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Brier Dodge

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Can you afford to retire? Part 1 of a Metroland Special Series. – Pages 44, 45

Strike a pose

René Narcisse, a Grade 3 student from Good Shepherd School in Blackburn Hamlet practises his tree pose during a game at the launch of the Healthy Kids Quest at the Canada Agriculture and Food Museum on April 24. The program promotes healthy eating and staying physically active. See story on page 3.

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News - Police were called to a home on St. Bruno Street in Avalon on the afternoon of April 22 because a woman had her throat cut. Police arrived at the Orléans home to find 49-year-old Luce Lavertu dead. Several hours later, police were seen sprinting from the crime scene towards neighbours’ backyards. Lavertu’s 18-year-old son, Christopher Gobin, was running from police through neighbours’ backyards. Police eventually caught up with the teenager, and pinned him to the ground in the front yard of a property on Esprit Drive. He was crying as police held him on the ground and put him into handcuffs. He was wearing a T-shirt, jogging pants and only socks on his feet.

laura.mueller@metroland.com

News - Developers say the city isn’t really reaching its intensification goals in the suburbs, even if homes seem more densely

packed. While houses might be crammed closer together, it doesn’t mean space in the entire community is well-used, said Frank Cairo of Caivan Communities. Cairo is one of the developers who par-

ticipated in a forum discussion hosted by the city on how to build better suburbs on April 24. The unique event brought together a group of five developers and city councillors in a panel format to air concerns and ideas about how to make suburban development work better. See TURF, page 7

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Neighbours shocked over killing

City-wide spring burn ban in effect

Continued from page 1

He stopped crying and stared straight ahead as police put him into a cruiser. He was arrested, and later charged with first degree murder. “He was running through the backyard,” said a woman near the house where he was arrested. “I saw him running from the side of my house … I was scared, of course.” The woman said she was aware a woman had been killed before she came home. Other neighbours were shocked when they arrived home, and said they had never seen anything like it in the Avalon neighbourhood before. Before Gobin was arrested, neighbours crowded around police tape on St. Bruno Street. Gobin, a student at St. Peter High School, appeared in court at the Elgin Street courthouse via video feed the next day. He wore a baggy white tank top and white shorts, with his hands in cuffs, as he calmly stated his name. He was then charged with the first-degree murder. He was scheduled to appear in court again on April 30.

Brier Dodge/Metroland

Christopher Gobin, 18, is held by police in the front yard of a home on Esprit Drive after a short manhunt which saw him run through neighbours’ backyards on April 22. He has been charged in the murder his mother, 49-year-old Luce Lavertu. Gobin attends St. Peter High School. The Catholic school board said counsellors would at the school in the days following Gobin’s arrest.

His social media profiles offered little insight into much information about him, but he did have a few chilling words in a survey style question-and-

“That was way to easy!”

answer that was displayed. The last of several of his answers to the question, “3 worst words to hear?” He wrote “your mom died.”

News - A city-wide burn ban is in effect to prevent the rapid spread of fire due to grass and brush fires. The ban will remain in place until conditions improve and the green grass starts to show through dead tall grass. This winter left more debris on the ground, such as fallen tree branches and leaves, than in previous years, which increases the risk of fire spread. All open air fires are prohibited during a fire ban even for those properties that have a burn permit.

buildings and propane tanks. • Keep barbecue propane tanks at least three metres from buildings. • Wood piles should stored a safe distance from the home. • Trees should be pruned to create a good vertical separation from the ground. • Have a working garden hose and water supply to promptly extinguish any grass fires. • Clear out any accumulated dry/dead debris from property. For tips on disposing yard waste, visit Ottawa.ca

REDUCE YOUR RISK

CIGARETTES

Residents are encouraged to take advantage of weekly yard waste collection and use the following tips to prevent grass and brush fires: • Clear all combustible materials such as tree limbs, leaves and other dry materials away from

Carelessly discarded cigarettes continue to be a major cause of grass fires during these dry periods. Smokers are reminded to please use care when butting out. Do not throw lit cigarettes out vehicle windows.

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Claire Emond, a Grade 3 student at Good Shepherd School in Blackburn Hamlet, plays a game during the launch of the Healthy Kids Quest at the Canada Agriculture and Food Museum on April 24. The program promotes healthy eating and staying physically active.

Blackburn Hamlet students join Healthy Kids Quest Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

News - Blackburn Hamlet students from Good Shepherd School were the first to try out the Healthy Kids Quest, an educational program that launched on April 24 at the Canada Agriculture and Food Museum. The program is available free to students across Canada, for teachers or community members. “Choices we make as adults start when we’re very young,” said KerryLeigh Burchill, the museum’s director-general. The program sets out different activities for the classroom, which are accompanied by a different daily goal for six days of the week. “Monday might be bring a green or orange vegetable in your lunchbox, Thursday might be physical activity day,” Burchill said. She said the daily routines are repeated for at least four weeks to start making them habit, and include information sheets for parents to participate at home. The program was developed over the last eight months with consultations and focus groups with teachers. It incorporates some of the most popular activities and lessons that are already taught at the museum. It also ties into different English, math, science and social studies curriculums across the provinces and territories for students in grades 1 to 3.

The museum is in the start of the second year of a five-year commitment to food literacy, so activities – such as teaching children about pollination and bees – have already been running. Students can take part in some of the quest activities at the museum on an ongoing basis, but the full program is meant to be run in classrooms or at home. The Blackburn Hamlet students were was the first try out the program. The Grade 3 children played games, picking up cards with photos of different fruits and vegetables and acting out the corresponding activity. Activities were physical, like running on the spot, or jumping up and down. The Ottawa RedBlacks mascot, Big Joe, came to participate in the game and encourage physical activity with the group. The youth were enthusiastic about playing the games and moving around during their field trip. “This is to help you make healthy choices when it comes to picking what to pack in your lunch,” Burchill told the children. “We’ll talk about foods we like to eat.” The program provides the youth participants with different “social rewards,” like a soccer game during the school day, a no-homework night, or a pyjama day at school. It was funded by a private grant and the federal government, and is a free program available for download. For more information, visit www. healthykidsquest.ca.

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2014 Omnibus Zoning By-law Amendment

Millennium Park to get $6-million boost laura.mueller@metroland.com

News - Expanded recreation facilities, including an artiďŹ cial ďŹ eld, are coming to Millennium Park years earlier than the city could have built them. The addition of three soccer ďŹ elds, bathrooms, gazebos, a large splash pad, a major play structure, more parking and a semi-professional turf soccer ďŹ eld with bleachers is made possible because the city agreed to loan developers $6 million to get the work done. It will take two years to construct, said Cumberland Coun. Stephen Blais, who co-ordinated the deal. It’s called a front-ending agreement and it’s something developers and the city have increasingly been using as a way to build park facilities faster, but the Millennium Park deal is particularly large. “What we’re deciding to put in it goes well beyond the city’s standard,â€? Blais said. “It is a place where you can host major tournament-style amateur sports, even semi-professional soccer. It’s going to be quite the show.â€? There are plans to put out a contract for a dome to cover the showcase ďŹ eld in the winter,

Blais said. Millennium Park already exists, but approximately 11 hectares remain to be completed. The proposal makes sense for the developers, including Claridge Homes, Mattamy Homes, Minto, and Taggart, because it will help them sell homes in the area, Blais said. “This is the destination park,â€? he said. “It will be the jewel in the crown.â€? Attracting sports tournaments will also be a boon for local business, Blais said. The agreement would see builders pay back the loan through the standard development charge for parks, which is already added to the price of future homes and businesses built in OrlĂŠans and Cumberland. The key clause in the deal is that developers committed to make payments to the city every year, regardless of how many new homes have been built. If the developers go bankrupt, the city has letters of credit to secure the deal, plus some cash was provided up front, Blais said. “Nothing is 100 per cent ever, but we have a huge amount of protection for taxpayers built in for this,â€? he said. The project led the city to pursue changes to the develop-

ment charges bylaw that could see developers build all new suburban parks. That proposal will go to the planning committee in May. CUMBERLAND SOCCER PLANS

The Cumberland United Soccer Club will also develop an area at Millennium Park. The club owns property at 2075 Trim Rd., where it plans to build a clubhouse and indoor ďŹ eld, separate from the city’s plans. The club’s board submitted a proposal to the city to have the property rezoned to allow for the project. There is currently a structure on the property, but it will likely be torn down and replaced with a more functional building, said Carlos Conde, the club’s strategic planning director. Conde said the project is still in the proposal stage, and the club is leaning towards a building instead of a dome to house an indoor turf ďŹ eld. The indoor ďŹ eld would be about two-thirds of the size of a full ďŹ eld. Leagues and team training would still be run at the current ďŹ elds at Millennium Park through the summer.

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Tuesday, May 6, 2014 Ottawa City Hall Councillorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lounge, 2nd ďŹ&#x201A;oor 110 Laurier Avenue West 5 to 8:30 p.m.

This drug KILLS BABIES It can KILL WOMEN too

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Carol Ruddy City of Ottawa *Â?>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;>}iÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152; 110 Laurier Avenue West "Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x153;>]Ă&#x160;"Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;]Ă&#x160;ÂŁ*Ă&#x160;ÂŁÂŁĂ&#x160; /iÂ?\Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Â&#x2021;xnäÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;{Ă&#x201C;{]Ă&#x160;iĂ?Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;n{xĂ&#x2021; E-mail: carol.ruddy@ottawa.ca vĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x160;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;LÂ?Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;LÂ&#x153;`Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;`Â&#x153;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;>Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;LÂ&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;LÂ?Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;Â&#x201C;iiĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;LÂ&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;"Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x160;LivÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x153;Ă&#x192;i`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;Â&#x2021;Â?>Ă&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;i`]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;LÂ?Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160; body is not entitled to appeal the decision of the Council of the City of Ottawa to the Ontario Municipal Board. vĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x160;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;LÂ?Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;LÂ&#x153;`Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;`Â&#x153;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;>Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;LÂ&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;LÂ?Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;Â&#x201C;iiĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;LÂ&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;"Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x160;LivÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x153;Ă&#x192;i`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;Â&#x2021;Â?>Ă&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;i`]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;LÂ?Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160; body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Ontario Municipal Board unless, in the opinion of the Board, there are reasonable grounds to do so.

R0022038067

OrlĂŠans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

R0012657926-0424

Laura Mueller and Brier Dodge

Public Information Session

5


NEWS

Connected to your community

City waters down apartment rules Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

385 Tomkins Ave. 613-834-3666

The Ottawa Student Transportation Authority will be conducting Public Consultation sessions on proposed bell time changes and new walk zone maps.

0501.R0012668746

May Special

News - The city has doubled back on its plan to require backyards for low-rise apartments across the city after developers complained about the rule. A number of representatives for builders in Ottawa told the planning committee on April 23 that they weren’t in the loop about proposed broad changes that would have added a new requirement for green space behind apartments up to four storeys. The rule was tacked on to a bylaw change eliminating special zoning exemptions for homes converted into multi-unit dwellings. The city kicked off the study after hearing complaints about “de facto rooming houses” in neighbourhoods near universities or in colleges, like Sandy Hill. The developers said they were under the impression that any change to the rules would only affect the inner-urban wards that reported problems arising from the conversion of homes, which is what led to a freeze on converted dwellings and the study. “This report deviates significantly from where we started in 2012. It now includes low-

rise apartments,” said Ursula Melinz, a lawyer representing a group of developers including Minto, told the planning committee on March 12. “It has a larger impact.” In response, city planners agreed to limit the backyard requirement to wards in the city’s core. Planned-unit developments, the term given to a large lot with several residential buildings on it, are also exempt from the backyard requirement. “What you have before you today is a direct reflection of the feedback you heard,” Lee Ann Snedden, the city’s manager of policy development and urban design, told city council. The modifications help make the bylaw more appropriate, she said. City council also agreed with city planners’ suggestion to only allow “tandem” parking – where two vehicles can park one behind the other in a driveway – in the same inner-urban wards, instead of across the city. Council also voted to give developers not affected by the converted-dwellings freeze more time to get their planned projects into the city before the changes take effect. The builders would still have had to get

their rezoning, site plan, committee of adjustment of nowextinct cash-in-lieu of parking applications in before March 20. But the city will now grandfather in applications already in the works, as long as the builders get a building permit application into the city before April 23, 2016. That captures about 30 or 40 development applications currently in the process. The transition period doesn’t apply to Sandy Hill, Old Ottawa South or the Glebe, where an interim control bylaw was used to freeze converted dwelling applications for the past year. City planners didn’t accede to all the suggestions made by developers or residents after the planning committee’s meeting. Discarded ideas included: eliminating the requirement for a yard “amenity area” or allowing it to be located above grade, such as a rooftop patio; loosening landscape requirements; allowing more applications to be submitted in an extended transition period; exempting certain properties from the rules; and extending the interim control bylaw until the city can deal with the second phase of its updated infill rules, which address the size of homes within the Greenbelt.

Submit your feedback online by completing our survey at www.ottawaschoolbus.ca LOCATION OF SESSION - St. Matthew HS, 6550 Bilberry Dr.

As each school community has its own concerns, please be sure to attend the session that pertains to your child(ren)’s school(s).

DATE - Saturday, May 3, 2014 SCHOOL COMMUNITY 9:00 – 11:00a.m. Cairine Wilson PSS Convent Glen CES Convent Glen PES

Emily Carr PES Glen Ogilvie PES Good Shepherd CES

12:00 – 2:00p.m. Divine Infant CES Orleans Wood CES

St. Matthew CHS Terry Fox PES

Please visit OSTA’s website at

www.ottawaschoolbus.ca for more information.

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news

Connected to your community

Turf wars lead to bloated public areas say developers Continued from page 1

A good 70 per cent of Ottawa’s “urban” residents live in the suburbs, said Alain Miguelez, the city’s program manager of intensification and zoning, and tremendous growth in the suburbs is highlighting the need to fix up how communities outside the Greenbelt are designed. Half the land in a new suburban community is written off before developers begin laying out where the homes go, said Rob Pierce, land development director for Monarch. “It makes it hard to hit those intensification targets,” he said. “We’re doing our parts ... need to look at the other stakeholders and how they can use their land more efficiently.” Infighting and “turf wars” between utility agencies and other players vying for land in the suburbs, such as schools and the city’s parks department, often lead to a bloated amount of public space set

aside for all those elements, said Pierre Dufresne, president of the Greater Ottawa Home Builders’ Association and vice president with Tartan Homes, who also participated in the discussion. “When we take a piece of land and more than 50 per cent of it is provided for other interests before the first house is built, it limits our ability to meet the intensification policies in the (city’s) Official Plan to the extent we otherwise could.” Nitty-gritty topics like where to place hydro boxes on lawns and how wide roads should be are some of the topics that will help the city drill down to create better standards for the elements it requires when new suburban communities are built. The planning committee will receive a report on “guiding principles” for the Building Better Suburbs project at its meeting on May 13. The overall project has been extended into the fall – it was

supposed to wrap up before the summer – and a final report is expected in November. There will be another public forum in the fall where residents can view and comment on the suggested changes before they go to the planning committee for final approval, said Lee Anne Snedden, the city’s manager of policy development and urban design. Initial public consultations happened last fall. Developers are happy to be involved in the process because in the case of building new communities, they serve as the main voice for consumers and future residents, Cairo said.

school sites. A recent example saw the city require a fence to be built between a park and the neighbouring school yard in the Avalon development in Cumberland, said Coun. Stephen Blais. Parents shouldn’t have to sign waivers for their kids to cross from a schoolyard into a city park, said Kanata North Coun. Marianne Wilkinson. Discussion at the forum in-

dicated the city is now more willing to look at things like joining city parks with schoolyards. Dufresne also suggested looking at putting stormwater management ponds in parks as a natural feature, instead of finding other additional space for the ponds. That would be a throwback to the way it used to work before amalgamation, and developers welcome that, he said. The old city halls were

smaller and developers could work more directly with city staff across the different departments, he said. “There are barriers between us now to be able to resolve these issues,” Dufresne said. Integration between all the players involved in constructing new communities is key moving forward, said a number of councillors and developers involved in the discussion.

COMBINING PARKS AND SCHOOLS

One of the big topics developers are looking forward to is the city’s new willingness to pair parks with school sites. The major example of that is the city’s insistence that parks be separated from

ONE EXCITING WORKPLACE,

OVER 1,000 EXCITING

OPPORTUNITIES

Please note: The location and time of this meeting has been changed to the West Carleton Community Complex, Roly Armitage Hall, 5670 Carp Road at 6 p.m.

TD Place at Lansdowne is opening soon and now staffing over 1,000 part-time positions. Attend our Job Fair and find out how you can be part of our exciting team!

DEVELOPMENT APPLICATIONS / AMENDMENTS UNDER THE PLANNING ACT NOTICE OF AGRICULTURE AND RURAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE MEETING

Cooks Supervisors Security Merchandise Server Assistants Warehouse Workers

Monday, May 5, 2014 – 6 p.m. The item listed below, in addition to any other items previously scheduled, will be considered at this meeting, which will be held at West Carleton Community Complex, Roly Armitage Hall, 5670 Carp Road, Ontario. To see any change to this meeting agenda, please go to Ottawa.ca.

Zoning – 3505 Trim Road 613-580-2424, ext. 125126 – edith.tam@ttawa.ca

Saturday, May 3 Ottawa Convention Centre 55 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa 10 am – 3 pm

Zoning 669-681 Meadowridge Circle 613-580-2424, ext. 31329 – jeffrey.ostafichuk@ttawa.ca

Anomalies and Minor Corrections – Exception[19r] 613-580-2424, ext. 28457 – carol.ruddy@ottawa.ca

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OPINION

Connected to your community

EDITORIAL

Internet now a necessity

M

any of us have the Internet in our pocket; an instant connection to news, email and, during an emergency, information that can even save lives. For others, the Internet is a distant concept. And not just in Third World countries â&#x20AC;&#x201C; here in Ottawa too. The cost of an Internet connection is more than some people can afford, despite the fact that highspeed connections are literally at their front door. Information is power, as well as a key element of a modern education. Without a decent connection to the worldwide web, people who are already behind the rest of Canadian society are destined to fall further behind. The children in homes without a fast connection are destined to fall behind their peers. It seems less likely they will get a chance to excel at school and beyond, which equals a massive waste of potential. A low-income advocacy group organized a march on April 17 to draw attention to the high cost of highspeed, a price tag that puts the Information Highway out of reach for many Canadians. The Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now is calling for high-speed Internet to be made available to Canadians for $10 a month. Given that the federal government regulates our telephone service, a more

affordable Internet is within reach if Parliament feels it is important. We pay taxes so that our libraries can share information with all residents. Why not a Canadian system to share the Internet with all Canadians? For this tech-savvy nation, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s within our control to make it happen. The federal government has made rural high-speed Internet a priority, which is commendable. That doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean urban users â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with high-speed connections available â&#x20AC;&#x201C; should be forgotten. Internet access should be treated the same as basic phone service, with controlled rates so low-income families can get connected. Ottawa libraries provide Internet access â&#x20AC;&#x201C; when they are open and if there is no lineup of other customers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the same as having information on your kitchen table. Low-speed, dial-up connections are still available â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with a phone line â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a good way to research material on todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s image-heavy websites. ACORN has the right idea. Every Canadian should have high-speed access. And if their current finances mean they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford it, rates should be controlled. If Internet service providers wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t or canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make the cost affordable, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up to all of us â&#x20AC;&#x201C; through our federal government â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to help offset costs so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all on an equal footing.

COLUMN

Free to vote. Free to not vote.

U

sually the subject of voter turnout emerges briefly after elections, when it is discovered that two out of five of us didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bother to go to the polls. There is a brief period of handwringing and then the political world reverts to its normal pattern of evasion, distortion and character assassination. Now thanks, if that is the word, to the Fair Elections Act, we are having the discussion at a time when it can do some good. It is a serious problem: according to the Canadian Press, just over 60 per cent of eligible voters turned out in 2011, and among voters under the age of 30 the turnout was less than 40 per cent. Provincial and municipal turnout figures are usually worse. There is no shortage of explanations. Some blame the nasty tone of our federal and provincial politics. Some blame the lack of issues of relevance to younger voters. And some blame the voting system itself. The argument goes that either it is too difficult to vote, or young voters just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care, or a combination of the two. The proposed solutions include asking the political parties to become more relevant. Godspeed on that one. On changes to the voting system, the one

OrlĂŠans News !URIGA$RIVE 3UITE /TTAWA /. +%"

613-723-5970 Published weekly by:

CHARLES GORDON Funny Town weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been hearing for years is that Canada should adopt the compulsory vote, a system used with apparent success in other countries, such as Australia. The likelihood of being fined would bring young people out to the polls and, the argument goes, the likelihood of going to the polls would cause them to pay more attention to the issues. The counter-arguments are familiar. First, non-voters are usually non-interested and non-informed. Do we really want more people like that voting? Second, we live in a free society. For better or worse, one of our freedoms is the freedom not to vote. If we discard the compulsory option, the alternative most commonly proposed is online voting. We do everything online now, the argument goes, so why not voting? Young

Vice President & Regional Publisher Mike Mount mmount@perfprint.ca 613-283-3182, ext. 104 Regional General Manager Peter Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary poleary@perfprint.ca 613-283-3182, ext. 112 Group Publisher Duncan Weir dweir@perfprint.ca 613-283-3182, ext. 164 Regional Managing Editor Ryland Coyne rcoyne@perfprint.ca Publisher: Mike Tracy mtracy@perfprint.ca

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OrlĂŠans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

people are more likely to vote if they can do so online. The argument is made forcefully by comedian Rick Mercer in one of his CBC rants, quoted in the Huffington Post: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The government has a responsibility to make voting available wherever Canadians live. And yes, all Canadians reside in a riding but young Canadians, they live online. If we let them pay taxes there, let them vote there.â&#x20AC;? A couple of counter-arguments can be made. One comes from Ottawa Coun. Rick Chiarelli, quoted by CFRA, who used the example of the Heartbleed bug to point up the possible lack of security of online voting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always open to failure because the battle between security and hacking is a seesaw battle and it goes on like that,â&#x20AC;? Chiarelli said, and it is hard not to agree. The amount of attempted tampering in the last election indicates that any online voting system adopted will become a target, by those attempting to bias the result or perhaps just mess things up for fun. Even if online voting could be guaranteed to be secure, there would be still be reservations. It could be argued that putting voting online trivializes it, by putting it in the same category as downloading a song.

