either unlocked the gate or gave Chloe the key to open the lock, testified Lapierre. She said at the point Chloe went back to the pool to go swimming, and the young girl found Jérémie in the pool. But there was an in-and-out process at least once, as one of the children in McLellan’s care had gone to get a life-jacket while she waited for permission to swim with the older girls. “They were supposed to wait until everybody was ready and that didn’t happen,” said McLellan. “I figured once the gate got open for swimming, one of the parents would be up there.” Jérémie had on his swim trunks and bathing cap to play in the wading pool and McLellan last saw him sliding into

the wading pool as she dressed other children in bathing suits. She estimated it was two to three minutes later when the girls found Jérémie floating face down in the pool. McLellan said her nineyear-old daughter Audrey was incorrect when she said McLellan was aware Jérémie was missing before he was found in the water. Both McLellan and Lapierre said they only realized he was missing when he was found in the pool. McLellan said she took over performing CPR so Lapierre could phone 911, but Lapierre said she took over when she thought McLellan, who is a former CPR instructor, was performing it incorrectly. Gavin Fletcher, an investigator with the Children’s Aid Society, was present for the police interviews following Jérémie’s death. Based on the interview with McLellan’s daughter, the CAS decided that McLellan didn’t take the necessary steps immediately after realizing she was unaware of Jérémie’s whereabouts. “During the interview, the daughter specifically said her mom had asked her (about Jérémie’s whereabouts)... the daughter then indicated that (her mother) sat back down, which played a large role,” Fletcher said. “We believed she was aware he had gone missing and did not go looking.” No criminal charges were laid following the investigation of Jérémie’s death, but Lapierre was fined under the Day Nurseries Act for having too many children at her daycare. McLellan was ruled as a high-risk child care provider by CAS. “Legally, we can’t shut her down,” Fletcher said. “But we would consider it high risk if she was (open).” McLellan no longer operates a daycare, and Lapierre continues to run her daycare as an unlicensed facility. She said that four of the five children continued home care with her following the incident. She no longer uses her backyard for any daycare-related activities.

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Daycare provider high risk, Children’s Aid says


Your Community Newspaper

NEWS

New scam asks victims to be mystery shopper, police warn Jessica Cunha jessica.cunha@metroland.com

EMC news - Ottawa police are warning residents of a letter scam. The “mystery shopper” fraud targets residents by sending them a letter containing a cheque from a wellknown bank. The cheque is invalid and by the time the scam is realized, the recipient is held responsible for the outstanding funds. “The letter encourages the recipient to participate in a mystery shopper opportunity in return for cash,” said the police in a release. “The recipient is asked to cash the cheque and transfer a portion of it to another account – (the) account number provided by the company.” If a person follows the instructions, it makes them an accessory to the offence. The victim is encouraged to keep the remaining portion of the cheque as payment “for acting as a mystery shopper assessing the customer service received at the bank,” said police. At least two people in the Kanata area have reported the scam, said Const. Lori Fahey of the Kanata/Stittsville com-

munity police centre. Fahey said people can report fraudulent letters to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre by calling 1-888-495-8501. “Be cautious of all unsolicited correspondence and sales,” she said. If a person has suffered a financial loss, then they are asked to file a report with police by calling 613-236-1222, ext. 7300. “Call it in,” Fahey said, adding sending an email to an officer isn’t the same as filing a report. Kanata North Coun. Marianne Wilkinson discussed the problem at her ward council meeting on Nov. 26. A resident reported receiving one of the letters. She said she and her husband contacted the bank listed on the cheque and were told it was a scam. “(The police) have had several complaints about it,” said Wilkinson. “If something seems to good to be true, it is too good to be true.” VIRUS

Fahey said she’s received complaints of another scam involving Internet providers, computer programs and virus

detection. A caller pretending to be from a well-known company with a call centre based in Asia or India will call people and tell them a virus has been detected on their computer. The caller asks the target to go to a website where they can download anti-virus protection software for $49 and asks for the target’s credit card information over the phone or through the website. “They’ve got your money and you don’t get anything,” said Fahey. “It’s very difficult to trace it.” She said it’s important to research all companies before doing business. “Do not provide personal information over the phone,” said Fahey. AGGRESSIVE

Fahey added there have been reports of insistent hot water tank rental representatives going door-to-door. “People are finding them very aggressive,” she said. “If you ask them to leave and they don’t, give us a call.” It can be intimidating to have a person like that at the door, but, “Your front door is yours so feel free to close it to unwanted solicitation,” said Fahey. To report aggressive sales people who will not leave, call 613-230-6211.

