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Contact me with your provincial concerns 1795 Kilborn Ave. 1795 Kilborn Ave. Ottawa, K1H6N1 6N1 Ottawa, ON ON K1H

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

City moves to block 7-unit

613-990--77 613-990-7720 7720 www.john nba baird.ca www.johnbaird.ca

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Dogs across the city got pampered recently at Dovercourt’s annual dog swim and spa event. – Page 13

two semi-detached buildings containing four units and a three-townhome building. “This is a very good step against random spot zoning across the city,” said Gary Sealey, chairman of the zoning committee for the Federation of Citizens’ Associations, a group representing community associations across the city. Unchecked intensification “offends community values,” Sealey told members of the city’s planning committee. “The city planning committee decided to agree with those values,” Sealey said. “There is a choice of people over mindless development here. The councillors are hearing that.”

Ashcroft won’t seek Byron Park access Kristy Strauss kristy.strauss@metroland.com

EMC news - Just as the latest move at the development slated for the former Westboro convent was about to inflame old wounds, the company behind the project announced it was not considering a move to cut a driveway across the Byron Linear Park. The developer, Ashcroft Homes, had submitted a rezoning request to allow a permanent road to be built through the park, but late last week in-

dicated it would not be following through with the plan. David Choo, president of Ashcroft Homes, said in a statement he wants the developer to be “a good neighbour” in Westboro. “While we believed the Byron access was the best one, our neighbours have been clear, and we’ve listened,” said Choo. “We look forward to moving forward to build a great addition to Westboro.” Ashcroft, which purchased the former Soeurs de la Visitation convent site a few

years ago, has battled with the community in numerous public and planning committee meetings and a possible Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) appeal to get its 600unit condominium development to proceed at 90 and 114 Richmond Rd. After a $200,000 cash settlement with the appellants in exchange for dropping their OMB appeals, Ashcroft came forward with its first site plan about a year ago. The site plan, which includes building heights, land-

scape and even a sun shade study, is at a point where planning staff has the authority to make the final decisions surrounding it. In August of last year, the community was concerned that the Byron Linear Park would be used as the southern access. That particular portion of the site wasn’t illustrated under the site plan released last year. “I am pleased that Ashcroft has agreed to stick to the plan adopted by council in November 2010 and not cut across the Byron Linear Park,” said

Bob Chiarelli, MPP/Député Ottawa West-Nepean/Ottawa-Ouest-Nepean

Ontario’s Strong Action budget is taking action to cut costs and protect public services

Find out more: www.bobchiarelli.onmpp.ca 613-721-8075 bob@bobchiarelli.com @Bob_Chiarelli R0011584990


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Dalton McGuinty

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TOTAL EMC DISTRIBUTION 474,000

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Contract between the city and Plasco for new Trail Road gasification plant nearly finalized. – Page 9

CITY HALL NEWS

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012

613-990-7720 www.johnbaird.ca

City moves to block 7-unit project Committee rules 936 Woodroffe proposal too dense Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

Westboro native wants to bring the arts and crafting communities together with annual Confederation Park event. – Page 11

COMMUNITY

Dogs across the city got pampered recently at Dovercourt’s annual dog swim and spa event. – Page 13

EMC news - When it comes to spot rezonings in Ottawa, the buck stops with an attempt to pack a seven-unit development onto one Woodroffe Avenue lot. In a rare move, the city’s planning committee rejected a planned-unit development in Whitehaven on Aug. 23 because it was too dense. The unusually deep 1,423square metre property between Georgina Drive and Highway 417 created a planning quandary for city staff and the developer, a numbered company. In the end, the developer refused to budge from its plan to replace one home with two semi-detached buildings containing four units and a threetownhome building. “This is a very good step against random spot zoning across the city,” said Gary Sealey, chairman of the zoning committee for the Federation of Citizens’ Associations, a group representing community associations across the city. Unchecked intensification “offends community values,” Sealey told members of the city’s planning committee. “The city planning committee decided to agree with those values,” Sealey said. “There is a choice of people over mindless development here. The councillors are hearing that.” See CITY, page 3

KRISTY STRAUSS/METROLAND

Ready, set, march Residents and their children, dressed in colourful costumes, marched along the Byron Linear Park on Aug. 25 as part of a celebration of the community space. Three-year-old Miya Grace blew a whistle as the festivities began.

Ashcroft won’t seek Byron Park access Kristy Strauss kristy.strauss@metroland.com

EMC news - Just as the latest move at the development slated for the former Westboro convent was about to inflame old wounds, the company behind the project announced it was not considering a move to cut a driveway across the Byron Linear Park. The developer, Ashcroft Homes, had submitted a rezoning request to allow a permanent road to be built through the park, but late last week indicated it would not be follow-

ing through with the plan. David Choo, president of Ashcroft Homes, said in a statement he wants the developer to be “a good neighbour” in Westboro. “While we believed the Byron access was the best one, our neighbours have been clear, and we’ve listened,” said Choo. “We look forward to moving forward to build a great addition to Westboro.” Ashcroft, which purchased the former Soeurs de la Visitation convent site a few years ago, has battled with the community in numerous

public and planning committee meetings and a possible Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) appeal to get its 600unit condominium development to proceed at 90 and 114 Richmond Rd. After a $200,000 cash settlement with the appellants in exchange for dropping their OMB appeals, Ashcroft came forward with its first site plan about a year ago. The site plan, which includes building heights, landscape and even a sun shade study, is at a point where planning staff has the authority to

make the final decisions surrounding it. In August of last year, the community was concerned that the Byron Linear Park would be used as the southern access. That particular portion of the site wasn’t illustrated under the site plan released last year. “I am pleased that Ashcroft has agreed to stick to the plan adopted by council in November 2010 and not cut across the Byron Linear Park,” said Kitchissippi Coun. Katherine Hobbs in a statement. See SOUTHERN, page 7

Bob Chiarelli, MPP/Député Ottawa West-Nepean/Ottawa-Ouest-Nepean

Ontario’s Strong Action budget is taking action to cut costs and protect public services

Find out more: www.bobchiarelli.onmpp.ca 613-721-8075 bob@bobchiarelli.com @Bob_Chiarelli R0011584990


COMMUNITY

Centretown groups honoured for efforts to improve LGBT health

Volunteering At the Children’s Aid Society of Ottawa

Community health centre, Ottawa Senior Pride Network awarded Ottawa West EMC staff

Making a difference Volunteering is defined as the act of working on behalf of others without financial or material gain. At the Children’s Aid Society of Ottawa, volunteers are described as individuals helping to build a better community through the generosity of their time, their energy and their skills. Our volunteers are fundamental and provide a vital link in the delivery of services to children in our community. Volunteering at the CAS There are several reasons why you may be interested in volunteering. It may be a means of exploring new challenges or discovering new career options. You may be looking to develop interpersonal skills or gain self-confidence. Volunteering can be a great way to meet new people and through their experiences and your own, you may gain a better understanding of the people and organizations in our community. That being said, to many, the greatest satisfaction in volunteering at the CAS, is knowing they have made a difference in the life of a child or youth. From all walks of life Our volunteers are residents of our community who chose to give their time. They are men and women over the age of 18, single or partnered and represent diverse cultural, racial, ethnic and religious backgrounds. Our volunteers are from all walks of life, but they share a common goal: improving the life of a child or youth. Volunteer opportunities With back-to-school season upon us, our biggest opportunity is becoming a volunteer driver. These individuals assist with school drives, in the morning and afternoons, but also bring children and youth from foster homes to scheduled appointments. “Volunteering give me a sense of worthwhile. It doesn’t feel like work and I’m able to give something back - it’s like a breath of fresh air” – Richard M. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer driver or tutor, we will be hosting an orientation session on September 5th, 2012 at 6:00 pm. Remember, the caring gift of your time assists the Society in its efforts to keep the children and youth of our community safe and secure. Children’s Aid Society of Ottawa Volunteer Services Call: 613-747-7800 ext 2805 E-mail: yourcasquestion@casott.on.ca Facebook.com/children’s aid society of ottawa Twitter.com/OttawaCas

in LGBT equity.” The United Way Ottawa acknowledged the Ottawa Senior Pride Network through the Community Builder Award, for their work in providing queer seniors in Ottawa passionate and LGBT-friendly services The Association of Ontario Health Centres awarded the Centretown Community

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Health Centre with the Health Equity Award for their work on moving forward the LGBT health equity agenda through service and program delivery. “Many of us were gay activists in the ’70s and ’80s. Our generation is not going back in the closet as we age and need services,” said Marie Robertson, community development coordinator at the Ottawa Senior Pride Network in a press release.

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EMC community - The Centretown Community Health Centre and Ottawa Senior Pride Network have received awards recognizing the work they have done for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender health equity. “This award is not ours

alone. Centretown works with multiple partners and individuals who, through their outstanding contributions, make Centretown CHC’s work possible,” said Jeff Morrison, board president at Centretown CHC in a media release. “Today’s celebration is about recognizing everyone in our community who have played a role

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Children learn safety tips at school bus awareness day Schools host event to acclimatize first-time bus riders

who will be taking the school bus for the first time this year safety tips for waiting, riding and getting off the bus. Scolli said the annual event is in its 20th year. “We’re now teaching the kids of parents we taught before,” said Scolli, adding the day is important in showing children how to safely ride the

Kristy Strauss kristy.strauss@metroland.com

EMC news - One child fatality is one too many for Sue Scolli. That’s why Scolli, transportation co-ordinator at the Ottawa Student Transportation Authority, lead the annual School Bus Safety Awareness Day at Woodroffe High School on Aug. 26. “The main thing is the safety of the child,” said Scolli. “That there are no fatalities and that no one gets hurt.” Woodroffe High School was one of the sites across the city that took part in the annual day staged by the four school boards, area bus companies and the Ottawa Student Transportation Authority.

City wants to reduce spot zoning requests Continued from page 1

“It’s not lost on us that people don’t like spot rezonings,” planning committee chairman Peter Hume responded. But he added that the city’s intent is to reduce spot rezonings by rezoning swaths of land during the Official Plan review that is just getting underway, so higher density development will still be the result. That was OK with Sealey, who said that the FCM isn’t opposed to density, but it will advocate for the city to rezone the right areas to target higher density development. Three area community associations – the Whitehaven Community Association, the Woodpark Community Association and the Glabar Park Community Alliance – opposed the development proposal. While Bay Coun. Mark Taylor said he understood the developer’s goal to design a financially viable development, the company wasn’t willing to compromise to fully address the community’s concerns. So he wasn’t willing to compromise his stance in supporting residents, he said.

school bus that haven’t before and to serve as a reminder for some children in younger grades. “The goal is basically safety. Kids don’t know what they’re supposed to do.” Some of the important safety tips the sessions highlight include how many steps back to take from a bus once it’s stopped and to never go in

front of the bus. Scolli said everyone can feel safer when following the rules presented at the session, including parents and drivers. “There are four year-olds leaving mommy who never left mommy before,” she said. “We just want to make (riding the bus) safe, comfortable and secure.”

KRISTY STRAUSS/METROLAND

Ottawa South resident Bruno Gallucci and his daughter Elisa, 4, wait for the bus to depart from Woodroffe High School to D. Roy Kennedy School on Aug. 26 as part of the annual School Bus Safety Awareness Day. Sessions also took place onAug. 26 at Earl of March Secondary School, École élémentaire catholique Saint- Joseph d’Orléans, St. Peter High

School, St.Mark High School and École élémentaire publique Charlotte Lemieux. Each session took about 45 minutes and showed children

SUBMITTED

A plan to replace a Woodroffe Avenue home with seven dwellings was rejected by the planning committee on Aug. 23. This graphic shows an earlier version of the proposal. “I am generally in favour of intensification and infill,” Taylor said. “I’m not the councillor who opposes everything, so when I oppose something it’s for good reason. I think that’s probably what resonated with my colleagues.” Councillors Stephen Blais, Allan Hubley, Bob Monette and Shad Qadri agreed with Taylor and voted against the rezoning. Committee chairman Peter Hume, vice chairwoman Jan Harder and Coun. Katherine Hobbs voted in favour, but their vote was defeated. The issue caught the attention of people from across the

city. A resident of Glen Cairn, Faith Blacquiere, also spoke against the development proposal. “Why does the city even need a zoning bylaw if all land use types can be built anywhere?” she said. If council agrees with the planning committee’s vote, the proposal would go to the Ontario Municipal Board for a final decision. The city will have to hire an outside planner to defend it’s position, since council would have disagreed with it’s own planner. That could cost up to $20,000, according to a staff report.

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Group calls for community house after stabbing Westboro Beach association renews push following incident at housing complex Kristy Strauss kristy.strauss@metroland.com

KRISTY STRAUSS/METROLAND

The capital shows its pride Thousands gathered in downtown Ottawa on Aug. 26 to take part in the annual Capital Pride Parade, capping off a week of GLBTQ celebrations.

Residences to replace commercial building Complex will include 227 units, storefronts on Richmond Road laura.mueller@metroland.com

tive force,” adding that the planning process offers no protection for residents. There was some concern from the neighbouring Canadian Bank Note Company, which is located to the east of the proposed development. On behalf of the bank note company, planner Tim Chadder asked the planning committee to delay the matter because he said the committee didn’t have all the information it needed to make a decision. He said the company was concerned about the city allowing residences in a former industrially zoned area

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EMC news - There was little opposition to a sprawling residential development at Richmond and Kirkwood during an Aug. 23 meeting of the city’s planning committee. No neighbours, not even the Westboro Community Association, came out to speak against the proposed 227-unit development, which would replace a commercial and warehouse building and parking lot at that corner near the Real Canadian Superstore. Claridge is proposing the development include two buildings: a nine-storey structure on Richmond that includes commercial space on the main floor with residential units above, and a six-storey building along Kirkwood Avenue that steps down to four storeys along Wilbur Avenue. The two buildings would take up half a block. The area was zoned for industrial use and allowed to have a building of up to 22 metres, or about six storeys. If city council gives it the final sign off, the new zoning would allow up to 30 metres on the Richmond Road side. The original design proposed to connect the two buildings at the third floor, but the developer revised it based on feedback from the community. The new proposal includes two buildings separated by a driveway that

leads to underground parking. Concern about the height of the nine-storey part of the building and the impact on traffic from all the new residents were the main concerns expressed in comments submitted to the city. The site is within 600 metres of a major transit hub (Westboro Station), a city report notes. A Westboro resident, Charles Ficner, came to the planning committee meeting to voice his concern that land-use planning in Ottawa is a “big, intensive, destruc-

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Laura Mueller

that’s beside a noise-emitting factory. Janet Bradley, a lawyer working on behalf of Claridge Homes, said that issue isn’t a concern at this stage and rather that it should be dealt with during the siteplan process. She added that she understands the bank note company is looking to increase production and the company would already have to consider the amount of noise it makes based on the surrounding homes. Bradley added that Claridge could make tweaks such as putting air conditioning units on the side of the building, or adding glazing to decrease noise bleed.