It should be thought of as a more serious matter than that. One way of observing that seriousness is to rise from your chair, put your shoes on and go out the door. Voting may or may not be a duty, but it is certainly a privilege. Polling places are almost always within walking distance. Many people are allowed time off from work to vote. Rides to and from are available. To treat the act of voting as some kind of hardship is a distortion of reality. If itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a hardship to vote, millions of people around the world would like some.

Editorial Policy The OrlĂŠans News welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at ottawacommunitynews.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to theresa.fritz@metroland.com, fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to the OrlĂŠans News, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa, ON, K2E 7L2.

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opinion

Connected to your community

A living will removes future headaches for families

T

he other day, some friends in the neighbourhood, now in their mid-sixties, informed us they would be putting their house up for sale. “Sorry to disappoint you,” she said. “But if we wait until we’re 70, we’ll be past our sell-by date.” It was a cute play on words. But it got me wondering about my own relatives in the same age group, who have never raised the issue of downsizing or moving to a more seniorfriendly establishment. Our neighbours are in excellent health, to be sure. They are expecting their first grandchildren. They have a Florida condo and a cottage and their current house is lovely and centrally located. But they’re smart. They know that the stairs may at some point become a burden, along with the maintenance of their current freehold property – from roofing and plumbing repairs, to snow removal and gardening. These are things they’ve chosen not to worry about as they age, thus the decision to sell while they are still able-bodied and able-minded enough to make decisions about where they want to live. I wish my own relatives could be so practical. But this is not an easy subject to broach with seniors. For one thing, no one likes to be told what to do. For another, few people like to think about the potential of becoming disabled, less self-sufficient or widowed. The latter is most concerning In the last few years, I’ve known three elderly couples where one spouse had health or disability issues and the other acted in the role of caretaker. People tend to assume the one in poor health will pass away first, but in all three cases it was the caretaker who died. This left the family in a crisis situation. Not only did they have to think about downsizing and relocating the widowed parent – but they also had to rapidly reorganize their lives to find a caregiver replacement. Conversations about aging in place, relocation and potential retirement residences need to be brought out of the shadows before they become necessary. As part of the sandwich genera-

566 Cataraqui Woods Dr., Kingston, ON K7P 2Y5

BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse tion, I’ve seen many families wait for a crisis to take action on senior relocation and downsizing. It leads to critical decisions made under stress,

which not only limits their choices, but also has lead to decisions that they later came to regret when life settled back to a normal pace.

How does one go about broaching the subject of seniors’ intentions? There’s no point acting forceful or overly opinionated, which may just get people’s backs up. But you can start by asking some of the big questions gently: Have you thought about how long you’ll live in your current house? Is it still financially viable if you eventually have to outsource all maintenance? Over time, you may want to broaden the questions to get them thinking about life if one person in the couple becomes disabled or dies and how practical the house would be at that time.

What if they can no longer drive or need help with meals? Are these things possible in their current location? What are their expectations of their relatives? Do they anticipate they will need their relatives to care for them or live with them? Or have they sourced other possibilities of care – home care or residential care – if they need it? Many people take the time early on to contemplate their lives after death by creating a will. It’s time to start taking the idea of a living will more seriously, ideally before anyone reaches their “sell-by dates.”

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Connected to your community

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OrlĂŠans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014


Connected to your community

Walking the Talk According to the 2011 National Household Survey, 68% of Ottawa residents drive a vehicle to work. Every day, people use vehicles to get to work, school, run errands, visit friends, and to take children to recreational activities. Although vehicles can be a quick form of transportation, did you know that in urban areas, walking for a distance of 500 meters or less is usually faster than using the car – and it is free and good for you. Car-centered living robs us of the chance to include physical activity into our daily lives. Every year, each Canadian makes an average of 2,000 car trips of less than three kilometers. Imagine how much healthier we would be if these short trips were replaced with an active mode of transportation, such as walking or cycling! May is Physical Activity Month and throughout the month, Ottawa Public Health is challenging residents to get active every day. A simple way is to walk if you are headed somewhere

that is 2 km or less. A 2 km walk is equal to thirty minutes of physical activity. If you do this 5 times per week, you will meet the 150 minutes of activity recommended for adults Using active forms of transportation not only improves our health, it can also help reduce vehicle emissions which have negative environmental and health effects.

Please join us for the Ottawa Walking Day Celebration on Tuesday May 13, 2014 from 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. at Ottawa City Hall located at 110 Laurier Avenue West. Bicycle parking is always free! There will be opportunities for networking, to listen to motivational speakers and to participate in guided walks along the canal. Register today! OttawaWalkingDay.Eventbrite.ca or for more information call: 613-580-6744 ext. 23514.

Ottawa Hospitals Keeping it Fresh Have you recently been to an Ottawa area hospital? Maybe you were a patient, visiting someone or even going in to work your shift? You may have noticed that the air you are breathing feels a little fresher! As members of the Smoke-Free Hospital Workgroup, local hospitals, including the Ottawa Hospital, The Queensway Carleton Hospital, the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, The Royal, Hôpital Montfort, CHEO and Ottawa Public Health are partnering to support patients, visitors and staff who smoke. Each hospital campus has supports in place to help patients and staff quit smoking or curb their cravings. Patients, staff and visitors can take advantage of various services offered such as one-on-one

counselling, group support, workshops and access to quit smoking medications. Recently, the hospitals partnered up to support their staff by offering the Fresh Air Challenge to those who want to quit smoking, help a co-worker quit or who simply want to remain smokefree. Nearly 250 hospital employees across all local hospitals participated in the challenge. Whether you are curious and want to know more about the hospital’s policy, what services could benefit you, or where to go if you choose to smoke, the Smoke-Free Hospital Workgroup has answers to your questions. Visit Smokefree-Sansfumee.ca to learn more… because we all breathe the same air. Let’s keep it Fresh Ottawa! Follow us on Twitter @OttawaHealth

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ELECTRICITY ELECTRICITY A stopped bus means the RATES CHANGE ELECTRICITY driver is alert RATES CHANGE PROVINCE WIDE ON MAY 1 RATES CHANGE opinion LETTER

PROVINCE WIDE ON MAY 1 $ PROVINCE WIDE ON MAY 1 $ ELECTRICITY RATES $ HAVE INCREASED ELECTRICITY RATES FOR ONTARIO RESIDENTIAL HAVE INCREASED AND SMALL BUSINESS ELECTRICITY RATES FOR ONTARIO RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS TO COVER HAVE INCREASED ANDRISING SMALLCOSTS BUSINESS THE OF FOR ONTARIO RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS TO COVER GENERATING POWER. AND SMALL BUSINESS THE RISING COSTS OF CUSTOMERS TO COVER GENERATING POWER. THE RISING COSTS OF GENERATING POWER.

THE ONTARIO ENERGY BOARD (OEB) REGULATES THE PROVINCE’S ENERGY SECTOR AND SETS ELECTRICITY THE ONTARIO ENERGY BOARD (OEB) RATES TO ENSURE A RELIABLE REGULATES THE PROVINCE’S ENERGY AND EFFICIENT SYSTEM. SECTOR AND ENERGY SETS ELECTRICITY THE ONTARIO BOARD (OEB) RATES TO ENSURE A RELIABLE REGULATES THE PROVINCE’S ENERGY AND EFFICIENT SYSTEM. SECTOR AND SETS ELECTRICITY RATES TO ENSURE A RELIABLE RegulatoRy ChaRge AND EFFICIENT the RuRal oR Remote RateSYSTEM. PRoteCtion ChaRge (inCluded in the RegulatoRy

Change ONTARIO’S NEW TIME-OF-USE RATES ARE:

To the editor,

After spending a pile of money on meetings and consultants’ studies, Ottawa’s transit committee (none of whom are or have been professional drivers, it would appear) doesn’t believe that bus safety can be improved by making OC Transpo buses stop at rail crossings. This pronouncement defies all logic and common sense. For safety reasons the entire North American school transportation system adopted the requirement of having to stop at rail crossings already a decade ago! Professional drivers, especially those repeating the same monotonous routes hour after hour, day after day, week after week (read OCTranspo), are prone to “white line fever” whereby they can become oblivious to extraneous visual and auditory cues. If ever you’ve blindly driven through a newly-erected stop sign or traffic signal along an accustomed route you’ll know exactly what I’m talking about. The requirement of a school bus

Connected to your community

to stop at a rail crossing is benign in nature but in reality signals unequivocally to trains, motorists and passengers that the driver of the nearby bus is fully alert. This is the key to that policy.  The onerous ritual of engaging the four-way warning lights, opening the driver’s window, turning off all fans and blowers, slowing down and stopping, disengaging the transmission, applying the emergency brake, opening and closing the entry door and actively looking both ways, cannot be competently performed by an inattentive or distracted driver. Had all Route 76 OC Transpo drivers been required to do this in advance of crossing the Woodroffe rail tracks in September of 2013, that tragedy would either have been averted or blame would have been infinitely easier to determine. It is entirely for this reason that it sh ould be mandatory for any and all passenger buses to stop at rail crossings.  Bert van Ingen Nepean

ChaRge), will inCRease to 0.13 ¢/kwh (uP 0.01 Cent). this ChaRge helPs to off-set Costs to ConsumeRs in RuRal and Remote aReas of ontaRio.

ONTARIO’S NEW TIME-OF-USE RATES ARE: MIDNIGHT

MIDNIGHT

MIDNIGHT

MIDNIGHT

MIDNIGHT

MIDNIGHT

P.M. MIDNIGHT A.M.

P.M.MIDNIGHTA.M.

P.M. MIDNIGHTA.M.

ONTARIO’S NEW TIME-OF-USE RATES ARE:

P.M. A.M. Planned WorkP.M. A.M. P.M. A.M. InP.M. YourA.M. Community NOON

NOON

¢

¢

¢

Summer Island Park Drive (May 1 –NOON October 31) weekdays Summer NOON (May 1 OFF-PEAK–= October 31) weekdays 7.5 ¢/KWH (UP 0.3 CENT) Summer (May 1 – October 31) OFF-PEAK = weekdays

P.M. P.M.

A.M. A.M.

NOON

Weekends Winter Information Session and NOON (November 1 – April 30) NOON Statutory Holidays weekdays Weekends Winter NOON NOON and (November 1 –=April 30) ¢¢¢ ON-PEAK ¢¢ MID-PEAK = Statutory Holidays Weekends weekdays 13.5 ¢/KWH (UP 0.6 CENT) 11.2 ¢/KWH (UP 0.3 CENT) Winter and (November 1 – April 30) ¢¢¢ ON-PEAK = ¢¢ MID-PEAK = Statutory Holidays weekdays

13.5 ¢/KWH (UP 0.6 CENT) 7.5 ¢/KWH (UP February 0.3 CENT) 11.2 ¢/KWH (UP 0.3 CENT) Thursday 2014 7:00 - 8:30 p.m. CHANGES TO 20, TOTAL MONTHLY BILLS ¢¢¢ ON-PEAK = ¢¢ MID-PEAK OFF-PEAK = Churchill Seniors Centre, 345 Richmond Road = 13.5 ¢/KWH (UP 0.6 CENT) 7.5 ¢/KWH+$3.07 (UP 0.3 CENT) +$7.67, OR 2.61% TYPICAL , OR 2.48% 11.2 ¢/KWH (UP 0.3 CENT) We know electricity matters even when you’re not at home. SMALL BUSINESS CUSTOMER TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL Connect with us on the go!

CHANGES TO TOTAL MONTHLY BILLS CUSTOMER (WITH

(WITH AVERAGE CONSUMPTION

CHANGES TO TOTAL MONTHLY BILLS

Find us on+$3.07 Social Media: +$7.67, OR 2.61% TYPICAL , OR 2.48% AVERAGE CONSUMPTION OF 2,000 KWH PER MONTH See real-time power outage updates on Twitter. SMALL BUSINESS CUSTOMER TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL OF 800 PER MONTH) A on DEMAND OF >50 KW) Save on energy with KWH expert advice from our Energy CoachAND videos YouTube. (WITH AVERAGE CUSTOMER (WITH +$7.67 2.61%CONSUMPTION TYPICAL +$3.07 , OR 2.48% Find conservation tips and learn about our programs like peaksaver, OR PLUS(R). AVERAGE CONSUMPTION OF 2,000 KWH PER MONTH SMALL BUSINESS CUSTOMER TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL See how we’re making the community a better place. Find out about employment opportunities. for you! OF 800 KWH PER MONTH)We might be looking (WITH AVERAGE CONSUMPTION CUSTOMER (WITH AND A DEMAND OF >50 KW)

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each $100 silver jewelry purchase.

Valid until May 10th

WE BUY GOLD & SILVER

2866 St. Joseph Blvd.

613-424-5452

R0012670304

AVERAGE CONSUMPTION These charges are collected by Hydro Ottawa and OF 2,000 KWH PER MONTH Visit us on the web: passed through without mark-up to the province OF 800 KWH PER MONTH) AND A DEMAND OF >50 KW) Check out our mobile power outage map, updated every 15 minutes. andTrack other electricity market participants. your hourly consumption with our customer portal, MyHydroLink. These charges are collected by Hydro Ottawa and Questions? hydroottawa.com passed Givethrough us a call:without mark-up to the province aelectricity power outage on our dedicated outage line at 738-0188. Get friendly, helpful andReport other market participants. These charges are collected by Hydro Ottawa and Questions? hydroottawa.com advice about your account by talking to one of our passed through without mark-up to the province customer service reps at 738-6400. and other electricity market participants. Questions? hydroottawa.com

VANTAGE JEWELLERS


FRESHLY CUT PRICES! CANADA’S GARDENING STORE

GARDEN CENTRE NOW OPEN! HURRY IN & SAVE! FRIDAY, MAY 2 TO THURSDAY, MAY 8, 2014

3 DAYS ONLY!

NOW

1

74

GARDENING

HURRY IN! FRIDAY, MAY 2 TO SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 TM

SAVE 30%

4” CUTTING GERANIUM

33-3700-8 Reg $2.49

SAVE

15

%

OFF OUR REGULAR PRICES ASSORTED FRUIT TREES

5 and 7 gallon. 33-0183-x

4

99

SAVE 38%

SELECTED PERENNIALS 1 gallon and 20cm only. 33-4907-x. Reg 7.99

5

99 NOW

NOW

SAVE 20%

SAVE 25% SCOTT’S MULCH

3

4

99

C.I.L GOLFGREEN SEED AND FERTILIZER 1KG BAG

Sorry no rainchecks.199-9943-0.

Innes Rd 613-830-7000

Ogilvie Rd 613-748-0637

Coventry Rd 613-746-4303

Heron Rd 613-733-6776

Merivale Rd 613-224-9330

SCOTT’S LAWN SOIL 30L BAG

Ideal for planting new lawns and repairing bare spots. 59-4550-8. Reg 4.99

Carling Ave 613-725-3111

Barrhaven 613-823-5278

99

Helps improve water retention and prevent weeds. Long–lasting colour. 59-4930-x Reg 6.99

Bells Corners 613-829-9580

Kanata 613-599-5105

R0012667406-0501

NOW

Findlay Creek 613-822-1289

Orléans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014 13


$250

99 Reg 599.99 KitchenAid an Stand Mixers. 43-0686X. mail-in rebate...299.99.

GREAT GIFTS FOR MOM

price before rebate. nAid.ca/specialoffer for rebate & offer details.

PRICES IN EFFECT FRIDAY MAY 2 TO THURSDAY MAY 8, 2014

$50 MAIL-IN REBATE*

Save $250 Sale 349.99 Reg 599.99 KitchenAid Pro 5 Artisan Stand Mixers. 43-0686X. *After $50 mail-in rebate...299.99.

3 2

Taxes payable on price before rebate. Visit www.KitchenAid.ca/specialoffer for rebate & offer details.

1

2

1

MOTHER’S DAY MOTHER’SGIFTS DAY 3

149.99 Keurig KUB70 Coffeemaker. Brews a choice of 5 sizes in less than 1 minute. 43-0296-4. 149.99 Keurig KUB70 Coffeemaker. 79.99 Brews Keurig Mini Brewing a choice of 5 sizes in less than System. 1 minute. 43-0296-4. Silver. 43-0469-4. 79.99 Keurig Mini Brewing System. 43-0469-4. 99.99 Silver. Keurig Brewing 99.99 KeurigElite Elite Brewing System. System. Brews 3 cup sizes. 43-0436-2. Brews 379.99 cupKeurig sizes. 43-0436-2. Mini Plus Brewing System. 3 cup sizes. 79.99 Brews Keurig Mini43-0437-0. Plus Brewing System. 119.99 Keurig Special Edition Coffeemaker. 43-0426-6. Brews 3Single-Serve cup sizes. 43-0437-0. K-cups sold separately. 119.99 Keurig Special Edition Single-Serve Coffeemaker. 43-0426-6.

2 1

p.19-22

2

3

p.19-22

GIFTS

1

3

4

4

5

5

4

4 5

SAVE

5

%

K-cups 2 sold separately.

SAVE

1

3

VE

0

75

142-2407-4. 13-Pc Clad Cookware. 18/10 stainless steel.

142-2407-4.

%

2

1

2

3

%

SAVE

1

20

75

Sale 249.99 Reg 999.99 Lagostina Sale 249.99 Elite Series Reg 999.99 13-Pc Lagostina Clad Cookware. Elite Series 18/10 stainless steel.

2 % 9.99 Reg 199.99 Breville Cafe 1 149.99 Keurig KUB70 Coffeemaker. Brews a choice of 5 sizes in less than 1 minute. 43-0296-4. 2 79.991Keurig Mini Brewing System. Silver. 43-0469-4. SAVE esso Maker. 43-0475-8. 3 99.99 Keurig Elite Brewing System. Brews 3 cup sizes. 43-0436-2. 9.99 Reg 199.99 Breville 4 79.99 Keurig Mini Plus Brewing System. Brews 3 cup sizes. 43-0437-0. % 5 119.99 Keurig Special Edition Single-Serve Coffeemaker. 43-0426-6. ain Plus. 3˝ feed tube. 43-2270-2. K-cups sold separately. 1 Sale 159.99 Reg 199.99 Breville Cafe 9.99 Reg 249.99 Breville Roma Espresso Maker. 43-0475-8. mart Toaster Oven. 43-1190-8. 2 Sale 159.99 1Reg Sale199.99 159.99 Breville Reg 199.99 Breville Cafe Roma3˝Espresso Maker. 43-0475-8. Juice Fountain Plus. feed tube. 43-2270-2. Sale249.99 159.99 Breville Reg 199.99 Breville 3 Sale 199.99 2Reg Juice Fountain 3˝ feed tube. 43-2270-2. Compact Smart Toaster Oven.Plus. 43-1190-8. 3 Sale 199.99 Reg 249.99 Breville 5 Compact Smart Toaster Oven. 43-1190-8.

20

1

For the

3 3

Mom that’s hard to shop for

Sale 249.99 Reg 999.99 Lagostina Elite Series Clad Cookware. The13-Pc Canadian Tire18/10 gift stainless card. steel. 142-2407-4.