SUBMITTED

City’s former top librarian celebrated Former city librarian Barbara Clubb was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal by Ottawa Centre MPP Yasir Naqvi on Nov. 29 for her promotion of literacy and learning. Clubb served as chief executive of the Ottawa Public Library and has held executive positions on provincial and national library associations. Through leadership and advocacy, Clubb has helped libraries manage the many challenges facing them. R0011769119

Callers claiming to provide computer virus solutions, pushy salespeople also on prowl

Jewish federation expresses solidarity with Israel Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

EMC news - The Jewish Federation of Ottawa will be joining groups across the country to raise money for Israel’s recovery from recent rocket strikes. Mitchell Bellman, longtime CEO of the federation, said the group hosted a solidarity gathering to show support for Israel on Nov. 21. During the solidarity gathering people got to hear from someone serving on the on the front line. “We had a family in at-

tendance whose son is serving with the Israeli defence forces,” Bellman said. “He was on the phone and wanted the people in his unit to know that Jews in Canada stand by them.” There is currently a ceasefire between Palestine and Israel, halting eight days of air strikes targeting militant groups in the Palestinian territory and rocket attacks that reached deep into Israel. Bellman said he received the news with cautious optimism. “We hope that it’s on the

path toward peace, but there’s a likelihood things could start up again,” Bellman said. He said the federation is concentrating its efforts on helping children deal with post traumatic stress. While the air strikes were happening, school was cancelled and families were moved into bomb shelters. “We are hoping to give them (families) a chance to get some respite and move away from the region that is in ruins,” Bellman said, adding he hopes to see Israel recover quickly.

On Nov. 27th, Carlington Community Health Centre hosted a “Shop Your Local Talents” fundraising event for the United Way. The aim of the event was to promote inclusion and participation of the community members living in Caldwell, Lepage and surrounding streets, demonstrating Participants in the event: (from left to right) Anneka local talents, community McVee, Irene Kischook, Therese Ladouceur, Helen Kelly, commitment and support. Helene Choiniere, Anita Masterson 1206.R0011791250

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Breakfast puts big dent in Maplesoft fundraising goal Eddie Rwema eddie.rwema@metroland.com

EMC news - It’s been just a year since the first cancer survivorship centre opened in Ottawa, but survivors and patients alike are already singing praises of what they call a home-away-from-home. The Maplesoft Cancer Survivorship Centre helps people living with the disease and their families from diagnosis to survival. On Nov. 29, about 230 people gathered for the second-annual breakfast fundraiser in support of the care-coaching program at the centre. By the end of the breakfast $176,000 had been raised, with more pledges still coming in. The Ottawa Regional Cancer Foundation, which supports the centre, hopes to raise $250,000 from that breakfast alone. In the midst of looking after her mother who had been diagnosed with cancer last year, Kathy Dunn was referred to the regional screening program at the Ottawa Hospital – a specialized program available in Ottawa for family members of patients with cancer. Through a routine colonoscopy, Dunn learned that she also had cancer. “It came as a total shock and my message to all of

you is that screening works,” said Dunn, as she offered her testimony on how the centre helped her through her treatment and recovery. She expressed her gratitude to the Ottawa Hospital and the Maplesoft Centre, both of which were instrumental in her care, treatment and recovery. “I can assure you from my personal experience, these services do make a difference to patients and families affected by cancer,” said Dunn. The Maplesoft Centre, located on Alta Vista Drive, provides support services that are not covered by standard medical treatment programs designed to help survivors cope with the psychological and physical effects of having cancer. “The simple act of getting there and connecting with others with similar experiences is invaluable,” said Dunn. The centre offers cancer coaching sessions, including pain management, nutrition, relaxation, and fatigue management. “The importance of nutrition and exercise is critical to a successful recovery and from my experience, I consider these as pillars of programming at the Maplesoft Centre,” said Dunn. Linda Eagen, president and chief executive of the Ottawa Regional Cancer Foundation,

FILE

Members of the Governor General’s Foot Guards played the national anthem at the official opening of Canada’s first cancer survivorship centre in Alta Vista last year. The Maplesoft Centre held a fundraiser on Nov. 29 to help support cancer coaching programs. said the money raised will support cancer coaching programs. “This is the way that we directly impact the lives of people who are affected by cancer,” said Eagen. “Every dollar that is raised

today is going to make a difference in somebody’s life.” Nestled beside the Richard and Annette Bloch Cancer Survivors Park, the centre acts as a place of quiet refuge and reflection, support and em-

powerment for people battling cancer. Since its inauguration last year, Eagen said the feedback is beyond what they expected. “We’ve been working with clients, with individuals and

their families one-on-one to personalize their care and what we are hearing is ‘I don’t know what I would have done without the centre.’ Anyone can donate to the foundation through its website www.ottawacancer.ca.