EMC news - The Westboro Beach Community Association has been working closely with their councillor to establish a community house at a residential complex that was the site of a stabbing early last week. A man at the complex was stabbed and sent to hospital with life-threatening injuries in the early afternoon on Aug. 21. Ottawa police Const. Marc Soucy said the incident happened in a complex on Van Lang Private in the Westboro Beach area. Before the stabbing took place the Westboro Beach Community Association, which covers the neighbourhood in which the residence is situated, has been working to get a community house at the site. Kitchissippi Coun. Katherine Hobbs is working with the association to develop a community space not just for use by the Van Lang Private residents, but the whole community. Hobbs said she would spend cash-in-lieu of parkland money to fund the project. “There isn’t anything in Westboro Beach in terms of a community centre,” she said. “(The community association’s) interest was to fully integrate by means of this community building. It becomes one community.” Meri Wellman, chairwoman of the Westboro Beach Community Association, said the association felt it was important to have a community house at the complex, especially for the children who live there.

“A few years ago there was a shooting and we worry about the children there,” Wellman said. “(We want to) get them on the right path and give them right tools to move ahead. We would like community house sooner rather than later.” Wellman said her reaction to the stabbing was that she hopes those involved in the stabbing can get the help they need. “I wish we could spend money more on preventative services and preventing these types of things,” she said. Hobbs said she was “very sad” to hear of the stabbing last week and that she has been in talks with Ottawa Community Housing. “The OCH have indicated they’ll be going out to tenants and talking about what they feel would make the area safer,” Hobbs said. “It’s very frightening for the residents who witnessed it and are dealing with this.” The head of the Westboro Community Association said the stabbing in the neighbourhood is a reflection of a larger problem. “It’s always unfortunate and sad to hear there’s been an altercation of some kind and someone’s been seriously hurt,” said association president Gary Ludington. “To me, it seems to be happening all over this city.” He said he feels it’s bigger news when a violent incident occurs in a community housing project. “They’re there to serve a purpose,” said Ludington, adding the complex is very much a part of the community. “There are problems in the rest of our neighborhood. It doesn’t matter where it is.”

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

5


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

OC Transpo ‘cautiously optimistic’ on Presto fixes Metrolinx officials confirm city has final say on student fare age Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - Ninety-five per cent of Presto card taps are now working on OC Transpo buses, according to Metrolinx officials. Speaking at a transit commission meeting on Aug. 24, OC Transpo general manager John Manconi said he is “cautiously optimistic” about the future of the smart-card payment system. The city delayed Presto’s rollout from July 1 until February of 2013 due to a series of technical glitches that prevented payments from being registered on card readers installed on 60 per cent of OC Transpo buses during a trial run. While Presto is used in several cities in southern Ontario including Toronto, Ottawa is the first city to roll out a “new generation” system. Transit users involved in the pilot project had been getting error messages when they tap their cards on the readers to pay their bus fare, while others reported that the cards aren’t recognizing when the user tops them up with more value. The delay will cost between $4- and $7 million, costs that Metrolinx will be on the hook to cover. Metrolinx wants to minimize those costs, said Metrolinx chief executive Bruce McCuaig, and he asked for

OC Transpo’s help in reducing the length of time needed to roll out the smart cards to all OC Transpo riders. Manconi revealed that OC Transpo no longer wants to launch the cards for all OC Transpo riders at the same time next February. Instead, it will be a phased rollout before February, with certain “customer groups” getting the cards before other riders. That will give OC Transpo and Metrolinx a chance to respond to any capacity issues that could arise, and to make it easier for customers to adapt to the new system. Details on that phased roll out will be presented to the city’s transit commission in October or November, Manconi said. While Metrolinx and Accenture have fixed some problems, new issues have cropped up. There is an issue with handheld devices OC Transpo enforcement officers use to check riders’ cards. While the officers can still use the devices to check peoples’ fares, there are defects that the manufacturer is working to fix. There are also worries that the time it takes for a Presto card tap to register a fare are too long. Slow tap times are improving, said Darryl Brown, a Metrolinx official. The time it takes to register a fare with Presto is the same amount of time it takes to

board with existing types of fares and passes, he said, and those times will continue to improve. Following anger that the introduction of the Presto card meant students over age 19 who can’t get a U-pass would have to pay the full adult fare rather than a student fare, Metrolinx officials confirmed that the student fare age isn’t a dealbreaker for the Presto system. The reasoning behind creating a cut-off age of 19 for student bus passes was to align the fare structure with other areas that use Presto, such as the GTA and Hamilton. But in response to a question from Innes Coun. Rainer Bloess, McCuaig said the Ottawa transit commission has the final say over its fare structure – Metrolinx’s role is to implement the fares that the commission decides on. Bloess tabled a motion to increase the age for a student pass, but it was defeated with all commissioners except Bloess voting against the idea. “Treat these students equitably, treat them fairly,” Bloess said. While transit commission chairwoman Diane Deans said that McCuaig’s statements about fares is “new information,” she said that Presto integration was never the only reason for changing the age for a student pass. “I think it was driven by many things,” Deans said. “We’re also trying to end the discounts on the discounts so we can have a sustainable system.”

LAURA MUELLER/METROLAND

All aboard On Aug. 24 OC Transpo revealed one of the 75 new double-decker buses that will hit the road in October. The buses hold 90 people and will replace 70-person articulated buses on express and high-capacity routes. Route 35 in Orléans, Route 61 in Kanata and Route 77 in Barrhaven will be the first to get the new buses. These double deckers are about 30 centimetres shorter than the three double deckers tested by OC Transpo during a three-year trial project, so they can fit under all bridges in the city. That means the city will spend $72.1 million to buy the buses – $9.7 million less than anticipated, because no changes to bridges need to be made. Using double deckers will save $8.1 million a year beginning next April, when all the new buses are available for service.

Metroland supports new online venture SHOP.CA SHOP.CA is promising Canadians a better way to shop on the Internet. Torstar, parent company of Metroland Media Group, publisher of the Ottawa West EMC, has invested in the new site which launched this spring. SHOP.CA offers millions of products in categories such as clothing, house and home, baby and child, electronics, books and e-books, movies and music. And all are sold and shipped within Canada. The investment will give Torstar an initial stake of approximately 14 per cent with a commitment to increase its interest to 30 per cent over thirty months based on the company achieving certain performance milestones, in exchange for a total invest-

ment of up to $6 million in cash and up to $12.4 million in promotional support. “We are proud to have aligned with such an experienced industry leader,” said Drew Green, SHOP.CA CEO and co-founder. “Torstar has a proven track-record of using its media assets to drive online transactions. It is truly exhilarating to work with a partner who shares our vision to improve the online shopping experience in Canada.” Torstar’s promotional support to SHOP.CA will be provided through its many media properties. In addition to the investment, Metroland Media Group has entered into a strategic alliance with SHOP. CA focused on developing the merchant base. David Holland, president

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

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and CEO of Torstar said “ecommerce is an area which is growing rapidly and we are very pleased to be partnering with the management team at SHOP.CA to bring a new Canadian alternative to Canadians who shop online.” The site offers millions of products from many leading brands in over two dozen product categories. Price, speed of delivery, ease of return, and a rewards program are important aspects that are expected to appeal to Canadian shoppers. SHOP.CA will also help local businesses access the Canadian online shopping market, where sales are expected to reach $33 billion by 2016. Retailers and manufacturers can use the site to sell their products, on a cost-per-order basis, to customers across town or across the country. “Metroland has strong relationships with thousands of local businesses and we think SHOP.CA will be an attractive way to support them in tapping into the growing trend of online shopping,” said Metroland president Ian Oliver. For more information, visit SHOP.CA.


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Cities may need to take back seat, Hudak warns Deficit, prosperity outside GTA would be PCs top priorities, opposition leader says Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news – Municipalities should dial down their expectations for provincial funding because Ontario needs to get serious about tackling its debt and balancing the budget, provincial conservative leader Tim Hudak said in Ottawa last week. Hudak spoke to a packed room of municipal representatives from across the province during the annual Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO) conference Aug. 19 to 22. Hudak surprised many municipal leaders at last year’s AMO conference in London, Ont. by stating that he would only commit to the $1 billion or so the province had already uploaded – the implication being that he wouldn’t commit to taking back the remaining $500 million the provincial Liberals had promised to municipalities. This year, Hudak is singing a slightly different tune. “We’re committed to it. We want to see the project done,” Hudak said. “I think anyone that comes out and says they have all kinds of money to do it in a particular time frame is not being honest with munici-

ing overspending and balancing the budget, Hudak said. “Otherwise, we won’t have the services we hold near and dear to our hearts,” he added.

pal leaders across the province.” Hudak told delegates the final $500 million or so is supposed to be uploaded from municipalities by 2019. Hudak pointed to the Drummond report on Ontario public service reform. The report, released in February, stated that it would be more financially feasible to extend the uploading deadline to 2020. Hudak suggested 2021 as an option, but emphasized that he wouldn’t commit to a particular deadline for the rest of the funding, if an election were called and the PCs were elected. “To be honest, we’re in a mess. But we’ll get the job done,” Hudak said.

STUDENTS FIRST

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Strengthening local economies throughout the province – not just the GTA – is a priority for Hudak, he told reporters following his speech. “I do think that this government has lost sight of vast parts of our province – eastern Ontario, rural and northern (Ontario),” Hudak said. “I do have a great concern that this government is dominated by thinking that is strictly around the City of

LAURA MUELLER/METROLAND

Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Tim Hudak told provincial municipal leaders that the Ontario government needs to focus more on economic development and issues eastern Ontario and other areas outside the GTA. Toronto. Clearly, we need to have a thriving Toronto, but we also need to have strong, thriving small-town communities,

northern communities and a strong City of Ottawa.” When it comes to funding items like the Ottawa River Action Plan, Hudak said dol-

ing out new funding wouldn’t be at the top of his list if he were leading the government. “Job number one” is end-

Tensions between the province and teachers’ unions reached a fever pitch last week with the news that MPPs would be recalled three weeks early to legislate a new contract. Premier Dalton McGuinty wants his “Putting Students First” legislation dealt with by the end of the month to institute some wage freezes and a two-year strike ban. Hudak stopped short of saying he’d support the legislation. “I think it’s been badly bungled, and sadly, students and parents are paying the price as the school year is in jeopardy,” Hudak said. The Progressive Conservatives want a “fair, balanced and reasonable” approach that includes across-theboard wage freezes. Hudak says he would want assurances that there are no “loopholes” that prevent salary increases in other ways, such as merit pay. “We’ll look closely to make sure those elements are there,” Hudak says. “I do think there is a better plan and I will continue to press that plan.”

Southern access won’t cross Byron park, developer says Continued from page 1

Ashcroft Homes has decided not to apply for re-zoning to allow an accessway to cut across Byron Linear Park, pictured at left, at its new development at the former Soeurs de la Visitation convent site. R0011585545_0830

“The neighbours of the site made it clear that they did not want another cut across this park. “When Ashcroft first told me they were going to file this application, my answer was clear: I would not support it. Following my announcement on Twitter to this effect, the response from the community has been substantial, and overwhelmingly opposed to such an exit.” “I’m really surprised,” said Glenn Carswell, a Westboro resident, when asked about the developer’s decision. “I’m neutral, and I can sympathize with both sides.” One of the options still on the table for the southern exit for the development is via Shannon Street, which is a one lane street adjacent to the convent site that has four homes located along it. Westboro resident Anita Grace said it’s not exactly a win for the community, since it didn’t want a southern access at all. “I’m sad for Shannon,” Grace said. “Our position was always no southern access.” Hobbs said she has met with residents on Shannon Street, and said she wants to minimize the impact to the street. “I don’t think there is an ideal solution,” she said in a recent interview with EMC.

FILE PHOTO

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7


OPINION

Your Community Newspaper

EDITORIAL

Motorists must be mindful as students return to class

W

hile our politicians talk about putting students first with controversial legislation proposals, we can all do our part for young people when motorists begin seeing a lot of yellow starting next week. Fleets of school buses will flood our streets as children return to elementary and high schools. Most schools welcome students back the day after Labour Day, Sept. 4, but the

French public and Catholic boards open a week earlier. The colour yellow in motorist’s language always translates to one word: caution. Motorists must keep their eyes open for children waiting on street corners. Kids will be kids, which usually means they are in constant motion. We must always remember the first rule of defensive driving: expect the unexpected.

The colour yellow in motorist’s language always translates to one word: caution. Children tend to offer a lot of unexpected behaviour, which occasionally involves a mad dash across the street chasing a ball or friend waiting at a bus stop. Drivers would do well to drive a little more slowly the first few weeks of September.

They might also want to reacquaint themselves with the rules of driving when approaching a stopped school bus with its lights flashing. The flashing lights mean cars must come to a halt to allow children to board the bus. It also allows children and

parents to safely cross the street. By law, traffic in both directions must stop anytime a school bus is stopped with its overhead alternating signal lights flashing. If the danger of hitting a child with your vehicle isn’t reason enough, failing to stop for a school bus can result in a $400 to $2,000 fine upon conviction and six demerit points given to a motorist’s driver’s license. And that’s only for a first

conviction. Each subsequent offence can result in fines ranging from $1,000 to $4,000 together with six demerit points and possible imprisonment up to six months. Staying alert while behind the wheel and being aware of the rules of the road governing school buses is everyone’s responsibility. We’re all winners if we educate ourselves about the rules of the road and school bus safety.

COLUMN

Maybe the mall is worth saving CHARLES GORDON Funny Town

W

e expect shock and dismay when a place like Westboro Sports closes – a family-owned business with 48 years of close connection to the community; or when the beloved Newport Restaurant announces that it will downsize and clear out of its historic location. But we don’t expect shock and dismay when a shopping centre passes. After all, we associate malls with chain ownership, chain food and with the squeezing out of local businesses. But look at what happened when the roof fell in on a shopping centre in the town of Elliott Lake, forcing the mall to close. The mall building contained 60 per cent of local businesses, as well as the library and some government offices. As reported in the Globe and Mail, the community is stunned and saddened. “People have no place to go,� said one local woman. “That was their favourite place to be. They liked to hang out there in the mall. That’s just how people were.� With all the sentimental attachment we have toward the small independent business of years gone by, we shouldn’t forget that it’s possible to get sentimental about shopping centres, too. After all, they have been with us for four or five decades. And for a lot of neighborhoods, not to mention smaller communities, the local shopping centre is the closest thing they have to a main street. Take a careful look the next time you’re in Carlingwood or Billings Bridge or St. Laurent or Westgate. People use those places for more than shopping. They meet their friends, they have lunch, they have coffee, they take power walks.