2

149.99 Keurig KUB70 Coffeemaker. Brews a choice of 5 sizes in less than 3 4 1 minute. 43-0296-4. 2 79.99 Keurig Mini Brewing System. Silver. 43-0469-4. Reg 999.99 3 99.99Sale Keurig 249.99 Elite Brewing System. Brews 3 cup Lagostina sizes. 43-0436-2. Elite Series 4 79.99 Keurig Mini Plus Brewing System. Brews 3 cup sizes. 43-0437-0. 13-Pc Clad Cookware. 18/10 stainless steel. 5 119.99 Keurig Special Edition Single-Serve Coffeemaker. 43-0426-6. 1

K-cups sold separately. 142-2407-4.

thanof 5 sizes in less than oice

System. Silver. 43-0469-4. 9-4.

p sizes. 43-0436-2. 3 cup sizes. 43-0437-0. eemaker. 43-0426-6.

the

SAVE UP TO

50

1 Sale 74.99 Reg 149.99 6-Slice Stainless-Steel Countertop Toaster Oven. Touch controls with LCD display. 120-minute timer. 43-0652-6. 2 Sale 29.99 Reg 59.99 SmartBrew Plus 12-Cup Coffeemaker. Perfect Pour dripless carafe. Sneak-a-Cup feature. Programmable digital clock and timer. 43-0545-2. 3 Sale 24.99 Reg 39.99 Belgian Waffle Maker. Non-stick plates. 43-2275-2. 4 Sale 49.99 Reg 99.99 2L Deep Fryer. Variable temperature control. 43-1678-0. Sale 12.99 Reg 16.99 175W Hand Mixer. 43-2194-4.

For the

14 Orléans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

R0012667447-0501

%


DESTINATION SPRING 30 SEE WHAT'S NEW THISSAVESPRING!

EMBRACE RUSTIC CHARM Lakeside Harvest Patio Collection.

3

$

Lakeside Harvest Chair. No assembly required. 88-1702-6.

Teak Wood Harvest Table. can weather any storm for years to come. 40 x 75½˝. 88-1703-4.

13˝ 40V Cordless String Trimmer. Multi-position pivoting head converts from trimmer to edger. 40V battery gives you 70 minutes of powerful runtime! 60-2289-8. Reg 229.99...199.99

NEW $200 SAVE

FEEL RESTORED

WEEK SALE!

Lakeside Conversation Set.

Switch to Greenworks and get the power you need without the hassle of gas. La-Z-Boy Avondale Collection, 6-pc. Oversized deepAll our cordless machines are backed by an industry-leading 4 year warranty seats, cashmere multi-weave wicker, and La-Z-Boy recliner and include our interchangeable 40V battery and charger. technology. Table measures 42 x 25½˝. Toss cushions $MOST SAVE 15% La-Z-Boy Avondale IT’S THE POWERFUL CORDLESS! included. Relaxing just got more relaxing. 88-1615-4 Greenworks brushless motor design generates more 88-1616-2. Reg 429.99... 365.49 Recliner. ✓ 30% more BRUSHLESS

6-pc set includes loveseat, 2 armchairs, 2 ottomans, coffee table

SAVE

(Pieces sold separately).

Table. 22˝ W x 36˝ L. 88-1588-8. Reg 79.99...69.99 Armchair. 88-1587-0. Reg 140.00...115.00

LOVING THAT LA-Z-BOY

49 1147 $

Loveseat. 88-1589-6. Reg 240.00...

50

power, more efficiently, without the hassle of gas or cords.

torque

40V✓20˝ TwinForce Mower. This means maximum torque, high-speed performance, TECHNOLOGY? 80% longer longer equipment life and virtually no maintenance! motor life Features two 10˝ blades for superior mulching. Up to 13˝ 40V19˝ Cordless String 40V Brushless Switch to Greenworks and get the power you need without the hassle of gas. SAVE $30 minutes of runtime. Runs All our cordless machines are90 backed by an industry-leading 4 year warranty ® Trimmer. Multi-position pivoting Mower. Smart Cut 13˝ 40V Cordless String and include our interchangeable 40V battery and charger. on one battery at a time head converts from trimmer to Trimmer. Multi-position pivoting technology senses thenPOWERFUL automatically switches head converts from trimmer to IT’S THE MOST CORDLESS! edger. 40V battery gives you the edger. 40V battery gives you Greenworks brushless motor designTwo generates more if the fi rst runs out. 30% more ✓ height of yourruntime! grass70tominutes of powerful runtime!BRUSHLESS 70 minutes of powerful power, more efficiently, without the hassle of gas or cords. torque 40V batteries. 60-1786-0. This means maximum torque, high-speed performance, 60-2289-8. Reg 229.99...199.99TECHNOLOGY? ✓ 80% longer 60-2289-8.determine Reg 229.99... 199.99 the power longer equipment life and virtually no maintenance! Dual-blade motor life Reg 579.99...529.99

SAVE 15

SAVE 30

%

$

(Umbrella base sold separately).

42499

WHY

PRICES IN EFFECT FRIDAY MAY 2 TO THURSDAY MAY 22, 2014 on its own.

mower!

needed. So you can conserve power on shorter grass, or power through the thicker stuff. 60-1788-6. Reg 549.99...499.99

Dining Table. 39¾˝ W x 63¾˝ L. Glass top. 88-1575-8. Reg 130.00... ‘Faux wood’ steel top. 88-1593-4. Padded Sling Chair. 88-1572-4. 2-Tone Umbrella. 88-1599-2. Umbrella Base. 88-1601-6...49.99

NEW

✓ Up to 60 minutes

SAVE

runtime

✓ Includes two

$

40V batteries

SAVE 30 $

50

SAVE $50

40V 20˝ TwinForce Mower. Features two 10˝ blades for superior mulching. Up to 90 minutes of runtime. Runs on one battery at a time $ $ then automatically switches ® if the first runs out. Two 40V 16˝ Mower. Powerful, batteries. 60-1786-0. TwinForce 40V Mower. Dual-blade NEW529.99 Reg 579.99... compact and lightweight,

13˝ 40V Cordless String Trimmer. Multi-position pivoting head converts from trimmer to edger. 40V battery gives you $ 70 minutes of powerful runtime! 60-2289-8. Reg 229.99...199.99

Lakeside Assorted Acrylics.

SAVE 50

WHY

Reg 1349.99

19˝ 40V Brushless Less than ! SAVE 50 SAVE 50 SAVE 30 Mower. Smart Cut 40 pounds 40V 20˝ 13˝ 40V Cordless String technology themower! Features two 10˝ bladessenses for Trimmer. Multi-position pivoting perfect for the urban yard. superior mulching. Up toSAVE head converts from trimmer to 50 of your Folds for easy storage. 90 height minutes of runtime. Runsgrass to edger. 40V battery gives you to 45 minutes of on determine one battery at a time 70 minutes of powerful runtime! the power Up runtime. 60-1782-8. then automatically switches 60-2289-8. Reg 229.99...199.99 if the first runs out.So Two you can Reg 429.99...379.99 needed. 40V batteries. 60-1786-0. $ al-bla de SAVE 30 conserve powerDuon shorter Reg 579.99...529.99 GRILLIN' PRODUCTION ENGLISH PROOF FRENCH PROOF mo we r! NEW ✓ 13˝ 40V Cordless String grass, or power through THE NEXT BIG THING FEATURE SAVE Trimmer. Multi-position pivoting BRUSHLESS ✓ IN BBQ TECHNOLOGY? BRAND WHY 60-1788-6. the thicker stuff. 50 head converts from trimmer to TECHNOLOGY? CERAMIC! BRUSHLESS BRUSHLESS SAVE 50 ONLY WHY TECHNOLOGY? edger. 40V battery gives you Less thanTECHNOLOGY? WHY Reg 549.99... 499.99 ! SAVE 50 40V 20˝ TwinForceAT Mower. ds un 40 po See what's 70 minutes of powerful THE NEXT BIG runtime! THING Features two 10˝ blades for 40V 16˝ Mower. Powerful, WHY

to any outdoor feast. 59-1969X...

$

CSR Xxxxxxx Producer Xxxxxxx

ORIGINAL LAYOUT LAYOUT REVISIONS PRODUCT/COPY REVIEW Initials: XX Initials: XX Initials: XX Initials: XX mm/dd/yy mm/dd/yy mm/dd/yy mm/dd/yy

Initials: CM 11/12/14

Initials: XX mm/dd/yy

Initials: XX mm/dd/yy

Initials: XX mm/dd/yy

Initials: XX mm/dd/yy

Initials: XX mm/dd/yy

Initials: XX mm/dd/yy

GRILLIN'

Switch to Greenworks and get the power you need without the hassle of gas. All our cordless machines are backed by an industry-leading 4 year warranty and include our interchangeable 40V battery and charger.

Up to 60 minutes

Switch to Greenworks runtime and get the power you need without the hassle of gas. All our cordless machines are backed by an industry-leading 4 year warranty Includes40Vtwo and include our interchangeable battery and charger.

IT’S THE MOST POWERFUL CORDLESS! ✓ 30% more Greenworks brushless motor design generates more torque

✓ 80% longer motor life

FEATURE BRAND

CSR Xxxxxxx Producer Xxxxxxx

“Over the past year, we worked closely with Cuisinart’s R&D team to tackle the biggest BBQ challenges: precise heat control and preventing flare-ups! Now, Cuisinart’s patent-pending Ceramic Heat Technology truly eliminates hot & cold spots on the grill... ORIGINAL LAYOUT LAYOUT REVISIONS making grilling Initials:gourmet XX Initials: XXeasier mm/dd/yy mm/dd/yy than ever. This may be our tastiest teamwork yet!"

Check out our DESTINATION SPRING flyer for even more exciting offers! CSR Xxxxxxx Producer Xxxxxxx

Andrew Hannaford Canadian Tire Buyer, Barbecues

$

229.99...199.99 IN BBQRegTECHNOLOGY?

Switch to Greenworks ONLY and get the power you need without the hassl ATare backed by an industry-leading See what's 4 year All our cordless machines and include our interchangeable 40V battery and charger.

40V batteries

IT’S“Over THE CORDLESS! theMOST past year,POWERFUL we worked Greenworks brushless motor design generates more more closely with Cuisinart’s R&D 19˝ 40V Brushless ✓ 30% power, more efficiently, without the hassle of gas or cords. torque team to tackle the biggest Mower. Smart Cut® This means maximum torque, high-speed performance, 80% BBQ$longer challenges: precise heat technology senses the ✓ motor longer equipment life and virtually no maintenance! controllife and preventing height of your grass to flare-ups! Now, Cuisinart’s CERAMIC? determine the power patent-pending Ceramic Heat Say hello to the future of BBQ precision. Ceramic plates needed. So youcompact can Technology truly eliminates dramatically improve heat distribution, eliminating and lightweight, hot and cold spots. Distinct cooking zones allow for conserve power on shorterhot & cold spots on the grill... the urban better control when cooking multiple items at different making gourmet grillingyard. easier grass, or powerperfect through for temperatures. Ceramic also provides unsurpassed ever. This may be our forthan easy storage. 60-1788-6. the thicker stuff.Folds temperature control, greater temperature range, and tastiest teamwork yet!" far superior heat retention. The future of BBQ is here, Reg 549.99...499.99 Up to 45 minutes of

✓ Up to 60 minutes

CERAMIC!

and it tastes goooood.

runtime GRILLIN'

mower!

✓ Includes two

✓ Includes two 40V batteries

ONLY

torque

✓ 80% longer motor life

power, more efficiently, without the hassle of g This means maximum torque, high-speed perf longer equipment life and virtually no mainten

Features included:

A B CD E F

SAVE $150

Cuisinart Ceramic 900 BBQ. With Cuisinart's innovative, patent-pending Ceramic Heat Technology, you get true evenheat distribution every time. Plus easy-clean grease collection, 75,000 BTUs, 13,000 BTU deluxe infrared side burner, 12,000 BTU infrared rotisserie burner, and 4 stainless-steel double burners. 34 burger capacity. 5-year limited warranty. Innovation sure is delicious. Propane. 85-3086-6. Reg 899.99...749.99 Natural Gas. 85-3087-4. Reg 949.99...799.99

GRILLI

Dual burn for ma er ximum heat

es Ceramic plat reverse for n off' easy 'bur cleaning

IT’S THE MOST POWERFUL CORDLESS! ✓ 30% more Greenworks brushless motor design generates

ONLY AT

AT See what's $ THE NEXT BIG THING THE NEXT BIG THING SAVE 50 GRILLIN' FEATURE 40V batteries IN BBQ TECHNOLOGY? IN BBQ TECHNOLOGY? BRAND 20˝ TwinForce Mower. Less than Features included: THE NEXT BIG40V THING $ FEATURE “Over the past10˝ year,blades we workedfor nds! Features two SAVE 50 IN BBQ TECHNOLOGY? CERAMIC! A B CD E F 40 pouCERAMIC! closely with Cuisinart’s R&D

FEATURE

Andrew Hannaford Canadian Tire Buyer, Barbecues

CERAMIC? BRAND

ONLY

AT Say hello to the future of BBQ precision. Ceramic plates “Over the past year, we worked BRAND dramatically improve heat distribution, eliminating closely with Cuisinart’s R&D CERAMIC! mulching. Up to hot and cold spots. Distinct cooking zones allow for 40V 16˝ superior Mower. Powerful, team to tackle the biggest team to tackle the biggest $ compact90and minutes of runtime. Runs better control when cooking multiple items at different BBQ challenges: precise heat lightweight, BBQ challenges: precise XX heat SPECIAL OFFER: Initials: XX Initials: XX Initials: sm Initials: XX Initials: MP Initials: XX Initials: Initials: XX Initials: XX control and preventing CERAMIC? NO FEE on the one battery at a time mm/dd/yy Ceramic also provides unsurpassed control and preventing mm/dd/yytemperatures.mm/dd/yy 02/12/14 mm/dd/yy 03/21/14 mm/dd/yy mm/dd/yy mm/dd/yy perfect for urban yard. NO INTEREST flare-ups! Now, Cuisinart’s Cuisinart Ceramic 900 BBQ. CERAMIC? flautomatically are-ups! Now, A B C Cuisinart’s D E F switches CERAMIC? FINANCING temperature control, greater temperature range, and then Folds for easy storage. patent-pending Ceramic Heat $ PRODUCTION ENGLISH PROOF FRENCH PROOF patent-pending Ceramic Heat Say hello to the future of BBQ precision. Ceramic plates SAVE With Cuisinart's innovative, Features included: Say hello to the future of BBQ precision. Ceramic plates Features includ 150 far superior heat retention. The future of BBQ is here, 12 MONTHS ifeliminating the first of runs out. Two Technology truly eliminates to th 45an minutes dramatically improveCeramic heatUp distribution, Technology truly A eliminates BSeeCwhat's D E F patent-pending dramatically improve heat distribution, eliminating ssHeat A B CD E and it tastes goooood. under the grill ! hot and$ cold spots. Distinct Le cooking zones allow for hot & cold spots onNEW the grill... 40V batteries. 60-1786-0. hot and cold spots. Distinct cooking zones allow for 60-1782-8. ! hot & cold spots on the grill... $ SAVE 50 youcooking ds Technology, getruntime. true evenun po 40 better control when multiple items at different Du al$ making gourmet grilling 24 MONTHS bla SAVE easier better control when cooking multiple items at different de making gourmet grilling easier Reg 579.99... 529.99 40Vheat 16˝ Mower. Powerful, $ distribution every time. Plus Reg 429.99... 379.99 temperatures. Ceramic also provides unsurpassed NEW NEWalso provides unsurpassed than ever. This may50 be our temperatures. Ceramic Ceramic 900 BBQ. than ever. This Cuisinart may be our compact and lightweight, mo “Over the past year, we worked closely with Cuisinart’s R&D team to tackle the biggest BBQ challenges: precise heat control and preventing flare-ups! Now, Cuisinart’s patent-pending Ceramic Heat Technology truly eliminates hot & cold spots on the grill... making gourmet grilling easier than ever. This may be our tastiest teamwork yet!"

SAVE WHY 150

WHY

40V Brushless tastiest teamwork 19˝ yet!" Mower. Smart Cut

®

ORIGINAL LAYOUT LAYOUT REVISIONS Initials: XX Initials: XX Initials: XX mm/dd/yy mm/dd/yy mm/dd/yy

Initials: XX mm/dd/yy

PRODUCTION

Initials: sm 02/12/14

✓ Up to 60 minutes runtime

lates Ceramic p r reverse fo n off' ur 'b sy ea cleaning

two Dual ✓ Includes bu40V r batteries for m ner aximu m heat

Andrew Hannaford Canadian Tire Buyer, Barbecues

WHY

Features included:

Say hello to the future of BBQ precision. Ceramic plates dramatically improve heat distribution, eliminating hot and cold spots. Distinct cooking zones allow for better control when cooking multiple items at different temperatures. Ceramic also provides unsurpassed temperature control, greater temperature range, and far superior heat retention. The future of BBQ is here, and it tastes goooood.

SAVE 50

ENGLISH PROOF

See what's

*

Cuisinart Ceramic 900 BBQ. With Cuisinart's innovative, patent-pending Ceramic Heat Technology, you get true evenheat distribution every time. Plus easy-clean grease collection, 75,000 BTUs, 13,000 BTU deluxe infrared side burner, 12,000 BTU infrared rotisserie burner, and 4 stainless-steel double burners. 34 burger $ capacity. 5-year limited warranty. Innovation sure is delicious. Initials: XX foDural burnInitials: XX Initials: XX er maxim 19˝ 40V Brushless Propane. 85-3086-6. um heat mm/dd/yy mm/dd/yy mm/dd/yy Mower. Smart Cut® Reg 899.99...749.99 technology senses the Natural Gas. 85-3087-4. height of your grass to Reg 949.99...799.99

SAVE

when you spend $200 - $449.99 or

150

conserve power on shorter

wer!

*See

back cover for details.

®

deluxe infrared side burner,

grass, or power through double burners. 34 burger 12,000 BTU infrared rotisserie the thicker Features two 10˝ blades forstuff. Reg 549.99...499.99 burner, and 4 stainless-steel capacity. 5-year limited warranty. double burners. 34 burger superior mulching. Up to Up to 60 minutes Innovation sure is delicious. ✓ runtime capacity. 5-year limited warranty. Dual burner Innovation sure is delicious. 85-3086-6. Propane. Includes two 90 minutes of runtime. Runs tes ✓ pla fo40V r mabatteries Ceramic tes x Propane. 85-3086-6. im um SPECIAL OFFER: for heat Ceramic pla Reg 749.99at a time verse899.99... re on one battery r Reg NO 899.99... f' of FEE 749.99 rn reverse fo easy 'bu off' Natural Gas. 85-3087-4. Natural Gas. 85-3087-4. NO INTEREST Andrew Hannaford easy 'burn cleaning automatically switches then FINANCING Reg 949.99...799.99 Canadian Tire Buyer, cleaning Reg 949.99...799.99 if the first runs out. Two Barbecues 12 MONTHS 60-1788-6.

conserve power on shorter grass, or power through the thicker stuff. 60-1788-6. Reg 549.99...499.99

✓ Up to 60 minutes runtime

✓ Includes two

40V batteries

Dual burner NEW for m aximu m heat

*

40V batteries. 60-1786-0. Reg 579.99...529.99

SAVE

*

when you spend over $450 on products in this guide

temperature control, greater temperature range, and easy-clean grease collection, greater temperature range, and With yet!" Cuisinart's innovative, temperature control, SAVE SAVE Apply at customer service perfect for the urban yard. tastiest far superior heat retention. future of BBQ is here, teamwork $ far superior heat retention. 75,000 BTUs, 13,000The BTU patent-pending Ceramic Heat 50 50 The future of BBQ is here, tastesstorage. goooood. Foldsand foriteasy Initials: XX es $ and it tastes goooood. Ceramic plat Technology, you get true even19˝ 40V Brushless deluxe infrared side burner, reverse for Mower. Smart Cut Up to 45 minutes ofmm/dd/yy n off' heat distribution every time. Plus easy 'bur technology senses the cleaning rotisserie 12,000 BTU infrared runtime. easy-clean grease collection, height of your grass to FRENCH PROOF determine the power determine the power 75,000 BTUs, 13,000 BTU Regburner, 429.99... 379.99 and 4 stainless-steelMower. needed. So you can needed. So you can 40V 20˝ TwinForce

technology senses the heightXX of your grass to Initials: Initials: MP determine the power mm/dd/yy 03/21/14 needed. So you can Andrew Hannaford conserve power on shorter Canadian Tire Buyer, grass, or power through Barbecues60-1782-8. the thicker stuff. 60-1788-6. Reg 549.99...499.99

See what's under the grill !

R0012667439-0501

power, more efficiently, without the hassle of gas or $ cords. This means maximum torque, high-speed performance, longer equipment life and virtually no maintenance!

superior mulching. Up to 90 minutes of runtime. Runs on one battery at a time then automatically switches if the first runs out. Two runtime. 60-1782-8. ✓ Up to 60 minutes 40V batteries. 60-1786-0. Dual-blade runtimeReg 429.99...379.99 Reg 579.99...529.99

60-2289-8.