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ID#A150933 Meet Raider! This neutered male, golden Labrador Retriever, Siberian Husky mix is 1 year and 11 months old! He was surrendered to the shelter by his owner on November 8, but is now available for adoption. Raider loves his toys! Toys that present a challenge to keep him mentally stimulated are his favorite. He will need a home with teens and adults who can help him better learn his manners. Raider is a sweet boy looking for a loving forever home with a compassionate owner who understands that he was sick as a puppy, and cannot always keep with the other dogs at the dog park.

Meet Clyde, a 1 year-old neutered male, gray tabby Domestic Longhair cat. He was brought to the shelter as a stray on November 8, but is now available for adoption. Clyde is looking for a warm and loving home where he can relax. He’s looking for a forever home where he can truly settle in!

If you think either of these animals are the right pet for your family, contact the Ottawa Humane Society today! Visit the OHS website at www.ottawahumane.ca to see photos and descriptions of all of the animals available for adoption. Stop by the Adoption Centre, weekdays 11:00am-7:00pm and Saturdays 10:00am-5:00pm.

Cold Weather Tips for Pets

Finnegan 9dndji]^c`ndjgeZi^hXjiZZcdj\]idWZÆI=:E:ID;I=:L::@Ç4HjWb^iVe^XijgZVcYh]dgi W^d\gVe]nd[ndjgeZiidÒcYdjiH^beanZbV^aid/X[dhiZg5i]ZcZlhZbX#XVViiZci^dcÆEZid[i]ZLZZ`Ç

Time to make a grooming appointment

34 Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012

When adding antifreeze to your vehicle, pour carefully and clean up any spills that may occur. It’s also a good idea to check that your car isn’t leaking fluid. A quick look under the hood will help keep your own animals, and those in the neighbourhood, safe. If your pet does come in contact with antifreeze — either by ingesting it directly, or by licking exposed paws — you should be looking for signs of vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, unconsciousness, drooling and panting. If you suspect antifreeze ingestion, it’s important to act quickly, as the poisoning can cause kidney failure. Call your veterinarian immediately to avoid complications. You may want to consider a less toxic alternative to the ethylene glycol-based antifreeze that is most commonly used. There is new propylene glycol-based antifreeze available at many retail outlets that is safer for pets and humans alike. Entertain wisely: The winter season is a peak time for athome parties and other get-togethers. It may be a good idea to keep animals away from the bustle and noise during a party. If everyone does mingle together, keep an eye on your pets to make sure they don’t sneak any of the festive food and drink. Identification: Having an animal run away from home at any time of the year is troublesome, but especially during the winter season. Make sure your best friends are equipped with proper identification, including a collar, tag and microchip to ensure they have the best possible chance of finding their way back to you.

Please note: The Ottawa Humane Society has many other companion animals available for adoption. Featured animals are adopted quickly! To learn more about adopting an animal from the Ottawa Humane Society please contact us: Website: lll#diiVlV]jbVcZ#XV Email: 6Ydei^dch5diiVlV]jbVcZ#XV Telephone:+&(,'*"(&++m'*-

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My name is Finnegan and I am a 18 month old St. Bernard/Husky mix. I had a rough start to life, but thanks to the wonderful people at Friendly Giant Dog Rescue my mom adopted me when I was 5 months old. Now I get to run and play everyday with my fur friends at the dog park and the fields near our house. My mom also brings me along with her to work sometimes, and I get LOTS of attention from the kids she works with - she tells me I would make a great therapy dog...I just like the belly rubs!