Mostly, they hang out. Older people hang out, teenagers hang out. You should never underestimate the importance of hanging out. Top-level hanging out enhances our quality of life. Sure, some of us wish the hanging out was in the open air. Some of us wish the open air was on open streets filled with locally-owned shops. But that doesn’t seem to be what has been happening since the first shopping centres were invented. Looking down the road a few years, when the current shopping centres wears out, we can anticipate a wave of nostalgia. “Remember when we used to park on the second deck and take the escalator to the Sports Experts?� people will say, a bit like what they say now about riding their bikes to the malt shop or, driving their large cars, powered by leaded gasoline, to the drive-in movie. Anything can be the subject of nostalgia. There was a movie a few years ago about a woman who pined for the lifestyle of East Berlin, before the wall came down. So it’s no surprise that people in the future will look fondly back on the mall, remembering when there were five jewelry stores, a tax place, a CD store, a video store, a book store. Remember CDs? Remember videos? Remember books? People may even wax nostalgic about the awful and inescapable music coming out of the ceiling. So perhaps the mall is worth saving after all. As Elliott Lake’s plight demonstrates, the mall’s importance grows in a cold climate. Since, despite everything, we still have a cold climate, it may be time to stop lamenting the mall. By coming to terms with it we have an opportunity to campaign for changes that will mall life more interesting. It goes without saying that more local stores and eating places would help, but the changes can go beyond that. Elliott Lake’s idea of a library in a mall is brilliant. Sunday markets in those vast parking lots might be popular. Small performance spaces and exhibit spaces for local artists and musicians would enhance the shopping centre experience and benefit the community. After all, if Tunney’s Pasture can be humanized, anything is possible.

Ottawa West EMC welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at www.yourottawaregion.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to patricia.lonergan@metroland.com , fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to Ottawa West EMC, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa, ON, K2E 7L2. Published weekly by:

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

DISPLAY ADVERTISING: Caroline Grist - Kanata - 221-6215

THIS WEEKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S POLL QUESTION

Are out-of-pocket expenses for school supplies and fees getting too high for Ontario students?

PREVIOUS POLL SUMMARY

What do you think of the decision to rename the Ottawa River Parkway?

A) Definitely. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m spending hundreds

A) Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fitting tribute to Sir John A. Macdonald, our first prime minister.

15%

B) A little bit. Fees are excessive, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pretty frugal with supplies and clothing.

B) It was a terrible decision to rename the road â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it will only cause confusion.

44%

C) We shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be spending money to rename anything in this city.

30%

D) It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bother me either way.

11%

of dollars to send my kids to class.

C) No. These expenses just go with the territory when it comes to raising kids. D) No skin off my back â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have children.

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EDITORIAL: Managing Editor: Patricia Lonergan 613-221-6261 patricia.lonergan@metroland.com NEWS EDITOR: Matthew Jay, 613-221-6175 MATTHEWJAY METROLANDCOM REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER: Kristy Strauss kristy.strauss@metroland.com - 613-221-6161 POLITICAL REPORTER: Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com - 613-221-6162

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Another school year, another $700?

E

very year we’re caught off-guard as the summer comes to an abrupt halt and the morning orchestra of yellow diesel school buses becomes our new alarm clock. Despite talking in vague terms about the new school year for weeks, it takes at least a carafe of coffee to get us going at 6 a.m. each school morning. But what hits us and other families hardest at this time of year is the hundreds of dollars needed for new clothes, stationary and shoes. A study released by Visa in August suggests the average Canadian family will spend $677 on back-to-school supplies, an increase of $200 over last year. Ontario families are the biggest spenders, averaging $757. Families in Quebec

grocery shopping or to the mall in case you spot a deal.

BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse – always the most frugal province – are expected to spend the least, about $519 per household, which is still a substantial sum. There’s nothing we can do about the kids growing an inch between June and August, but there are ways families can lessen the burden on the pocketbook: Make a list and stick to it “Most parents over-shop,” says Judith Cane of Money Coaches Canada. “And the retailers support that by

bundling everything in packages. Twenty pencils? Most kids won’t use that many in their school life.” Cane recommends having a list and buying only what you need. Every June, our school sends a list of must-haves for the kids. This generally includes a backpack, a lunchbox, a few boxes of tissues, a couple of pairs of shoes and some stationary. Even if you don’t have one provided by the school, write down the items that you need, carry it around in your pocket when you go

Take advantage of sales, coupons and points One of the biggest advantages to the consumer of the competitive retail market is that most stores have loyalty programs in place. Think Shoppers Optimum, Canadian Tire dollars and HBC Rewards. Keep an eye on store flyers, look for manufacturer coupons online and tabulate your points. I recently purchased four pairs of running shoes for the kids – which had a total value of $190 – but with a two-for-one sale, shopping in the clearance section and redeeming $50 worth of points, I paid just $76 after tax. That’s big savings. And while you want to purchase nice things, “your child does not need the designer ver-

sion,” says Ted Wernham, owner of Wernham Wealth Management in London, Ont. Think quality, not quantity When my son first started school four years ago, we excitedly purchased him a Spiderman backpack. Within a few months, however, the ribbing was tearing off, and what had started as a pinhole in the bottom corner soon frayed into a gigantic black hole. For a few extra dollars, we invested in a heavy-duty bag for each of the boys from Mountain Equipment Co-op. Three years later, the fabric, zippers and labels are still intact, and we’ve knocked about $40 off our annual school supply expenses. “Skip the trendy binders, folders and pens,” says Cane. “And go for what’s practical.”

Reuse and recycle Sure, there’s nothing nicer than a shiny pencil case full of new crayons. But chances are, if you’re like us and you’ve been buying supplies for a few years, you already have everything you need. Before you hit the shops, see if you can cobble together a full stationary kit from that bottom drawer in the kitchen. (You know the one.) And why not hit up some second-hand shops or a neighbour for some lightly used hand-medown clothes? But don’t go overboard. Children really only need a few outfits to keep them going through the week. Ours have school uniforms. We find three shirts and a couple of pairs of trousers are enough to satisfy the minimum hygiene requirements. With the money you’ve saved, you can buy yourself some really strong coffee to fuel up for those oh-so-early September mornings.

Finalized contracts between city, Plasco close to completion good sign, Kirkpatrick said. Bryden spoke to the Ottawa West EMC following a presentation to municipal politicians from across the province at the Association of Municipalities of Ontario conference held in Ottawa from Aug. 19 to 22. He said his company is already in the process of tender-

Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

If for some reason the city and Plasco don’t end up proceeding with their partnership, Plasco could always take the “modules” of equipment on order for its Ottawa plant and re-use them for other facilities it has in the works in China, California, the United Kingdom and the Bahamas.

FILE PHOTO

Plasco chief executive Rod Bryden, shown at a December 2011 technical briefing for councillors and the media, said while the agreements between his company and the city have yet to be finalized, the tendering for production of the project’s equipment has already begun. chairwoman Coun. Maria McRae was pleased to hear that. “These are very complicated technical legal agreements,” she said. “Council did not give a mandate to the city manager to execute them quickly, he was asked to execute them thoroughly.” Last December, city manager Kent Kirkpatrick said the deal is a good one for the city. “We have been very, very diligent in protecting the city’s

interests if this works out … and if it doesn’t (work out),” Kirkpatrick said at the time. Part of that confidence comes from the willingness of international investors to put their money into Plasco’s plan. The “due diligence” of corporations that are investing millions of dollars into the projects is something the city can take as a sign of faith. If that money – and faith – is still there when Plasco begins constructing the facility, it’s a

R0011581383_0830

EMC news – The city and Plasco Energy Group could be days away from finalizing contracts needed to bring a worldfirst garbage-to-energy plant in Ottawa. The company has been quiet for the past eight months, since city council signed off on the terms of the deal last December. The contract will make Ottawa the first city in the world to use Plasco’s plasma gasification technology to take leftover residential garbage and use a novel plasma process to turn it into electricity. It has taken eight months, but final contracts are right around the corner, said Plasco CEO Rod Bryden. “I think that both the city and we thought that we’d be done maybe two months ago,” Bryden said. The delay amounts to the “meticulous care” the city and its lawyers have taken when it comes to “analyzing every word” in the series of six agreements that will soon be signed. Environment committee

ing for production of the equipment needed for the plant, which will process 109,500 tonnes of Ottawa’s residential garbage each year. Construction on the site near the Trail Road landfill will begin this spring, Bryden said, and it should wrap up by the first three months of 2014.

R0011580845

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

9


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Shopping cart consultation to be held in September Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

FILE

The city is looking at ways to address the number of abandoned shopping carts. A public consultation will be held on Sept. 11 at the Earl Armstrong Arena to address the issue. carts and sending city crews to clean them up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s costing us money and fuel for the vehicles,â&#x20AC;? he said.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shopping carts are rampant. They are all over the place.â&#x20AC;? The transportation committee directed staff to examine

the costs and benefits of creating a program to retrieve abandoned carts. A report released in May noted the city collects

about 1,000 carts in the downtown area and 450 carts in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s east end per year. When Tierney first brought the issue to the committee, he had wanted to charge retailers $20 for every shopping cart the city collected. The report took this idea into consideration and highlighted what other cities across Canada do to deal with the problem and the scheme may be among those explored by residents at the consultation. The consultation will take place on Sept. 11 from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Earl Armstrong Arena at 2020 Ogilvie Rd. on the main floor. To reserve a spot in advance, residents can contact Leslie Vanclief at 613580-2424 ext. 27945 or leslie. vanclief@ottawa.ca.

Sunday Worship 10:00am Wednesday Chapel Service 7:15pm

Real God. Real People. Real Church. 7275 Parkway Rd. Greely, ON 613-821-1056

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meets every Sunday at The Old Forge Community Resource Centre 2730 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K2B 7J1

Location: St. Thomas More Catholic School, 1620 Blohm Drive

Sunday Services: Bible Study at 10:00 AM - Worship Service at 11:00 AM

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Join us Sundays at 10:30

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Invites you to our worship service with Rev. Dean Noakes Sundays at 11am, 10 am in July/August 414 Pleasant Park Road 613 733-4886

Worship services Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

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Gloucester South Seniors Centre 4550 Bank Street (at Leitrim Rd.) (613) 277-8621 Come for an encouraging Word! R0011292837

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Minister - Rev. William Ball Organist - Alan Thomas Nusery & Sunday School, Loop audio, Wheelchair access

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Minister: James T. Hurd Everyone Welcome

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10

Free Methodist Church

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Come Join Us!

225 McClennan Road, Nepean ON 613-596-9390 www.awfmc.ca

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

ALL WELCOME Sundays at 10:30 a.m. The Salvation Army Community Church Meeting at St. Andrew School 201 Crestway Dr. 613-440-7555 Barrhaven www.sawoodroffe.org

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St. Timothyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Presbyterian Church

Holy Eucharist 8:00 am & 10:30 am 9:30 am - Play Area for Under 5 934 Hamlet Road (near St Laurent & Smyth) 613 733 0102 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; staidans@bellnet.ca

2400 Alta Vista Drive (613) 733 0131 Sunday Worship at 10:00 a.m. Sunday School; Ample parking; OC Transpo route 8 A warm welcome awaits you. Minister: Alex Mitchell sttimothys@on.aibn.com www.sttimsottawa.com

Riverside United Church 3191 Riverside Dr (at Walkley)

Sunday Worship at 9:30am Refreshments / fellowship following service www.magma.ca/~ruc (613)733-7735

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St Aidanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church

OUR LADY OF THE VISITATION PARISH 5338 Bank Street, Ottawa 613-822-2197 www.olvis.ca Masses: Saturday 5:00 pm Sunday with Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Liturgy: 9:00 & 11:00 am Weekdays: Wed. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Fri. 9:00 am Now open for rentals: www.avisitationbanquetcentre.com 613-822-1777

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The Church Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Always Longed For...Starts September 16 Come join us!

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10 Chesterton Drive, Ottawa (Meadowlands and Chesterton) Tel: 613-225-6648 parkwoodchurch.ca

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Military Chapel Sunday Services at Uplands! Protestant Worship with Sunday School 09:30 Roman Catholic Mass with Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Liturgy 11:00

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Dominion-Chalmers United Church

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715 Roosevelt Ave. (at Carling at Cole) Pastor: Rev. Marek Sabol 6ISITHTTPWWWOURSAVIOUROTTAWACOMs  

43 Meadowlands Dr. W. Ottawa

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429 Parkdale at Gladstone Ministers Rev. Dr. Anthony Bailey Barbara Faught - Pastoral Care Melodee Lovering - Youth and Children Worship Service - 10:30 am 613-728-8656 Sunday School for all ages pdale@trytel.com www.parkdaleunitedchurch.ca Nursery Available

Our Saviour Lutheran Church

Come & worship with us Sundays at 10:00am Fellowship & Sunday School after the service

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Worship the Lord in the Beauty of his holiness...â&#x20AC;?

Sunday Services Worship Service10:30am Sundays Prayer Circle Tuesday at 11:30 10:30 a.m. Rev. James Murray

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Sunday Services: 9am Thursday Eucharist: 10am Nearly New Shop Closed July and August 8 Withrow Avenue 613-224-7178

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613-722-1144 Parkdale United Church

Heb. 13:8 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and today, and forever

Tel: (613) 276-5481; (613) 440-5481 1893 Baseline Rd., Ottawa (2nd Floor) Sunday Service 10.30am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12.30pm Bible study / Night Vigil: Friday 10.00pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1.00am Website: heavensgateottawa.org E-mail: heavensgatechapel@yahoo.ca

613.247.8676

(Do not mail the school please)

Worship 10:30 Sundays

The Redeemed Christian Church of God

Heavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gate Chapel

St. Richardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church

Celebrating 14 years in this area!

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Pleasant Park Baptist

Watch & Pray Ministry ǢČ&#x2013;Ĺ&#x2DC;_É´ǢsÇ&#x2039;É&#x161;Ă&#x17E;OsÇŁ Çź ˨ŸÇ&#x2039;Ë Ë Ĺ?

We are a small church in the city of Ottawa with a big heart for God and for people. newhopeottawa.co

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The West Ottawa Church of Christ

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Rideau Park United Church

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EMC news - A public consultation will be held next month to address what should be done about the problem of abandoned shopping carts in the city. The consultation will be held at the Earl Armstrong Arena on Sept. 11 and will call on residents to help come up with the ideal way to collect runaway carts as well as deterring people from taking carts away from retail outlets in the first place. Residents who attend the meeting will have a chance to work in small focus groups, sharing ideas on three topics: ways to collect and return abandoned carts; educational

programs and initiatives to prevent carts from being removed; and the implementation of enforcement or a bylaw. The information gathered at this consultation will be used during the implementation of a pilot project in Beacon-HillCyrville and Rideau-Vanier wards. The pilot project will be monitored to determine whether it is effective in reducing the number of abandoned shopping carts in these two communities. The issue of runaway shopping carts was initially raised in November 2011, when Beacon-Hill-Cyrville Coun. Tim Tierney brought it to the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transportation committee. At the time, Tierney made weekly jaunts around his ward, photographing errant


ARTS & CULTURE

Hydro Ottawa Rooftop Rent Diverted to Charity

R0011579986

Your Community Newspaper

Bryce Conrad, President and Chief Executive Officer of Hydro Ottawa, and Terry Matthews, Chairman of Brookstreet, atop the hotel’s roof.

KRISTY STRAUSS/METROLAND

Trevor Proulx, a crafter and organizer of Art in the City organizer, shows off his homemade glasses at the event held at Confederation Park on Aug. 25. The third annual event took place from Aug. 24 to 26 and featured 48 artists.