WHY

19˝ 40V Brushless Mower. Smart Cut® technology senses the height of your grass to determine the power needed. So you can conserve power on shorter grass, or power through the thicker stuff. 60-1788-6. Reg 549.99...499.99

Cuisinart Ceramic With Cuisinart's inn patent-pending Ce Technology, you ge heat distribution eve easy-clean grease 75,000 BTUs, 13,0 deluxe infrared side 12,000 BTU infrare burner, and 4 stain double burners. 34 capacity. 5-year lim Innovation sure is d Propane. 85-3086-6. Reg 899.99...749. Natural Gas. 85-308 Reg 949.99...799.

when you spend $200 - $449.99 or

24 MONTHS DualbladeOrléans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014 mower! *

when you spend over $450 on products in this guide Apply at customer service *See back cover

for details.

than

15


SHIFT INTO

SPRING

PRICES IN EFFECT FRIDAY MAY 2 TO THURSDAY MAY 22, 2014

From tire changeover to hot wheels to automotive cleaners, we have the products GARDENING to ready your ride for spring. Vava vroom! TM

We took our top tires, including the Continental TrueContact, to the track and tested them under tough, challenging, wet and dry conditions. We also tested for fuel economy and comfort. Which tires are best for your driving needs?

We took our top tires, including the Continental TrueContact, to the track and tested them under tough, challenging, wet and dry conditions. We also tested for fuel economy and comfort. Which tires are best for your driving needs?

See the results at: canadiantire.ca/tiretesting

See the results at: canadiantire.ca/tiretesting

NEW &

ONLY AT

wet ✓ Superior braking capabilities

SAVE✓ $70

Exceptional on a grip in all condition

SAVE 25% ✓ Exceptional grip in all conditions

SAVE 25

%

Continental TrueContact Tires. Our best performing tire in wet conditions! Comfort-ride technology for a quieter, smoother ride. Alignment and performance indicator systems. 05-2304X. Reg, from 129.99...97.49 ea, up

Innes Rd 613-830-7000

Ogilvie Rd 613-748-0637

16 Orléans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

Coventry Rd 613-746-4303

Heron Rd 613-733-6776

General Tire Evertrek RTX Tires. Visual alignment indicators extend tire life by detecting issues early. Twin-cushion silicon tread compound. 04-4901X. Reg, from 109.99...82.49 ea, up

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Connected to your community

Sir Wilfrid students host conference on world conflicts Over 300 students invited to Adult High School Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

News - Sir Wilfrid Laurier Secondary School students aren’t in the dark when it comes to international conflicts. A group of Grade 12 students in a courses which covers conflict and crises of the 20th and 21st century are well-versed in international events, and presented projects at a conference they hosted on April 23. The youth conference was held at the Adult High School on the same day as Canada’s National Day of Remembrance and Action on Mass Atrocities. The date is a tribute to April 23, 1867, the birthdate of former prime minister Lester B. Pearson. Sen. Roméo Dallaire and MP Paul Dewar selected the day to acknowledge the former prime minister’s commitment to peace. Ottawa students in other social science courses from Rideau, Glebe, Hillcrest and Ridgemont high schools attended the conference. Over 300 students were invited to the day-long event. “Basically we’re informing the community and other schools about atrocities around the world and what’s going on,” said Sir Wilfrid Laurier student David Sendi-Mukasa. “A lot of high school students aren’t exposed to this type of course.” Alisar Bawab, also a student, said the course has been opposed in some Ontario high schools because of the angle taken on certain world issues. “It’s a controversial course because there are parts of the course that highlighted the Armenian genocide, which some Turkish people did not like,” she said. “So here, even in Canada, they did not want their children to attend a class where they would learn about that.” The Armenian genocide took place in the modern-day Turkey, starting in 1915. “That’s a difficultly with getting our age aware of these things, if we can’t even have the classes available to us,” Sendi-Mukasa said. The students said they weren’t aware of any controversy over the course being offered at Sir Wil, and were glad to take it. Student Carolyn Grandy said she plans to go into international development in university, and the background knowledge in international conflict and war is a good stepping stone to studying those issues at the post-secondary level.

of guest speakers such as Rwandan genocide survivor Mary-Claire Wihogora and OXFAM Canada executive director Robert Fox. “Hearing what they all had to say is very inspirational,” Bawab said. “Everyone leaves this conference with new knowledge and a new understanding of what they can do to make a change. That’s why or theme and logo is spark the change, ignite the hope.”

Sir Wilfrid Laurier students, from left, David Sendi-Mukasa, Alisar Bawab and Carolyn Grandy, are students in a Grade 12 conflict course. The students helped organize the Youth Conference for Canada’s National Day of Remembrance and Action on Mass Atrocities at the Adult High School on April 23. Brier Dodge/Metroland

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Connected to your community

‘Skylink’ to top landmark Centretown towers Twin, 27-storey skyscrapers first to capitalize on tall buildings Laura Mueller

laura.mueller@metroland.com

News - Two curved towers attached by Ottawa’s highest pedestrian walkway could be coming to Metcalfe Street. Mastercraft Starwood, developer of the “Soho” condo buildings, is proposing the first “landmark” building since the creation of a policy allowing buildings up to 27 storeys in Centretown. There are only three sites in the neighbourhood that could qualify for extra height in exchange for amped-up design standards and a public park covering 40 per cent of the lot. MasterCraft Starwood’s 0.4-hectare site at 267 O’Connor St. bounded by Gilmour and McLaren streets is one of them. Architect Gianni Ria from Page and Steele in Toronto has designed two, 27-storey concave glass towers with a small, 750-square metre floorplate. The towers will rise in two phases: the first at the northeast corner of the site, which is currently a surface parking lot. The tower would sit atop a curved, three-storey podium that’s 1.5 metres wider than the tower. Four townhomes facing Gilmour Street are planning for that podium.

R0012670602-0501

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Orléans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

The second tower would take the place of the existing medical building at the northwest corner of the site. Its identical podium would house a single, 370-square metre retail unit. The three-storey podium levels will be clad in limestone to help the buildings fit into Centretown’s heritage streetscape, Ria said. Once the second tower is built – within the next decade, Ria said, a “skylink” pedestrian walkway will be added to connect the two towers. “We were looking for iconic buildings,” Ria said. The two towers would hold a total of 500 residential units. The city’s policy also calls for interesting articulation at the top of the building and Ria said he has designed a unique topper to house the mechanical functions, as well as spiraling balconies that culminate at the top of the towers. But the key feature isn’t the towers – it’s the promise of new “open space” – a public park/square at the corner of O’Connor and Gilmour. The rare opportunity to create new gathering spaces and to green Centretown was what drove the creation of the controversial tall landmark buildings clause contained in the community design plan for Centretown. The issue divided residents when a final version of the plan was debated in 2013. The Centretown Citizens Community Association board even took the unheard-of step of partnering with representatives from the development industry – led by FoTenn consultants partner Ted Fobert – to draft an al-

ternate policy aimed at creating green spaces downtown. Now, Fobert is guiding Mastercraft Starwood through the development application process for its landmark building. The park would be built as part of the first phase of development and take up 40 per cent of the lot, as the city’s policy requires, Fobert said. That would eventually be reduced to 38 per cent when the second tower is built. There would be views from the park to art inside the open glass lobby of the first building, Fobert said. Where Fobert and the city are at odds is the ownership of the park. A last-minute change to the tall landmark buildings clause requires the open space to be deeded to the city, but Mastercraft Starwood would rather keep ownership of the parkland and pay to maintain the landscaping. The developer also wants to build a fourlevel parking garage under the park, which might not jive with the city’s ownership of that piece of land, Fobert said. Mastercraft Starwood is proposing to give the city a permanent surface access agreement as a compromise to make the park “public.” Somerset Coun. Diane Holmes wasn’t enthused about the half measure. During an April 15 Centretown Citizens Community Association meeting, she bemoaned the proposal’s failure to meet both the 40 per cent provision for public open space and the 20-metre tower separation distance. The policy calls for the buildings to be separated by 20 metres and even with the curved, concave design, the two towers are only be-

tween 15 and 18 metres apart, Fobert said. “I think it comes very close to meeting the intent of the tall landmark buildings clause,” he said. “It will be a very distinctive building in the skyline.” The developer also wants to make sure the park, which is being designed by noted Montreal landscape designer Claude Cormier, is well-maintained, Ria said. Cormier is also designing a unique feature for a hard-surface parking, drop-off and pedestrian area. They’re calling it the “carpet” and the mosaic of hard materials will resemble something similar Cormier designed for the entrance to the Four Seasons hotel in Toronto. “It’s pretty cool,” Fobert said. “It’s a parking areas in association with the open space. The vehicular space becomes a patterned material ... it pedestrianizes it and creates an open space.” There would be room for about four visitor vehicles in unmarked spaces on the “carpet,” Ria said. The developer is prepping to submit the rezoning application to the city in the next couple of weeks, Fobert said. Given the controversy when the tall landmark buildings clause was drafted, Fobert said there is bound to be “mixed reaction” to the proposal. He anticipates more Centretown residents will be opposed to the two towers than in favour. Representatives from Mastercraft Starwood’s team are expected to present the proposal to the Centretown community association’s planning committee in early May.


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– Page 24 out. rumour was a “I think the been here for Certainly, I’ve said. See PROGRA time,” Holmes five other M, page a life,” long 2 I need to get There are already for the time. I think to get out registered candidates residents head she said. “I just want – MarBy the time world.”Holmes’ Somerset Ward election Holmes on Oct. 27, and see the that she Thomas McVeigh, to the polls the ward for April 3 announcement of this tin Canning, Denis Schryburt , will have served at the end way Jeff Morrison would retire the decades. Weemen. three clears health Lili has her council almost 30 s who and While she still burn, Holmes term of of candidate run news - Afterng downtown page 6 to for a field See MAKING, and energy -0886 Connected to signed up to to start enyears representi Coun. DiYour Comm have already time for her CORNERS) 1-888-226 it’s Somerset said (BELLS unity • Receive your residents, she is role. ON ROAD more. announced long for her own 1902 ROBERTS ENT PLEASE n joying life ane Holmes here for a pay cheque! OUTLET BY APPOINTM of the re-electio “I’ve been WHOLESALE CAR dropping out • Win Great TRUE DIAMOND ENT RINGS ONLY Prizes OTTAWA’S race. IN ENGAGEM • Once a week WASH SPECIALIZING onds.com delivery $ holesaleDiam • Weekend www.CapitalW s Off tion 474,000 Hazeldean Road

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has been enShe said it the artists tertaining meeting who will guide k and musicians the eight-wee entrants in been think. Arts - If you’vea new musi- programs s are all out “The instructor al ing of trying this spring, or and profession t for practicing musicians,” said cal instrumen programming working are seeking number of Bluesfest small of Coyle. “A kids, the creators n for you. doing their eduexthem are still have a destinatio 28, the have teaching Starting April of Music cation and Bluesfest School new perience.” House started life opening its Festival Unitand Art is for public former Westboro church’s Festival House Located at as the the and support programming. Avenue, the ed Church, offered their 450 Churchill and art pro- council venture as it was in music the to of building’s ent phase. The the product program gramming is between RBC the developm in which the be named ip a partnersh the Dovercourt hall will will be housed ity Hall Bluesfest and Association. the Kitchissippi Commun Community n of this. director of Ere’n Coyle, newness of in recognitio inception, RBC the Since its program, said them strived to foswill allow Bluesfest has awareness and the facility musical nt with programto experime what resonates tered creativity among Otartistic ming to see with their Blues tawa students the public. a last with ‘well, we’ve in the Schools program. will likely be “There’s no said what for 6 before,’” Bay on April this spring, warm temperae- never done this it’s ‘sure, do S, page 13 n Britannia See PROGRAM adventur ly thick “instead, takes to a still-froze ice is stubborn to the fun. These same on water. Coyle, a teacher?’” A kite boarder Although river be used we have put an end

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Community the world were - Buildings around 2, but at Mary lit up blue on April Honeywell Elementary School it was the students Connected went blue for to Your Comm World Autism who ness Day. Awareunity In fact everyone Samantha Long at the school made an effort The city’s new soccer Saturd the school’s to team ay, April newest student Total Distri blue, not just to wear something prepares for its president and - A new generatio April 199 a.m. to News 12 As a former promote butio vice-pres awarenes of 3 n 474,0 n more kickoff. s of 00 p.m.engaged young “This reputation ident. Trudeau emphasiz teacher, opportuni autism, but to greater (40 indoorple became the peoschool’s ties ed for that the imleadership, students with support vendo Justin Trudeau’s young people have portance of an – Page1115 autism. Mary about beeducated pop- but also a voice for the message rs) 35 Dunnin ing apathetic ulation for stu- the publicHoneywell includes four dent body. is complete g Rd when he stopped misplaced by Algonqui of school board’s ly seven out the future, with cumberlandfarm n College ,” said “We 14 elemenof tary the develop 10 classroom on party leader. March Liberal ing jobs requirersmark 28et.ca to help announce Proud some tive citizenshi habits of ac- tism. While s for children with auApril 10, ly form p ... when our post-secawarenes “Young 2014 ondary servinof g the community people that |44 pages is still a school,” itself is strong due s at the school dis- passion education. He comm connect from unity said to said the should politics do so, integration Trudeau. of students in not because main stream motivator when be the sole they Though he choosing a … it’s because don’t care career decided to tic stream classes, greater and autisfollow path because awareness in society is they don’t his father’s get to shape people steps, in Ottaw an important will often aComfootthe goal said munitautistic they don’t get discussion, pectation follow societal ex- taught Trudeau said his father yNewclass teacher Sharon High Efficiency s him to make Lyng. “One s.com in every 110 politics. It’s listened to in ily ones and not necessar- for decisions 16.5 SEER + HST children has not that himself, autism,” about are the especially said Lyng. not for them. -$400 OPA Rebate caring, it’s about best fit his with there involvement caring too and it’s really “It’s really out much that you Free Estimate important to and the Liberal in politics aware and understan be protect yourself.”step away to party. ‘ACTIVE CITIZENS d how we can “The decision involve them.” HIP’ In partnersh about the parties we make ip with the That has been police and we supTrudeau refl public safety Mary Honeywe the philosophy at ected on his port should be based on program at ll, time in values,” he said, the college, Autism is a she said. the that the university, agreeing “shouldn’ presentation adding they disorder that included a most influential a person’s nolimits question ex- ing the t be based on vot- abilities, social and communieffects and answer periences were those Locally Owned same way your cative but to many session that ranged spent ents and Operated outside parvarying dewww.coolhea ics such as military from top- vironmenthe classroom en- positedid, or voting the op- grees. While some children tcomfort.ca t. He said student tism with way that your spending to the senate parents at speak well, others don’t audid.” scandal, to his associations are hugely all, speak have problems favorite Canadian important to campus dealing with “They should artists. life bebe based on change, understanding cause they not other’s feelings and figuring only provide decisions we make as young Sir Wilfrid Laurier out social cues. adults and adults.” theatre group stages My Fair Lady musical. See

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Liberal leader March 28. He Justin Trudeau, centre, said young Canadian mingles with well-wish s disconnect from politics ers following a presenta “because they tion don’t get to at Algonquin College shape the discussio on n.”

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Nussbaum Lindenlea’s Tobi kcliffe seeks the Rideau-Roc council seat. – Page 3

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Good News for ottawa By Jim Watson

Years ago, when I was the head of the Canadian Tourism Commission, I often ran into former Ottawa residents who were living abroad. Without fail, one of the things that always came up when talking about the things they missed about our city was our tap water. It sounds like a strange thing to miss about a city but it really is true that Ottawa has exceptionally good tap water. In fact, in 2013, the City of Ottawa’s drinking water system received a perfect score in Drinking Water System inspections performed by the Ministry of the Environment (MOE). The MOE inspections involved up to 14 different aspects of operations including drinking water quality, water quality monitoring programs and operator certification. A perfect score on this inspection reflects what many of us residents take for granted and what those who leave Ottawa realize quickly: Ottawa has some of the best tap water in the world. Building Permits Up Meanwhile, new statistics show that our economy is continuing to grow and we see new opportunities for job creation in the skilled trades sector. Many think of Ottawa as entirely a government town but at a time when the Federal Government is shrinking its workforce, Ottawa’s population is growing and our economy is diversifying. This growth means more demand for both residential and commercial buildings across our city. In 2013 that demand pushed our housing and construction project activity to have 20% construction applications than they did in 2012. In real terms, 2013 saw the City of Ottawa receive $2.4 billion worth of construction applications versus $2 billion in 2012. These figures show that Ottawa’s economy is moving along at a strong pace and that Ottawa is transforming itself for the better. At City Hall we recognize that growth at this level brings challenges to our city’s infrastructure and our ability to deliver services to all residents across Ottawa. But these are challenges that we work hard every day to meet. I am proud that we have built recreation centres in some of the city’s fastest growing neighbourhoods and extended our road, water and sewer networks so that every resident of Ottawa can enjoy all that our city has to offer (including great tap water) wherever they may live. R0012669414-0501

Jim Watson, Mayor

110 Laurier Avenue West Ottawa ON K1P 1J1 Tel: 613-580-2496 • Fax: 613-580-2509

www.JimWatsonOttawa.ca 20

Orléans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

First strike ABOVE: Ottawa striker Vini Dantas, left, celebrates his goal – the first in Ottawa Fury FC history – on April 19 at Carleton University’s Keith Harris Stadium. The goal tied the game against Minnesota at 1-1 but the visitors scored in extra time to take a 2-1 victory in front of a sell-out crowd. The Fury will play at Carleton University until TD Place is completed in July. The next home game is April 26 at 3 p.m. versus the Carolina Railhawks. LEFT: Ottawa winger Oliver Minatel streaks past a Minnesota defender. Photos by Nevil Hunt/Metroland

Governor General to host movie nights Ottawa East News staff

News - Canadian films will receive the royal treatment this summer on the public grounds of Rideau Hall. “Enjoyed by millions of people here at home and around the world, Canada’s vibrant film industry and its many achievements deserve to be celebrated,” Gov. Gen. David Johnston said. “I am pleased to invite you to join me at Rideau Hall this August for a taste of our homegrown talent and a memorable evening among friends.” Starting mid-August, the Governor General will host Rideau Hall Movie Nights, which will feature acclaimed Canadian films. In partnership with the Canadian Film Industry, the event will offer both English and French Canadian films, screened on the grounds of the official residence. Official dates and the film selection will be announced at a later date. Visit rideauhallmovienights.gg.ca to find out more information or subscribe to the email distribution list to stay up to File date with the movie selection, dates and Gov. Gen. David Johnston will host movie nights under the stars details. starting in mid-August on the grounds of Rideau Hall.


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CLR518450

PROPERTY FOR SALE VILLAGE MIXED-USE RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL 1131 MILL STREET– MANOTICK MILL QUARTER AREA

AMENDMENTS UNDER THE PLANNING ACT NOTICE OF PLANNING COMMITTEE MEETING

The Manotick Mill Quarter Community Development Corporation (MMQCDC), a municipal corporation, is receiving purchase or lease offers for property at 1131 Mill Street on behalf of the City of Ottawa. The property is located in the Manotick Mill Quarter of Manotick on the north side of Mill Street near the Watson’s Mill Museum.

Tuesday, May 13, 2014– 9:30 a.m. The items listed below, in addition to any other items previously scheduled, will be considered at this meeting which will be held in the Champlain Room, City Hall, 110 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa. To see any change to this meeting agenda, please go to Ottawa.ca.

ADDRESS 1131 Mill St

ZONING VM [679r] S298

ASKING PRICE:

$349,900 plus HST

Zoning – 3700 Jockvale Road 613-580-2424, ext. 27912– birgit.isernhagen@ottawa.ca

LEGAL DESCRIPTION Lot 2, N/S Mill Street, PL15 N Gower; Part of PIN 03903-0012

TOTAL AREA .060 ha (.148 acres)

Zoning – Part of 4650 Spratt Road 613-580-2424, ext. 27583 – cathlyn.kaufman@ottawa.ca Zoning - 1079, 1123, 1161, 1213 and 1291 Old Montreal Road and 1190 Regional Road 174 613-580-2424, ext. 27588 – michael.boughton@ottawa.ca Zoning – 1131 Teron Road 613-580-2424, ext. 27586 – louise.sweet-lindsay@ottawa.ca Zoning – 250 City Centre Avenue 613-580-2424, ext.13856 – douglas.james@ottawa.ca

2014 Development Charges Policy Report and Framework 613-580-2424, ext. 27893 – krista.libman@ottawa.ca Building Better and Smarter Suburbs – Guiding Principles and Vision 613-580-2424, ext. 27617 – alain.miguelez@ottawa.ca 22

Orléans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

R0012673334-0501 Ad # 2014-01-7005-23091-S

Official Plan and Zoning – 1445 and 1451 Wellington Street West 613-580-2424, ext. 26936 – hieu.nguyen@ottawa.ca

Offers must be on our standard Agreement of Purchase and Sale, and must be accompanied by a five thousand ($5,000) certified deposit cheque made payable to the City of Ottawa and include a business plan and description of the proposed use for the property. The sale will be subject to an option to repurchase agreement and heritage agreement. An information package on the property including details for submitting a business plan with the offer will be provided upon request, For more information please visit www.ottawa.ca/en/business/doing-business-city/city-properties-sale-and-lease or contact: Dave Powers Tel: 613-580-2424, ext. 13989 Email: dave.powers@ottawa.ca

R0012671010-0510

Offers will be received until Thursday, May 29, 2014 at 1 p.m.