Just because animals have built in fur coats doesn’t mean they are immune to the harsh realities of a Canadian winter. With a bit of thoughtful planning, your best friend will be warm and safe when the snowflakes fly. Here are some tips for animal care in cold weather. Limit exposure: When the mercury plunges, exercise caution and limit your pet’s exposure to the outdoors. Salt: While the salt used on roads and driveways is helpful in preventing spills, it can irritate the sensitive pads on the bottom of your pet’s feet. Keep a towel by your front door and wipe down your pooch’s paws after a walk so they aren’t tempted to lick them clean. Fresh water: If you keep any water bowls outside for your animals during the winter, be sure to check the supply a few times a day to ensure it isn’t frozen over. If you are unable to provide fresh, clean water regularly throughout the day you need to provide an insulated, heated water bowl in order to keep the water from freezing. Clean, fresh snow is not an adequate replacement for water for an animal. Car engines: Cats and wildlife are drawn to the heat generated by your car’s engine on cold days. Make sure you bang on your car’s hood to avoid injuring a sleeping creature. Antifreeze: The taste of antifreeze is tasty to many animals, and they’ll readily consume it if given the chance. But even a small amount of antifreeze can be harmful, or even fatal, to your pet.


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CHEO, Ronald McDonald House celebrate opening of family room Eddie Rwema

Eddie.rwema@metroland.com

EMC news - Parents of children receiving critical care at CHEO can now get away from the hospital without leaving their children, thanks to a new family room unveiled on Nov. 27.

The room, which was funded by the Ronald McDonald House charity, is a large lounge on the fifth floor that has been fully renovated. Families of children being treated at CHEO can use the room as their special place of respite, relaxation and privacy within the walls of the

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hospital. “These family rooms create just a little bit of normalcy and comfort at a very difficult and uncomfortable time,” said Alex Munter, the hospital’s CEO. Munter said the room will give parents an opportunity to have a bit of a break without

the need to go far away. “Families are here at some of the toughest moments of their lives with so much anxiety and stress and to be able to (retreat) from that, even if it is only for a few minutes or a few hours, into a comfortable space, is refreshing,” said Munter. Ronald McDonald House Ottawa said it cost about $265,000 to revamp the room and a separate space with beds near the intensive care unit. “Parents will have an opportunity to somewhat just

relax, calm down a bit after a pretty stressful and hectic time when their child is being treated here at CHEO,” said Carol Houston, executive director at Ronald McDonald House Ottawa. The eight Ronald McDonald Family Rooms across Canada are equipped with qualified staff and volunteers who take care of the day-today essentials of running a room, so families don’t have to worry about them. Each year, the 14 Ronald McDonald Houses in Cana-

da provide 10,000 Canadian families with a place to stay during their most difficult times, but many have to turn families away due to lack of space. By 2014, Ronald McDonald Houses expects to be able to accommodate 465 families each night – more than twice what was available in 2010.

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Carol Houston, left, executive director at Ronald McDonald House Ottawa, Pat ElliottMiller, chief nurse and CEO Alex Munter attend the opening of a new family room at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario on Nov. 27.

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Ottawa City Councillor — Bay Ward Dear Neighbours, I’m sure many of you are busy planning for the holidays as yet another year is quickly drawing to an end. I often find myself contemplative this time of year; looking back at what I have accomplished and wondering what lies ahead for the coming year. As your City of Ottawa Councillor I can tell you this, as I reflect on 2012 and what we have achieved here in Bay Ward, I am very proud. We opened a new Splash Pad in Whitehaven, we ensured our streets are safer as we held a number of slowdown campaigns and lowered speed limits on some streets, we listened and worked with City staff to secure a pedestrian crossing signal at Holy Acres Road, we are keeping the lines of communication open between residents of Queensway Terrace North and the CMFO to make sure the old Grant School development is a good fit for the community and we assisted and are currently assisting a couple of communities with their Better Neighbourhoods Initiative applications. These are just a few of our accomplishments together, there were many more, too many to list. As I look to 2013 I am excited by what we have planned. Britannia Park & ron kolBus Centre: We will continue our work on the renewal of Britannia Park & Ron Kolbus Lakeside Centre. We listened to you, our residents and the many user groups of Ron Kolbus and have asked the planning department to re-work their initial concepts. We will hold another open house in early spring to unveil the revised plans. Brier Dodge/Metroland

Eyes on the ball Liam Wood, from Westboro, catches the ball during a goalkeeper warm-up at Louis Riel public school’s soccer dome on Dec. 3. Young players from all over the city came to Louis Riel to participate in a recruiting showcase for the Montreal Impact Academy. If players are selected, they would move to Montreal to board with families and play for the 12 and under age group team. Liam plays for the Ottawa Fury.

infrastruCture: 2013 will see one of the larger Ottawa on the Move Projects be rolled out in Bay Ward as we renew Carling Avenue from Carlingwood Mall to Pinecrest Road. Residents will be left with the infrastructure they deserve to have serving them. Additional projects are planned on Woodroffe North and other streets.