Art in the City a crafters’ celebration Kristy Strauss kristy.strauss@metroland.com

EMC entertainment - Westboro-raised Trevor Proulx has gone to countless arts and crafts shows across western Canada and the United States, but he always felt his hometown needed one too. That’s how Proulx, who comes from a family of crafters, came up Art in the City, an outdoor arts and crafts show held in the heart of downtown Ottawa at Confederation Park. “It’s in its third year and it’s doing very well,” said

Proulx at his tent that features homemade vodka glasses. This year’s show took place at the park on from Aug. 24 to 26 and featured 48 artists from all over Ontario and Quebec who showed off their photography, pottery, and glass among the many different wares on display. Proulx said he knew the show would be a hit in Ottawa because residents have an appreciation for the arts and crafts industry. “(Arts and crafts) is a dying breed. Everyone’s buying stuff from China and looking

for a cheap price point,” he said. “But the Ottawa market’s starting to turn around . . . people are buying pieces for their home.” Another added bonus to this year’s show was that its timing coincided with the annual Capital Pride Parade that marched by on Aug. 26. “It’ll be very busy here and very colourful,” he said the day before the parade. He also said he hopes the show can continue being a success. “Hopefully this goes on for the next 30 years and I can retire a millionaire,” Proulx said

with a laugh. For future shows, he said he hopes he can get the word out more to promote the event and also bring some additional features to the show. “Maybe a food tent and food trucks . . . maybe a beer and wine tent. I’m looking to expand that,” Proulx said. “But this is a great location. It doesn’t get any better than right downtown Ottawa, next to city hall, in an absolutely gorgeous park.” For more information about the event, visit the website at ArtintheCityOttawa.com.

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A strong communications network is an integral element of the smart electricity grid that Hydro Ottawa is building throughout its service territory. As part of its network, Hydro Ottawa has a communications antenna atop the Brookstreet Hotel in Kanata. With an excellent location, height and clear line of sight, the Brookstreet Hotel’s 18-storey rooftop is sought after for communications equipment installation by local companies. Hydro Ottawa is one of five commercial tenants on the rooftop of the hotel. Renting its rooftop to other companies is more than a commercial venture for Brookstreet – it is also an opportunity to contribute to the community. Brookstreet is allocating $5,000 of its annual rooftop rent to support the hotel’s 10th Anniversary Lumière Charity Gala. “We are very excited that Brookstreet will once again be supporting local charities through the Lumière Charity Gala event,” said Bryce Conrad, Hydro Ottawa’s President and Chief Executive Officer. “This is a great event that directly benefits the Ottawa Regional Cancer Foundation.” The Lumière Charity Gala will be held at Brookstreet on September 12. Over the last nine years, Brookstreet has distributed more than $300,000 to local charities through Lumière and more than $160,000 for cancer research. “At Hydro Ottawa, we believe in acting at all times as a responsible and engaged corporate citizen. We commend Brookstreet for generously giving back to the community,” added Conrad. “We value our relationship with Brookstreet Hotel and are pleased to be associated with them in this effort and in their continued initiatives to reduce energy usage. In the past, Hydro Ottawa awarded Brookstreet with the Companies for Conservation award, an initiative to celebrate the exciting and innovative conservation projects being undertaken by commercial electricity users in Ottawa. The program recognizes local companies or organizations for their conservation leadership.” Hydro Ottawa is a community builder, maintaining one of the safest, most reliable electricity distribution systems in Ontario. The company is also dedicated to helping customers use electricity efficiently and teaching children and youth about electricity safety and conservation.

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

11


ARTS & CULTURE

Your Community Newspaper

Digging LeBreton Flats Brandy Lockhart, lead resident archeologist with Golder Associates Ltd., poses with the most unusual artifact her team discovered at LeBreton Flats: a sword that dates to the 1700s. The dig was done in preparation for the site to be used as a staging area for light-rail construction. The dig was especially interesting for Lockhart because an intact archeological site in a cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s downtown area is extremely rare, she said. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;It provides a really interesting glimpse into the lives of people who were some of the earliest settlers in Ottawa, and right up to the 1960s,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lockhart said. The sword and other artifacts will be displayed at city hall sometime later this year.

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012


COMMUNITY

Your Community Newspaper

TRISH STOLTE/SUBMITTED

Trish Stolte of Dovercourt Recreation Centre and her dog, Grace, had some fun in the water on Aug. 26 at the annual dog swim event.

THE FAMILY THAT RIDES TOGETHER, SAVES TOGETHER

Pooches get pampered at Dovercourt rec centre kristy.strauss@metroland.com

EMC community - Dozens of dogs got pampered at Dovercourt Recreation Centre as part of the annual Dog Swim on Aug. 26. And while the dogs went for a swim, got shampooed, brushed and their nails clipped, a dog rescue shelter also benefited. “(The dogs) love it and they get so excited,” said Christine Pelletier, manager of aquatics at Dovercourt who’s also involved in the event. Pelletier, who’s been with Dovercourt for about 17 years, said the event has been going on at the recreation centre since before she started. “Someone came and asked if we could do it,” she said, adding Dovercourt has a hard time saying no to such requests. Since then the event has happened every year and an

animal charity has always been the fundraiser. In the past, Pelletier said Dovercourt has had the event to raise money for organizations for guide dogs and the humane society. “We raise a couple hundred every year,” said Pelletier, adding she’s not sure how much the event has raised overall since it started. As part of the event, there was an on-the-spot dog spa,

shampooing, brushing, towel drying and nail clipping as well as a swim. Masters’N’Dogs were there with gifts and goodies and the dog swim was sponsored by The Guy With The Dog, in partnership with Hopeful Hearts Dog Rescue and Dovercourt. Pelletier said the event usually attracts about 75 dogs every year and it’s usually the same participants.

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

13


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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012


COMMUNITY

Your Community Newspaper

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A blockbuster night Area residents enjoyed popcorn, drinks and a movie when Bay Coun. Mark Taylor hosted a free showing of the animated film Madagascar in Michele Park on Aug. 26. More than 300 people in the community came out to enjoy the movie.

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Orleans - Innes Rd. & Mer Bleue Rd. - 4270 Innes Road, 613-824-8914 x 135 Ottawa - Merivale Rd. & Baseline - 1460 Merivale Road, 613-226-6001 x 135 Ottawa - Baseline Rd. & Woodroffe Ave. - 1980 Baseline Road, 613-723-3200 x 135 Gloucester - Ogilvie Rd. & Blair Rd. - 1980 Ogilvie Road, 613-746-5724 x 137 Stittsville - Main St. & Hazeldean - 1251 Main Street, 613-831-7697

Kingston 770 Gardiners Rd. RioCan Centre 613-389-0600 *See store for details. Savings and Discounts cannot be combined with any other offers. Hot Buys excluded. Although every precaution is taken, errors in price or specification may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct such errors. Featured items may not be stocked exactly as shown. Items shown are representative; selection, styles or fabrics may vary. Sale ends Sunday, September 2nd, 2012.

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

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Monday - Friday 9:30 - 9 • Saturday 9:30 - 6 • Sunday 11 - 6

15


EVENTS

Your Community Newspaper

Ride set to support Canadian Guide Dogs Motorcycles to be out in full force along surprise route winding across region Ottawa West EMC staff

Local charities need your help The Conservative Government is focused on keeping our communities safe and prosperous while aligning itself with the interests of Canadian families. With the rapid population growth in Nepean-Carleton, it is more important than ever to promote community organizations that take care of our families and those in need. Harvest House, located on Ramsayville Road in Ottawa’s Greenbelt, is one such organization. Serving men between the ages of sixteen and thirty, Harvest House is focused on rehabilitating young men who suffer from addiction in order to reintegrate them as productive members of society. Relying on emotional and financial support from the community, this professional facility houses, teaches, trains and mentors over fifty young men at once through a policy of abstinence and faith. The Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind (CGDB) has their National Training Centre located in Manotick. This is another valued community organization in our riding that has far-reaching influence. The National Training Centre provides assistance to visually impaired individuals from across Canada. It relies on dedicated volunteers as well as donations received from individuals, corporations, service clubs, foundations and fundraising events. As an organization entirely separate from the Ottawa Food Bank, the Barrhaven Food Cupboard cares for local families in need throughout the year. It is run by volunteers through the Barrhaven United Church and survives entirely on the assistance of caring members of the community for cash or food donations. The Food Cupboard recently announced that, due to a thirty percent increase in demand from last year, they worry they may not be able to meet further demand. Recognized as the only working industrial heritage site within the boundaries of the City of Ottawa, Watson’s Mill is revered as an irreplaceable element of Manotick’s history. Thousands of tourists and residents from the Ottawa area have enjoyed this historic site, which brings both character and commerce to this unique and treasured region. The Mill itself, however, is in great need of repair. The exterior surface of the structure is compromised and a new roof is needed. Local events have been held to help fundraise, but more is still needed. Since the 1970’s, the obesity rate in Canada has more than doubled, a ratio that is even more pronounced in our children. The Greco Foundation to Fight Obesity in Children is an integral community program promoting health and prosperity among those who are most vulnerable to unhealthy lifestyles. This charity has donated over $40,000 worth of fitness equipment, coaching services and nutritional consultations to families and to non-profit organizations working with low income families. The Foundation has also contributed $35,000 to help rebuild school play structures in our communities. While I have listed only five organizations above, there are many other groups deserving your help. In this tough global economic climate, it is important that we help each other out and give back to our communities. Pierre Poilievre MP for Nepean-Carleton

EMC events - Ottawa River Riders will host its annual Guide Dog Run charity motorcycle ride on Sunday, September 9, with a surprise route through Eastern Ontario. The 200-kilometre ride will be unveiled during registration, which will take place from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at the Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind headquarters and training centre in Manotick.

All motorcyclists in the area are welcome to participate, and all motorcycle brands are welcome. Cost is $15 per person, which includes a score card and a barbecue ticket. All proceeds support the guide dog organization. The Guide Dog Run starts, rain or shine, from 4120 Rideau Valley Drive North, Manotick. Participants can depart on their own or with one of the guided rides leaving at 9:30

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or 10 a.m. After the ride, participants can stay for an afternoon barbecue and social, with many prizes available. Riders will also meet future guide and assistance dogs, and learn more about Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind. The guide dog organization was established as a registered charity in 1984. Since that time, Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind has provided professionally trained guide dogs to Canadians who are visually

impaired from coast to coast. In 2010, Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind launched an Assistance Dogs Division, which trains assistance dogs for individuals in the Ottawa area with mobility-related disabilities. Ottawa River Riders is a motorcycle enthusiasts’ club in the Ottawa region. They are a non-brand specific touring club, whose motto is ‘Friends Riding Together.’ For more information call 613-692-7777 or visit www. ottawariverriders.ca.

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012


FOOD

Your Community Newspaper

Cornmeal muffins always pass taste test

W

hether your taste runs to a bowl of spicy chili or a steaming plate of beef stew, you’ll enjoy the taste of these cornmeal muffins. These are slightly sweet, moist and simple to make. You can find the cornmeal in the supermarket, usually in the section with the cooked cereals such as oatmeal. If you find the muffins start to get a bit dry after a couple of days (if they last that long), just pop them in the microwave for a few seconds. They’ll taste almost as fresh as if they just came out of the oven. This recipe makes a large batch, 12 to 16 muffins, but they freeze well. I thaw a few and then reheat them in the toaster oven. CORNMEAL MUFFINS

• 1 1/2 cups cornmeal

PAT TREW Food ‘n’ Stuff • 1 3/4 cups flour • 2 1/2 tsp. baking powder • 1 1 /2 tsp. baking soda • 2/3 cup brown sugar • 1/2 tsp. salt • 2 eggs • 2 cups buttermilk (or 2 Tbsp. vinegar with enough regular milk to make 2 cups) • 1/4 cup vegetable oil Generously grease a muffin pan. I use a pastry brush because it’s quick and less messy than other methods. In one bowl, combine the cornmeal, flour, baking powder baking soda, salt and sugar.

In another bowl, mix the eggs, milk and oil. Pour this into the dry ingredients, and stir just until combined. Spoon the batter into muffin cups, filling them about three-quarters full. Bake at 400 F (205 C) for about 15 minutes. If you’re not sure whether they’re done, insert a toothpick in the centre of a muffin near the middle of the pan. If the toothpick comes out clean, they’re done. Let the muffins sit in the pan for five minutes, then you’ll be able to remove them without having them break apart. Serve warm.

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SENIORS

Your Community Newspaper

Baby chick certainly had fashion sense

L

earning that it was not wise to have a farm animal as a pet was a hard lesson for me when I was young. Sooner or later, it would be hauled off in the back of the wagon or peddled door-todoor in Renfrew. Many would end up in our smokehouse. But that didn’t stop me from favouring a baby lamb or a newborn calf, and at one time I was especially fond of a chicken that I had named Squeaky. It had come into the world in the late spring, bursting out of a shell right before

MARY COOK Mary Cook’s Memories my eyes one rainy day. All the other baby chicks were bright yellow, but this little one was almost white and its feathers were few and far between. Father said it was a weakling and he doubted it would survive. But survive it did and it

was soon obvious it was not going to be at all like the other chickens. I could see that as it grew it was not going to have much in the way of feathers. Father said that happened sometimes. A cull, he called it. I took to that little chicken

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and it to me and we were soon inseparable. It didn’t look like a chicken and it certainly didn’t sound like one. While the others chirped, this one squawked and that’s why I decided to call it Squeaky. My brothers made fun of the little bare chicken with nothing more than a bit of fuzz around its tail end and a few scraggly hairs at its neck. The rest of its body was completely bare and pink. It had lost its colour as it grew. As the summer wore on and the warm days got chilly, I grew increasingly concerned about Squeaky. It was often pushed aside by the other chickens and I would find it huddled by itself in a corner of the chicken coop trying to keep warm. I begged Mother to let me bring it in the house at night. I told her I would look after it and I would keep it in a cardboard box so that it wouldn’t dirty the kitchen floor. Mother said farm animals belonged in the barn, chickens in the chicken coop. After many tears and promises to scrub the floor on my hands and knees if there was a reason to, Mother finally agreed that I could bring Squeaky into the house to sleep. I emptied a box I found in the drive shed and put one

of my dolls’ blankets in it and situated Squeaky and the box behind the Findlay Oval. When I went to bed that first night, the last thing I did before climbing the stairs was check on Squeaky. She was asleep with that bare head tucked under an equally bare wing, the picture of perfect chicken contentment. For the first time in many nights I would go to sleep assured that my pet chicken was warm and safe. As soon as Mother blew out the coal oil lamp and the kitchen was turned to black, loud squawks could be heard right through the house. I could hear Father jumping out of bed, while Audrey and I sat bolt upright. I flew

solution the next day. She said not to worry – she would take care of the situation. The morning broke cold and windy for a late summer day. When I leaned out of the bed Squeaky was still fast asleep, just as I had left her with my sweater over her naked body. Audrey got out of bed and headed right for the box I kept my doll clothes in. She took out a tiny sweater with buttons I used on my China doll Aunt Lizzie had sent me from Regina. She forced Squeaky’s legs into the arm holes and buttoned the sweater across its bare breast. It fit her like a glove and once she had shaken her legs a couple of times, resigned herself to her new clothes. We walked right out the kitchen door with the chicken in my doll’s sweater and over to the chicken coop. When Audrey put her down she went scurrying into the

I took to that little chicken and it to me and we were soon inseparable. It didn’t look like a chicken and it certainly didn’t sound like one. While the others chirped, this one squawked and that’s why I decided to call it Squeaky. downstairs in the dark just as Father was lighting the lamp and peering into the box behind the stove. There was Squeaky with her head in the air and her mouth wide open letting out the most outrageous roars I ever heard come out of a chicken. Mother said she was to be taken right out to the chicken coop. I started to wail that it was the middle of the night and that Squeaky would be frightened to death. “Best thing that could happen to her,” I heard Emerson say from the top of the stairs. I learned early in life that if I cried as if my heart was broken I could usually move Father. Mother was another matter. But that night it was Father’s decision that the chicken could stay in the house upstairs beside my bed, but that it would be the last night it would be sleeping anyplace but in the henhouse. I was sure if it had to spend one more night out in that drafty place it would surely freeze to death. It was my very clever sister Audrey who had the perfect

crowd demanding her share of the feed. Just before it got dark that night, Audrey and I went out to take one last look. There was Squeaky apart from the rest of the chickens, fast asleep in her bright red and yellow hand knit sweater. A clever girl was my sister Audrey. Emerson said the coloured sweater would put off the other hens from laying eggs. Audrey said to pay him no attention. My featherless chicken kept growing into larger sweaters. I dreaded the day when she would join the others in the back of the old Model T Ford to be taken into Renfrew and traded for sugar and flour. But Father and Mother decided, because she was such an odd looking bird, she would likely be as tough as blazes. Squeaky was allowed to live out her life naturally to my great relief. She was featherless and stayed bared in the warm weather, and when the weather was cold, she was cozily wrapped in a doll’s sweater.