Zoning – 2940 and 2946 Baseline Road 613-580-2424, ext.16187 – melissa.jort-conway@ottawa.ca Zoning – 12 Stirling Avenue 613-580-2424, ext. 27603 – bliss.edwards@ottawa.ca

PERMITTED USES Retail store, bed and breakfast, artist studio, office, personal service business, restaurant, convenience store, retail food store, detached dwelling, small batch brewery, service or repair shop

Ad # 2014-04-7031-23100

Only qualified applicants will be contacted for interviews. • Full time hours Monday – Friday • Able to read/write and effectively communicate in English. • Have your own reliable transportation • Enjoy cleaning • Looking to work for a company that values its employees as its #1 asset. • Comprehensive paid training/apprenticeship program. • Generous compensation package which includes bonding insurance, paid stat. holidays, vacation pay, CPP, EI, & WSIB. With us, you earn a Trades Wage!


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Bilingual Services

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BACKWATER VALVES INSTALLATIONS

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Plumbing, Heang & Renovaons Completed right the 1st me - residenal or commercial Over 27 years experience. Free esmate, licensed and insured Honesty, Integrity & Professionalism Email at plumbing@landriault.org www.landriault.org

Please Call GILLES 613-978-7524 or 613-841-2656

REACH UP TO ROOFING ROOFING 91,000 HOMES BH Residential Shingle Specialist Quality Workmanship EVERY WEEK Fully Insured â&#x20AC;˘ Free Estimates

SPECIALIZING IN SHINGLE ROOFS

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A Proud Member of The Better Business Bureau

CALL SHARON AT 613-688-1483 or email srussell@thenewsemc.ca Fax: 613-723-1862 Read us online at

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OrlĂŠans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

23


news

What is the 2014 Zoning Review all about?

Ottawa residents dine on $1.75 to raise awareness

Why? In 2013, City Council approved new Official Plan policies to create a more liveable Ottawa. To put these policies into action, the Zoning By-law needs to be updated. The 2014 Zoning Review will make that happen. How? Zoning affects how land can be used on both public and private properties. Things like types of housing, shops, schools, industries, as well as building heights and building densities. The right zoning will make sure our streets and neighbourhoods develop in ways that encourage vibrant, liveable places for all to enjoy

Michelle Nash

michelle.nash@metroland.com

How will this affect me? Zoning changes will provide greater certainty for residents, developers, businesses and others, about what to expect when it comes to future development in the review areas. Learn more about the project and view maps of the review areas at ottawa.ca/zoningreview. You may also email us at zoningreview@ottawa.ca, call 3-1-1 or attend a Public Information Session:

Omnibus amendments May 6 5 to 8:30 p.m. City Hall

South and West areas June 18 4 to 8 p.m. Ben Franklin Place

613-590-0677 smtvblackburn@gmail.com www.stmarysblackburn.ca

Services at 9:00 am every Sunday All are welcome to join us in faith and fellowship.

R0012512459-0123

2750 Navan Rd. (2 minutes South of Innes)

QUEENSWOOD UNITED CHURCH

R0012655500

Minister: Rev. Ed Gratton Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. Come and celebrate God’s love with us.

The little church with a big heart, where all are welcome!

360 Kennedy Lane E., Orleans

613-837-6784 www.queenswoodunited.org

R0012091848-0516

THIS IS MY

Celebrate with us Sundays @ 10am Teen programs, Sunday School & Nursery Available 1111 Orleans Boulevard 613-837-4321 Check us out at: www.orleansunitedchurch.com

Sunday Eucharist 10:00 a.m. Sunday School

pentecostal church

9:30 am - Sunday School (all ages) 9:00 am Sunday School (all ages) 10:30 amam - Morning Worship 10:00 Morning Worship

KidzChurch (agesAwhile 4-11) Children’s Musical “Spend on the Nile” 7:00care pmavailable Young Adult Nursery duringService Sunday School Nursery Worship care available during SundaytoSchool & Morning infants and Morning Worshipfor for infants – 3yrs. 3yrs.

Programs for children, and young Service adults. Homegroups, 6:00 pm (Sat) -youth Spanish Adult Bible studies, Ladies Prayer & Share. See website for details. 3:00 pm (Sun) - Spanish Service

1825 St. Joseph Blvd, Orleans 613-837-3555

treme poverty through citizen engagement. For this week’s campaign, Nuyens will be joined by thousands of people across the country including 90 other Ottawans. According to Results Canada, 1.2 billion people are living below the poverty line, struggling to meet their daily needs on less than $1.75 a day. For support, Nuyens and his team of eight other individuals will lean on each other for support as well as to spread their money a little further by sharing a bag of potatoes or onions to make the $8.75 they each have to spend for the five days to go a

Dominion-Chalmers United Church

www.cpcorleans.ca

355 Cooper Street at O’Connor 613-235-5143 www.dc-church.org

24 Sandridge Road, Manor Park www.stcolumbaottawa.ca

Choral Eucharist Sunday, 9:30am

265549/0605 R0011949629

ST. HELEN’S ANGLICAN CHURCH

Sunday Worship 8, 9:15, 11 1234 Prestone Dr, Orleans (1 block west of 10th Line, 1 block south of St. Joseph) 613-824-2010 www.sthelens.ca

St. Columba Anglican Church

R0011949345

R0012653942-0424

St. Clement Parish/Paroisse St-Clément at l’église Ste-Anne

Sunday Masses: 8:30 a.m. Low Mass 10:30 a.m. High Mass (with Gregorian chant) 6:30 p.m. Low Mass

We welcome you to the traditional Latin Mass - Everyone Welcome For the Mass times please see www.stclement-ottawa.org 528 Old St. Patrick St. Ottawa ON K1N 5L5 (613) 565.9656

GRACE PRESBYTERIAN ChuRCh 1220 Old Tenth Line Rd, Orleans

SuNDAYS 10:45 am 613-824-9260

R0012306872

2476 Old Montreal Rd., Cumberland Tel: 613-859-4738

R0011949385-0307

St. Mark’s Anglican Church

Jim Nuyens

Sunday Services Worship Service10:30am Sundays Prayer Circle Tuesday at 11:30 10:30 a.m. Rev. James Murray

R0012666677

St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Church

R0022657939_0501

East areas June 19 4 to 8 p.m. Peter D. Clark Place

Central areas June 17 4 to 8 p.m. City Hall

News - Imagine only having $1.75 a day to feed yourself. That is how much people who are living below the poverty line in Ottawa and around the world must face everyday – regardless how hungry they may be. In an effort to raise awareness about poverty, from April 28 to May 2 a group of Ottawa residents, including Alta Vista resident Jim Nuyens are currently taking on a challenge to live below the poverty line. For five days, they will have to plan, prepare and fill themselves up on less than a twoonie. “The Live Below the Line Challenge is an opportunity for me to get people thinking about international development,” Nuyens said. Celebrating its second year, the event is organized by Results Canada. The national grassroots organization runs programs and events in an effort to end ex-

www.graceorleans.ca

For all your Church Advertising needs Call Sharon 613-688-1483 Deadline Wednesday 4PM 24

Orléans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

little further. This week’s experience, Nuyens said he hopes can help make a change in reducing the number of people who live below the line. “I see this event as the same thing of people who do runs or walk-a-thons, but it’s about raising the awareness,” he said. Orléans News spoke with Nuyens before the campaign began, and instead of dreading the week, he was looking forward to it. “You need to prepare, but I think it’s going to go really well,” he said. “This is the best way to fundraise and raise awareness.” Last year, Nuyens said time went by easily because of the team support, which included a team lunch mid-week. Nuyens would like to raise at least $100 for the campaign, because he said, anything can help make a difference. To donate or to find out more information visit results-resultats.ca.

R0012227559

Over 30 Zoning Reviews will take place throughout Ottawa in 2014.

Kanata Reviews April 28 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Kanata Recreation Complex

Connected to your community

R0012670630-0501


Connected to your community

1396 Windmill Lane, Ottawa 2014 NISSAN ALTIMA SV 2014 NISSAN MAXIMA SV 2014 KIA FORTE LX

2014 FORD ESCAPE

13,620 kms, Stk#6172X Ex-Daily Rental Ex-Daily Rental, Leather, Sunroof, Back up Camera 24,642 kms, Stk#6180X Cash Price Cash Price

16,414 kms, Stk#CC1817 Cash Price

$23,999

PRE-OWNED

$27,950

EX DAILY RENTAL

$15,950

EX DAILY RENTAL

2014 CHEVROLET CRUZE 2013 HYUNDAI LT ACCENT GL 25,971 kms, Stk#CC1816 Cash Price

EX DAILY RENTAL

$26,950

Ex-Daily Rental, 15,190 kms, Stk#6185X Cash Price EX DAILY RENTAL

$27,950

PRE-OWNED

Leather, Nav, SYNC, Moonroof 30,847 kms Stk#6159X Cash Price

$13,950

$19,950

PRE-OWNED

EX DAILY RENTAL

Leather, Nav, SYNC, Moonroof 17,0855 kms Stk#6160X Cash Price

$21,950

EX DAILY RENTAL

2013 TOYOTA COROLLA

2013 FORD EXPLORER XLT 2013 HYUNDAI ACCENT 2007 TOYOTA MATRIX

$16,995

$27,950

27,118 kms, Stk#cc1813 Cash Price

Ex-Daily Rental, 82,551 kms, Stk#6183X Cash Price

2013 HYUNDAI SANTA FE SPORT AWD

2013 FORD FUSION SE

$25,950

$17,950

23,401 kms, Stk#6184X Cash Price

EX DAILY RENTAL

Ex-Daily Rental, 45,825 kms, Stk#6173X Cash Price

EX DAILY RENTAL

2013 MAZDA 3

Ex-Daily Rental, 21,855 kms, Stk#6187X Cash Price

PRE-OWNED

2012 DODGE CARAVAN 2012 SUZUKI 84,708 kms, VITARA JX AWD EX DAILY RENTAL

Ex-Daily Rental, 18,926 kms, Stk#6186X Cash Price

$17,450

PRE-OWNED

PRE-OWNED

$12,450

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$14,950

EX DAILY RENTAL

2011 SUZUKI SX4 AWD WOW! LOW KMS! 11,821 kms, Stk#6185Y Cash Price

$13,950

EX DAILY RENTAL

2012 KIA FORTE EX

Ex-Daily Rental, 51,958 kms, Stk#6176X Cash Price

$12,950

2010 DODGE CARAVAN

$14,950

$12,450

75,316 kms, Stk#6142X Cash Price

EX DAILY RENTAL

$9,450

EX DAILY RENTAL

EX DAILY RENTAL

99,524 kms, Stk#6137X Cash Price

EX DAILY RENTAL

2012 DODGE CARAVAN 76,499 kms, Stk#6078X Cash Price

EX DAILY RENTAL

2011 DODGE CARAVAN “STOW AND GO”

2011 BUICK LUCERNE

$10,995

$12,950

$8,450

88,716 kms, Stk#CC1664A Cash Price

74,009 kms, St #6135x Cash Price EX DAILY RENTAL

PRE-OWNED

2012 CHRYSLER 200

$15,995

$12,450

EX DAILY RENTAL

2011 DODGE RAM

$12,950

$23,900

$11,450

PRE-OWNED

$8,495

2009 MAZDA CX-7

$11,950

$9,950

$7,950

$11,450

PRE-OWNED

2007 SUZUKI SX4 AWD 78,519 kms, Stk#CC1729A Cash Price

$5,995

$17,497

PRE-OWNED

PRE-OWNED

EX DAILY RENTAL

2010 DODGE AVENGER 80,724 kms, Stk#6149Y Cash Price EX DAILY RENTAL

$9,950

PRE-OWNED

PRE-OWNED

2009 KIA SPECTRA 5

89,671 kms, Stk#6110P Cash Price

4x4, 36,950 kms Cash Price

47,280 kms, Stk#6106P Cash Price

54,070 kms, Stk#6114P Cash Price

2009 SUZUKI SX4

Stk#CC1616 Cash Price

PRE-OWNED

EX DAILY RENTAL

2009 HYUNDAI ACCENT

2009 SUZUKI SX4

$10,498

71,488 kms, Stk#6088X Cash Price

2011 VOLKSWAGEN ROUTAN

2010 SUZUKI SX4 SEDAN BASE

PRE-OWNED

$11,995

2012 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA AWD

2009 HONDA CIVIC DX-G 2009 CHRYSLER 78,731 kms, TOWN & COUNTRY

85,254 kms, Stk#6119P Cash Price

PRE-OWNED

2012 MAZDA 3

56,563 kms, Stk#6091X Cash Price

64,109 kms, Stk#5855X Cash Price

PRE-OWNED

Ex-Daily Rental, 41,786 kms, Stk#6179X Cash Price

PRE-OWNED

79,398 kms, Stk#6042P Cash Price

56,563 kms, Stk#6130P Cash Price

72,285 kms, Stk#5926Y Cash Price

EX DAILY RENTAL

2013 KIA FORTE EX

$14,450

68,214 kms, Stk#6113X Cash Price

$14,950

$10,450

PRE-OWNED

EX DAILY RENTAL

$17,950

Ex-Daily Rental, 42,882 kms, Stk#6178x Cash Price

$13,450

$8,995

$8,950

$19,995

$11,950

$10,950

59,038 kms, Stk#6016P Cash Price

EX DAILY RENTAL

$11,950

$10,450

2008 SUZUKI SX4

$16,950

2012 MAZDA 3

$13,950

PRE-OWNED

EX DAILY RENTAL

32,590 kms, Stk#CC1814 Cash Price

2012 NISSAN ALTIMA

2010 MAZDA 3

EX DAILY RENTAL

Ex-Daily Rental, 27,862 kms, Stk#6175X Cash Price

2012 CHEVROLET IMPALA

2009 NISSAN VERSA

PRE-OWNED

$37,000

2013 HYUNDAI SONATA GL 2013 TOYOTA CAMRY

PRE-OWNED

2010 CHEVROLET AVEO

55,101 kms, Stk#6111P Cash Price

Ex-Daily Rental, 44,893 kms, Stk#6181X Cash Price

Leather, Roof, Nav 27,161 kms, Stk#6072X Cash Price

$14,450

2010 DODGE CARAVAN 110,208 kms, Stk#6144X Cash Price

EX DAILY RENTAL

EX DAILY RENTAL

2013 DODGE DURANGO 4X4 2013 KIA OPTIMA

$19,950

2010 KIA FORTE SX 95,586 kms Stk#6133Q Cash Price

Leather, NAV, SYNC, Moonroof 23,757 kms Stk#6161X Cash Price

$21,950

$19,999

PRE-OWNED

2013 KIA FORTE EX

2009 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA SLX-1

PRE-OWNED

5 Passenger 32,154 kms Cash Price

2013 CHRYSLER 200 LIMITED

121,203 kms, Stk#6163Y Cash Price

Leather, AWD, 62,512 kms Cash Price EX DAILY RENTAL

Manual Transmission 71,065 kms Cash Price

70,253 kms, Stk#6092X Cash Price

74,009 kms, Stk#6135X Cash Price

$9,950

2011 SUBARU IMPREZA AWD PRE-OWNED

EX DAILY RENTAL

82,846 kms, Stk#6095X Cash Price

PRE-OWNED

48,441 kms, Stk#6123P Cash Price PRE-OWNED

$17,999

Ex-Daily Rental, 19,366 kms, Stk#6154X Cash Price

2011 NISSAN VERSA

Ex-Daily Rental, 52,744 kms, Stk#6177X Cash Price

$12,950

$15,995 $11,950

2012 DODGE JOURNEY SE 2012 KIA FORTE EX 5 Passenger, 69,291 kms, Stk#6079Y Cash Price

19,855 kms, Stk#CC1830 Cash Price

$23,950

EX DAILY RENTAL

EX DAILY RENTAL

2013 MAZDA 3

2012 MAZDA 3

65,850 kms, Stk#6051X Cash Price

$26,500

$13,950

2013 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING

2012 DODGE CARAVAN

44,843 kms, Stk#6086Y Cash Price

$14,950

2013 MAZDA 5

27,320 kms, Stk#CC1822 Cash Price

$17,450 Stk#6050X Cash Price

PRE-OWNED

Ex-Daily Rental, 38,772 kms, Stk#6174X Cash Price

2014 KIA RONDO LX

Stk#CC1800 Cash Price

2013 FORD TAURUS SEL 2013 FORD TAURUS SEL 2013 FORD FUSION SE

24,727 kms, Stk#CC1605 Cash Price

$17,999

2014 HYUNDAI SANTA FE 2014 CHRYSLER 200 22,791 kms, SPORT AWD

Ex-Daily Rental 24,587 kms, Stk#6182X Cash Price

49,137 kms, Stk#6139P Cash Price

PRE-OWNED

2008 SATURN AURA XE 46,572 kms, Stk#6116R Cash Price

13,500 kms, Stk#6171Y Cash Price

PRE-OWNED

$7,950

PRE-OWNED

All prices are cash prices with only the HST extra. Other charges may apply if finance option chosen, such as PPSA or other fees charged by the finance institution, Carproof, lien checks, or other charges that may be incurred when trading in a vehicle, discharging lien, or financing a vehicle. Many clients with less than perfect credit may qualify for rates as low as 3.99% but rates may vary based on credit history from 3.99 to 29.99%. Many institutions charge fees in addition to PPSA and those charges are passed on to the consumer.

PRE-OWNED 0501.R0012668540

Orléans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

25


news

Connected to your community

Active thinking leads to much better grades News - All students are active thinkers by nature, but not all students know how to think actively when it comes to classroom learning or athome studying. According to Oxford

Learning’s CEO and founder, Dr. Nick Whitehead, this is because, like many other school skills (such as studying, organization, and focus) active thinking is a skill that students need to be shown how to use.

“Active learning is not a skill restricted to the classroom. Children (and adults, too) should always be thinking about the world around them. In fact, the more that children develop this skill outside the

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classroom, the more they are able to apply it in class.” Dr. Whitehead outlines three simple steps for students to follow to practice their active thinking skills: • Before the activity,

• During the activity students should ask themselves questions to draw connections or highlight details, like “What is this similar to?” News Canada

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Stisville News Stisville News Orléans News Business Manotick News Classifieds Directory Oawa East News T South M News 1, 2014 Oawa Oawa West News Protesters demandNepean-Barrhaven telecom giants close digital divide News The Renfrew Mercury Font_PalatinoLinotype_Bold Location_MyriadPro_Bold ALL TYPE OUTLINED

Second Section hursday

Erin McCracken

erin.mccracken@metroland.com

News - For Elmvale resident Robert Fitzpatrick, the Internet is a lifeline. Without online access to services, the U.S. resident says he wouldn’t even be able to live in Canada with his Canadian wife. “If it wasn’t for the Internet, I wouldn’t even be here right now,” said Fitzpatrick. He said the Internet allows him to regularly connect with Immigration Canada and fill out the necessary forms in his quest for Canadian citizenship, which is especially important because there is no immigration office near his home. But, he says, the $70 price tag he pays every month is too high, and has, in the past, made it tough for him and his wife to stretch their dollars. They’ve even turned to the food bank during tough times. This prompted Fitzpatrick to join about 40 members of the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now, a low-income advocacy group with chapters in Ottawa, and march 10 kilometres through the downtown on April 17. They are calling on Bell, Rogers, Telus, and the federal government to provide people living below the low-income measure with high-speed Internet for $10 a month. “Fight, fight, fight. Internet is a right,” ACORN members chanted near the Canadian Tribute to Human Rights at the corner of Elgin and Lisgar streets.

Some walked while others navigated their wheelchairs in a loop that took them past the Parliament Buildings as well as Industry Minister James Moore’s Queen Street office. ACORN members chose to begin and end their rally at the human rights memorial to reflect a 2011 United Nations report stating Internet access is a human right. “And I agree with that because I cannot even begin to describe all the ways that people are connected … with the Internet,” Fitzpatrick said. ACORN cites a 2010 Statistics Canada report outlining the disparity in access between high and lowincome earners. About 54 per cent of households that earn $30,000 or less had home Internet access, whereas 97 per cent of households making $87,000 or more were connected online. Figures released in a 2012 Statistics Canada Internet usage survey tell a similar story. Almost all those households surveyed making $94,000 or more had home Internet access, while 58 per cent of households earning $30,000 or less were connected online. But the advocacy group points to promising developments south of the border where Comcast launched an Internet program in 2011, offering low-speed Internet for about $10 a month, free Internet training and the chance to purchase a low-cost computer. ACORN’s members are also closely watching Toronto, where Rogers launched a pilot program last August to provide high-speed Internet to

ay

some community housing residents for about $10 a month, as well as the opportunity to buy a refurbished $150 computer. “It’s something that is a huge part of everybody’s life, and, like food or anything else I think that there should be easier and less costly access, especially for kids nowadays,” said Vanier resident Jaye Rutter. She attended the rally because she says she pays

$79.95 a month to connect online, which eats into her grocery budget. “You can’t find a job the old way anymore,” she added. “You can’t even go in and bring in a resume. Everything is through the computer. It’s like a telephone. It’s necessary.” For some, like Fitzpatrick, free Internet access at Ottawa library branches is neither convenient, nor easily accessible.

