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Inside Toddler

gets special welcome home

COMMUNITY

Berrigan Elementary School riases funds for UNICEF.

Car crash victim faces daily rehab

– Page 11

Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

NEWS

EMC news - When Natalie Rose Shearer was hit by a minivan in June doctors weren’t sure she would make the night, much less return home to her family in just six months. The two-year-old was hit by a minivan on Cymbeline Drive on June 21 while walking behind the stroller with her mother, Jennifer, and sister Grace. She darted out onto the road, was hit by the van and suffered life-threatening head, chest and internal injuries. Jennifer described the incident as a mother’s worst nightmare. “There was severe brain damage,” Jennifer said. “We weren’t sure she was going to survive.”

ParaTranspo services in the city’s rural areas have changed. – Page 20

NEWS

WELCOME

Nov. 3 was a day of celebrations at the Westcliffe community building on Seyton Drive where family and friends gathered to welcome the little girl. There was a bouncy castle, music, crafts and food. “She has been home since Thanksgiving, but I wanted a chance to hold a celebration and thank all the people that have lent us support over the last few months,” Jennifer said. Despite the celebrations, the toddler has a long road to recovery.

Grandmothers take to Parliament Hill to voice their concerns. – Page 29

See REHAB, page 3

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Down but not out Nepean Redskins running back Dobor Kollie, left, is taken down by Myers Riders linebacker Donovan MacLean during the National Capital Amateur Football Association’s B Cup Championship on Nov. 3. The peewee teams faced off in Orleans at the Millenium Sports Park, enduring biting winds and chilly drizzle to fight for the championship. The Redskins eventually took the cup with a final score of 29-13.

New hub: the bus stops here Cash from province provides extension to transit system Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

EMC news - A cash infusion from the province has fast-tracked an extension of the transitway near Baseline Station. Ottawa West-Nepean MPP and provincial Minister of Infrastructure Bob Chiarelli announced on Nov. 1 that the province will allocate $16.6 million to the project that would see the Transitway extend from the tunnel south of Baseline Road to Tallwood Drive, a distance of

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about 500 metres. The announcement was made at Algonquin College’s construction trades building, which stands beside the transitway. “There is a lot of congestion at Baseline Station,” Chiarelli said. “This will help improve the commute for Algonquin students and the western corridor served by the station.” Watson said the city set aside the same amount of money in the 2010-11 capital budget and hopes to get shovels in the ground near the end of 2013. Without the provincial dollars, the project likely would have been delayed until 2015. The original plan was to have a gradeseparated Transitway link from the tunnel and travel south to Norice Street. That won’t happen without money from the federal government. Chiarelli said the provincial govern-

ment had slated $12.9 billion for infrastructure in the last budget – compared with $6 billion pledged by the federal government. The new link will ease bus traffic onto bus-only lanes that run from Baseline Station south to Hunt Club Road. Chiarelli mentioned the possibility of a public-private partnership between the two levels of government and the college. “P3 Canada has funding for publicprivate partnership projects,” he said of the federal program. “There could be a partnership evolving out of this.” While Algonquin president Kent MacDonald said the college’s isn’t currently putting up cash to fund the extension, he did say a safe, simple commute is important to students. See PARKING, page 3

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Parking may expand as new transit hub is built Continued from page 1

“Students have said to us that accessibility and transportation are some of their top concerns,” he said. “We can’t do what we’re meant to do if the students can’t get here.” College Coun. Rick Chiarelli said the residents of Centrepointe have helped to shape a vision for the area that included the Centrepointe Theatre expansion and the new archives building on Tall-

wood. The Transitway is an important piece of that plan, he said. “A lot of the parking lots will be changed to structures,” he said, adding that will make room in surrounding areas to have buildings with a mix of uses. “Twenty thousand people from the surrounding community are served by this transit station,” he said. “It will be the transit hub of the west end, handing 250,000 people per day.”

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Natalie Rose Shearer is pictured with her mother Jennifer at a celebration with family and friends held at the Westcliffe community building on Nov. 3 to welcome her home. The toddler was hit by a minivan on Cymbeline Drive in June.

Aside from regaining her motor functions and re-learning how to walk, talk and feed herself, the toddler had to have eye surgery. Doctors are worried she might have amblyopia, more commonly known as lazy eye. “She has speech therapy, behaviour therapy, rehab and we have had contact with the (Canadian National Institute for the Blind),” Jennifer said. “There’s something every day and sometimes it’s tough to keep it all co-ordinated.” Natalie has a specialized medical stroller to help her get around and at home she sleeps in a hospital bed. But despite all that, Jennifer is happy to have her home. “She is home with family, she is in familiar surroundings,” Jennifer said. “We don’t know if she will ever fully recover but she has come a long way.”

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Fashionable fundraiser A number of Hunks with Hammers helped make the Rotary Club of South Nepean’s annual Fall Into Fashion event a success on Sunday, Nov. 4. Left, Manotick firefighters Doug Dean and Max Renaud joined Metcalfe volunteers Mason Fisher and Giovanni Pallotta to serve wine to the guests. The event was held at Longfields-Davidson Heights Secondary School and supports the Queensway Carleton Hospital Foundation, Maplesoft Cancer Survivors Centre and the Longfields International Venture Exchange. PHOTOS BY EMMA JACKSON/METROLAND

Women browse the jewelry for sale at the Rotary Club of South Nepean’s annual Fall Into Fashion event on Sunday, Nov. 4. The St. Joe’s Grandmothers group was selling the jewelry, which directly benefits the Nairobi women who make it. Hundreds of guests came for the afternoon, which included food and drink, shopping and two fashion shows.

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NEWS

Holocaust Education Month honours Swedish diplomat Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

EMC news - The Jewish Federation of Ottawa has joined with three embassies to honour a man known for saving the lives of thousands of Hungarian Jews during the Holocaust. Raoul Wallenberg was a Swedish diplomat sent to Hungary during the Second World War. This year marks the 100th anniversary of his birth. He was detained by the Soviet authorities following the siege of Budapest in 1945 and subsequently disappeared. “Wallenberg single-handedly saved 100,000 people,” said Mina Cohn chair of the federation’s Shoah committee. “The Allies sent him to Budapest to stop the death machine.” Every November the Shoah or Holocaust committee organizes Holocaust Education Month to remember the lives of those who were lost and educate people to prevent something similar from happening. Cohn said she thought this year, on the anniversary of Wallenberg’s birth, it was important to commemorate his work. “The goal is to educate,” Cohn said. The series of events was kicked off on Oct. 30 with a lecture by historian Karen Polak at the Agudath Israel congregation on Coldrey Avenue. Polak works with the Anne Frank House and was to give a lecture entitled Remembering, Reflecting and Responding – Young People’s Wartime Diaries. On Nov. 9 a tree planting ceremony will take place at

Raoul Wallenberg Park on Viewmount Drive in honour of Kristallnacht, a series of attacks on Jews and their businesses and synagogues throughout Austria and Germany in 1938. Mayor Jim Watson and Swedish Ambassador Teppo Tauriainen will be on hand to mark the event. The official launch will be held at the Soloway Jewish Community Centre on Naldony Sachs Private on Nov. 10. Robert Rozett, director of the Yad Vashem Libraries in Israel will be the keynote speaker. Throughout the month there will be workshops for teachers to give them materials to teach students about Wallenberg and the Holocaust.