Your Community Newspaper

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"UUFOUJPO BACK-to-SCHOOL 'BMM3FHJTUSBUJPO Healthy school lunches Save on back-to-school Confrontations focusing on diet between children and parents have been around seemingly since the beginning of time. Many children start off as cooperative eaters, anxious to try different types of foods. As they get older, the number of foods they’re apt to eat diminishes, which can make choosing healthy items for lunches and dinners more difficult. It also can make packing lunches for school more challenging. Many initiatives have attempted to improve the quality of school lunches provided by school cafeterias. Government regulations to reduce the amount of fat and sodium in these lunches, and to introduce more whole grains, fruits and vegetables, are one such initiative. Parents of students who prefer to bring their own lunches from home may be left wondering how they can create

healthy lunches their kids will eat. Considering school lunches must compete with far less healthy yet widely available alternatives, parents will need to be creative in their creation of homemade lunches. Here are some ideas to get you started. * Purchase a new lunch container. There are many different new and innovative lunch containers that can make separating school lunches easy. Few kids want to dig into a brown paper sack and pull out something that has been so squashed it’s unrecognizable. Partitioned lunch boxes enable you to pack different items together where they can be stored separately. The divisions also help you remember to include foods from the basic food groups, such as a fruit, vegetable, protein, starch and dairy item. * Have your child make a list

of his or her favorite foods. Once the list has been made, see how you can make the foods healthier. For example, if chicken nuggets make the list, prepare your own nuggets with white meat chunks that are baked, not fried. If there are a number of bread items, see if you can substitute whole grain breads instead of white, bleached varieties. * Get creative. Children may not be inclined to eat loose pieces of fruit. But if the fruit is stuck on skewers or served with a low-fat dipping sauce or caramel, it may look more appealing. Look to “mini” foods, which tend to be more fun as well. Little sandwiches and little burgers may present an optical illusion, where kids think they’re eating only a small amount, but actually it’s a full serving. * Hide healthy foods within others. There are entire recipe books that teach you how to mix fruits and vegetables into desserts to increase nutritive value. Everything from spinach to tofu to beets have been included in items like cake, cookies and brownies. So if kids are reticent to dig into their greens, try a clever hiding method. * Cut foods into fun shapes. Kids may be more inclined to eat a turkey and cheese sandwich if it’s cut into star shapes or their favorite cartoon characters. Invest in a few cookie cutters so that lunchtime becomes fun time.

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

his or her clothes. If you can’t find a family to swap with, visit your local community center or church to see if it has a clothing swap program. * Shop discount stores. If the local consignment store has already been raided, consider a discount store like Marshalls or TJ Maxx. These stores typically sell items at heavily discounted prices and often have similar inventories to mall department stores. * Shop online. A relatively new way for parents to save on back to school clothing is to shop online. A popular store’s Web site might offer discounts that their brick-and-mortar store does not. Parents can also scour a host of coupon Web sites to find special codes they can use at checkout. These codes might offer free shipping or a percentage off the bill when consumers spend a certain amount of money.

2120 Prince Charles Road Near Carlingwood Shopping Centre

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will overspend, and developing the budget early helps you spread out your spending. * Shop at consignment stores. Consignment stores offer name-brand clothing at discounted prices, something parents of ever-growing youngsters can appreciate. Kids will like the namebrand gear, while Moms and Dads will enjoying not having to pay namebrand prices. A consignment store with significant inventory might sell anything from blue jeans and T-shirts to sneakers, shoes and jackets. * Swap clothes with other families. Clothing swaps between families have grown increasingly popular as more and more parents look to save money on rising clothing costs for their kids. Typically, families will swap clothes, including jackets, if their kids are similar in age and one youngster has outgrown

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The back to school season can be bittersweet. Parents may miss having their youngsters around the house when summer officially ends, but it’s also fun for parents to watch kids partake in all that school has to offer. One of the things few parents look forward come the end of summer vacation is back-to-school shopping. Such shopping can be costly, especially when it’s time to outfit kids with new wardrobes. While a complete wardrobe overhaul might not be necessary, kids typically need to replace a few items they’ve outgrown since the start of summer break. There are several ways parents can save on back-to-school clothes. * Get a head start. Parents can save themselves some money by shopping early for their children’s back-to-school wardrobes. Though kids may experience a growth spurt during the summer, shop for items, like socks, that they aren’t likely to grow out of before the back-to-school season begins. This affords you time to comparison shop and spread out the cost of replacing your child’s wardrobe instead of being hit with one big bill all at once. * Establish a budget. Without a budget, it’s easy for parents to overspend on back-to-school clothing, especially for those parents who wait until the last minute and simply buy the first things they see. Establish a budget, ideally several weeks before your child’s first day of school. Having a budget in place reduces the likelihood that you

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"UUFOUJPO BACK-to-SCHOOL 'BMM3FHJTUSBUJPO Buy school supplies in bulk and save. pers choose convenience over low prices on school supplies. Parents could end up at the check-out line with a considerable bill to pay, particularly if they are shopping for multiple students. Buying items in bulk -- and sharing the cost -- may be a more affordable option.

The back-to-school season is fast approaching. This is a time of school bus traffic on the roads, anxious parents snapping first-day-of-school photos, and children will meeting their new classmates and forging new friendships.

This time of the year is also one when parents and students must shop for school supplies. Tradition dictates that families will flock to stores after dismissal and shop for folders, binders, pens and protractors. Caught up in the moment, many shop-

Although it can be easy to procrastinate and wait until school starts to buy supplies, it might be prudent to shop before the new school year begins. Many teachers, in an attempt to help parents save money, publish school-supply lists online in advance of the school year. Most teachers do not vary their requirements from year to year, so if your son or daughter has been assigned a teacher, ask around among last year’s students to see what that teacher requires. This way you can head to the store or comparison shop online at your convenience. Some supplies are standard regardless of class assignment.

These include pens and/or pencils, folders, spiral notebooks, copy paper, looseleaf paper, erasers, crayons, markers, and highlighters. Purchased individually, the per-unit cost of each item may be higher than purchasing these items in bulk. This is when the advantage of buying in bulk shines through. Here are some helpful hints for parents about to shop for school supplies. •

Shop for frequently used items in bulk, whether from online wholesalers or through a warehouse store for which you are a member.

Collaborate with a few different school parents to chip in for school supplies. Then one parent does the shopping and splits the supplies with the others.

Keep a stockpile of

supplies at home. They do not expire, and next year you may not have to shop at all. •

Having extra supplies on hand enables duplicate sets for at home and in school for consistency.

Some parents like to buy many supplies and then donate some for underprivileged children. This time of year manufacturers or retailers could actually donate a portion of school-supply proceeds to some educational organizations.

Parents connecting with social media

Social media has changed the way people communicate. Whether through tweets or status updates, information shared through social media avenues is often instantaneous and can reach a large number of people, which is why many parents

have turned to social media to learn about events at school. According to a study by Nielsen McKinsey Company, parents are more likely than adults without children to play games, engage in creative pursuits, and look for entertainment on Facebook, blogs and other social sites. The data collected from 2,000 adults (both parents and nonparents) who frequently use social media found 88 percent of users rely on social networking sites for communicating with family and friends. The next most popular activity is connecting with new friends, followed by accessing product reviews and online entertainment. Reports show that adults devote a quarter of their

time spent online to social media sites. Parents, in particular, are finding new ways to put these sites to use. Social media is helping parents in a variety of ways, even enabling them to keep an eye on their children when they go online. According to a survey from Laptop magazine, 55 percent of parents are using social media to watch their kids’ online activities. Of that 55 percent, one-fifth indicated they only use social media to monitor their child’s online activity.

Contact the teacher and see if you can volunteer to buy all of the supplies in bulk for the entire class, with each student then paying the required amount. This will save many families time and effort.

If you have a friend or family member who is a teacher, find out if he or she can purchase your school supplies. Often teachers are eligible for a discount on school supplies.

Purchase bulk quantities of certain supplies and find out if they can be sold as a fundraiser for the school. A portion of the sales will go to the PTA.

REKSAP NURSERY SCHOOL

parents use social media to stay abreast of school happenings, asking questions about when fundraiser money is due or if anyone got the spelling words for the week. Others find it is a good way to meet parents or speak with the parents of their child’s classmates. Some moms and dads use it to set up parents’ nights out, advertise things for sale or ask for recommendations on contractors.

2599 Regina St. Ottawa - 828-8743 www.reksap.org New N ew w Nursery School opening: Sept. 2012

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There is a power outage, and your child’s school is dismissing students early, requiring you to arrive quickly for pickup. Your kid will not be left waiting for you because you got this information immediately after a quick log-in to the social media site you use to connect with other parents. Some other parents may be delayed in receiving this important information because they rely on phone alerts.

Buying larger quantities of supplies could enable you to build up rewards points at certain retailers. This may entitle you to future coupons or dollar awards that can be put toward more

expensive items, including tablets or graphing calculators.

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However, social media has other handy purposes. Many parents use it as they would a bulletin board -- posting all types of information. Some

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Promote self-confidence in children through sports and martial arts It’s no secret that playing individual and team sports can help children develop social skills and raise self-esteem. There are several classes offered through Ottawa’s Parks Recreation and Cultural Services department that offer these benefits and more for any child looking to learn skills for life.

There is a variety of sports options for adults and children alike through City-wide Sports. Girls ‘n Women and Sport run physical activity programs that promote fun, friendship, skill development, confidence building and fair play values while learning to play in a team setting.

You can review these classes by visiting ottawa.ca/recreationguide.

More than sports

For some, the journey to higher selfesteem begins and ends with martial arts. You can register for a variety of martial arts classes, from the more familiar practices such as Karate and Judo, to the lesser known ones such as Kendo, Capoeira and Aikido Yoseikan. In addition to confidence, martial arts is known to promote physical fitness, discipline, respect and self control. Participating in sports and exercise can create a supportive environment that acknowledges a child’s skill development and provide positive social relationships with teammates and coaches. Consider ball hockey, basketball or the Saturday morning sports club for a unique team experience.

NEWS

Councillor sent to hospital after fainting at conference Kanata North Coun. Marianne Wilkinson ‘fine’ after episode during speech Blair Edwards and Laura Mueller blair.edwards@metroland.com

Not into the sports scene but still want to move? Children can also expand their creative scope and gain confidence in their abilities through Jazz dance; or, improve balance, coordination and self-esteem through Irish dancing. How about Cheerleading for a different kind of team activity?

Fall Classes start soon! Browse online at ottawa.ca/recreation to discover affordable fall and winter programs. Visit your favourite facility where knowledgeable and friendly staff will help you discover your next adventure. You can also call 3-1-1 for more details.

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You’re never too young to develop these skills. Children three and four can develop athletic ability and improve confidence through sport and games in a Sportball class. The program introduces basic skills such as balance, large muscle development and body awareness.

Your Community Newspaper

EMC news - Kanata North Coun. Marianne Wilkinson was released from hospital on Aug. 22 after fainting at a conference. Wilkinson said she suffered a fainting spell, not a stroke as suggested by several reports in the media, during a session at the Association of Municipalities of Ontario conference. “The heart’s fine,” she said. “I got a strong one.” Wilkinson was delivering a speech about cycling at a conference held at the Westin Hotel downtown, when she began slurring her speech and leaned on the podium. “All of a sudden, just like whammo, they tell me I went white as a sheet,” said Wilkinson. The councillor was showing what she thought were obvious signs of a stroke, said the event’s organizer, Eleanor McMahon of Share the Road Cycling Coalition. “It was sort of like a computer shutting down,” McMahon said. “She was slowing and slurring her words.”

Luckily there were nurses and a paramedic in the audience and everyone reacted quickly to get Wilkinson treatment, she said. Councillor Diane Deans was attending an event in south Ottawa when she learned that Wilkinson was in hospital and was upset. Wilkinson had been attending every session at the conference and even stayed at the Westin overnight to speak at a morning session, she said. “She’s been working way too hard, and I’ve told her that she has to slow down,’ said Deans. Wilkinson is known for attending city and community event on top of being in charge of the city’s huge transportation file, said Deans. “I’m a much younger woman and sometimes I look at her and I think, I don’t know how you do it,” said Deans. “It would be a devastating loss if she can’t come back to council,” she said, adding that would be especially hard because Wilkinson is one of her few female colleagues on council. Wilkinson was taken to the Ottawa Hospital General cam-

FILE PHOTO

Marianne Wilkinson, councillor for Kanata North, was hospitalized briefly on Aug. 22 after fainting while speaking at an Association of Municipalities of Ontario conference event. pus, where doctors performed a series of tests, but failed to find a reason for the incident. “They don’t know exactly what caused it,” Wilkinson said. “(But) they see it all the time. “I’m going to take it easy for three days,” said Wilkinson. She had hoped to attend the city transit commission meeting on Aug. 24, but did not end up attending. She was present at the finances and economic development committee meeting on Monday Aug. 27, however. With files from Jessica Smith/Metro

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ottawa.ca/recreation 22

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

R0011566934

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FARM

CLEANING / JANITORIAL

FIREWOOD

Ford 4610 FWD $12,750; MF 165 $5,150; MF 1135 cab $7,500; CIH 585 cab $14,500. 613-223-6026.