Computer use is limited, said the chair of ACORN’s South Ottawa chapter. Because of his visual impairment, Fitzpatrick must hook up a device to a computer that reads words on the screen to him. But he isn’t able to plug his portable screen reader into a library computer. “A library computer would not be the best solution,” he said.

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With megaphone in hand, Kathleen Fortin leads the way at the start of a 10-kilometre march in downtown Ottawa, on April 17. She joined about 40 members of ACORN, a national advocacy group for low-income earners, to call on telecommunications companies to provide $10-a-month Internet access to those in need.

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Fluffy flat out refuses to like garden idea

T

he seeds from Steele-Briggs had long since arrived in the mail. Mother had little wood flats laid out all over the downstairs of the house. Every day I checked, looking for sprouts of life, and when I saw some that hadn’t been there before, I was as excited as if I was witness to a birth, which, in a way, it was. Some of the boxes filled the window sills, and space on the bake table had been taken over, and that table pushed close to the window that looked out into the grape arbour. Mother tried to capture as much sunlight as possible to help her growing seeds along. I couldn’t tell what the plants were to become, and I wasn’t sure Mother knew either. So to take the mystery

MARY COOK Memories out of it all, Mother laced the empty seed packet onto a little stick and there was one in each box identifying what was planted. Very clever indeed, was my mother. There was still a chill in the air, but the days were warming up, and Mother said soon the garden would be ploughed up. By then the sprouts could be ready for planting. Every night before I went to bed, I carried my little kitten Fluffy in my arms and circled the boxes, putting

firmly in my mind how tall each sprig was, so that in the morning I could check to see what growth had taken place over night. Mother, who was dead set against any pets in the house, allowed me to keep Fluffy, but only until she was grown enough to move to the barn. With her in my arms, I would talk to her about the plants and how once they had been tiny little seeds, sure in my mind that she knew every word I was saying. “Those have grown a good

inch,” Mother said that night, as she took a teaspoon and poked at the earth around the little plants coming to life in the box under the window. I wanted to believe her, but to me they looked exactly as they did two days before. Firmly holding Fluffy, I got down on my knees and smelled the little plants. All I could smell was earth. I put Fluffy’s nose close, too, but she didn’t seem the least bit interested in whether or not the plants were showing any sign of life. Sometimes I sneaked Fluffy upstairs to my bedroom, which I shared with my older sister Audrey. I’d put her under my bed on a folded blanket. That night I put her in her small cardboard box behind the Findlay Oval, because the house had cooled down, and I knew she would

be as snug as a bug in a rug. I wakened the next morning to Mother’s yelling up the stairwell for me to get down to the kitchen, and I better make it fast. Wiping the sleep from my eyes I followed Mother’s pointing figure to the flat box of sprouts under the kitchen window. There was Fluffy, stretched out as neat as you please, on top of what was just about ready for planting. Mother stopped only long enough to repeat once again that animals belong in the barn before ordering “that cat” to be immediately moved right out to the barn, and she was never to darken the door again. I scooped up the kitten, and even I knew the sprouts were beyond repair. Mother said I could take the wood box out to the junk

pile behind the silo while I was at it. Still in my pyjamas, with Fluffy under one arm, and the box of soil and flattened sprouts in the other, I headed for the silo. Fluffy spent the rest of her days with the rest of the barn cats well away from the house. Litter boxes were unheard of back in those days, but you didn’t need a university degree to tell you the smell coming from the wood box held more than a few dozen would-be vegetable plants. Interested in an electronic version of Mary’s books? Go to smashwords.com and type MaryRCook for e-book purchase details. If you would like a hard copy, please contact Mary at wick2@ sympatico.ca.

Ontario adds to immunization requirements for next school year News - Ontario will require immunizations to be up to date before children return to school in September.

The province has updated the immunization requirements for the 2014-15 school year to include new mandatory immunizations and

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dose requirements that align with changes to Ontario’s publicly-funded immunization program. All students attending primary or secondary school this fall will need to have proof of immunization against three more diseases: • meningococcal disease. • whooping cough. • and – for children born in 2010 or later – chickenpox. This is in addition to updated dose requirements for tetanus, diphtheria, polio and mumps immunizations. Requirements for measles and rubella immunizations have not changed. Parents should take the following steps to ensure that their children meet the new immunization requirements: 1) Double check with their doctor, nurse practitioner or local public health unit to make sure their children’s immunization records are up to date.   2) Make sure that their child’s updated immunization record has been reported to their local public health unit.  Once the school year begins, parents will be contacted by the local public health unit if catch-up immunizations are required. Following Ontario’s immunization schedule and maintaining immunization records are

important steps to prevent the spread of these diseases in our communities. These diseases can spread easily in schools and can lead to serious health consequences especially in children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems. QUICK FACTS

• Thanks to vaccines, infectious diseases that were the leading cause of death worldwide 100 years ago are now the cause of less than five per cent of all deaths in Canada. • Vaccines for meningococcal disease, whooping cough and chickenpox are publicly funded and part of Ontario’s routine immunization schedule. They are also consistent with current clinical guidelines for best protecting Ontario’s children from disease. • The Ontario government currently publicly funds 21 different (routine and non-routine) vaccines through its provincial immunization program that protect against 16 diseases. Parents of children who require an immunization exemption should speak to their local public health unit. Children who are exempt from immunization are at increased risk and may be removed from school during a disease outbreak.

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31


Connected to your community

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CANADIAN TIRE FLYER inside your community papers beginning Thursday, May 1st 0

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tomortoday, gone News - Hair the 150 row. the case for Hair That will be in the upcoming participants cancer research Donation Ottawa is coming up on Earl of March fundraiser which students now 27. sock Sunday, April event, away money. annual This fourth College Algonquin– Page e the at hosted 9 Salon on Woodroff Hair Stylist as a local Stittsville More than 20 membe to involve The event Avenue, began now grown included a rs of the Goulbourn has ts, It event. sing-a-long Male and 150 participanalportion where Chorus perform and 25 hair stylists residents sang for seniors at Chartwe raised last year with $31,000 raised so far this year, songs such as ‘The Blue ll Stonehaven Retirem most $32,000 reaching as high as Tail Fly’ and ent on ‘Yellow Bird’. Residence in Bridlew with eyes set ood on April , as it $50,000. 1. the beginning And this is just a planned expanwith is hoped that College Hair sion of the Algonquin Hair Donation this • Receive grow your own Stylist Salon, g event will pay Ottawa fundraisin number of cheque! doubling the $100,000 • Win Great Prizes even more, the reaching • Once a week perhaps participants, Adam Kveton mark and delivery fundraising Canada. Weekends Off launching across for this year’s• fourth “I think that there is But right now, participants to pick up News – The KANAT its socks and a need for the city president of A over 125, most to doannual event, verbrook Commun very busy ly the associati invest in what the registered 613.221 on’s ity Associat Kanata Bea- Ottawa,” community, one is who will .6252 are already on the city of the finest a after amalgamation,responsibility. Howeve ion is calling including six said Gary to in sibility Sealey. nate hair but heads shaved. There ing infrastru fix Beaverbrook’s r, the city took Sealey, who deterioratfor those areas. cture. on responbe having their a few more with 150 dent for four has been associati Though he for on says the city is still room that can be verbrook’s years, said taking care presi- take responsi has yet to as the limit community bility. really participants a couple of weeks to spaces was of Beaoriginalhandled. With already are over last go, funds raised See COMMUN ITY, page year’s total. 2

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– Page 24 out. rumour was a “I think the been here for Certainly, I’ve said. See PROGRA time,” Holmes five other M, page a life,” long 2 I need to get There are already for the time. I think to get out registered candidates residents head she said. “I just want – MarBy the time world.”Holmes’ Somerset Ward election Holmes on Oct. 27, and see the that she Thomas McVeigh, to the polls the ward for April 3 announcement of this tin Canning, Denis Schryburt , end will have served Jeff Morrison retire at the three decades. has her health wouldof council clears the way and Lili Weemen. 30 almost s who While she still burn, Holmes term of candidate run news - Afterng downtown page 6 to for a field See MAKING, and energy -0886 Connected to signed up to to start enyears representi Coun. DiYour Comm have already time for her CORNERS) 1-888-226 it’s Somerset said (BELLS unity • Receive your residents, she is role. ON ROAD more. announced long for her own 1902 ROBERTS ENT PLEASE n joying life ane Holmes here for a pay cheque! OUTLET BY APPOINTM of the re-electio “I’ve been WHOLESALE CAR dropping out • Win Great TRUE DIAMOND ENT RINGS ONLY Prizes OTTAWA’S race. IN ENGAGEM • Once a week WASH SPECIALIZING onds.com delivery $ holesaleDiam • Weekend www.CapitalW s Off tion 474,000 Hazeldean Road

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Holmes to CARRIERS ED Dianeepolitician has represented downtown ward for almost 30 years Long-tim WANT • Win Greatweek • Once a y deliver nds Off • Weeke

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has been enShe said it the artists tertaining meeting who will guide k and musicians the eight-wee entrants in been think. Arts - If you’vea new musi- programs s are all out “The instructor al ing of trying this spring, or and profession t for practicing musicians,” said cal instrumen programming working are seeking number of Bluesfest small of “A Coyle. kids, the creators n for you. doing their eduexthem are still have a destinatio 28, the have teaching Starting April of Music cation and Bluesfest School new perience.” House started life opening its Festival Unitand Art is for public former Westboro Festival House Located at as the and the church’s support programming. Avenue, the ed Church, offered their 450 Churchill and art pro- council venture as it was in to the The of building’s music phase. ent the product program gramming is between RBC the developm in which the be named ip a partnersh the Dovercourt hall will will be housed ity Hall Bluesfest and Association. the Kitchissippi Commun Community n of this. director of Ere’n Coyle, newness of in recognitio inception, RBC the Since its program, said them strived to foswill allow Bluesfest has awareness and the facility musical nt with programto experime what resonates tered creativity among Otsee artistic their Blues ming to students with with the public. ‘well, we’ve tawa program. likely be a lastin the Schools “There’s no 6 for what will before,’” said Bay on April this spring, warm temperae- never done this it’s ‘sure, do S, page 13 n Britannia See PROGRAM adventur ly thick “instead, takes to a still-froze ice is stubborn to the fun. These same on water. Coyle, a teacher?’” A kite boarder Although river be used we have put an end

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Community the world were - Buildings around 2, but at Mary lit up blue on April Honeywell Elementary School it was the students Connected went blue for to Your Comm World Autism who ness Day. Awareunity In fact everyone Samantha Long at the school made an effort The city’s new soccer Saturd the school’s to team ay, April newest student Total Distri blue, not just to wear something prepares for its president and - A new generatio April 199 a.m. to News 12 As a former promote greater butio vice-pres awarenes of 3 n 474,0 n more kickoff. s of autism, p.m.engaged young “This reputation ident. Trudeau emphasiz teacher, opportuni but to (40 indoorple became the school’s 00 peo- young ties ed for that the leadership students with support vendo importance of an people have Justin Trudeau’s , – Page1115 autism. Mary about beeducated pop- but also a voice for the message rs) 35 Dunnin ing apathetic ulation for stu- the publicHoneywell includes four dent body. is complete g Rd when he stopped misplaced by Algonqui of school board’s ly seven out the future, with cumberlandfarm n College ,” said the Liberal “We develop 14 elemenof tary 10 classroom on March jobs ersmark party leader. habits requir28et.ca s for children ing some form to help announce Proud April 10, with auly servinof post-sec- tive citizenship ... whenof ac- tism. While awarenes “Young 2014 ondary education g the commcommuni our s at people that |44 pages . He disconnect from unity ty is still a school,” itself is strong due to the the school politics do so, passion should be the said said Trudeau. integratio of students in n not because sole main stream motivator when they Though he choosing a … it’s because don’t care career decided to tic stream classes, greater and autisfollow path because awareness in society is they don’t his father’s get to shape people steps, in Ottaw an important will often aComfootthe goal said munitautistic they don’t get discussion, pectation follow societal ex- taught Trudeau said his father yNewclass teacher Sharon High Efficiency s him to make Lyng. “One s.com in every 110 politics. It’s listened to in ily ones and not necessar- for decisions 16.5 SEER + HST children has not that are the himself, especially autism,” said -$400 OPA Rebate caring, it’s about about not for them. best fit his Lyng. with there involvement caring too and it’s really “It’s really out much that you Free Estimate important to and the Liberal in politics aware and understan be protect yourself.”step away to party. ‘ACTIVE CITIZENS d how we can “The decision involve them.” HIP’ In partnersh about the parties we make ip with the That has been police and we supTrudeau refl public safety Mary Honeywe the philosophy at ected on his port should be based on program at ll, time in values,” he said, the college, Autism is a she said. the that the university, agreeing “shouldn’ presentation adding they disorder that included a most influential a person’s nolimits question ex- ing the t be based on vot- abilities, social and communieffects and answer periences were those Locally Owned same way your cative but to many session that ranged spent ents and Operated outside parvarying dewww.coolhea ics such as military from top- vironmenthe classroom en- positedid, or voting the op- grees. While some children tcomfort.ca t. He said student tism with way that your spending to the senate parents at speak well, others don’t audid.” scandal, to his associations are hugely all, speak have favorite Canadian problems dealing important to campus “They should artists. with life bebe based on change, understanding cause they not other’s feelings and figuring only provide decisions we make as young Sir Wilfrid Laurier out social cues. adults and adults.” theatre group stages My Fair Lady musical. See RECESS,

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Liberal leader March 28. He Justin Trudeau, centre, said young Canadian mingles with well-wish s disconnect from politics ers following a presenta “because they tion don’t get to at Algonquin College shape the discussio on n.”

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April 10, 2014

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– Page 18

the raceway. not what we spokesman for tion 474,000 step, but it’s “It’s a positive said. was canhad,” Lawryk funding program154 races Before the old d Carleton hosted annual program announce celled, Rideau $5.25 million The new funding31 to replace the Slots a year. With the new the raceway is lookMarch funding on program, which the province funding for five years, s races this season. at Racetrack ago. ing to offer 90 page 5 two years over five years and axed See RACEWAY, the $26.5 million it’s enough Carleton Raceway ity Whilematch the old funding,Alex Lawryk, of relief News - Rideaubreathingthe a sigh commun won’t are serving going, said $26.5-milProudly horse owners to keep racing confirmed a nityNews.com alive. after the province OttawaCommu to keep racing lion lifeline

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slots program funding was leftover after the cancelled, Lawryk News - Rideau said. Carleton out, That money has now Raceway and run so without the are breathing horse owners ing, new fundRideau Carleton a sigh of relief after the province would confirmed a have only offered “a few $26.5-million en” racing opportunities dozracing alive. lifeline to keep year. each The new funding That’s program owners simply because announced the funding on love and are March to -Page 5 31 to replace committed racing, which the nity has been part tracks program, Slots at Race- of the Your Commu raceway for which the province axed Connected to 50 years, Lawryk said. While the $26.5two years ago. “It would just five years won’t million over regionalbe a local, size track,” match the old funding, it’s he said. “That enough to r and racing going, keep wish would be the owner’s is set will off 1795 Kilborn ... ateityJeff Zamune page 5. Nguyen, left, Construction season 613.736.9573 ryk, spokesmasaid Alex Law- want I’m sure they wouldn`t see commun stylist MichelleO’Grady theSchoolm , seated. announces to shut it n for the raceserving the full story, to begin as city Hair Republic d by AnnekaProudly way. plans. y event. To read was no gaming down. If there nityNews.com raiser organize and no revenue, expansive road-work 15 te in the kids-onl OttawaCommu “It’s a positive – Page step, but it’s it would be very costly.” Bryan will participa not what we The two-year had,” Lawryk said. and the uncertaingap in funding ty of the raceused in many Before the old April 10, 2014 way’s future façade has been funding its until gram was pro- left deep now cancelled, Rideau dianedeans.ca wounds in the have films. Carleton hosted fields and setting local 154 races a horse-racing industry, the • Its sports year. With the Lawryk of that part of based on said. n, feature new key The $5.25 milis a RedBlacks rename lion annual didate for designatio “A lot of people, their funding a provincial heryears, the raceway for five years, following points: , and any Glebe features are large- mascot to avoid negative would be seekingn for the 92-year- the have left the after two • Its heritage is looking has several feedback. to offer 90 races • It is a landmark or its loss business,” he said. ÕÀÊœÜ˜Ê r, itage designatio outside and it this season. Michelle Nash cant alterations Back in Novembe UÊ,iViˆÛiÊޜ sur- ly intact The raceway features still intact, “There are begin signifi old building. impact its -Page 14 unique interior mixed feelings. «>ÞÊV…iµÕit able to continue has only been People e said it would for would greatly auditorium. *Àˆâià the committe are quite interested hosting racing including the for the past designation UÊ7ˆ˜ÊÀi>ÌÊ roundings for specific buildings ŽÊ continuing, by J. Albert in two years Connec News - A heritage for Glebe looking n in an effort to help quite because ted to Your E, page 11 excited it had money Commu UÊ"˜ViÊ>ÊÜii • It was designed1922. It is of about the cards nity See COMMITTE designatio from the previous the possibility of in neighbourcould be on `iˆÛiÀÞ continuing history in the commit- Ewart and builtsignificance, and the industry Ê"vv . preserve the the in ral Ži˜`à of Collegiate to Ottawa, UÊ7ii but it’s committee a lot less than can- architectu A TRADITI n hood. According The heritage it was. is an excellent ON OF ity Associatio “We basically EXCELLENCE it tee, the school Glebe Commun 6213 March 25 that ignite the interest have to reannounced on 613.221. and rebuilding,” he said. 613-59

 

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Jazz up the taste of grilled lamb skewers Lifestyle - Strawberries take a twist here in a savoury glaze for lamb. They add an overall sweetness to the dish. Soak wooden skewers, if using, for at least 10 minutes. Preparation time: 15 minutes. Standing time: two hours. Cooking time: about 20 minutes. Serves six to eight. Ingredients

Lamb and marinade: • 2.2 kg (5 lb) boneless leg of lamb • 50 ml (1/4 cup) vegetable oil • 50 ml (1/4 cup) minced fresh chives • 15 ml (1 tbsp) grated fresh lemon rind • 25 ml (2 tbsp (25 mL) each fresh lemon juice and maple syrup • 4 cloves garlic, minced • 2 ml (1/2 tsp) each coarse sea salt and pepper Strawberry maple chive glaze:

• 15ml (1 tbsp) vegetable oil

• 1 shallot, minced • 2 cloves garlic, minced • 2 ml (1/2 tsp) each salt and pepper • 750 ml (3 cups) halved strawberries • 10 ml (2 tsp) grated fresh lemon rind • 50 ml (1/4 cup) maple syrup • 25 ml (2 tbsp) each fresh lemon juice and balsamic vinegar • 50 ml (1/4 cup) minced fresh chives Preparation

Trim the fat from the lamb and cut it into five-centimetre (two-inch) cubes. In a bowl, whisk together the oil, chives, lemon rind, lemon juice, maple syrup, garlic, salt and pepper. Pour it into a resealable plastic bag and add the lamb cubes. Seal the bag and turn the cubes inside to coat. Refrigerate and marinate the lamb for two hours. Strawberry maple chive glaze: In a saucepan, heat the oil over medium heat and add

Plant sale signals start of spring Michelle Nash

Michelle.nash@metroland.com

the shallots, garlic, salt and pepper. Sauté until softened, about 3 minutes. Add the strawberries, lemon rind, maple syrup and lemon juice. Using a potato masher, mash the berries to bring out the juices. Bring them to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, to combine the flavours -- about 10 minutes. Stir in the vinegar and cook until thickened and syrupy, about five minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat and stir in the chives. Set aside 175 ml (3/4 cup) of the mixture to use as a dipping sauce. Thread the lamb cubes onto skewers and place on a greased grill over medium-high heat. Brush the cubes with the remaining strawberry glaze and grill until medium-rare, about 20 minutes, turning and basting skewers occasionally with the glaze. Serve the skewers with the reserved glaze as a dipping sauce.