Wallenberg singlehandedly saved 100,000 people MINA COHN

Cohn said the training could be the background for a museum exhibit set to be unveiled in mid-November. The Swedish embassy will provide an exhibit called To me there’s no other choice – Raoul Wallenberg 19122012 at the Canadian War Museum. The exhibit is free to the public and also has some material provided by the Hungarian Embassy. Hungarian Ambassador László Pordány said the

whole year is a commemoration in Hungary. “Every school child in Hungary knows the name of Wallenberg,” he said. In addition to the material provided for the exhibit, Aron Manthé, head of House of Terror Museum in Hungary will be one of the speakers at a international academic panel on Dec. 6 at the War Museum. SWEDISH CONNECTION

David Lunderquist of the Swedish Embassy said the exhibit was produced in collaboration with the Swedish Institute and the Living History Forum. The exhibit opened at the National Museum in Budapest in January 2012 and an English version is touring the world – with Canadian stops in Toronto and Ottawa. “It’s basically the life and work of Wallenberg,” Lunderquist said. “Today more than ever it’s important to show examples of people standing up for what is right.” The exhibit is set to open on Nov. 21. Yosi Aviram, of the Israeli Embassy, said the series of events this month is the result of a partnership between the embassies, the federation and the Shoah committee. He said the embassies have come together to offer students in Ottawa a chance to win a trip to Washington D.C. to see the Holocaust museum. “It’s important for children to learn about civil courage and the difference one person can make,” Aviram said. For a list of events contact Sarah Beutel at 613-7984696, ext. 253 or sbeutel@ jewishottawa.com

Ottawa - A new report has just been released which reveals 7 costly mistakes that most homeowners make when selling their home, and a 9 Step System that can help you sell your home fast and for the most amount of money. This industry report shows clearly how the traditional ways of selling homes have become increasingly less and less effective in today’s market. The fact of the matter is that fully three quarters of homesellers don’t get what they want for their homes and become disillusioned and - worse - financially disadvantaged when they put their homes on the market. As this report uncovers, most homesellers make 7deadly mistakes

that cost them literally thousands of dollars. The good news is that each and every one of these mistakes is entirely preventable. In answer to this issue, industry insiders have prepared a free special report entitled “The 9 Step System to Get Your Home Sold Fast and For Top Dollar”. To order a FREE Special Report, visit www.OttawaSoldFast.org or to hear a brief recorded message about how to order your FREE copy of this report call toll-free 1-888-313-7023and enter 1000. You can call any time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Get your free special report NOW to find out how you can get the most money for your home.

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Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Rideau Trail hiker returns to roots Quest runs from Kingston to Ottawa Stacey Roy sroy@perfprint.ca

EMC news - When cancer threatened to take everything, Bruce Watts decided he would take back control by conquering a lifelong dream and reconnecting with nature and his past. That’s exactly what the Ottawa resident did last week when he entered the Perth and Smiths Falls area where some members of his family still live. Watts enjoyed standing on the mountain overlooking Westport and seeing the post office that his grandfather had built. The immense feeling of connection to nature and his core helped to keep him high despite the challenges of the day before. “Physically I was totally beat up. There was nothing left of me,” Watt said of his condition exiting Murphy’s Point, outside of Perth, on Oct. 28. The first segment of his hiking trek along the Rideau Trail from Kingston to Ottawa – he’s calling it his OktoberQuest – was challenging terrain and required Watts to dig deep every day he set off. For that reason it was a delight when his wife arrived at Murphy’s Point to whisk him away to Perth for a night at a bed and breakfast and a muchneeded meal with friends. With renewed physical and emotional body, Watts took off from Perth on Oct. 29 and walked into Smiths Falls by lunch. This town holds a number of fond memories for the nature enthusiast from his brief period attending high school to his sister living in Rocolyn House (the present day Kilt & Castle) when it was completely residential. The retired police officer admits he has missed human interaction on his country trek that will ultimately take him over 400 kilometres, though he’s had a lot of animal communication. Watts’ online blog at www. campology.ca recounts each day of his journey, including his first day when he had to detour off the trail because

beavers had flooded it by blocking a culvert. A most enjoyable animal encounter occurred on day six when three deer dashed in front of him and then disappeared into the bushes. “I like to be able to hear the sound of nature,” he said. “People underestimate the value of unplugging; the peace it brings.” Since Oct. 22, Watts has traveled solo with just one occasion when a friend joined him for part of a day. Carrying 14 kilograms on his back, the city resident has travelled between 15 and 30 kilometres a day. With so much experience (past and present) on public trail systems, Watts was asked to weigh in on the current dialogue going on about waterfront trails and connecting the community and downtown core. Watts’ number one recommendation was to improve signage for visitors from the Rideau Trail. He noted the signage falls off at the edge of town and details simply say to walk through the municipal parks. “If I wasn’t a local this would have been very hard,” he said. STACEY ROY/METROLAND

MULTI-USE PATHS

He found the signage around Foley Mountain Conservation Area to be superb, and congratulates the town on its work to enhance the multiuse trail system that will serve many in the community. “I think multi-use is the way to go now,” he said. When a reporter caught up with him on Oct. 29, he had 90 kilometres left before ending in Ottawa – a destination he aplanned to reach by the end of the week. At that time Watts will resume another journey he began earlier this year when he was diagnosed with melanoma skin cancer. He will be heading into a checkup following his surgery, which took place on Sept. 18. Early detection is the key to Watts’ success to this point and he urges everyone to be proactive in their health. “If you have any strange and ugly moles that have changed, please get it checked,” Watts said. The OktoberQuest has been on his bucket list for at least 20 years, having travelled parts of the Rideau Trail system but never end to end.

Bruce Watts, a retired police officer and webmaster for www.campology.ca hikes along the Rideau Canal in Smiths Falls Oct. 29 during his OktoberQuest to travel the entire length of the Rideau Trail system from Kingston to Ottawa. Watts’ cancer diagnosis inspired him to seize the day and realize this lifelong wish.