Antique book case must see to appreciate. Best offer. Yamaha electric Org $200. Garden tools for sale. 613-254-5358.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Motel in Westport- 16 units with a 1 bedroom owners residence and a 18 hole mini golf. 613-539-8072. $349,900.00

BUSINESS SERVICES Drew’s Computer RepairWebsite design, certified technician, $25/hour, email drew@dcrtech.net web..dcrtech.net Residential and Business. 613-826-0521.

CAREER OPPORTUNITY Bilingual Customer Care Agent Ezipin Canada is seeking an energetic, organized and self motivated individual with a sincere interest in ensuring superior customer satisfaction. Duties include; training customers via phone, responding to inbound requests, troubleshooting and participating in outbound call initiatives. Knowledge of Excel and any customer management software is a definite asset. A minimum of 1 year customer care experience and fluency in French and English is mandatory. This is a full- time, permanent day position in west Ottawa. Ezipin offers a competitive salary and a comprehensive benefits package. Please send your resume, cover letter and salary expectations to hr@ezipin.ca or fax to 613 831-6678.

EDUCATION & TRAINING

KANATA Available Immediately 3 bedroom townhouse, 1.5 baths, 2 appliances, unfinished basement, one parking spot. $1038 per month plus utilities.

CL365991

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

loader loader duals loader

FOR RENT

ALL CLEANED DRY SEASONED hardwood, (Hard Maple), cut and split. Free delivery. Kindling available. Call today 613-229-7533.

MARINE

HELP WANTED

613-831-3445 613-257-8629 www.rankinterrace.com 800 sq ft, 1 bedroom between North Gower and Kars. Ground level. Private entrance, yard, appliances and utilities included. Seniors preferred. $825/month. Available September 1. 613-800-2330. KANATA RENTAL TOWNHOMES

3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Bathrooms, 5 appliances and more, located in established area, on site management office, 323 Steeplechase Dr. (just off Stonehaven Dr) Kanata, K2M 2N6, call 613-592-0548

FOR SALE Apples, cider and apple products. Smyths Apple Orchard, 613-652-2477. Updates, specials and coupons at www.smythsapples.com. Open daily til April 1st. Disability Products. Buy and Sell stair lifts, scooters, bath lifts, patient lifts, hospital beds, etc. Call Silver Cross Ottawa (613)231-3549. *HOT TUB (SPA) Covers-Best Price. Best quality. All shapes and colours. Call 1-866-652-6837. www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper

HELP WANTED

Up to $1500 CASH Weekly NEW Direct Sales Position NO Door to Door Sales Apply Online Today

Tutor with 20 yrs. special ed teaching experience. $40.00/hour; after school hours; your home preferred. Call 613-614-8340.

PropertyStarsJobs.com

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Help Wanted!!! Make up to $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.TheMailingHub.com Looking for persons willing to speak to small groups, 1 on 1 presentations. A car and internet necessary. Diana (866)306-5858. School Bus Drivers Wanted. 2 School Routes in North Gower, Stittsville Area. Contact Lisa at 613-489-3742.

Territory Sales Representative Direct Target Promotions, (www.dtarget.com) Established in 1989 is the largest Canadian Publisher of Direct Mail Publications with over 35 million copies printed annually in the greater Toronto, Hamilton, Montreal and Ottawa areas. We require an ambitious, self-motivated, team player with outstanding communication & interpersonal skills to participate in our growth and expansion into the Ottawa region’s market. The ideal candidate would have more than 3 years experience in advertising sales or similar. Strong skills at developing new accounts and maintaining existing accounts with proven professional sales techniques are essential. The successful candidate will enjoy a rewarding career & excellent compensation package of salary, expenses and incentives. Car is a must. Email resume to tg@dtarget.com The Greenboro Community Centre Association is looking for a Program Coordinator to coordinate and supervise delivery of recreational programs. Must have college diploma in Recreation or related discipline and supervisory experience. Relevant experience and qualifications may substitute for academic requirements. Part-time– flexible hours. Salary to be commensurate with experience. Resumes to be sent to GCCA, 363 Lorry Greenberg Dr. Ottawa, ON K1T 3P8 Attn. Mary Lockhart or GreenboroCommunityAssociation@gmail.com before September 6,2012

CL371368

Mature Honest lady will do house cleaning references available. 613-868-5590

CLASSIFIED Elderly Care in home. 15 years Nursing experience. Specializing in Demential/Alzhiemers & pallative clients. Assistance with care as required, flexible hours. (819)684-8834.

HUNTING SUPPLIES Hunter Safety Canadian Firearms Courses, Carp October 5, 6, 7. Arnprior Oct 12, 13, 14 and Carp Oct 26, 27, 28. Wenda Cochran 613-256-2409. Hunter Safety/Canadian Firearms Courses and exams throughout the year. Organize a course and yours is free. Call Wenda Cochran 613-256-2409.

VACATION/COTTAGES

Winter boat storage- Winterizing, shrink wrapping, indoor and outdoor, $335-$425. Mobile shrink wrapping available. 613-267-3470. relax@christie lakecottages.com

MUSIC Friendly and experienced piano teachers in Barrhaven. $15 per 1/2 hour. Saturdays. Recitals. Beginners welcome. kehurd@sympatico.ca or 613-823-8601. Lila Ballet School- Opening Ballet Classes for children 3+ & adult group. Merival/Hunt Club area. Call Lila (819)770-5130.

NOTICES Saint Germain Foundation Ottawa. “I Am Activity” Original Assended Master Instruction on the Laws of Life, given as a “Glad Free Gift of Love for all mankind” We welcome interested individuals who wish to know more of this Assended Master Teaching. To inquire please call (613)596-8180 (613)834-8896.

PERSONAL

ARE YOU SINGLE? Is the Fall TV lineup all that’s in store? Misty River Introductions can make you put down the remote and meet someone great to share your life with. www.mistyriverintros.com or (613) 257-3531 No computer required. TRUE Advice! TRUE Clarity! TRUE Psychics! 1-877-342-3032 or 1-900-528-6256 or Mobile #4486 (18+) 3.19/min. www.truepsychics.ca

www.emcclassified.ca

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

Findlay Creek Gem! Enjoy this magnificent two storey home. Tamarack “MacKenzie” model, 2,559 sq.ft living area, built in 2007, covered porch, living/dining room, family room, fireplace, den, main floor laundry, 4 bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, rear garage design, hedged yard, $546,000. Clive Pearce, Broker of Record, Guidestar Realty, Brokerage (613)226-3018 ext 222.

TRAILERS / RV’S

PETS COTTAGES FOR RENT 2 Jack Russell’s, females, English blood lines, shorties. Toy rat terrier puppies, all $400. 613-269-2770.

White Cedars Tourist Park Constant Lake/Eganville Fully Outfitted Waterfront 2 and 3 bedrooms Cottages. Until Thanksgiving week-end. 613-649-2255 www.whitecedars.ca

DOG SITTING Experienced retired breeder providing lots of TLC. My home. Smaller dogs only. References available. $17-$20 daily Marg 613-721-1530

Nice family trailer in excellent condition. Must see! Must sell! Call 613-548-8998 or 613-483-8503.

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

TRAILERS / RV’S Seasonal Camping White Cedars Tourist Park Constant Lake/Eganville 2013 Seasonal Sites Available Now Big Lots, 3 Services Great Rate for balance of 2012 Season By Appointment Only 613-649-2255 www.whitecedars.ca

VEHICLES Need a car or truck and can’t get financed? Whatever your credit issues we can help. Guaranteed financing is available to everyone regardless of credit history. Call today, drive tomorrow. Call Joseph 613-200-0100.

WORK WANTED Send A Load to the dump, cheap. Clean up clutter, garage sale leftovers or leaf and yard waste. 613-256-4613. To give yourselves some extra time allow us to take a grime. Call 613-262-2243, Tatiana.

FOR RENT

2007 Jay Flight 40’ Bungalow Park model 37’ Three season sunroom with windows & screens Lot 4 Mississippi Lake RV Resort, Carleton Place, ON. This special RV home is nestled under trees on an extremely nicely landscaped premium location. Just steps from the beach, docks, restaurant, pool and visitor parking area. A Pickett fence adds to the privacy of this property. The retail investment of this spacious and well decorated summer RV home with all the comforts available is $97,300. REDUCED, REDUCED ”FIRM” $49,900.00 for a quick sale. Financing available OAC. For viewing visit Kijiji ID 371015693 or call (613)-799-5000. CL369992

LEGAL CRIMINAL RECORD? You can be arrested, jailed or deported if you enter the United States with a criminal record. A waiver clears you for entry. Call now, toll free: 1-8-NOW PARDON) 1-866-972-7366 www.removeyourrecord.com In business since 1989

$1350

LIVESTOCK

$1150

Queen Bee’s for sale. www.debbeesbees.ca 613-483-8000. “Also BeeDry Winter Wraps”.

$1050 $950

Rideau Arcott Rams for sale. Ready for fall breading. Contact 613-812-2438.

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

A better life begins with better education.

CL369680

Your Community Newspaper

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

Offering diplomas in:

www.trilliumcollege.ca

CALL TODAY!

0301.332055

2525 Carling Avenue | Lincoln Fields Shopping Centre Ottawa, ON K2B 7Z2

TRILCOSTW1224

T AR ST H S 4T SET. 2 AS EP CL S

Intra Oral Dental Assisting, Medical Office Assistant

1-866-401-3748 Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

23


HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

GARAGE SALE

HELP WANTED

Eastern Ontarioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Largest Indoor Flea Market

Lumber Yard Help



150 booths Open Every Sunday All Year 8am-4pm Hwy. #31 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 kms north of 401

Mchaffies Flea Market Arnprior Aerospace Inc. combines facilities from Canada and Mexico to develop and manufacture aerospace structures and components for North Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest aerospace companies. We are recruiting for several positions at our Arnprior Ontario location. Located less than 30 minutes from the national capital region, Arnprior supplies endless outdoor activities including camping, fishing, hunting, white water rafting, cycling. Some of our current openings include but are not limited to: CL403881_0830

Prior experience with building material products, assisting customers, using a forklift and building lumber loads for delivery required. Lumber delivery experience helpful. Drivers abstract required. Job is very physical. Full time/full beneďŹ ts after probationary period. Safety training courses provided. Please reply with resume to: info@kbchome.ca

Aerospace Technician (Assembly) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Assembly of small and large aircraft structures Aerospace Technician (Brake Press) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Set up and run CNC Brake Press machines Aerospace Technician (Machinist) - Set up and run CNC machines Facilities Technician - Install, trouble-shoot and repair complex mechanical equipment and distribution systems

    

Vendor Liaison â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Supply Chain Management Support

TENDERS

CL373181

TENDERS

0315.CL334946

Process Planner â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Manufacturing process planning TENDERS

For a full list of jobs and job descriptions please visit our career site at: http://www.arnprioraerospace.com/careers.html Applicants must be eligible to meet requirements for Canadian Controlled Goods Program (CGP) and U.S. International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR). Qualified applicants can e-mail their resume and cover letter to Arnprior Aerospace Human Resources Department at hr@arnprioraerospace.com



CITY OF BELLEVILLE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

BELLEVILLE FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES CL389624_TF

SUPPLY & DELIVERY OF TANKER/PUMPER APPARATUS AND URBAN PUMPER The City of Belleville is soliciting bids for the supply of one (1) Tanker / Pumper Apparatus and one (1) Urban Pumper. These apparatus shall contain all of the features as described in the Scope of Project and Specifications.

Huge Indoooorm! Showr "*

24

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

CL400231

The lowest or any proposal or any part of any proposal not necessarily accepted. Tender Document Contact: Yasmina Jamal Purchasing Supervisor Tel. (613) 967-3200 Ext 3203/3301 Email: yjamal@city.belleville.on.ca 

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Bid documents and labels provided for submission are available from the Finance Department, Purchasing Division, City Hall, first floor, 169 Front Street, Belleville, Ontario, K8N 2Y8 and may also be obtained by downloading from www.city.belleville.on.ca. Sealed Bids will be accepted until 1:00 p.m. local time, on Monday, September 17, 2012.

Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Contact is: Fire Chief RhĂŠaume M. Chaput Belleville Fire Department Tel (613) 962-2010 Email rchaput@city.belleville.on.ca

GARAGE SALE

175277_0212

HELP WANTED

LARGE SELECTION OF QUALITY FURNITURE

and Ou Building! tdoor

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Call today:

613.825.9425 weewatch.com Serving Ottawa West and Barrhaven


BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Your Community Newspaper

BOOKING: FRIDAY 9:30AM FINAL APPROVAL: FRIDAY NOON

* Solar Pannels Wind Gen/Inverters Equipment * Geothermal Systems Commercial & Residential * Air ďŹ lters Commercial & Residential * Electric Motors * Variable Frequency Drives * Air source Heat Pumps (House & Pool) * Commercial Refrigeration AC & Chillers * Custom Built Electrical Panels * Steam HumidiďŹ ers * Motor Soft starts * Thermography * Air Balancing * Motor Controllers & PLC * Geothermal Supplies G%%&&)+%.'(

CLEANING

CARPENTRY

LEAKING PERKINS BASEMENTS!!

 SINCE 1976

FOUNDATION CRACKS WINDOW WELL DRAINAGE WEEPING TILE

 

           



613-761-8919

&REE%STIMATESs!LL7ORK'UARANTEED

www.perkinsdecks.com     

    

613-761-0671

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all sizes & styles available 8x10 delivered & installed

Garages Built & Installed

We can tear down and rebuild.

$ 00 Only $9900 Only 9999.00 *Does not include pad.

ALL SIZES AND STYLES AVAILABLE

613-220-2316

613-422-4510

GLAVINA DRYWALL

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FENCING

R0011368359

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The first place to Call For All your Electrical needs

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FLOORING 9Vk^YĂ&#x2030;h=VgYlddY ;addgh

WILLIAMSBURG WOODS & GARDEN INC. An Eastern Ont. Quality Fence & Deck MFGER & INSTALLER

FENCES, DECKS, GATES, POLE INSTALLATIONS & MORE

call us today

Expert Craftsmen. Professional Service We install! SAVE Time and Money! You buy the product and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll expertly install it! sPlumbing Service We install & repair s&AUCETSs3INKSs4OILETSs$RAIN5NBLOCKING sHandyman ServicesCarpentry Service sAppliances Installed

43

YEARS

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Evening & Weekend Serviceâ&#x20AC;?