News - For many residents in New Edinburgh, including New Edinburgh Plant Sale co-ordinator Mary Granger an annual plant sale marks the start of spring. The sale will take place Mother’s Day Weekend, May 10, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. “It’s the rite of spring,” said Granger, who has organized the event for the past 15 years. The history of the plant sale goes back to 1997, when Granger and some parents started the event to help raise money for Crichton Public School. When the school closed in 1999, the group approached the Crichton Community Council to see if it was still worthwhile to hold the fundraiser. Since 2000, the council has held the sale in front of Stanley Park’s field house. The profits from the sale, which range from $1,000 to $2,000 a year, help fund community needs such as rink

maintenance in the winter, play structures for the park, community events and activities throughout the year. The plants, which range in colours but are all annuals, have been provided by the same local gardener, Denis Lemieux, since the sale first started. “Deni’s plants are simply the best,” Granger said. After 15 years, Granger said she never thought she would still be organizing the event, but added she also couldn’t imagine the sale not going ahead during Mother’s Day weekend. “The biggest thing I have learned over the years is that people really look forward to it,” she said. “I know that every year I think that we have to have the plant sale. It is great to have that community event. People expect it.” Of course, Granger added, the sale would not be possible if it weren’t for the faithful volunteers who come out year after year and spend more than 12 hours selling plants to neighbours. “We have a good base of

volunteers -- over the last 15 years, we have the same people come out, including community gardening experts. It’s really great, and it’s(a) nice way to meet up and talk to your neighbours each spring.” Residents come out every year regardless of the weather to support the weather, said Granger. “We have had some dreadful Saturdays over the years, but still, people (came) out and bought their flowers,” she said. The prices are competitive with the Byward and Parkdale Markets in an effort to keep gardeners coming back every year, said Granger. Aside from plants, the event sells anywhere from 90 to 150 hanging baskets every year. “The quality of plants is really good. The hanging pots are the best. They look great all season and we have all the usual suspects, the flowers you would be looking for in greenhouse.” The sale starts at 8 a.m. at 193 Stanley Park.

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City’s Arts Court appeal quashed at OMB City can move ahead with $34-million redevelopment plan Laura Mueller

laura.mueller@metroland.com

News - The city’s ambitious Arts Court redevelopment can proceed after the Ontario Municipal Board overturned a challenge to the $34million project. The board overturned an appeal to the development at 60-70 Waller St. on the grounds that it was too tall and lacked enough parking or access to amenities. The appeal was filed by Graham Gleddie, who lives nearby.

In the written decision, the OMB’s Richard Makuch wrote that a cross-examination of Gleddie during the appeal only served to strengthen the city’s case. Gleddie and his supporters didn’t present any compelling evidence to make their case, other than personal anecdotes “typical of any downtown setting” about the lack of green space and parking and excessive building heights. Last August, city council approved the rezoning allowing a total height of 23 storeys, which included 17 storeys for residential, hotel or office use above a complex including a new Ottawa Art Gallery, 225-seat screening room, black box theatre and classrooms for the nearby University of Ottawa. No parking needed to be provided. The Ontario Municipal Board decision noted that Arts Court is within 600 metres of the future light-rail station at the Rideau Centre and

the availability of parking at the mall and in the nearby ByWard Market. Makuch declared it was “entirely appropriate that parking be reduced/eliminated on this site to support the growth of rapid transit,” according to a summary of the decision sent by city clerk and solicitor, Rick O’Connor. Last fall, Rideau-Vanier Coun. Mathieu Fleury said he and some of the arts groups that will be tenants in the facility were concerned about the lack of parking. Since Arts Court is intended to be a citywide hub for everything from the Ottawa Art Gallery to dance and media arts, patrons will come from farther afield and will need places to park, Fleury said in November. The board also sided with the city on the height of the tower, which is part of the plan to fund the project. Selling the rights to build a tower above the city’s land is expected to raise around $4.5 million.

The board was satisfied that the height of the building is was in keeping with the city’s Official Plan policies guiding future development. A tall building has been anticipated for that site in the city’s planning policy documents for some time, the decision notes. Given the configuration of the site, which includes a number of low-rise buildings with a tower in the northeast corner, the board was satisfied there would be enough distance separating the tower from potential future tall buildings in the area. The appeal also listed concern over a lack of amenities in the area, but the board accepted the city’s contention that the site is within walking distance of parks, the Rideau Centre and a number of tourist attractions. If everything goes to plan, the city expects to open the expanded Arts Court complex in 2017.

RAISING FUNDS TO HELP KIDS WITH CANCER THIS YEAR’S EVENT WILL BE HELD AT THE CANADIAN WAR MUSEUM & LEBRETON FLATS WITH

LANE REDUCTIONS/ROAD CLOSURES IN EFFECT:

OTTAWA RIVER PARKWAY 6 AM - 1 PM | Booth St. to Island Park Dr. OTTAWA RIVER PARKWAY 8 AM - 12:30 PM | Island Park Dr. to Carling Ave. WELLINGTON STREET EASTBOUND (Booth St. to Lyon St.) 8 AM - 11 AM | Eastbound lane reduction Booth St. to Lyon St. WELLINGTON STREET WESTBOUND (Sussex St. to Booth St.) 10 AM - 1 PM | Westbound lane reduction Sussex Dr. to Lyon St. PORTAGE BRIDGE 10 AM - 1 PM | Closed both directions LYON STREET (Wellington St. to Laurier Ave.) 8 AM - 10 AM LAURIER AVENUE (Lyon St. to Queen Elizabeth Dr. on ramp) 8 AM - 11 AM | Lyon St. to Elgin St. closed to all but crossing traffic LAURIER AVENUE 8 AM - 11 AM | Eastbound lanes Elgin St. to Nicholas St. (Partial Closure) QUEEN ELIZABETH DRIVE 8 AM - 11 AM PRINCE OF WALES DRIVE 8 AM - 11:15 AM | Northbound lane Preston St. to Heron Rd. (Partial Closure)

SUNDAY MAY 4 2014

6 AM – 1 PM

HERON ROAD (Prince of Wales Dr. to Riverside Dr.) 8 AM - 11:30 AM | Lane reductions Prince of Wales Dr. to Riverside Dr. VINCENT MASSEY PARK ACCESS 8 AM - 11:30 AM RIVERSIDE ROAD (Heron Rd. to Hogs Back) 8 AM - 11:30 AM | Southbound lane reduction Heron Rd. to Hogs Back Rd. HOGS BACK (Riverside Dr. to Prince of Wales Dr.) 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM | Westbound lane Riverside Dr. to Colonel By Dr. COLONEL BY DRIVE 8:30 AM - 12:15 PM SUSSEX DRIVE 9 AM - 12:30 PM | Rideau St. to Rockliffe Pkwy. Local access to Notre Dame Basilica from St. Patrick St. ROCKCLIFFE PARKWAY 9 AM - 12:30 PM | Sussex Dr. To St. Joseph Blvd. Local access to Aviation Museum and Rockliffe Flying Club from Aviation Pkwy. CUT OFF LOCATIONS Laurier St. @ Elgin St. Queen Elizabeth Dr. @ Preston St. (Dows Lake) 11 AM Colonel By Dr. @ Rideau St. Governor General Roundabout

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Students from Mindware Academy will an event on May 1 to help raise money and awareness for Free the Children.

Mindware kids want to make a difference Michelle Nash

Michelle.nash@metroland.com

News - Mindware Academy students have launched a year-long campaign to help make a difference to children in Third World countries. The school recently attended Free the Children’s Me to We concert at the Canadian Tire Centre. Moved by the stories from the event, the students immediately wanted to find a way to help.

To start, the school will host a fundraiser on May 1 from 2 to 3:30 p.m. The event will include a bake sale, a coin drive and hand-made Kenyan jewelry will be for sale. Mindware spokesperson Kate Kennery-Murphy said the event was organized because the students at the school were so inspired by the Me to We concert many felt it was important to help do their part to make a change. Some children will also be tak-

ing a vow of silence on the day, to help bring awareness to those who do not have a voice. Any money raised from the fundraiser will go towards Free the Children initiatives, which include helping children around the world thrive by building schools, offering income opportunities, farming and clean water initiatives and adopting villages. The event is open to everyone. More information about the event is available at mindware.ca

Brier Dodge/Metroland

All the trimmings Mohammad Javid Atefypour gives two thumbs up to the Easter dinner served at the Ottawa Mission on Easter Monday, April 21. The Ottawa Mission served 2,780 meals over six hours during the annual event. The meal was cooked and served by dozens of volunteers, and supported by community donations.

ADVERTISEMENT

Red Skelton Tribute

“Good Night and May God Bless”

On May 6 at the Shenkman Arts Centre, tribute artist Tom Mullica will perform a one-man show bringing these and other characters to life. “Good Night and May God Bless: A Tribute to Red Skelton” aims to capture the gentle sweetness and improvisational genius of the late comedy legend, who would have been 100 years old this year.

TUESDAY, MAY 6th, 2014 - 7:00PM Shenkman Arts Centre, 245 Centrum Blvd., Orléans, ON

Tickets available at the Box Office 613-580-2700 or online www.shenkmanarts.ca Adult $32.50 | Senior $27.50 | Child/Teen $15.00 plust HST and applicable box office fees 36

Orléans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

As a rising comic magician in Atlanta, Ga., Mullica met Skelton in the early 1980’s. They began a lasting, personal relationship that included some valuable advice from veteran to protégé: clean up the language,

avoid jokes built on negative racial stereotypes, and always perform as though there are children in the crowd. After Skelton’s death in 1997, Mullica penned a show in tribute to his good friend. Skelton’s daughter Valentina saw the show for the first time last year. “I thought it was my dad on stage, but it was Tom. His mannerisms and gestures were just like my father’s” she said. “What a treat to see a true impressionist.” Tickets to the show are available at the Shenkman Arts Centre, 245 Centrum Boulevard, Orleans, Ontario www.shenkmanarts.ca

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Didn’t get your War Amps key tags in the mail? Order them today!

Easter on the farm Orléans girl, Avery Lackey-Diguer, 2, pets a baby lamb in the barns at the Canadian Agriculture and Food Museum on Easter Monday, April 21. Besides the normal exhibits and animal viewings, the museum set up a special Easter egg hunt for children over the long weekend. Brier Dodge/Metroland

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GET ALL MEMBERS OF THE FAMILY INVOLVED IN YOUR CHARITABLE GIVING the perfect amount to leave children is enough “money so that they would feel they could do anything, but not so much that they could do nothing. ” One of the most challenging estate planning questions that parents have to wrestle with is how much of their estate should they leave to their children. As Warren Buffet once famously remarked,

Once parents have provided an appropriate amount of financial support to their children, they are often motivated to give back to the community. An increasing number of Canadian families are establishing family foundations in order to encourage all family members to get involved in the family’s charitable giving.

A private foundation is particularly well-suited to a family situation. Family members can be directors or trustees of the foundation and play an active role in deciding how funds will be managed and what charities will be supported by the foundation. Families find that the foundation keeps the family connected and parents can pass along their beliefs and values to children and grandchildren.

Apart from bringing the family together • Significant tax planning opportunities in order to promote charitable giving, a for the family. private family foundation has numerous Although there are costs associated with other benefits including: the establishment of a family foundation, • The ability of the family to decide on a number of financial institutions can an ongoing basis which charitable assist families with the establishment of organizations it will support; a foundation and many of the ongoing • The opportunity to create a legacy which administrative services. will continue once the parents have passed away;

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Scouts look to pay it forward erin.mccracken@metroland.com

Community - Sarah Djuric knows first hand that paying it forward doesn’t just benefit others. “Personally, I do feel it really does stay with you,” the 16-year-old said of the feeling she gets when she performs random acts of kindness for family members, neighbours or strangers. “It gives you a really big sense of fulfillment.” It’s a message the Elmvale resident has learned and benefited from during her five years in Scouts, thanks to Scouts Canada’s annual Good Turn Week, which happens this year from April 26 to May 4. The nine-day event, which spans the country, is a call to action in which Scouts challenge Canadians to do one good turn for others and ask the recipients to pay it forward. Good Turn Week is now in its fifth year, and scouting members of all ages, from Beavers to Rovers, continue to think up different ways of performing good deeds. “Last year I made a point of holding 100 doors open through the week,” said Djuric, whose desire to give back extends beyond Scouts to her involvement as a Grade 11 student council representative at Hillcrest High School. “Some people noticed and said thank you,” she said of the reaction she received, adding that others will simply walk by. Regardless of the response, Djuric said she enjoys doing nice things for others, whether it’s holding doors open or raking her neighbours’ leaves. “It does make you feel good even if the per-

son doesn’t appreciate it (vocally) as much as someone else does,” explained Djuric, who is in the Venturer level of Scouts. To further mark Good Turn Week, Scouts Canada is funding 12 large-scale service projects across Canada and beyond, from sprucing up a service club’s building and food drives to making care packages for the homeless and renovating a school’s kitchen in Mexico. But small-scale efforts can also make a huge impact on someone’s day, said Djuric said, adding that a recent York University study showed that the positive feeling that comes receiving a random act of kindness can stay with a person for six months. “It could be holding the door for someone or buying a coffee for someone behind you in line,” she said. “I’ve had people buy me a coffee. It’s really cool. It makes you feel really good.” In fact, she’s been in line when another customer ahead of her at the cash has purchased coffees for the next 10 people. She said she could never fathom the idea of not giving up her seat on a public transit bus to a senior, someone who is pregnant, or anyone in need. “It should be, ‘I want to do this,’” she said. A survey done last year on behalf of Scouts Canada looked at how often Canadians do good deeds for others and determined that 51 per cent of Canadians benefit from good turns at least once a month. However, only 20 per cent of Canadians are the recipients of a good turn twice a week or more.

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Love filing income tax? Author of Tax is Not a Four-Letter Word says paying taxes is a good thing Derek Dunn

derek.dunn@metroland.com

News – Next to weather, Canadians love to commiserate over taxes; especially when income-tax filing season is at hand. Not so much Alex Himelfarb. He wants to change the way Canadians view paying taxes. From the H&R Block commercials bemoaning ‘tax pain’ in the backside to the dominant narrative that public revenue is money forcibly taken from hardworking taxpayers: the assumption is taxes are bad. And any person or party calling for a tax hike is laughably unfit to rule. Himelfarb is co-editor of Tax is Not a Four-Letter Word – A Different Take on Taxes in Canada. The compilation of essays by many leading experts explores vari-

ous aspects of tax policy. Himelfarb filed already, well ahead of the May 5 extended deadline. Doing so didn’t in the least faze this Ottawa resident and Government of Canada’s former most-senior non-political official. “I was just fine with filing my taxes,” said Himelfarb, one-time clerk of the privy council. “I’ve had a truly privileged life. I’m the son of immigrants and this country has done much for us.” But what of those who are not grateful for government services? those who either don’t appreciate or need programs like welfare or the old age pension system, public education or universal healthcare? Himelfarb says class stratification can reach such extremes that the ultra rich be-

lieves it is entitled to all it has, that it earned its wealth (even if inherited or had educated employees). Conversely, the poor can loose all hope and believe the system is rigged. Meanwhile the middle class will resent those beneath and forgive those above. “That’s why we need to have a conversation on how we can restore the public good,” he said. “The book is really about taxes as a proxy for how we think about our obligations toward one another and our responsibilities to the public good.” The great bulk of taxes are used to pay for social programs that benefit the vast majority of Canadians, a point Himelfarb says has been lost amid the last 35 years of Thatcherism and Reaganomics that insist on decreasing taxes ad infinitum. The issue hasn’t always been as polarized between left and right. From the early to mid-20th century most

progressive social programs in the U.S. and Canada were put in place by rightwing administrations trying to stave off communism. Leftwingers were often libertarians suspicious of government as an instrument of tycoons and their corporations. When the generation that won the Second World War returned from Europe both sides favoured social programs to aid the transition back to civilian life. “That’s why left and right don’t work very well. Progressives understand the state is necessary to contain the market and a strong civil society is needed to contain the state.” That’s why he talks about value for tax dollars, as do all moderates, because blind trust in the state is as foolish as blind trust in the markets. Both are capable of tyranny. LESS MEANS MORE

But what of the commonly held refrain: tax people and corporations less and business will thrive, creating more jobs and more tax revenue? Trickledown economics

has been tried for the past 35 years, culminating in the 2008 economic meltdown caused by deregulation and profit concentration, Himelfarb indicated. He cited a recent bipartisan Congressional Research Service study showing tax cuts didn’t deliver on their promises. Then there are the obvious successes in social welfare nations in northern Europe where standard of living and happiness indicators far surpass the laissez-faire economies of the U.S. and Japan. “The market is not everything. Where’s the evidence that tax cuts deliver anything but suffering and pain,” he said. Suffering and pain is something tax cut advocates often point to, saying the private sector is suffering therefore the public sector must be reduced. But most mainstream economists agree that, when in recession or near recession there must be stimulus spending on the public side to bolster the economy; and when the economy rebounds, governments should scale back. That is exactly what the late

federal finance minister Jim Flahety eventually agreed to do. Himelfarb agrees that a large government presence in the economy cushions against booms and busts. Sunshine lists and union bashing among cynics contribute to a culture that denigrates the public sector. Himelfarb said the highest level public servants are paid less than counterparts in the corporate world. But that is a weak response for those who say the highest paid in both sectors are raking in too much. He added that it is untrue that public servants don’t contribute anything. To those who advocate austerity measures in the public sector, they need to explain why it is good for traffic gridlock, escalating post-secondary costs, healthcare wait lines and more to continue. “Let’s at least force our politicians to answer questions,” he said. “They are fond of asking how much a new idea is going to cost, but not what is lost when they cut taxes.” See AUTHOR, page 41

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Authors pens book about Canadian taxes Continued from page 40

As for those who say they can’t pay any more; those on fix incomes, or among the working class: it’s always better to pool money rather than go it alone, Himelfarb indicated, and lower income citizens tend to get back more than they pay in. To others, some of whom fake hardship to mask greed: “As for the ‘If I have suffered, others should suffer,’ I would just say that’s a race to the bottom that I don’t want to be a part of.” TAX-AND-SPENDERS

Another common refrain is this-or-that candidate is ‘just another tax-and-spend’ Liberal or New Democrat. It’s one of many catch phrases mouthed by neo-cons on talk radio and in most daily newspapers that often goes unchallenged, as if the right capitalizes off of base emotions while the left is fumbling through the rules of rational debate. Himelfarb, instead, turns it around. “Yes, they are tax-and-spenders. All politicians tax and spend. That’s what they do: tax, spend, and reallocate,” he said. “It’s not a question of those who don’t versus those who do. Even neo-conservatives tax and spend. It’s just a question on what: they tax and spend on military; progressives tax and spend on health care and social justice.” However, a recent example of a tax cut was when in 2006 newly elected Prime Minister Stephen Harper, against the advice of most economists, cut the GST from 14 to 12 per cent. It made for a nice photo opt, critics said, but also cost $14 billion a year in revenue that could have been put back

into roads, bridges and other desperately needed infrastructure upgrades. “It wasn’t a surprise that he did it. He said it was going to do it. But that the opposition barely pushed back - that was the surprise. We are not just taxpayers. We are citizens who want to act in the common good.” He called it a question of taxing fairly and spending wisely. That’s the conversation he eventually wants the public to swing back toward. And, as a confessed optimist, he believes it is happening – particularly at the municipal level, the end point for downloading cutbacks. Progressive mayors are elected in Vancouver, Edmonton and Calgary, and Halifax. New Yorkers elected a mayor who promised to increase taxes on the city’s wealthiest citizens. Republicans are doing a rethink on where the Tea Party has led them, which is out of touch with the majority of disenfranchised voters. U.S. President Barak Obama talks a lot about equality; fed-

eral Liberal leader Justin Trudeau talks about the middle class, but also about inequality; federal NDP leader Thomas Mulcair would roll back corporate tax cuts and possibly increase capital gains taxes, though he vowed to freeze individual income taxes. Himelfarb thinks many 2015 municipal elections will be focused on equality issues. “I feel like there is something happening out there.” He said more and more citizens are catching on to the fallacy of the rugged individual fighting the world to satisfy his greed for material gain. Even the English philosopher Thomas Hobbes, a conservative who famously said the whole is worth more than the sum of its parts, would have trouble identifying with today’s neo-conservative, Himelfarb said. “It’s not clear what they are trying to conserve,” he said. “Look, we are more than consumers and taxpayers with no obligations to one another. We are citizens figuring out what kind of future we want and are trying to build it.”

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The MacSkmimming Outdoor Education Centre in Cumberland hosted Connaught Public School students to celebrate the start of the The Weston Family Environmental Leaders of Tomorrow Program on April 16. Seven Grade 6 classes this year will take part in the multi-day program, and seven classes the next school year. This year, Hawthorne Public School, Roberta Bondar Public School, Cambridge Street Community Public School, Severn Avenue Public School, Connaught Public School, Queen Elizabeth Public School and W.E Gowling Public School will take part in the program.