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Your Community Newspaper

COMMENT EDITORIAL

City’s economic growth strategy on wrong track

T

he mayor’s latest bid to boost the local economy falls short in scope and runs the risk of at least being perceived as favouring certain businesses over others. During an event hosted last week by Mayor Jim Watson, a program called the Capital Investment Track was announced. Watson said the program would see the city provide assistance to business initiatives based on the potential to create at least

100 “quality – well-paying – private sector jobs.� Economic development staff would help shepherd these projects through the city’s regulatory and administrative regime, making them the system’s top priority. This program, while not an inherently bad idea – it’s aimed at attracting investment and creating jobs – puts the city in the position where it is picking and choosing what sorts of investment comes to Ottawa. On top

of the 100-job threshold, applicants from the life sciences, photonics, wireless, clean technology, aerospace, defence, film and television production, digital media and tourism sectors would also be considered for the Capital Investment Track. While this might appear to apply to a significant number of opportunities, in fact these employers represent a small fraction of the overall economy. Businesses with 100 or more people on the payroll

represent only 2.5 per cent of all employers in Ontario. In addition, with the exception of the tourism industry, the list of favoured sectors represents only a small slice of the total number of employers in the province and the types of jobs created would favour those with specialized experience and education. This means the city is offering to cut red tape for a group of businesses, including larger, better-financed firms, that are less likely to

need help navigating city hall than a business that employs four people, for example. Such small businesses represent more than 55 per cent of all employers in the province, and are often financed through the personal savings of the business owner. If the city truly wanted to attract investment, it would focus its efforts on cutting red tape for all types of businesses. This would maximize the potential number of jobs that could be created in

the city and would ensure opportunities are generated for residents from all walks of life, not just the highly educated. The spirit of the Capital Investment Track program is in the right place: helping to grow and diversify the city’s economy, which will in turn provide jobs as the federal government scales back its civil servant workforce. But the program isn’t playing fair when it comes to making Ottawa a more attractive destination for investment. Everyone should have an equal opportunity to set up or expand their shop in this city.

COLUMN

The calm before our storm CHARLES GORDON Funny Town

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ere in the capital, we’re shaking our heads over how lightly we were touched by hurricane Sandy and its lengthy aftermath. What did we get? A little rain, a bit of wind. And how much do you want to bet that we’re all thinking: “That’s nice, but we’re going to pay for it when winter comes.� That’s the fatalistic Canadian way of looking at it. If the weather spares us one day, it’s going to whack us the next. And just to add an extra dimension, an extra level of unease, remember how easy last winter was? We’re going to get it, for sure. When I was a youngish writer at the Citizen, we used to scoff at a succession of editors and publishers who insisted that the paper feature a weather story prominently almost every day. “How could the weather be news?� we wondered. Weather was just, well, weather. Turns out we were wrong. Even in those days readers were interested in weather and today there is much more weather to be interested in and it is more than a question of whether Friday will be a good day to play golf. Weather touches us in a way that we don’t always like. We used to think that severe weather was fun. Nothing like a good storm to watch through the window or maybe even run around outside in for a while. After the ice storm of 1998 and the big winds of 2011, not to mention a couple of rather small but rather scary earthquakes, we know that much of the fun has gone out of such events. Given this, it’s no surprise that people are

paying more attention to the weather than they used to. They are encouraged in this by the news media, particularly all-news television, which have made the weather a large percentage of the news conversation even when there is no storm happening. Even a storm that hasn’t happened yet is news. The storm might be coming, destruction is threatened. There is a weather watch, a weather warning, a red swirl on a map and it could, maybe, affect you. The news media have learned that the story about the impending storm can have great value, even if the storm itself never materializes. There’s lots of excitement in talking about the damage and devastation that might occur, great visuals in putting reporters in storm gear in front of the cameras in places where the storm hasn’t arrived yet and if the storm never arrives, well, it was exciting, wasn’t it? The problem with this kind of coverage is that people get used to it, come to believe that any storm warnings are exaggerated. The media cry wolf. Who knows, it may be that some of the people who were victims of Sandy were outside because they didn’t believe the storm could be as bad as the media said it would be. In the United States, the discussion about the storm quickly shifted to a discussion about the electoral politics of the storm, but not about climate change, which nobody wanted to talk about in an election year. Maybe now that the two storms, the real one and the political one, have died down, the discussion about climate change can begin again. It’s overdue. Many experts are saying that we are going to be seeing a lot more of this kind of weather. Many experts also say that our society can do something to reduce that likelihood by changing some aspects of our behaviour. How to bring that about will not be easy and will not be without sacrifice, but it is the kind of question that needs to be debated fully. Maybe that debate can start. In the meantime, we in the capital will go on being thankful for the weather we didn’t have and waiting confidently for things to get worse.

Editorial Policy

Web Poll THIS WEEK’S POLL QUESTION

Is the draft city budget on the right track?

A) It’s a time to pay tribute to those who have given their lives for our country.

A) Yes. The property tax increase is manageable.

0%

B) It’s a day to remember family

25%

members who fought for Canada.

B) It’s mostly good but we need to spend more on maintaining the infrastructure we have.

C) It’s a chance to honour our service men and women.

C) No. I don’t want to pay another cent in taxes.

50%

D) It’s a moment to reflect on the conflicts that still plague our planet.

D) I don’t pay attention to the budget. Just send me the bill.

25%

The Nepean-Barrhaven EMC welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at www.yourottawaregion.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to theresa.fritz@metroland.com , fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to The Nepean-Barrhaven EMC, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa ON, K2E 7L2.

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8

Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

PREVIOUS POLL SUMMARY

What does observing Remembrance Day mean to you?

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SALES: Sharon Russell - 613-688-1483 Kevin Cameron - 613-688-1672 Adrienne Barr - 613-623-6571 EDITORIAL: )NTERIM-ANAGING%DITOR4HERESA&RITZ 613-221-6261 4HERESAFRITZ METROLANDCOM NEWS EDITOR: Nevil Hunt, nevil.hunt@metroland.com, 613-221-6235 REPORTER: Jennifer McIntosh JENNIFERMCINTOSH METROLANDCOM    POLITICAL REPORTER: Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com, 613-221-6162

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NEWS

Ways to resist the impulse buy

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ever go shopping with your kids. Well, never go shopping with my six-year-old. He can be extremely persuasive. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the type to whine or beg. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so subtle that I usually donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been working on me until after Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve already purchased the not-on-the-list item. Just the other day we were at Value Village looking for a couple of very specific formal wear items for the children to wear as a one-off to an upcoming family wedding. As I was perusing the baby outfits â&#x20AC;&#x201C; not on the list, but evidently a good deal (failure one for the impulse buyer) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; my son said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mom, when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re done, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to have a look over there,â&#x20AC;? and he pointed to boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; outerwear. He waited patiently while I flipped through hanger after hanger of baby sleepers before we made our way over to boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; wear. Following my precise method, he started flipping hangers, rapidly sifting through the â&#x20AC;&#x153;junkâ&#x20AC;? until he came across what he wanted: â&#x20AC;&#x153;You see this vest, Mom. I think it would help to keep my chest warm this winter.â&#x20AC;? Interesting. I kind of knew at this point that he was after something. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not getting that today,â&#x20AC;? I said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh, I know,â&#x20AC;? he said, and

BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse he continued flipping the hangers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good one,â&#x20AC;? he said, and he removed the vest from the rack. He put it on and began to play with the zipper. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think this is the one,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a zipper and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have very good luck with zippers.â&#x20AC;? In hindsight, that was the turning point. In a very refined fashion, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d given me a problem to solve and I totally took on the challenge. As a result, I assumed the task of hanger flipping, looking for a nice, warm vest, with buttons. We found one for him â&#x20AC;&#x201C; very good quality, waterproof, with goose down filling â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and into the cart it went. It was only $6, but it was $6 I hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t intended to spend. My son is like that little voice inside my head. Even if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have kids, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve experienced it. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the voice that gets a little bored waiting in line at the checkout and whispers, â&#x20AC;&#x153;you need batteries.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the voice that ever so quietly says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;buying

a $6-magazine that tells you how to save money will help you to save money ... on your next trip.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the biggest causes of overspending in the 35-55 age group is impulse purchases,â&#x20AC;? says Judi Cane, a planner with Money Coaches Canada. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People have $800-per-month grocery bills, but they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize that half of that is spent on non-grocery items that they just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need.â&#x20AC;? Cane says retailers like Walmart, Costco and Loblaw have effectively tapped into our internal human weakness to buy things we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At Costco, you have to walk past aisles and aisles of non-grocery items â&#x20AC;&#x201C; everything from printer toner to eyeglasses and books â&#x20AC;&#x201C; before you get to the food,â&#x20AC;? says Cane. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And even if Walmart has a separate door for the grocery department, they put things in the aisles that will tempt you. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to get out of there with just groceries.â&#x20AC;? Of course, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just the grocery store that gets us. Ca-

nadian Tire has enormous bins of small items at the checkout quietly calling out to you. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty easy to go into the store for a $10 bag of road salt and come out with bags full of stuff like flashlights, chewing gum, even books,â&#x20AC;? says Cane. On the last Friday of each month, Cane and her Ottawa colleagues of Money Coaches Canada are offering free seminars on financial management. A â&#x20AC;&#x153;money town hall,â&#x20AC;? as Cane describes it, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an opportunity for people to raise any financial questions they may have in a relaxed and open forum. Octoberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Money Monday was held at Caffe Latte Cino in Orleans on Oct. 29. Eight weeks before Christmas, overspending was a hot topic. Caneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best advice? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Before you go shopping, make sure you know exactly what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to buy and only pay cash,â&#x20AC;? says Cane. She admits this is much easier said than done and that most of her clients donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even realize how much theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re overspending until she forces them to take a good look at their grocery bills. But committing to your list can make hundreds of dollars a month difference. November is financial literacy month in Canada. So why not take the first step toward good money management â&#x20AC;&#x201C; make a list and stick to it. Oh, and never take my sixyear-old shopping with you.

Kids at play again at Woodroffe Steph Willems steph.willems@metroland.com

EMC news - The weather was ominous on Oct. 30 thanks to the remnants of superstorm Sandy, but the students of Woodroffe Public School paid it no mind. They were too busy giving their schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new playground a long-awaited trial run. After going a full year without a play structure following the removal of its dilapidated predecessor, the kids now have a place to be active and adventurous. School officials had begun meeting to find a way to replace it a year before the structure was dismantled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was considered not safe and removed for a year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that increased the urgency of finding a replacement,â&#x20AC;? said Jean Byrne, a parent council member who headed up the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s playground renewal committee. Byrne joined principal Kim Power, vice-principal Monik Beauchemin, trustee Theresa Kavanaugh and Bay Coun. Mark Taylor in cutting the ribbon on the $70,000 play structure and landscaping project. The student body had been surveyed so that the most popular (and therefore, fun) elements were incorpo-

rated into the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s design. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We put up a drawing in the school (showing the options available) and we had the kids put a pin on what features they liked,â&#x20AC;? said Power. In trying to raise funds, renewal committee members left no stone unturned. They searched for both private and public funding, from businesses, individuals, municipal grants, and even a developer. Byrne gave her sincerest thanks to the community at the event, detailing the â&#x20AC;&#x153;hundreds of donations from community businesses and individuals.â&#x20AC;? The renewal committee will next help Severn Public School with their own playground renewal. That school has a smaller student body and surrounding community to work with, so Woodroffe was happy to lend their assistance after achieving success with their own project. On average, a childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s play structure has a lifespan of 20 years. With Ministry of Education budgets stretched thin due to an expanding population and aging infrastructure, parents and community members now play a large role in realizing improvements like the one seen at Woodroffe Public School.

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Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

9


Open House Sun. 2-4pm

29 RODEO DRIVE - BARRHAVEN $429,900

Fantastic Richcraft 2 storey home! This home has it all! Curb appeal galore, hardwood floors, living room, formal dining room, lovely kitchen with linoleum flooring and center island, family room with gas fireplace, main floor laundry, spacious master bedroom with 4 pc ensuite with separate shower and soaker tub. Upgraded maple cabinets in kitchen. Plenty of nice upgrades. Interlock front walk and nice fenced backyard. This home won’t last long!

BECAUSE YOUR AGENT MATTERS!

Open House Sun. 2-4pm

431 KILMARNOCK WAY - STONEBRIDGE $649,900

An elegant home that shows pride of ownership. Monarch built Mahogany with loft model located on a corner lot in Stonebridge. Tile entryway, gleaming hardwood floors and French doors greet you from the front door. Open concept with formal dining area. Bright and sunny kitchen with island, granite countertops, top of the line appliances and eating area. Family room has cozy fireplace and large windows. Second level has full bath, bedrooms and loft.

REAL ESTATE BROKER PATRICK CREPPIN, HE KNOWS BARRHAVEN! • 24+ years Experience • Lives in Barrhaven • Licensed as a ‘Broker ’ • Past Redskins Coach • Sold over $240,000,000

STONEBRIDGE $639,900 This full brick Monarch built bungalow can only be described as “elegant”. The vaulted ceiling in the living room only adds to the bright, open feel of this home. Features gleaming hardwood, ceramic and carpeting. Gorgeous kitchen with eating area overlooks the living room with fireplace. The eating area opens out to the lovely 2-tier deck and yard. Large, bright master bedroom with 5 pc ensuite. Spacious fully finished lower level.

BARRHAVEN $324,900

Bright 3 bedroom 3 bath home! Gleaming hardwood floors greet you from the tiled and spacious foyer. Separate living and dining rooms. Corner gas fireplace with oak mantle in living room. Kitchen features ceramic tile, backsplash, black appliances and upgraded cherry cabinets. Ceramic tile in all bathrooms. Spacious bedrooms. Master has 4 pc ensuite. Beautifully finished family room on lower level. Fully fenced yard with deck.

• BBIA Board Member • Major Sponsor • Community Supporter

BARRHAVEN $330,000

• Member Nepean Chamber of Commerce

Lovely Claridge built townhome on a corner lot! This two storey 3 bedroom, 3 bath home has tile and hardwood on main level.This home features an open concept design with hardwood and tile. Living room has a gas fireplace. Nice kitchen with plenty of oak cabinets. Stainless steel appliances are included. Master bedroom has 5 pc ensuite with separate shower and soaker tub. Convenient 2nd floor laundry. Spacious recreation room on lower level.

PATRICK’S MISSION: To make your home buying or home selling process a stress free and pleasurable experience!