613-858-4949

DYNAMIC HOME RENOVATIONS BATHROOMS KITCHENS PAINTING DRYWALL INSTALLATIONS

PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL BASEMENTS ALL TYPES OF FLOORING REPAIRS ADDITIONS

BILINGUAL SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES ~ ALL WORK FULLY GUARANTEED SENIORS DISCOUNT

R0011376959

613â&#x20AC;&#x201C;601â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9559

summer SPECIAL special SPRING

FREE GATE WITH PURCHASE OF 100 LINEAR FT. OR MORE VALID UNTIL MAY 14, 2011 VALID UNTIL MAY 31, 2012

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HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT R0011369064

Home Services

Home Maintenance & Repairs

R0011576917

R0011291721

FREE ESTIMATES- REFERENCES

HOME IMPROVEMENT MasterTrades

613-688-1988 or call Brian 613-857-2976 LIC#ECRA1ESA7007076

0324.358922 R0011503999 R0011305815

END OF SEASON DISCOUNT

1-877-266-0022 or 613-543-2666 Email: williamsburgwoods@bell.net Website: www.wwginc.com

Residential & Commercial Home Rewire & Upgrades Repairs, Renovations & Tenant Fit-up Preventative Maintenance Hot Tubs & Pools R0011509821

DECKSCAPES ELECTRICAL

R0011436778

STAINING & REFINISHING

>Â?Â?Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; 613-225-9183Ă&#x160; , Ă&#x160; -// -

  

ELECTRICAL

EAVESTROUGHS

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Call for FREE Estimate

G%%&&(&)+&

DRYWALL FRAMING DRYWALL INSTALLATION & FINISHING EVERYTHING FROM NEW BUILDS TO SMALL REPAIRS

0324.359174

R0011291831

00 $165000 $1690

DECKS UĂ&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; ,iwÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160; ->Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;`iVÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; viÂ&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x192;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}

WWWLETITSHINECLEANINGCA

s#ONCRETEWORKs'ARAGEmOORS s&LOORlNISHINGs7ALKWAYS$RIVEWAYS s2EPAIRS2ESTORATIONSs0ARGINGEPOXY COATINGs#ONCRETECRACKINJECTION

Single Car 12 x 20 H^c\aZ8Vg&%m'%

for only

Tony Garcia 613-237-8902

#ALL4/$!9  

SPRING SALE

SPECIALS

Seniors Especially Welcome

2%3)$%.4)!, #/--%2#)!,#,%!.).' &ULLYLICENSED INSUREDANDBONDED

GARAGE BUILDERS

GARDEN SHEDS SPRING "    "    !   "  ! "  " 

CLEANING SERVICES

CONCRETE

CUSTOM BUILDS

We come to you!

LET IT SHINE 7EEKLYs"I WEEKLYs-ONTHLY /NE4IME#LEANING3ERVICES

Call Ardel Concrete Services

COMPUTER SERVICES

0830.R0011586018

0315.R0011315133

WWW.KINGSCROSS.NET (613-271-0988 ex 3) denis.laframboise@gmail.com Sales & Service

613-688-1483

0524.R0011407074

BASEMENTS

AIR CONDITIONING

R0011291791

Your Community Newspaper

DEADLINES:

Golden Years

R0011303110

HANDYMAN PLUS (OME-AINTENANCE 2EPAIRS2ENOVATIONS s#ARPENTRY s+ITCHEN"ATH4ILING s0AINTING

s#AULKING s$RYWALL s&LOORING

s0LUMBING s/DD*OBS ANDMORE

s&REE%STIMATESs"EST2ATESs3ENIOR$ISCOUNTS

613-566-7077

Read Online at www.emconline.ca Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

25


BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Your Community Newspaper

BOOKING: FRIDAY 9:30AM FINAL APPROVAL: FRIDAY NOON

HOME IMPROVEMENT

R0011449402

Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i°°°Ă&#x160; " t Fully Insured â&#x20AC;˘ Independently Owned and Operated in Ottawa since 1998 * Electrical work performed by ECRA contractors

Free Estimates, Guaranteed Workmanship

CALL ROBERT 613-862-7870

613-733-6336 INTERLOCK

2EFERENCES!VAILABLEÂ&#x201E;&REE%STIMATES

INTERLOCK R0011291745

INSULATION

PHC

Interlock Fencing Design/Install/Repair

UĂ&#x160;/Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;>Â?Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x20AC; UĂ&#x160; VÂ&#x153; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;

Custom Home Specialists

613-843-1592

STONE SPECIALISTS IN: UĂ&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x153;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;`iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160;*>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x160;,i}Ă&#x2022;Â?>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;,>Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;i`Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160;7>Â?Â&#x17D;Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;­Ă&#x203A;>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x160;

Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160;

Relevelling - Re-laying existing stones

613-282-4141

+

A Accredited

Serving Ottawa Since 1989

Estimates 613-219-3940

R0011351202

LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING

GOT GRUBS?

SOD SPECIAL! R0011291637/0301

JUNK REMOVAL We Remove Almost Anything from Anywhere!

k In Boo and st u g Au HST the Save Free s e mat Esti

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

GRUB DAMAGE repair soil & sod installation interlocking stone driveways retaining & garden walls interlock repair patios & steps

613-226-8858

61 825-0 613-825-0707 25-070 707 7

HERITAGE LAWN CARE

www.heritagelawncare.ca Â&#x201E;7EEKLY-OWING4RIMMINGFROMPERMONTH Â&#x201E;,AWN3ODDING4OP$RESSING Â&#x201E;7HITE'RUB4REATMENT  Â&#x201E;(EDGE4RIMMING4REE0RUNING4REE2EMOVAL Â&#x201E;'ARDEN"ED)NSTALLATION2EJUVENATION Â&#x201E;)NTERLOCK0ATIOS7ALWAYS3TEPS Â&#x201E;7OOD&ENCES)NSTALLATION2EPAIR

0614.R0011444457

JUNK REMOVAL

Bin Rentals Available

UĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x152;iÂŤĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x192; UĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;`iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x160;,iĂ&#x152;>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;7>Â?Â?Ă&#x192; UĂ&#x160;Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;iĂ&#x20AC;Li`Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;LĂ&#x192;

692-1478

613

Toll Free 1-855-843-1592 www.insultech.ca

10% Summer Discount

Serving the Nepean & Barrhaven Area.

TO BOOK THIS SPACE CALL 613-688-1483

R0011544691

LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING SMALL LOAD DELIVERIES

Lawn/Tree

Intex Landscaping

Landscape Maintenance Limited

We also do any kind of brick or cement work

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Algonquin applied research event showcases partnerships Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland. com

EMC news - From lasers to water filtration techniques, Algonquin students showcased their talents at the annual Applied Research Day at the college on Aug. 24. Hourier Exir, who is part of the college’s joint program to obtain a bachelor degree in photonics, said her work over the summer on a project to improve the design of CO2 lasers that monitor biofuels

taught her a lot. “It was great to be able to work in the field,” she said. Waste and waste water technician students Shane Makarenko and Dillon Duxbury said they worked tirelessly on a new system for filtering pathogens like E. Coli out of water. “It was a lot of work,” Duxbury said. “If your calculations were just a little bit off you would have to start over.” The group of 28 projects were judged by faculty and industry professionals with

a project called Rideshark, a secure mobile, web-based device that could used by clients to simplify transportation such as carpooling, cycling, walking and telework came out on top. A membrane filtration system came in second that would uses reverse osmosis to provide potable water in disaster relief situations. Third place went to a project that would use social enterprise solutions to connect native Algonquin youth with traditional knowledge and

promote cross-culture relations. Alexander Yang, with the college’s applied research department said the goal was to have every student have an applied research component as part of their course loads

2016. It has been growing,” he said. “There were 200 to 400 students working on projects during the school year and 30 over the summer.” Yang said students are part-

nered with industry professionals and given the benefit of school facilities to complete their projects. “It’s great because it gives them a chance to work with a client and problem solve,” Yang said.

Be a Superhero

Brave participants rappel and raise funds to takepart in this exciting and unique event. Anyone (over 18 years of age) may register to rappel at

www.thedropzone.ca

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JENNIFER MCINTOSH/METROLAND

Hourier Exir is pictured beside her group’s system for monitoring biofuels at Algonquin College’s Applied Research Day on Aug. 24.

ROCK GYM

Pet Adoptions

PET OF THE WEEK

IDRA

GUMBY

ID#A146451

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Gumby is a neutered male, fawn tabby and white Domestic Shorthair cat who is two-and-a-half years old. He was brought to the shelter as a stray on July 14, and is quite the social butterfly! His instant purr makes sure is happiness is contagious. Gumby has a soft, chatty chirp when he greets his friends. He gets along well with other cats if he’s allowed to take his time to get to know them.Gumby likes to keep all four on the floor and prefers to give affection on his own terms; he prefers not to be picked up. He needs an owner and family who understand he’s a sensitive fellow with a few spots, such as his tummy, where he does not like being touched.

Idra is a spayed female, tricolor Siberian Husky mix that is about three years old. She was brought to the shelter as a stray on July 25, but is now available for adoption. Idra loves to explore! She is looking for an active family who will bring her along on lots of fun, outdoor activities. She is an independent gal who likes having some alone time once in a while.She gets along well with children eight years and older who won’t be intimidated by her tendency to jump up. Her new family will need to remind her to keep her paws on the ground when she gets excited. Idra is a smart girl and knows her basic commands and is eager to learn more. Obedience training would help her bond with her new family and help instil proper manners. She needs an owner familiar with her breed and willing to put the time and effort into meeting her exercise and training requirements. For more information on these or other pets currently available for adoption through the Ottawa Humane Society, please contact 613-725-3166 ext. 258 or visit www.ottawahumane.ca.

THE PRICE OF ADOPTION Why doesn’t the Ottawa Humane Society (OHS) give away dogs, cats, and other pets for free? At first this may seem like a great idea: free pets means more families will be able to afford a homeless animal. However, having a pet costs money. A free kitten from a friend of a friend is hard to resist. However, that kitten needs to be health checked by your veterinarian, dewormed, vaccinated, and spayed. A free puppy from the newspaper or an online ad needs the same. How much are you really saving?

Charlie

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Time to make a grooming appointment

The year one initial costs sterilization, vaccination, deworming, etc. will cost more than $600 for a kitten, plus approximately $900 in yearly ongoing costs that include food, litter, grooming and boarding. Sadly, many people are uninformed of these costs and many “free” animals end up being surrendered to the humane society. In fact, more than 7,000 cats end up at the Ot-

lates into much needed information about the dog in order to make the best possible match between the potential adopter and the canine, for a successful and permanent placement.

At the OHS, a health check, initial deworming and vaccination, sterilization (spay or neuter) a permanent microchip identification and pet insurance for 6 weeks is included in the dog and cat adoption fees. The average cost of canine sterilization at a vet clinic is $350.00 while feline sterilization costs and average of $250.00. In the end, adopting a pet from the OHS offers great savings!

All animals receive a routine health check by OHS veterinary staff prior to adoption. A veterinarian will examine all animals requiring a diagnosis or prescription All animals receive medication for the most common internal parasites. Ear mites are common in cats; OHS cats’ ears are swabbed and then examined under the microscope. If the swab is positive for ear mites, the ears will be cleaned and the animal will be treated.

The OHS adoption prices are: $290 for dogs older than six months, $350 for puppies and small breeds; $170 for cats older than six months, $225 for kittens. It’s the best deal around! OHS dogs receive a temperament assessment prior to being placed for adoption. This trans-

The OHS receives all animals, whether healthy or sick. Therefore, we often have cases of Upper Respiratory Infection (a common yet very contagious cat cold). These animals must then be placed through our foster program for two or three weeks on average, often with

medication and a prescription diet. About 46 per cent of all cats placed for adoption have received foster care. The first vaccination is given and if the animal is within our system for any extended period of time, they will receive a booster (second vaccination). All animals are implanted with a microchip (a permanent form of identification) prior to being adopted, and are automatically enrolled with pet insurance for six weeks of free coverage, effective 48 hours post-adoption. Considering adopting an animal? Consider taking a PreAdoption Seminar at the OHS to learn more about responsible pet ownership. Visit www.ottawahumane.ca. Ready to adopt? The OHS is overflowing with cats looking for loving homes! There are cats of all ages, sizes, and personalities. Let us play match-maker to help you find the perfect pet!

Please note: The Ottawa Humane Society has many other companion animals available for adoption. Featured animals are adopted quickly! To learn more about adopting an animal from the Ottawa Humane Society please contact us: Website: lll#diiVlV]jbVcZ#XV Email: 6Ydei^dch5diiVlV]jbVcZ#XV Telephone:+&(,'*"(&++m'*Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

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Hi, my name is Charlie, I am a 18 months old Golden Retriever. I was adopted by my family at the age of 5 months. Since then I have been enjoying going to the dog park and taking all kind of classes. I proved to be a very smart dog!! I Love to play with my two brothers, Azlan and Jaga are two Highland Lynx kittens. Our little pack of three love to play, cuddle and by time “get in trouble” together!!!

tawa Humane Society every year. Thirty-five percent of them are believed to have been acquired either from a friend or relative or from some form of “free to good home.”

29


ARTS & CULTURE

Your Community Newspaper

River Ward City Councillor Conseillère, quartier Rivière

Fall Cleaning the Capital On September 15, 2012, the City of Ottawa will launch the fall Cleaning the Capital campaign, which runs until October 15, 2012. I invite everyone to get involved to help keep our city clean, green and free of litter and grafďŹ ti. You can begin by selecting a cleanup location â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a park, woodlot, ravine, shoreline, bus stop, pathway, schoolyard or any public property â&#x20AC;&#x201C; where litter or grafďŹ ti has accumulated. Large or small, all cleanup projects are welcome! Once you choose your cleanup location, register online at ottawa.ca/clean or by calling 3-1-1. The registration form also includes a section for our Cleanup Starter Kits, which are donated by our campaign sponsors and are available to all registered volunteers. If you would like a kit, please indicate the type of kit best suited to your project (litter or grafďŹ ti) and select the pickup location nearest you. Every year, entire communities â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including schools, neighbourhood organizations and associations, businesses, families, friends and individuals â&#x20AC;&#x201C; take part in the Cleaning the Capital campaign. Together we can help keep Ottawa clean, green, grafďŹ ti-free and litter-free. You can also do your part to keep our community clean, vibrant, safe and welcoming year-round by reporting incidents of grafďŹ ti in your neighbourhood. The sooner you report grafďŹ ti, the sooner it will be removed. â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘

If you witness grafďŹ ti vandalism as it occurs, it is considered a crime in progress and can be reported by calling 9-1-1.

MICHELLE NASH/METROLAND

Images from Mexican filmmaker Francisco GutiĂŠrrezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s film On the trail of the Monarch Butterfly at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum will be on display until Sept 3. The exhibit was formally inaugurated on Aug. 21.

Monarch butterfly exhibit soars into aviation museum Film, photo collection highlights unique connection between Canada, Mexico

If your property is vandalized with grafďŹ ti, call the Ottawa Police Service at 613-236-1222 ext. 7300 to make a report.

Michelle Nash

To report grafďŹ ti on public property (parks, roads or street signs) or private property (utility boxes, newspaper boxes, Canada Post boxes, or residential, business and industrial buildings), please ďŹ ll out an online form at ottawa.ca or call 3-1-1.

EMC entertainment - Millions and millions of travelers make the 6,000 kilometre journey from Canada to Mex-

michelle.nash@metroland.com

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City Service Closures on Labour Day

Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cut

As we get ready to enjoy the last long weekend of the summer, I would like to remind you that many City services are closed on Labour Day, Monday, September 3, 2012. â&#x20AC;˘

Ottawa City Hall and all Client Service Centres are closed.