Bowel disease costs Canadians $2.8B per year

WinthroP Court: By next summer the children of Winthrop Court and the surrounding neighbourhood will have a brand new park to play in. It’s the first park to be built in Bay Ward in over two decades. I’m looking forward to the grand opening and knowing that the kids in the community will no longer have to play in a parking lot. The residents of Winthrop Court have worked hard to make the park a reality and soon it will be. miChele Park: Michele Park is an integral part of the community and it will see some beautification enhancements along with a new paved path which will assist and ensure residents have an easy and safe pathway to Carling Avenue. These are just a few of the plans we have for our community in the coming year. I hope you are as excited about them as I am. As always, please feel free to contact me at our City Hall or Community office, or reach out to me on social media. Bookmark and visit our website to learn much more about our community and to stay up to date on what’s new. As we say goodbye to 2012, from my family to yours, I want to wish you all a safe and Happy Holiday season and may 2013 be a year of good health and happiness. Sincerely,

Mark Taylor Ottawa City Councillor, Bay Ward

CITY HALL ADDRESS

110 Laurier Avenue West Ottawa, ON K1P 1J1 COMMUNITY OFFICE

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Mark.Taylor@Ottawa.ca

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BayWardLive.ca Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, December 6, 2012

1206.R0011791704

EMAIL 1206.R0011787796

EMC news - There are about 233,000 Canadians living with inflammatory bowel disease: 129,000 with Crohn’s disease and 104,000 with ulcerative colitis. To kick off November as Crohn’s and Colitis Awareness Month, the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of Canada is launching a report and recommendations about the disease. The Impact of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Canada 2012 report was developed to raise awareness and understanding of IBD in Canada, ultimately leading to new research opportunities and improved quality of life of people with IBD. Among the key findings are: • One in every 150 Canadians has IBD. • An estimated 5,900 Canadian children have IBD. • More than 10,200 new cases of IBD are diagnosed every year (5,700 with Crohn’s disease, 4,500 with ulcerative colitis). • The incidence of IBD in Canada has been rising, particularly since 2001, and significantly so in children under the age of 10. • The economic costs of IBD are conservatively estimated is $2.8 billion per year, which is more than $11,900 per person every year. There are direct medical costs and indirect costs dominated by long and short-term work losses.

Carling avenue eConomiC DeveloPment: Carling Avenue from Pinecrest Road to Bayshore Drive will evolve and renew through our economic development plan. The Community Improvement Plan for Carling Avenue will encourage new businesses to set up shop and entice current businesses to refresh their properties. I see Carling Avenue as the piece that connects families to renewed parks and young people to fulfilling local jobs.

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Local events and happenings over the coming weeks — free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: ottawawest@metroland.com

Dec. 6

The Canadian Cancer Society is hosting a Holiday Bazaar in support of its Wheels of Hope Campaign. This campaign raises funds and awareness for our transportation program which helps local patients get to their cancer treatments. Our first annual holiday bazaar will be taking place from 12 p.m. – 2 p.m. on Dec. 6 at our office at 1745 Woodward Dr. Jewelry, crafts, bakes goods, and so much more.

Dec. 9

A Taste of Ottawa: Westboro Holiday Food Fair, Sunday, Dec. 9, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Location is Westboro Masonic Hall, 430 Churchill Ave. (at Byron). Free admission and parking. Event charity is

the Westboro Region Food Bank. For more information visit www.osfa.ca. More than 20 local artisan gourmet food vendors will be selling their products such as baked goods, coffee, teas, chocolate, honey, tortieres, vanilla, jams, chutneys and ice cream to name a few.

Dec. 9

The Probus Club of Western Ottawa meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 33 Leacock Drive Kanata at 10 a.m. for coffee followed by a guest speaker. On Tuesday Dec. 11 Dr. Janet Biggar, a veterinarian, will speak on “Empowered youth become tomorrow’s role models”. The Probus Club is for retired and semi-retired men and women who appreciate and value

opportunities to meet others with similar levels of interest. For further information call Pat Thompson at (613) 5911390.