BARRHAVEN $319,900

Beautiful 1867 sq. ft. Minto built Executive Townhouse. Open concept with gleaming upgraded maple hardwood floors is located across from a park. Ceramic tile is in foyer, kitchen and all bathrooms. Upgraded kitchen has bright, sunny eating area and breakfast bar. 6 appliances included. Curved staircase. Master bedroom has walk in closet, ensuite with separate shower and soaker tub. Finished lower level with recreation room and gas fireplace. New great price! BARRHAVEN $394,900 Incredible 3 bedroom Minto built centre hall home. Home features living room with woodburning fireplace, spacious dining room and main floor den. Bright, sunny, tiled kitchen has extra large bay window, eating area, brown melamine cabinetry and granite countertops. Master bedroom has 4 pc ensuite and walk in closet. Partly finished recreation room on lower level. Upgrades include kitchen and bath 2007, new driveway, roof 2009, windows/patio doors 2005. R0011717332

10

Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012


Your Community Newspaper

NEWS

Students scare up $4,700 for UNICEF Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

EMC news - A group of Grade 6 students at Berrigan Elementary School learned they can make a difference. Teacher Suzanne Stewart said for the second year in a row the two classes she teaches raised money for UNICEF and raised awareness about the programs it offers in the developing world. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part of a unit we do about global citizenship,â&#x20AC;? Stewart said. Kids in Barrhaven are privileged and I want them to know thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a life outside their community, city and country. Stewart teaches her students about child labour and the importance of fair trade and about the United Nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Convention on the Rights of the Child. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of the kids think the rights are a given,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And I have to explain that some kids donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even have what they consider basic things.â&#x20AC;? As part of the learning unit, the students become UNICEF ambassadors and give an assembly to help educate the other classes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;UNICEF is great for approaching the schools and helping with learning material,â&#x20AC;? Stewart said, adding other grades incorporate the fundraising totals into their math lessons. Stewartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grade 6 students count the coins donated as part of their own math unit. She said on Nov. 5 that she expected the total to reach $4,700, a $100 increase from last year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are 940 students at Berrigan so it makes sense that we could raise a substan-

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SUBMITTED

Grade 6 students at Berrigan Elementary School raised $4,700 for UNICEF during the month of October. The initiative ended with a haunted house at the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s library for Halloween. tial amount,â&#x20AC;? Stewart said, adding she plans to repeat the fundraiser. The charity has a program called the global classroom which is speciďŹ cally designed to teach students about the developing world and how they can help. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the most important part is the kids can see how they make a difference,â&#x20AC;? Stewart said.

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Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

11


Your Community Newspaper

Students Win Youth Futures Bursaries

R0011723272

NEWS

Grade 8 students exposed to career opportunities Eddie Rwema eddie.rwema@metroland.com

Councillor Steve Desroches; Bryce Conrad, Hydro Ottawa President and CEO; and Mayor Jim Watson congratulate bursary recipients Faduma Hassan and Ahmad Hussein.

Hydro Ottawa presented bursaries of $500 each to two deserving youths at the 10th Anniversary Breakfast of the Ottawa Community Housing Corporation on October 26. The Youth Futures bursaries help youth living in low-income communities to attend post-secondary education and pay for books and tuition. “As a dedicated community citizen with roots that stretch back more than 130 years, Hydro Ottawa strongly believes in investing in our city and the development of its people,” said Bryce Conrad, President and CEO of Hydro Ottawa, who attended the breakfast. “I am honoured to make this contribution to the futures of two young people with lots of promise.” The Youth Futures bursaries sponsored by Hydro Ottawa were awarded to Faduma Hassan and Ahmad Hussein, two community volunteers who are first-generation post-secondary students. “I’d like to thank Hydro Ottawa for this opportunity. I come from a low-income family and this helps me reach my goals,” said Ahmad Hussein, a Grade 12 student at the Ottawa Islamic School who plans to pursue nanoscience at Carleton University.

EMC news - KnoxdaleMerivale Coun. Keith Egli discussed his job at city hall during a Work for You Too forum for thousands of high school students held at the CE Centre. More than 7,500 Grade 8 students attended the 2012 WRK 4U2 (Work for you too) hosted by the Ottawa Catholic School Board and the WOW( World of Work) hosted by the Ottawa Carleton District School Board forums on Oct. 30 and 31. The forum provides students with the chance to meet and to talk with community leaders, businesses and organizations as well as other secondary school students, along with their teachers. “I am getting questions like what do you do on a daily basis; how many hours a week do you work; do you get a long with your colleagues… that sort of thing,” said Egli. Grade 8 is a pivotal year for students to become aware of what career opportunities await them in their community as well as academic pathways that lead to these opportunities. “I think it is a good event. It gives the kids an opportunity to see all sorts of different kinds of jobs and ask questions. It is the first time I have done it and I think it is fabulous,” said Egli. “It is a tough decision we ask children to make at 17 or 18 years of age, and I think this is a good way to get them

EDDIE RWEMA/METROLAND

Grade 8 student Patrick MacCarthy of St. Matthew High School, right, chats with Knoxdale-Merivale Coun. Keith Egli at a Grade 8 student career opportunities show on Oct. 31 at the CE Centre. The show drew about 7,500 students from across the city. some help with background to make that decision.” Grade 8 student Patrick McCarthy from St. Matthew High School was excited to engage the councillor and get to know what his duties and responsibilities were at city hall. “I am very interested in politics and I hope to work in government one day, so it is nice to get to know the different aspects of being a councillor,” said McCarthy. “I asked him what his duties are, different projects he handles in his ward and how

Faduma Hassan said she was “shocked and very happy” when she learned that she won the bursary. The Grade 12 student hopes to help others through her future career in science.

he got elected.” MacCarthy added that the two-day annual academic and career exploration forum enabled him to have direct access to different organizations. “It is good for people to know different trades that are available to them, because a lot of people don’t know all these trades are available,” he said. Students such as Kenneth Rending, a Grade 12 student at at St. Francis Xavier Catholic High School working on a co-op placement were on

hand to explain what happens while on work field. “It is very important because it makes students know what it is to be in a work field instead of being stuck in a classroom,” said Rending, a student “If you are in a work field, you are learning from hands on and you learn more.” Rending who hopes to pursue a career in architectural design, said he was getting a lot of questions ranging from how co-op placement works, what it is like and what the hours are.

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Honourary Co-Chairs Mayor Jim Watson and Deputy Mayor Steve Desroches, who is also Chair of Ottawa Community Housing Corporation, were on hand to join in the celebration. “We would like to thank Hydro Ottawa for their generous community spirit,” said Jo-Anne Poirier, Chief Executive Officer of the Ottawa Community Housing Corporation. “The bursaries they have funded will make a difference in the lives of these two recipients.” Funding these Youth Futures bursaries is just one way Hydro Ottawa is contributing to the well-being of our community. Hydro Ottawa is a community builder, maintaining one of the safest, most reliable electricity distribution systems in Ontario. The company is also dedicated to helping customers use electricity efficiently and teaching children and youth about electricity safety and conservation.

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Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012


Your Community Newspaper

ARTS

Aristocats hits Knoxdale Public School stage 11-year-old student directs Disney original Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

EMC entertainment - When Adam Linton, an 11-year-old student at Knoxdale Public School, found out that there wasn’t going to be a musical at his school this year he decided to take matters into his own hands. “I have always been into musical theatre,” Adam said, adding he has seen many Disney shows. “I checked the website (for Disney’s licensing arm) and saw Aristocats,” he said. “My brother and I loved it, so we got the licensing and went to work.” Adam is going to play Edgar the Butler, who gets jealous of Madame’s aristocats and drops them off in the Parisian countryside to fend for themselves. He also enlisted the help of classmates and friends to complete the cast of 15. He said he had friends in mind for certain parts and the cast grew from there. “I am excited about playing the butler; the bad guys seem to have all the fun,” he said. It was more than simply getting a licence and getting some friends together. The Grade 6 student also had to

organize renting the gym for the night of the performance and finding rehearsal space – not to mention doing the choreography. “I tried to keep the numbers as simple as possible because some of the cast were beginners,” Adam said.