â&#x20AC;˘

OC Transpo is operating on a Sunday schedule. New fall service goes into effect on Sunday, September 2 and new timetables are available at octranspo.com. OC Transpo Sales and Information Centres are open on Labour Day, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at Lincoln Fields, Place dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;OrlĂŠans and St. Laurent, and from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. at the Rideau Centre.

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There is NO collection of green bin, recycling and garbage on Monday, September 3, 2012. Recycling, green bin and garbage collection schedules are delayed by one day for the remainder of the week, with regular Friday collections taking place on Saturday.

â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘

Many pools, arenas and ďŹ tness centres are open, with modiďŹ ed schedules, for public swimming and ďŹ tness classes. All branches, departments and services of the Ottawa Public Library are closed.

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monarchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s journey is currently on display at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum. In 2005, Mexican filmmaker and pilot Francisco GutiĂŠrrez followed the monarch butterflies migration from Canada to Mexico. The 72-day flight was captured in photographs and in On the Trail of the Monarch Butterfly, which has been on display at the museum since July 6. At the official opening of the exhibit on Aug. 21, Mexican Ambassador Francisco Barrio Terrazas praised GutiĂŠrrez for his work that highlighted the natural connection between the two countries. â&#x20AC;&#x153;During the months of harsh Canadian winters, they are in the beauty of my coun-

Let Zolaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s look after dinner with this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feature deal on

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I appreciate hearing from you and encourage you to keep in touch with me as it allows me to serve you better. It remains an honour and a privilege to be your strong voice at City Hall.

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

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A complete list of closures is available at ottawa.ca.

Tel./TĂŠl.: 613-580-2486 Maria.McRae@ottawa.ca MariaMcRae.ca @CouncillorMcRae

ico each year, but only a small fraction are human. The rest consist of creatures seeking shelter from Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s harsh winters, including the monarch butterfly. A film documenting the

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try, much like what Canadians do,â&#x20AC;? said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I encourage you to view this exhibit, modest in its size, but vast in experience.â&#x20AC;? GutiĂŠrrez travelled with the butterflies in an ultra light aircraft said at times he was not sure of how the film would turn out. He thanked friends and family at the event for their support, both in the sky and on the ground. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I never thought this is where I would land, seven years ago,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope you all enjoy the film and I am very thankful to this country.â&#x20AC;? Those who attended the event had the opportunity to watch the film or to explore the exhibit itself. Kerry-Leigh Burchill brought her friend, Jenn Orman, as an outing to celebrate Ormanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 40th birthday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just thought it would be a great night,â&#x20AC;? Burchill said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love the fact that the museum has incorporated art into their collection. It makes sense, this exhibit is all about flight, and it is beautiful.â&#x20AC;? The museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s director, Stephen Quick said the exhibit truly showed what an incredible journey GutiĂŠrrez had taken and was happy the museum had the opportunity to share the filmmakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accomplishments with the rest of Canada. The ambassador said there are a number of butterfly sanctuaries in Mexico where the insects stay when they make it to their destination. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Next time you travel to Mexico, ask one of the hotelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s staff to take you to one of those sanctuaries, so you can see for yourself,â&#x20AC;? Barrio Terrazas said. He also credited the butterflies as a symbol of the strong relationship the two countries have. The exhibit will be on display until Sept. 3.


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

JENNIFER MCINTOSH/METROLAND

Algonquin College president Kent MacDonald stops to talk to faculty members in attendance at the sold-out president’s breakfast at the college on Aug. 23.

MacDonald begins reign as Algonquin president jennifer.mcintosh@metroland. com

EMC news - Algonquin College’s job is to transform a student’s hopes and dreams into career success, newly minted president Kent MacDonald said to a sold-out crowd at the college’s annual president’s breakfast on Aug. 23. MacDonald’s first pledge was to continue making the college a global leader for integrating digital technology in the classroom. He also committed the college to enhancing the learning experience for students by leading the way in bringing technology and teaching together. “There is no college in this province that is more progressive and forward-thinking in the use of techno¬logy and how it’s changing the way our students learn,” he said And while students are learning through flexible and online courses to fit their schedules and discipline, MacDonald stressed the importance of the college being part of the larger community. He said the college should continue to work towards a hands-on, practical component in all of the courses offered. “It provides a learning experience to the student and a service to the community,” he said. The connection to the community makes it an important institution in the city, MacDonald said. “At this moment, I believe it’s this institution that is the most important public organization in this city in terms of reaching a certain amount of targets and opportunities for people,” he said. MacDonald, previously the college’s vice-president of academics, talked about his roots in New Glasgow, N.S. and said the commitment to education will improve the town. “There has been no time

in history when education has been more important,” he said. MacDonald said he would be looking to the provincial government to fix the credit transfer system to make it easier for students to move from college to university and vice versa. “The fact that we are, in this province, having students redo work and courses that are underwritten by the public purse simply isn’t right,” he said. After the speech, the curious got a sneak peek inside Algonquin’s new, $52-million student commons building. The building is expected to be opened for the upcoming school year. Anchored by a 700-seat

auditorium, it will house a wide variety of student supports, including counselling and employment services, the Centre for Students with Disabilities, the ¬Mamidosewin Aboriginal Student Centre and offices for the students’ association, and will also feature a food court, computer store and lots of space in a soaring atrium for students to meet and study. David Corson, president of the college’s student association, said the new building was an example of the college administration and students working together. “Working together allows us to understand and respond to student demands,” Corson said.

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Jennifer McIntosh

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012

31


Local events and happenings over the coming weeks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: patricia.lonergan@metroland.com

Sept. 4

Sept. 5 & 19

Meri Squares Modern Square Dance Club invites new dancers to two free evenings of dancing, fun and friendship from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 470 Roosevelt Ave. Singles welcome. For more information visit: MeriSquares.ca or call Harold Hedley at 613-7316538 or Marilyn Collins at 613-820-9084.

OAPWS, Ottawa Association of People Who Stutter meets on the first and third Wednesday of each month at Lakeside Gardens Centre, Britannia Park, 102 Greenview Ave, from 7 to 9 p.m. For more information visit www.oapws.ca, email david. burton2@rogers.com, or call 613-226-7001.

Sept. 5 The Granite Curling Club of West Ottawa, located at 2026 Scott St. in Westboro, is holding its 2012-13 registration night from 5 to 9 p.m. Openings are available for experienced and new players in daytime (Monday to Friday) and weekend leagues. See our website at ottawagranite.com or call the club at 613-722-1843 for details. Interested players, aged seven years and up, are welcome to come and ask questions about the club or sport without obligation to register.

1930â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drive In Movie Night! Cumberland Heritage Village Museum, 2940 Old Montreal Road Friday, August 31st, 2012 7:30 p.m.

Sept. 9 Ottawa River Riders will host the annual Guide Dog Run charity motorcycle ride to benefit Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind. Ottawa River Riders is a motorcycle enthusiastsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; club in the Ottawa region. They are a non-brand specific touring club, whose motto is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Friends Riding Together.â&#x20AC;? The Guide Dog Run is a 200-kilometre ride through Eastern Ontario; a surprise route unveiled during registration. Registration is from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Depart on your own or with one of our guided rides leaving at 9:30 or 10 a.m. The cost is $15 per person, which includes a score card and a barbecue ticket. All proceeds support Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind. The Guide Dog Run starts, rain or shine, from the National Training Centre of Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind, 4120 Rideau Valley Dr. North, Manotick. For more information call 613692-7777 or visit the website at ottawariverriders.ca.

Sept. 11

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Relive the haunting 1939 screening of Sir Arthur Conan Doyleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Hound of the Baskervillesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; as it was meant to be seen â&#x20AC;&#x201C; at the drive-in, in the dark, in the great outdoors! 613-833-3059

Ottawamuseumnetwork.ca

Canadian Federation of University Women/Nepean will meet at 1 p.m. at Knox United Church, 25 Gibbard Ave. Leslie Holton, from Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tea, will speak about â&#x20AC;&#x153;All You Wanted To Know About Tea.â&#x20AC;? Visitors are welcome. For more information, contact 613-727-0136.

Sept. 23 A benefit Concert for Allison Woyiwada takes place at 7 p.m. It will be a celebration

of music to raise funds for rehabilitation and related medical expenses from brain surgery for award-winning music teacher Allison Woyiwada. Hosted by Rob Clipperton with singers Isabelle Lacroix, Marya Woyiwada, Sandra Graham, Dillon Parmer, Fraser Rubens, and Denis Lawlor with pianist Jean Desmarais, pianist/organist Matthew Larkin, trumpeter Nick Cochrane, Members of the Savoy Society of Ottawa, featuring Shawne Elizabeth, accompanied by Robert Palmai, the 2011 Hopewell School Jazz Band conducted by Blair Smith, and the Southminster United Church Choir conducted by Roland Graham. Tickets are available at the Ottawa Folklore Centre and online. For more information, visit woyiwada. blogspot.ca. All friends, former members of Westboro United Church and members of the Westboro community are invited to a special closing service to celebrate Westboro United Church at 450 Churchill Ave. at 2 p.m. There will be a reception following the service including memorabilia from the church archives open to the public to view. For more information about this event please contact Kitchissippi United Church at 613-7227254 or email kitchssippi@bellnet.ca.

29-30 to experience the West End Studio Tour in Westboro/West Wellington.

Sept. 27 The Hintonburg Community Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual General Meeting takes place at the Hintonburg Community Centre, 1064 Wellington St. West. Doors and membership table open at 6:30 p.m., and at 7 p.m. there will be reports from the board of directors, with an election of new board of directors. There will also be an open forum to meet your neighbours and help make Hintonburg an even better place to live, work and play.

The artists of the 17th annual West End Studio Tour invite you to visit their studios in the Westboro/West Wellington neighbourhoods on the weekends of Sept. 22-23 and September 29-30. Spend an autumn weekend wandering one of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most vibrant and eclectic areas as you visit the 14 artists of the tour. Enjoy the works. From painting to fabric art, etching to photography, the West End Studio Tour offers a multitude of styles and mediums that will engage and entertain. Set aside a weekend on Sept. 22-23 or

Wednesdays Buns in the Oven, a free program for pregnant moms led by a nurse and a parent educator at South Nepean Community Health Centre, 4100 Strandherd Dr., suite 201, runs on Wednesdays from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. in May. For more information or to register, please call Susan 613-288-2825, ext. 2134.

Sept. 28

Fridays

Britannia United Church will hold a roast beef dinner starting at 6 p.m. The music will be provided by Gord Ley and Caper Country. They have been entertaining in the Ottawa Valley for about 20 years. Caper Country specializes in old country favorites, down east music and some rock and roll songs. Tickets are $25 per person. Call Dave and Elaine Mackenzie at 613-596-4088 or the church office at 613828-6018. The cut off date is Sept. 27. Britannia United Church is located at 985 Pinecrest Rd.

Five pin bowling league is encouraging senior citizens over the age of 50 to participate in an activity that provides regular moderate exercise. Members range in age from 50 to 90. There is no registration fee. Bowling takes place each Friday afternoon between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. at Walkley Bowling Centre, 2092 Walkley Rd. Ottawa. Participants are placed on mixed four person teams. To register, please call Roy or Jean Hoban at 613-73l-6526.

Mondays

Sept. 22-23, 29-30

or come for cards, crafts, friendly chatter and camaraderie. We welcome all new Canadians with new ideas and hope that we can add to yours. Drop in and check us out. For more information call Shirley at 613-225-8089.

Looking to learn conversational Spanish? Improve your Spanish speaking skills with Los Amigos Toastmasters. We meet at Tunneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pasture Mondays from 4:55 to 6:30 p.m. For more information, contact Carole at 613-7616537 or visit our website at amigos-tm.ca.

Tuesdays The Hogs Back 50+ Club meets every Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the front room of the Boys and Girls Club, 1463 Prince of Wales Dr. at Meadowlands and Hogsback. Bring a bag lunch

Ongoing The Westboro Youth Centre, a non-profit organization, is looking to increase the size of its board. The Westboro Youth Centre is a free recreational program serving Westboro area youth, ages 10 to 17. Supervised sports and craft programs are offered from 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Friday nights, providing a safe environment for kids to have fun and take part in healthy activities. Ottawa Newcomersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Club invites women new to Ottawa to join our activities and meet some new friends. Activities include: Bridge, Scrabble, walks, luncheons and dinners, book club, Ottawa

R0011585225

sights/events, travel cafe and craft and chat. Please check out our website at: www. ottawanewcomersclub.ca. For more information call 613860-0548 or ottawanewcomers@hotmail.ca. Teen Book Club takes place at Ottawa Public Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Carlingwood branch. Chat about books and share your favourites with other teens. The club is for ages 12 and up and takes place the last Tuesday of the month (Aug. 28) at 7 p.m. A campaign to establish a Department of Peace in Canada is undertaking its first membership drive. For $10 people can support a national effort to bring the political peace agenda to the federal government. For more information and to join as a voting member of CPI, visit departmentofpeace.ca or email Ottawa Eastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Iman Ibrahim at imanibrahim@rogers.com. The Neuropsychology Laboratory, School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, is recruiting Englishspeaking stroke survivor volunteers to take part in a memory training study (done at your home or on campus). This research involves eight sessions over the span of four weeks. All our testing is noninvasive. Call at 613-5625800 x 8757. Theatre Nights takes place on the last Friday of every month at Gigspace Performance Studio, 953 Gladstone Ave. (1 block west of Preston). Admission is $10 at the door. Drinks and snacks are provided. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. and performances start at 8pm Do you have an hour a week to volunteer? Volunteer as a career mentor with the Ottawa Community Immigrant Services Organization and make a difference in your community, and in a new Canadianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. Contact OCISO to attend the next mentor orientation by email at: hazad@ociso.org.

MERI SQUARES MODERN SQUARE DANCE CLUB Invites new dancers to attend two free evenings of dancing, fun and friendship on Tuesday, September 4 and 11, 2012 7:30 to 9:30 pm

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Singles Welcome

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Mondays starting Sept. 10th at 7pm (7 weeks @ $50 per couple)

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Parkdale United Church - 429 Parkdale Ave., Ottawa info & registration: tel. 613-836-5795 or email: iq4u@storm.ca

32

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Location Westminster Presbyterian Church 470 Roosevelt Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario Contact Harold Hedley, 613-731-6538, or Marilyn Collins, 613-820-9084 Website http://MeriSquares.ca R0011569353


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family Westgate Wellness Centre

Contact us to book (Designated OHIP) (Westgate Shopping Centre) a free 1309 Carling Avenue consult Phone: 613.715.9000 today!

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33


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Malibu Boats 5675 5674 5711 5699 5716 5715

22 MXZ 23 VRide 21 Wakesetter LSV 21 Wakesetter VLX 21 Wakesetter VLX 20 Wakesetter VTX

*prices are subject to HST & all applicable fees *Proceeds to:

In addition to blowout pricing, Hurst Marina will Winterize, Shrink-Wrap, Store & Spring Commission your new boat for FREE this winter if you buy before the end of our In-Water Boat Show & Sale!

2726 RIVER ROAD, MANOTICK (OTTAWA) (613) 692-1234 www.hurstmarina.com R0011581960

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, August 30, 2012


Ottawa West EMC