Dec. 15

Orpheus Choral Group Xmas Concert - Saturday, Dec. 15 at 7 p.m. St. Paul High School, 2675 Draper Ave. For all friends and family. Free admission, free parking. Special surprise for young children. Good-will donation welcome. Refreshments afterwards. For information contact Ted Blair at 613 8369351 or teddb@rogers.com. Stairwell Carollers Christmas concerts. The Carollers bring focus to the true meaning of Christmas, with beautiful interpretations of mostly

Holiday memories start here! Ballet Jörgen Canada presents

TheANutcracker Canadian Tradition Centrepointe Theatre - December 15 Shenkman Arts Centre - December 17 & 18 Tickets from only $40 $35 FREE PARKING at both venues centrepointetheatre.com shenkmanarts.ca 613.580.2700

traditional carols in many languages and donation of proceeds to local charities (this time the youth literacy group Sage Youth – Jeunesse Sage) and a scholarship fund for music students. Dec. 15: Glebe St. James United Church, 650 Lyon, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 19: St. Columba Anglican Church, 24 Sandridge, 7:30 p.m. Tickets $20 at the door or $15 in advance at The Leading Note, 370 Elgin St., Compact Music, 190 & 785 1/2 Bank St., and Books on Beechwood, 35 Beechwood Ave., or online. No charge for children 12 and under. Savory and sweet reception follows. Information: www. stairwellcarollers.com or 613-746-2779. Christmas dinner and dance. Saturday, Dec. 15, (Dinner at 6:00 p.m.) at St. Augustine Parish Hall, 1060 Baseline Rd. This special event is not only to celebrate the Christmas season but it is also to celebrate the recent installation of an elevator at St. Augustine parish. A ham and turkey dinner followed by desserts will be catered by Nate’s Deli Family Kitchen. The event includes a cash bar and entertainment will be provided by “Colour It Music” DJ. Tickets are $35 per person (Tickets must be purchased before Dec. 9) Tickets can be purchased from St. Augustine parish office (613-225-7388), Monday and Thursday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (office hours) or by calling 613-823-0247. For more information, call 613-8230247, Fern or Doreen

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Dec. 20

IODE Walter Baker Chapter will meet Dec. 20 at 1 p.m at the Ottawa Guide House located at 453 Parkdale Ave. (between Foster Street and Gladstone Avenue). Women of all ages are invited to attend and learn about volunteer work. For information,

visit iodewbc@gmail.com or call Alia at 613-864-6779.

Mondays

Looking to learn conversational Spanish? Improve your Spanish speaking skills with Los Amigos Toastmasters. We meet at Tunney’s Pasture Mondays from 4:55 to 6:30 p.m. For more information, contact Carole at 613-7616537 or visit www.amigostm.ca.

Tuesdays

Our painters circle is a friendly, encouraging group with a wide range of painting experience. Sharing ideas, showing off work, seeking suggestions, it has proven to be a really pleasant experience for painters. All media except oils are welcome. No tuition, so experience is necessary. Tuesday mornings from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Call 613-695-0505 or email clderwent@gmail.com for information. The Hogs Back 50+ Club meets every Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the front room of the Boys and Girls Club, 1463 Prince of Wales Dr. at Meadowlands and Hogs Back. Bring a bag lunch or come for cards, crafts, friendly chatter and camaraderie. Drop in and check it out. For more information call Shirley at 613-225-8089.

Wednesdays

Drop-in playgroup for moms with children four years-old and under runs each Wednesday morning from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at East Gate Alliance Church, 550 Codds’ Rd. Come for a casual time of play and circle time. More information is available at www.eastgatealliance.ca. Faith Friends Kids’ Club begins on Wednesday, Sept. 19. This Kids’ Club runs each

Wednesday night from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the East Gate Alliance Church, 550 Codd’s Rd. Activities include Bible stories and games. Children ages four to11 years-old are invited to join. More information is available at www.eastgatealliance.ca or by calling 613-744-0682.

Fridays

Five-pin bowling league is encouraging senior citizens over the age of 50 to participate in an activity that provides regular moderate exercise. Members range in age from 50 to 90. There is no registration fee. Bowling takes place each Friday afternoon between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. at Walkley Bowling Centre, 2092 Walkley Rd. Participants are placed on mixed four-person teams. To register, please call Roy or Jean Hoban at 613-731-6526.