“I am excited about playing the butler; the bad guys seem to have all the fun.” ADAM LINTON

He said the whole thing has been a learning experience, one he hopes to repeat. “I think next time we could do a compilation of songs,” he said. “Maybe the cast could grow to 20.” Adam added that arranging the gym time and getting into the school newsletter to advertise was a bit daunting. “It was a bit weird to send emails to the (school) board and everything. I mean I am only an 11-year-old kid,” he said. In order to pay for the li-

censing and the gym rental, Adam borrowed his dad’s credit card. But Adam said he hopes to have 140 people in the seats when the show opens on Nov. 9 at 6:30 p.m. “I am hoping to recover the costs and pay my dad back,” he said. His father, Bruce, added that there would be refreshments for sale during the show to help increase revenue. The whole family has really pitched in, with Adam’s mother helping with costumes and set design. The cast has been practising every Sunday since September and is excited for opening night. It’s easy to tell Bruce is proud of his son. “Sometimes even as parents we don’t what our children our capable of,” he said. “It has been really amazing to watch him direct the whole thing.” Tickets for the show are $5 for kids under 12 and $7 for adults. The show starts at 6:30 p.m. and the box office opens half an hour earlier. For more information, email doozofrezno@gmail.com.

SUBMITTED

Adam Linton, right, is the director of Aristocats the musical set to play at Knoxdale Public School on Nov. 9. He also plays Edgar in the show. His brother Max plays Tolouse in the show.

Deanryans Enterprises gearing up for snow and for Santa! By Bev McRae out all day plowing. We do our best to make sure our customers can get in and out of their laneways. We plow after five centimetres, but we’ll go out if you get four centimetres one day and four centimetres the next.” Unfortunately for the rest of Ottawa, Deanryans won’t take on snow removal customers outside of Barrhaven and Cedarview. “We don’t go outside Barrhaven for snow,” Dean said. “A lot of companies like to but we can’t offer the best service by sending a vehicle that’s just done 20 lanes in Barrhaven outside Barrhaven to do another 40 lanes. The people in Barrhaven would have to wait too long for the second round.” As a result of nearly losing their shirts in the near-record snow accumulations of 2008 – when more than 50 cm of snow fell one day in March – Deanryans now charges extra for clearing more than 254 cm of snow in one season. “If the extra accumulation is only 10 cm, I wouldn’t waste anyone’s time sending out an invoice, but if we were 100 cm over then I would,” said Dean. A couple of key differences set Deanryans apart. When you call the company you’re likely to get Dean on his cell phone, even during snow cleanup. That’s because Deanryans owners are out on tractors with commercial snow blowers clearing driveways just like their employees. “This is my livelihood,” stressed Dean. “This isn’t one of those companies that will lowball you on price then short change you on service.” Snow removal is Deanryans winter business. The rest of the year the company does property maintenance, landscaping, masonry, installs precast interlock and natural stone and supplies residential customers with landscape materials – all over Ottawa. The company also has a successful commercial division. Currently, Dean and his partner are gearing up for Barrhaven’s Santa Claus Parade of Lights on Sunday, Nov. 18 at 5:30 p.m. Deanryans is a major sponsor of the parade since

Nick Dean, pictured here, and Jake Ryan, co-owners of Deanryans Enterprises Inc. are putting their landscape and property maintenance business to bed for this year and getting ready for the snow removal season – and for Barrhaven’s Santa Claus Parade of Lights on Sunday, Nov. 18 at 5:30 p.m.

teaming up with local realtor Patrick Creppin last year to build Barrhaven a permanent Santa Claus float, complete with a 100-year-old refurbished sleigh and reindeers that dazzle, thanks to Deanryans typical innovation. “Jake and I wanted the reindeer to be able to go up and down like they were taking off from a roof,” said Dean. “We had an old plow that we tore apart and went to a metal fabricator to have him build our idea.” And of course Nick Dean and Jake Ryan are anxiously awaiting the first snowfall of the season. “We’re still signing up new customers,” Dean

said. “I’ll buy another tractor if I have to, but I’ll never turn down a customer. I’ve had people call me in March and say my company hasn’t showed up, can you take me on. Typically, I just plow their laneway after the storm and if we don’t get any more snow I won’t charge them. I’ll just say see you next year.” You can reach Nick Dean or Jake Ryan by phone at 613825-7913 or through Deanryans website at www.deanryans.com. Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

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It’s one of the hardest jobs a company can take on to satisfy every customer, so it speaks volumes that many of Deanryans customers have stayed with the snow removal company for 18 years. That’s as long as Deanryans Enterprises has been in business. “We were in high school in 1991 when the teachers went on strike and we started landscaping as a summer job,” said Nick Dean. “That escalated after a few years until in 1994 we decided to go full time at it.” The “we” is Dean and partner Jake Ryan. “We started with a 1983 Chevy pickup truck that had no floor in it and we had to buy another truck, take the body off it and put it on the first truck without knowing anything about mechanics. But we got it done with the help of people who knew more than we did, and that’s what we used for two years until we made some money and bought a better truck.” Deanryans Enterprises now owns nearly one million dollars worth of landscaping and snow blowing equipment. It didn’t take the partners long to discover the drawbacks of clearing snow as a successful business. “You have no control over the weather,” said Dean. “You have no control over a $100,000 machine breaking down which you can’t fix yourself. The city has no schedule as to when they plow the roads or the sidewalks. So it’s very difficult.” You just do the best you can, said Dean, without worrying about profit margins. “If I cut corners to make more money, I wouldn’t have repeat customers,” he said, “but I have customers who are still customers after 18 years in the same house.” One of Deanryans most attractive attributes is the price – $350 to clear a double driveway for the season. Shovelling sidewalks starts at $100, plus salting and removing ice as needed. “We promise to do our best in the circumstances. If it starts snowing in the afternoon, we’re out all night plowing. When it starts snowing at night we’re

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Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012


NEWS

Councillor Comments

MPs announce new 10-year ePassport Brier Dodge brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - Canada’s new electronic passport was unveiled at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau last week. Ottawa-Orléans MP Royal Galipeau and Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird attended a press conference on Oct. 26 announcing the launch of the ePassport at the museum, formerly known as the Museum of Civilization. The ePassport will be issued in the spring, and will include an electronic chip that will hold the same information provided on the second page of the printed passport, excluding signature. The passports will be available for a fiveyear or 10-year passport for adults, with children’s passports issued for a five-year maximum. The passports will be available to everyone in the summer.