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Public Meetings All public meetings will be held at Ottawa City Hall, 110 Laurier Avenue West, unless otherwise noted. For a complete agenda and updates, please sign up for e-mail alerts or visit Public Meetings and Notices on ottawa.ca, or call 3-1-1.

or apply on-line at www.ottawacommunitynews.com

Monday, May 5 Ottawa Board of Health 5 p.m., Champlain Room

Wednesday, May 7 Transportation Committee 9:30 a.m., Champlain Room

Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee 6 p.m., West Carleton Community Complex, Roly Armitage Hall, 5670 Carp Road

Thursday, May 8 Built Heritage Sub-Committee 1:30 p.m., Champlain Room

Tuesday, May 6 Finance and Economic Development Committee 9:30 a.m., Champlain Room 1121.R0012421001

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Orléans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

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Makerspace ready to roll at Ottawa Public Library Laura Mueller

laura.mueller@metroland.com

News - Ottawa officially became the third city in Canada to open a “makerspace” on April 23. The small-scale fabrication facility features tools like a 3D scanner, 3D printers and a laser cutter available for the public to use. It’s an idea that’s taking off in the United States and the American government helped bring the concept here to Ottawa. Equipment in the space, which also includes video equipment, software and a green screen, was purchased by the U.S. Embassy. It’s part of the embassy’s American Corners program, which aims to make information about the States and its culture available in other countries. There are a total of 850 American Corners in 169 countries. “This is a trend we see more and more,” said Judith Bryan, public affairs officer at the U.S. Embassy. Some of the American Corners in Russia, where the program began 20 years ago, are now being converted into similar makerspaces, she said. The concept is to promote libraries and community spaces as places for a new type of learning – learning driven by doing something new and creating things. “It’s free to the public and it’s accessible,” Bryan said. “People can come together and figure out new things and how to do them.” Using the space is free, but materials are not. There is a cost if people want to do something like print a 3D object. Materials for the 3D printer – a white plastic that can be painted – cost 30 cents per gram. Pieces of wood or plastic to use in the laser cutter cost $2 to $5, but people can bring their own materials to cut. Payments must be made by Vendard, which is part of Ottawa Public Library cards and can be loaded with money at any library branch. Small equipment like video cameras and 3D scanners can be borrowed and taken outside the makerspace room, but not outside the Centrepointe library branch, and there is a fee if the equipment is returned

late. Equipment can be booked by emailing imagine@biblioottawalibrary.ca. A booking web form will soon be available at biblioottawalibrary.ca/en/imaginespace. The makerspace, which is called Imagine Space, is open in at the Centrepointe branch every afternoon, with longer hours on Friday and Saturday. Staff will be available to help people learn to use the equipment.

Judith Bryan of the U.S. Embassy shows off a laser-cut image of the logo for the new makerspace at the Centrepointe library branch. The embassy helped fund the equipment for the new facility. Laura Mueller/Metroland

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A Metroland Special series part 1

Can you afford to retire? “They (CPP) were always meant to provide a base so that the private sector and private savings can fill in the gap. CPP just News -No one ever said growing old in Ontario would be doesn’t provide enough to live on.” The public may have noticed that seldom does CARP use easy. Take for instance, the increased health concerns, intensified its full name anymore. Even their website doesn’t include the wrinkles and the whole notion that there’s less time ahead of you name: “Canadian Association of Retired Persons.” “That’s because the name isn’t really relevant anymore since than behind you. But, at least we have our retirement years to look forward too, right? Retirement is the time in life when we half of our 300,000 members either can’t (afford to) retire, or put away the work boots and enjoy life — taking trips to tropic choose not to,” Eng said. Several ideas have been floated locations, maybe touring Europe, or finally in recent months on how to adbuying that luxury car we could dress the shortfall in retirement never afford. savings. And, of course, we can spend One solution would see an more time with family. increase in mandatory contribuIt’s the life we’ve dreamed of, tions to CPP with the goal of as promised by those popular substantially raising CPP pension Freedom 55 and Pacific Life inpayments and doubling the cursurance company commercials. rent maximum yearly payout of Well, Deaven Lewis didn’t $12,000. get that memo. Even at the ripe Funding such an expansion of old age of 66, the Malton father the CPP would require a hike to of two can only dream of retirepremiums paid by workers and ment. employers. “Is that a joke?” he replies, when The Canadian Labour Conasked if she has any plans to give gress argues that even a modest up his part-time job at the Metro increase to CPP could solve the grocery store in Brampton. “If I pension crisis. retire now, I’ll be living on beans, A worker earning $47,200 or water and Kraft Dinner. At least more per year, for example, could this job allows me a little disposgradually double future CPP able income.” benefits with an initial premium Lewis, a former financial servicincrease of 9 cents an hour, or es officer in the banking industry, is $3.57 a week. part of Ontario’s looming pension That’s less than the cost of a crisis — Baby Boomers and future newspaper subscription, the Lagenerations who are in jeopardy of bour Congress notes. living in poverty as a result of an inHowever, critics of this opcreased life expectancy and a lack (BMO Financial Group tion, included among them the of financial foresight. survey, March 2014) Canadian Federation of IndepenLewis said he made a generous dent Business, as well as Quebec salary in commercial services. But, and Alberta, and to some extent he never had a pension plan outside the federal government, have of CPP. He and his wife Deanna live deemed mandatory increases a “job killer.” in a semi-detached home in Erin Calling it an added tax on business, opponents say a mandaMills, which they are still paying a mortgage on. The couple have some retirement savings put away in the form of Registered tory pension plan could put the province at a competitive disadvantage. Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs). The other pension fix being touted is a voluntary plan called “But if I could go back, I would have definitely looked for a work pension plan, not much I can do about that now,” she said. According to the Ontario government, less than 35 per cent of workers in the province have a pension plan at work, while only If I retire now, I’ll be living on beans, water 28 per cent of private sector workers belong to a pension plan. and Kraft Dinner. At least this job allows me Without a proper fix to Canada’s pension system, many mida little disposable income.” dle-income earners risk retiring without a fiscal safety net. “The cost of not doing anything is the real measure here,” said Deavan Lewis, brampton resident Ontario Finance Minister Charles Sousa. “Imagine the tsunami of retirees that are going to come up the system, relying on CPP and not having anything much more Pooled Registered Pension Plans (PRPP). Under PRPPs, the self-employed or employees of companies to support them. It’s going to be a huge cost to our social prowithout pension plans, could make voluntary contributions to a grams.” There is growing consensus in Canada that many middle- professionally managed pooled fund. The payout would depend on individual contribution and on income workers without a workplace pension plan will face a investments returns the fund generates. lower standard of living in their retirement years. Critics of that option, however, counter that unlike CPP, However, what many financial and government experts can’t PRPPs won’t require employers to contribute anything. agree on is how to solve this looming problem. On top of that, there are concerns a large number of Canadi“I really can’t believe people expect to get by on just CPP,” said Susan Eng, vice-president for Advocacy at the Canadian ans could choose not to buy into the plan. Association of Retired Persons (CARP), the country’s foremost advocacy group for seniors. See MAKE, page 45 By PETER CRISCIONE AND LOUIE ROSELLA

ALL WORK AND NO PLAY: Ontario’s Retirement Crisis

44

Orléans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

Survey

How will you fund your retirement?

• CPP: 90% • RRSPs: 88% • Part-time job: 59% • Sell home: 49% • Win lottery: 34%


A metroland special series part 1

Make workplace pensions mandatory: lobbyist Continued from page 44

Some question whether people who now don’t currently contribute to an RRSP would want to contribute to a voluntary plan. At a time when traditional company pensions are rapidly disappearing, and CPP benefits are capped annually at $12,000, there is agreed sentiment that doing nothing will leave millions of middle-class earners vulnerable in retirement years. Several provincial finance ministers, including Sousa, have stepped forward to urge the federal government to move on reforms, including implementing modest increases to CPP contributions. But calls to prop up the federal program have ultimately fallen on deaf ears. Former Canadian Finance Minister Jim Flaherty said the na-

Given the amount that the CPP ... pays out, Canadians should not rely on them as a primary source of income to fund their retirement. Susan Eng, retirement savings expert

tion’s economy isn’t strong enough to support the increased taxation needed to bolster the fund. Policymakers are nervous about declining savings, increased household debt and an overheated housing market. Flaherty had suggested taking more out of incomes of most of the working population isn’t a sound idea. “Right now the federal government is apprehensive about doing any of this, which is strange because it is in the benefit of Canadians in the long term,” Sousa said. Frustrated by federal foot-dragging, the province is drafting its own vision for an Ontario Pension Plan to supplement the CPP. Earlier this year, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne appointed former prime minister Paul Martin as a special adviser on pensions. Martin will contribute to a technical panel comprised of pension experts. Eng and other retirement savings experts suggest that individuals require 50-70 per cent of their pre-retirement income to maintain their standard of living in retirement. Most Ontarians can’t save enough to meet that target. Eng says, at best, with CPP and Old Age Security combined, one can earn about $18,000 annually post-retirement. Most Ontarians earn about $9,000 from CPP and Old Age Se-

curity, she said, with the average monthly payout less than $600. Chris Buttigieg, senior manager, Wealth Planning Strategy for BMO Financial Group, says sole dependence on CPP after retirement is a dire mistake. “Given the amount that the CPP ... pays out, Canadians should not rely on them as a primary source of income to fund their retirement,” he said. “Rather, they should consider the CPP … to be a supplementary component of their overall retirement income solution and focus on creating their very own personal pension plan by contributing to an RRSP on a regular basis.” Others are counting on the sale of a home as a way to fund retirement. That’s exactly what Sung Joo Park, a self-employed caterer, did after she turned 60. Park, 76, lives in a rented apartment in Mississauga. Her husband, Jong Joo Park, 82, died earlier this year. Neither one of them had a private pension plan. “It’s hard,” she said. “Life was a lot easier 20 years ago.”

Eng is calling on Ontario to make workplace pension plans mandatory. “It has to come into existence and somebody has to create it,” she said. Details on an Ontario plan still need to be ironed out. The plan though would likely be run by an independent organization at arms-length from the provincial government. It would also use a defined contribution system that allows workers the choice to opt out. Sousa is keen on the idea of a mandatory system with an optout clause, similar to what’s being done in Quebec and also in other countries. The Liberals remain steadfast on introducing new reforms. But any new pension would have to be approved by the Ontario legislature where the Liberals hold minority status. If the opposition parties vote down the government, the province will face an election, and a pension scheme for Ontario could be put on hold.

Nothing is guaranteed, not even your private pension By LOUIE ROSELLA Staff

News - If you’re enrolled in a pension plan, chances are your money is safe. Maybe. Perry Quinton, vice-president of marketing at Investor Education Fund (IEF), a non-profit organization founded by the Ontario Securities Commission, says anyone who is either looking for work or already employed should view privately-funded pension plans as a necessity. “It can be free money that if you don’t sign up for it, you’re not going to get it,” she says. “Any kind of incentive that forces you to save money is brilliant.” Quinton and her organization say there are mainly two types of private pension plans of-

fered in Ontario: • a defined benefit pension plan, where the employer promises a specified monthly benefit on retirement that is pre-determined by a formula. It’s up to the employer to deliver what they promised when you retire. If a plan doesn’t have enough money, the employer will have to put more money into the fund. • a defined contribution pension plan or Group Registered Retirement Savings Plan (Group RRSP), in which both you and your employer can put money into the plan. In either case, a trust company or insurance company holds this money in a separate account for you. You, not the company, own that money. Even if your employer goes bankrupt, your money is safe. Of course, you can always lose some or all

of your money if the market crashes or if you don’t invest it wisely, the IEF says. Your pension plan should not run out of money if the employer manages the fund properly, Quinton says. Even if the worst happens, some of your pension savings may be protected. In Ontario, most employers of defined benefit plans pay a yearly fee to Ontario’s Pensions Benefits Guarantee Fund. This fund insures the first $1,000 of an employee’s monthly pension in case the employer goes bankrupt. It’s the only fund of this type in Canada. However, not even this unique fund will guarantee that an employee gets all of his/her promised pension, Quinton says, noting the infamous Nortel Networks bankruptcy case in which employees didn’t receive all of their

promised pension. Should an employee be fired or choose to leave the company, depending on the type of plan, he/she may have the option of transferring their pension earnings into another plan, Quinton says. They could also leave it where it is and collect at time of retirement or transfer into a locked-in retirement savings account (LIRA), which works much like an RRSP. There is always the chance that a company chooses to shut down its pension plan, which it can do at anytime. “If the plan was properly funded, you should get everything you have earned so far,” Quinton says. However, if the plan was underfunded, you may not get all you’re promised, Quinton says. Orléans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

45


Local events and happenings over the coming weeks — free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: orleans@metroland.com The Gloucester North Lions Club is offering a free vision screening for children at Place D’Orleans from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Please note that this is not a complete eye examination by a doctor and is designed to identify children who have trouble seeing things at a distance, up close, or who have difficulty making both eyes work together. No attempt will be made to check the health of the eyes. DumpthisDump2 (Carlsbad Springs) and DumptheDumpNow (Russell) are holding a Trivia Night fundraiser at 7 p.m. at the Russell House Pub, 108 Mill St. in Russell. Each team needs to have six players at $10 per player. To register, send an email to dumpthisdump2@gmail.com before

April 18. The Orleans Tennis Club hosts their 2014 season opening from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. We offer leagues, tournaments, practice sessions, half day summer camps and much more. Come in to register at 1257 Joseph Drouin Ave. or visit us at www. orleanstennisclub.ca. Scotland garage and vendor sale goes rain or shine from 10 a.m to 3 p.m. at Sir Wilfrid Laurier Secondary School on Tenth Line. For further information please contact Kim at bskye@ hotmail.com. Greater Orleans Canada Day Celebration Inc. hosts a Canadian Trivia Night at the Queenswood Heights

Community Centre at1485 Duford Dr. Registration is at 6 p.m. and the event runs from 7:30 to 10 p.m. The cost is $20 per person or $140 per team. Registration: 6:00 p.m. event runs: 7:30-10:00 p.m. Contact Zybina Richards at ellz@rogers.com or call 613-837-7623

May 3 and 4

The Dominion (National) Darts Championship takes place between 9 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. at Branch 632, the Royal Canadian Legion, 800 Taylor Creek Dr. Opening ceremonies at 9 a.m. on Saturday and closing ceremonies will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Sunday.

NOTICE OF SUBMISSION OF TRANSPORTATION ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY REPORT Limoges Road (County Road 5) Underpass Rehabilitation Class Environmental Assessment and Detailed Design The Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO) retained Dillon Consulting Limited to complete the design and Class Environmental Assessment (EA) for the rehabilitation of the Limoges Road (County Road 5) Underpass on Highway 417. The underpass is on the boundary of the Municipality of the Nation and the Township of Russell, County of Prescott and Russell (G.W.P. 313-01-01). The rehabilitation will be completed in four stages over three years. During the spring and fall, one lane of traffic will be maintained on Limoges Road during construction, with traffic signals used to allow two directions of travel. For approximately seven weeks in the summer, Limoges Road will be restored to one lane in each direction. The traffic management strategy addresses concerns about the potential for traffic to back up on Highway 417 during construction. Subject to funding and approvals, construction is anticipated to begin in the fall of 2014 and be completed in 2016. The study was completed in accordance with the requirements of MTO’s Class Environmental Assessment for Provincial Transportation Facilities (2000) for a Group ‘B’ project. The Transportation Environmental Study Report (TESR) is being made available for a 30-day review period in accordance with the requirements of the Environmental Assessment Act and MTO’s Class EA. The TESR documents the environmental assessment process completed, key design decisions and potential environmental impacts and mitigation measures. The TESR is available for review online at www.EastOntarioBridges.ca and at the following locations during normal business hours from May 2, 2014 to June 2, 2014: Limoges Municipal Library 205 Limoges Road Limoges, ON

The Nation Municipality 958 Route 500 West Casselman, ON

Township of Russell 717 Notre-Dame Street Embrun, ON

Interested persons are encouraged to review the TESR and provide comments by June 2, 2014. If, after consulting with the Ministry’s consultants and staff, you have serious unresolved concerns, you have the right to request the Minister of the Environment (Ferguson Block, 11th Floor, 77 Wellesley Street West, Toronto, ON M7A 2T5) to make a Part II Order (i.e. ‘bump-up’) for this project. A Part II Order may lead to the preparation of an Individual Environmental Assessment. A copy of the Part II Order request should be forwarded to the Ministry of Transportation at the addresses below. If there are no outstanding concerns after June 2, 2014, the project will be considered to have met the requirements of the Class EA. Information collected will be used in accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act and the Access to Information Act. With the exception of personal information, all comments will become part of the public record. Jeff Matthews, P.Eng., Project Manager or Sabrina Stanlake, RPP, Planner Dillon Consulting Limited 130 Dufferin Avenue, Suite 1400 London, ON N6A 5R2 toll-free: 1-888-345-5668 ext. 1235 fax: 519-672-8209 e-mail: LimogesBridge@dillon.ca

Darren Waters, P.Eng. Senior Project Engineer Ministry of Transportation 1355 John Counter Boulevard Kingston, ON N7L 5A3 tel: 1-800-267-0295 ext. 4874 fax: 613-540-5140 e-mail: Darren.Waters@ontario.ca

May 4

Orléans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

The goal of the Miracle League of Ottawa is for every child to play the game of baseball. Join us 2 p.m. at our new home, Notre Dames des Champs in Orleans, for an update on our exciting progress towards establishing Canada’s first Miracle Field and accessible playground structure. Our guest speaker will be former Major League Baseball pitcher Mike Kusiewicz. This will be a family friendly event with refreshments, face painting, clowns and pictures with Homer our mascot. For more information see www.miracleleagueofottawa.ca.

May 7 to 9

Giant rummage sale at Résidence Saint-Louis long term care facility, 879 Hiawatha Pk. This is a fundraising for the residents’ comfort. Everyone welcome.

May 8

Cardinal Creek Community Association annual general meeting from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at the South Fallingbrook Community Centre, 998 Valin St., next to Mapleridge Elementary School, to elect a new board of directors, acknowledge community volunteers and celebrate successes. From 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., the City of Ottawa will hold an open house for the Greater Cardinal Creek subwatershed management plan. There will also be a presentation by the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority about their Stream Watch program at 7:30 p.m. as they plan to sample Cardinal Creek this year. Our elected officials will also be present to provide an update on their priorities. Visit www. cardinalcreek.org/ for details.

May 13

The Gloucester Senior Adults’ Centre’s annual spring tea, quilt and art show at 2020 Ogilvie Rd. from 1 to 3 p.m. Come and enjoy a relaxing afternoon tea with goodies and feast your eyes on the work of our artists. Tickets are $5. Call 613-749-1974 to reserve your ticket or drop by weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

May 9

Coro Vivo Ottawa presents A Grand Night for Singing: 30 Years with CVO featuring memorable favourites of Coro Vivo Ottawa sung over the last 30 years. Guest musicians and reception at 8 p.m. at Orléans United Church, 1111 Orléans Blvd. Advance tickets at Leading Note, CD Warehouse and Compact Music or by calling 613-841-3902. Adults $25, children 14 and under free. Visit www.corovivoottawa.ca for information.

World Walking Day is a world-wide event that encourages people from all walks of life to gather and walk together. Registration is at 6 p.m. at Liam Maguire’s Restaurant, 1705 StLaurent Blvd, Ottawa. Free event and parking, choice of 5 or 10 km map walk , invitation to stay for refreshments after the walk. Contact: Benoît Pinsonneault at 613-746-9071 or see www.ottawavoyageurs.ca,

May 10

Rock & Roll Dinner & Dance at the Cumberland Lions Club, Maple Hall, 2552 Old Montreal Rd. Cocktails at 5:30 p.m. and dinner at 7 p.m. Limited number of $27 tickets and advance sale only. Contact Charlotte Kerluke at 613-265-8299 or visit www.cumberlandlions.ca.

May 10

Spring flower show – Spring Is In The Air – presented by the Gloucester Horticultural Society from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Place d’Orléans shopping mall, main hall, 110 Place d’Orléans Dr. The show

*

See our Flyer in today’s paper *Select areas only

46

features spring bulbs, vegetables and beautiful decorative arrangements. Visit www.gardenontario.org/site. php/glouster/about/meetings for information.

Enjoy a Tulipathon in Commissioners Park, across from Dow’s Lake, from 3 to 5 p.m. to raise funds for a multifaith housing initiative. Registration starts at 2:30 p.m. Celebration, certificates of participation, food and refreshments at around 4:15 p.m.

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news

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Scouts challenge Canadians to do good deeds during Good Turn Week Djuric is hoping to change that statistic for several people in her Elmvale community in the coming days. Her 18-member Venturer group is currently in the process of planning a clothing drive for a local shelter that will happen during Good Turn Week. They will be putting up posters to advertise

their campaign and making donation boxes available so that others can drop off their used children’s and women’s clothing. Everything collected will be given to a women’s shelter in the city. Scouts Canada touts the many benefits that can result from doing kind acts for others, from building stronger communities to youth empowerment to improved mental health.

This is why good turns shouldn’t just happen one week of the year, Djuric said. Last May, she and other members of her 101st Ottawa scouting troop, plus their parents, spent one day planting about 100 saplings in a Kilborn Avenue park. Thanks to Good Turn Week, Scouts of every age, from the very young to those in their late teens, are learning important lessons about giving

back that will stay with them for years to come, said Djuric. “You forget that you’re doing good deeds because it comes naturally after a while.” The public is encouraged to share their good deeds during Good Turn Week by submitting them to scouts.ca/goodturn, tweeting them using #goodturn or posting them on the Scouts Canada Facebook page. R0012669618

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Orléans News EMC - Thursday, May 1, 2014

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