Ongoing

Ottawa Newcomers’ Club invites women new to Ottawa to join our activities and meet some new friends. Activities include: bridge, Scrabble, walks, luncheons and dinners, book club, Ottawa sights/events, travel cafe and craft and chat. Please check out our website at: www.ottawanewcomersclub. ca. For more information call 613-860-0548 or email ottawanewcomers@hotmail.ca. Westboro Nursery School – Spaces available for 30 month olds to five year olds. We are a parent cooperative preschool located in the Dovercourt Community Centre, staffed by Registered ECE’s. Our creative hands-on, play based curriculum includes intro to French, sign language, school readiness, music, daily outdoor play and more. Visit www.westboronurseryschool. ca, email wns@westboronurseryschool.ca or call 613860-1522 for details.

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ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21

Aries, you will have to work hard at presenting a different image if you want to win over a few more fans. It might take a little time, but it is definitely within the realm of possibility. Taurus, take a break no matter how busy you are this week. It is for your own good to recharge with some R&R and then get back on track at work. Unexpected things can happen when you explore new possibilities, Gemini. Get out there and immerse yourself in other social circles so that you can take advantage of opportunities.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

Cancer, run your ideas by a few people this week before you make a big presentation. This will help you to revise and tweak anything that needs a little work.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

22. Wheatgrass adjective 26. U. of Texas residential center 28. Estate (Spanish) 32. Pilots and Blues 36. Right angle building wings 38. Store fodder 40. Supersonic transport 41. Brand of plastic wrap 42. Comb-plate 43. Puppeteer Lewis 44. Tatouhou 45. Security interest in a property 49. Direct a weapon 50. One point E of due N 54. Latin for “and”

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

Capricorn, give an idea that would require some significant changes its due consideration. This can impact both your career and personal life in a positive way.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18

It may seem like too much money is going out of your pocket and not enough coming in, Aquarius. But the budget will balance out this month. Rest easy when making purchases.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20

Last week’s answers

Start a creative project that can be turned into something you keep for yourself, Pisces. It’s nice to enjoy the fruits of your creative labors.

This weeks puzzle answers in next weeks issue

Fun By The Numbers Like puzzles? Then you’ll love sudoku. This mind-bending puzzle will have you hooked from the moment you square off, so sharpen your pencil and put your sudoku savvy to the test! Here’s How It Works: Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

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CLUES DOWN 1. Jame’s “Fifty _____” 2. Scottish game pole 3. Atomic #18 4. Tattered cloth 5. Tokyo 6. Force from office 7. Wigwam 8. Dynasty actress Linda 9. Small mongrel 10. Rapidly departed 11. A corporate leader 13. King of Camelot 16. Mrs. Nixon 17. Macaws 19. Symphony orchestra 21. Cunning

Sagittarius, sometimes you may believe there isn’t room for anyone else in the spotlight but you. Don’t let your ego get in the way of friendships. Share the glory.

Leo, you will be full of energy this week and that energy helps you handle whatever is put on your plate. Take advantage of your productivity with a few days off next week. Virgo, jump on an opportunity to take a vacation. There won’t be many other opportunities this year to enjoy a vacation. So go along even if it’s related to work.

31. Opposite of gee 33. National Guard 34. A stratum of rock 35. Have a yen for 37. Cornell tennis center 39. Iranian monetary units 41. Settings in a play 43. Olfactory properties 44. AKA platyfish 46. Free from deceit 47. Ireland 48. 007’s Flemming 51. & & & 52. Kidney, fava or broad 53. W. African country 55. __ Frank’s diary 56. Induces vomiting

Scorpio, despite firm convictions you cannot change others’ viewpoints all of the time. Don’t be hard on yourself if other people do not see things the same way as you do.

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CLUES ACROSS 1. Afraid 7. Love grass 11. Hepburn/Grant movie 12. Opposite of good 13. Whale ship captain 14. A major U.S. political party 15. Rate of walking 16. A ceremonial procession 18. Unfolded 20. More pretentious 21. Ribbon belts 23. Himalayan wild goats 24. 100 =1 kwanza 25. Japanese wrestling 26. ___asty: family of rulers 27. Luteinizing hormone 29. British Air Aces 30. Being a single unit

There are too many happy things going on in your life to let any of the negative things bring you down, Libra. Face challenges with a smile, and you’ll sail through.


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