Passport Canada began an ePassport pilot project for diplomatic and special passports in 2009. The passport includes a range of historic Canadian images, from Samuel de Champlain to the Chateau Frontenac in Quebec City. And as for Ottawa-specific images, Samuel de Champlain is featured in the form of a statue at Nepean Point. It also includes a replica of Robert Harris’ Canada’s Fathers of Confederation which used to hang in Centre Block at Parliament Hill. As well as images of Centre Block itself and the War Memorial. “The new ePassport will be more reflective and representative of who we are as Canadians,” said Baird in a press release. “These images showcase Canada’s history and the building of our great nation while adding essential new security features for the 21st Century.”

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Your Community Newspaper

By Jan Harder

A few weeks ago, I received some exciting news. I was told that the Rotary Club of South Nepean has expressed interest in once again renewing their adoption of Strandherd Rd (Woodroffe to Highway 416). The adoption is for a minimum of two years and Rotary Club of South Nepean has been adopting this stretch of roadway for nine years now! I can’t thank Rotary Club of South Nepean enough for their continued commitment to and drive to get out there and help to clean and green their community.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Ottawa-Orléans MP Royal Galipeau joins Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird on Oct. 26 at the Canadian Museum of History, formerly the Museum of Civilization for an announcement about passport changes.

The Adopt-a-Park or Roadway or Gateway is a citywide program that encourages community involvement in the care and maintenance of our parks and roadways. It is a partnership between volunteers and the City. The program is open to community groups and individuals of all ages who want to take an active role in enhancing the quality of life in our community. Volunteers take on parks or roadways clean-up projects to improve safety, the environment and to keep the City clean, green litter and graffiti free. Also, by removing the debris and litter from the City streets it ultimately protects the water quality of our rivers and fish habitats. The volunteers’ involvement in clean-up projects needs to be a minimum of twice a year - once in the spring and once in the fall. The City asks individuals and groups to make a long-term commitment of a minimum of two years to provide continuity to the program. To acknowledge these important efforts, each park, roadway or gateway is furnished with a sign presenting the names of the adopting individual or group. The sign is displayed for the adopting period. The Adopt a Park or Roadway or Gateway program is in its 13th year with 120 parks and 60 roadways adopted in the City of Ottawa. Residents, schools, community groups, and businesses participated in hundreds of clean-up projects since the program’s inauguration day. Here are some other adoptions that are taking place in Barrhaven: s "URNETT0ARK(ASBEENADOPTEDBYTHE2ECONNECT Barrhaven Community Church for four years; s +ILBIRNIE 0ARK (AS BEEN ADOPTED BY THE Stonebridge Community Association for two years; s &ALLOWlELD 2D 'REENBANK TO 3TRANDHERD  (AS been adopted by the Greenview Presbyterian Church for nine years; s &ALLOWlELD 2D 7OODROFFE TO 'REENBANK  (AS been adopted by the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 641 Barrhaven for one year; s 'REENBANK 3TRANDHERD TO *OCKVALE  (AS BEEN adopted by the 25th Nepean Scout Group for seven years; and s ,ARKIN(ASBEENADOPTEDBYTHE"ARRHAVEN,IONS Club for four years. I thank each of these organizations for their generosity and devotion to their community – it truly is amazing and deserving of praise. If you are part of or know an organization that might be interested in adopting a park or a roadway in Barrhaven please visit ottawa.ca/adopt or email adopt@ottawa.ca for more information. As far as opportunities go, you can adopt any City owned land as long as another group isn’t adopting it. Please note that all adoptions are approved by the area manager to ensure that it is appropriate and no major construction and/or safety issues are of concern. http://www.janharder.com

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As always, I welcome your feedback. Contact me at jan.harder@ottawa.ca or 613-580-2473, and visit my webpage at www.janharder.com. Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

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Your Community Newspaper

NEWS

MADD kicks off 25th Project Red Ribbon campaign steph.willems@metroland.com

EMC news - Mothers Against Drunk Driving Canada got its red ribbon awareness campaign underway on Parliament Hill on Nov. 1, an event that marked the 25th year of the annual effort to promote safe and sober driving. “For a quarter-century, MADD Canada’s red ribbon has been a simple yet powerful symbol of the fight against impaired driving,” said Gaetan Gendron, vice-president of MADD Ottawa “We want our red ribbons to be seen everywhere, as reminder that it is never acceptable to drive impaired.” He cited statistics that between 1,250 and 1,500 Canadians are killed and more than 63,000 injured in impaired driving incidents each year. “These deaths and injuries are senseless and completely preventable.” Those who become involved in MADD Canada often do so in the wake of a personal tragedy involving impaired driving. Gendron is one such person, as was special guest Marjory LeBreton, leader of the government in the Senate. LeBreton, who lost her

only daughter and first-born grandson to an impaired driver, has been a steadfast supporter of impaired driving legislation and enhanced victim’s rights throughout her career. “To me, this red ribbon is a symbol of both safety and the victim,” she said. “If everyone takes one of these red ribbons and truly thinks of the message behind it and then makes the commitment to never drive impaired, imagine the impact it would have. Imagine the crashes that could be prevented. Imagine the physical and emotional pain that could be prevented. That is the hope of the red ribbon campaign.” LeBreton acknowledged the progress made throughout the 25 years of the campaign, adding there is still “a great deal of work yet to be done.” In addition to the volunteers who help implement the red ribbon campaign throughout Canadian communities, MADD Canada’s biggest partner is the law enforcement community. Before moving to Ottawa, RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson served in several British Columbia jurisdictions between 1985 and 2005. During his days as an officer, Paulson saw the tragic results

of impaired driving all too often. “I am proud and eager to lend the RCMP’s support to the launch of the 25th annual red ribbon campaign,” said Paulson. “Although education and law enforcement efforts have helped to reduce the threat, this deadly behavior is still a problem in Canada.” Paulson mentioned the number of Canadians who die each year in impaired driving incidents are three times the number of those murdered, showing there are still too many people are engaging in this dangerous activity and too many looking the other way when they see someone doing it. This message was repeated by OPP Chief Superintendent Gary Couture. “The (OPP), together with MADD and our partners, continue to work towards raising awareness, to educate communities through campaigns like this one,” he said. “Our goal is to eradicate impaired driving. We will continue to fight this crime, not only now but all the time, 365 days a year.” The OPP, like the RCMP, will be flying red ribbons as they conduct enforcement on the country’s roads and highways.

STEPH WILLEMS/METROLAND

RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson speaks at the Nov. 1 launch of MADD Canada’s Project Red Ribbon awareness campaign. This year’s campaign marks the 25th year that MADD Canada has asked Canadians to show their support for the victim’s of impaired driving crashes.

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Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012


COMMUNITY

Your Community Newspaper

Defending the Memory of our Fallen It is a sad day when it becomes necessary to enact legislation against those who desecrate our country’s war memorials and cenotaphs. Acts of vandalism on monuments which honour those men and women who bravely fought to defend our country are inexcusable, yet are becoming more common. The time has come to send a message to these criminals by increasing the penalties for such heinous actions. Recently, Conservative MP David Tilson introduced a private member’s bill to address this issue. My colleagues and I in the Conservative caucus are rallying around to support this initiative. Bill C-217, Mischief Relating to War Memorials, seeks to impose minimum penalties including a fine of not less than $1,000 for a first offence, a prison term of not less than 14 days for a second offence, and a prison term of not less than 30 days for all subsequent offences. EMMA JACKSON/METROLAND

While I support rehabilitative measures such as community service for first time offenders, I also believe that these should be in addition to a fine. This impresses on vandals the gravity of their actions, and the consequences for doing something so disrespectful. As for those who choose to commit this offense more than once, it is clear that a jail sentence is more than appropriate.

Ski swap Nepean resident Lauren Poole, 10, shops for a new pair of skis at the Kanata Nordic annual ski swap on Nov. 3. The cross country ski group hosted the event at the Bonnenfant Y Outdoor Centre in Dunrobin. For the first time, the event also included children’s games, guided tours of nearby trails, ski waxing clinics and clothing sales. Poole has been skiing for four years.

These penalties represent a reasonable response and send a strong message that this type of behavoiur is going to be treated seriously. To stand by with indifference regarding such repulsive actions is not an option. As a government, we will continue to stand up for our men and women in uniform. The memory of our fallen and the bravery of our soldiers are stronger than the acts of criminals and that is why this bill is so important. As Conservatives, we will always support our soldiers and veterans and we will always stand against vandals who seek to tarnish the memories and contributions of our men and women in service. Pierre Poilievre MP Nepean-Carleton

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Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

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Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012


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Longfields-Davidson Heights running back Kollie Soriba, right, goes wide around the Bridlewood defence during a semifinal touch football game for the city’s public elementary schools on Oct. 30 at the Nepean Sportsplex. LDHSS won the game 14-0 to advance to the board final later the same day where they were defeated by Henry Munro 20-6.

A deflected pass lands among three players: Henry Munro receivers Nathan Amesbury, left, and McCainly Thomas, right, with Roberta Bondar’s Jevon Anderson, centre. Amesbury was able to snag the pass during the semifinal Cedarview Middle School’s Gillian Phillips, right, can’t quite reach to tag Huntley quarterback Emma Kovacs during a game. Henry Munro won the match 13-6. girls touch football game at the Nepean Sportsplex on Oct. 30. Cedarview won the public school board semifinal in a 2-1 squeaker and then went on to win the final 1-0. PHOTOS BY NEVIL HUNT/METROLAND

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Your Community Newspaper

NEWS

Rural Para Transpo service hits a bump said OC Transpo and the community support service agencies have been discussing ways to provide rural-to-rural transportation for the affected passengers, but said a possible human rights case is not something thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s driving those talks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know anything about a human rights claim at all,â&#x20AC;? Scrimgeour said. Wilkinson said she is glad OC Transpo is looking at the problem, because she agrees the restrictions amount to a human rights issue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really concerned that they wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take them to any rural location in Ottawa,â&#x20AC;? Wilkinson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting there.â&#x20AC;? There is no obligation for Para Transpo to provide this type of service for that small number of customers, said Scrimgeour. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking into how best to accommodate those peoplesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; travel needs, but there is no obligation,â&#x20AC;? Scrimgeour said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The policy decision taken by the (transit) commission is that Para Transpo service is provided for those trips between rural areas and urban areas,â&#x20AC;? Scrimgeour said.

Emma Jackson and Laura Mueller emma.jackson@metroland.com

EMC news - Six months after making sweeping changes to how disabled people get around by transit in the rural area, some are being left at the curb. Para Transpo partnered with three rural community support service agencies in April to provide trips within rural areas, but in the process cut out people who canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t transfer out of their wheelchairs or scooters into a vehicle. The problem has led at least one Ottawa resident to speculate about filing a human rights complaint, according to Kanata North Coun. Marianne Wilkinson. Wilkinson referenced the specter of a human rights case during a transit commission meeting on Oct. 17 â&#x20AC;&#x153;They havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sent it in yet, but I have been told by someone that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re considering it, in that people are giving differential services â&#x20AC;Ś based on where they live,â&#x20AC;? Wilkinson said. Jennifer Lockyer, transportation manager for Rural Ottawa South Support Services (ROSSS), said thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a gap in the system now that Para Transpo has stopped doing rural-to-rural trips, because the community support services donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have wheelchair-accessible vehicles. Lockyer said the agreement signed six months ago between the three community support services and OC Transpo provided funding for the agencies in east, west and ru-

FILE PHOTO

While rural service agencies are now able to provide more trips for mobility-challenged people, a human rights complaint looms due to an inability to transport passengers who must remain in their wheelchairs. ral Ottawa to increase transit service for seniors and adults with physical disabilities. However, Lockyer said it was clear the agencies can only serve residents who can transfer independently in and out of vehicles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That very much was laid out that we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t provide transportation right now for people in wheelchairs because we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the equipment

or the expertise,â&#x20AC;? Lockyer said. But after the agencies took over rural-to-rural transportation on April 1, Para Transpo stopped providing rural-to-rural trips altogether. Now, rural residents who canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t transfer out of their wheelchair or scooter can only get to appointments using an accessible taxi. Para Transpo offers taxi discount coupons for its passengers, but the trips

are sometimes more expensive than regular Para Transpo service. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t under the impression (the agreement) was going to replace (Para Transpo), but it kind of did in the end. Para Transpo announced after the fact that they werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to continue their rural-to-rural trips,â&#x20AC;? Lockyer said. Pat Scrimgeour, manager of transit service planning and reporting,

 



 

LEFT BEHIND

Last year, there were fewer than 120 Para Transpo trips made by 19 customers who must remain in their wheelchair or scooter during the trip between two rural locations, Scrimgeour said. See MORE, page 21

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Your Community Newspaper

More trips offered by new rural transportation partnership Continued from page 20

Between 80 and 90 per cent of the trips were made by four Para Transpo customers, he said. “So that’s the total number of people we’re talking about here,” Scrimgeour said. “It’s a small number of people.” Most of the trips are a short distance, including one-third of the trips within the village of Richmond. Those are the types of trips that rack up a lot of mileage on Para Transpo vehicles that must drive out from the urban area to take people several blocks, before driving back into the city. “It’s going to be expensive (to operate),” Scrimgeour said. Another thing to keep in mind is a change to the taxi bylaw that makes it obligatory for cabs to pick up disabled passengers in the rural area. “Certainly, for some of the short trips, that becomes a decent alternative for travellers,” Scrimgeour said. The option of providing a requirement or incentive for rural service providers to offer more accessible, wheelchair-friendly service was discussed, Scrimgeour said, but the city and the agencies decided to go a different route.

“We talked about that issue with them,” Scrimgeour said. “Their way of operating – partly with regular cars, partly with vans, partly with volunteers and partly with paid staff – wasn’t adaptable. They didn’t have the equipment needed to move the wheelchairs while they’re travelling. But we’re talking to them about it now. “They, and we, together recognize there is a gap,” he said. Whether that means Para Transpo will return to providing some rural-to-rural trips or the support services will begin to offer wheelchair-accessible service remains to be seen, Lockyer said. Regardless, she said she’s confident the city and the agencies will find a solution. “I’m amazed with the working relationship that we have in the city, and we all see there’s a gap here. It might mean bringing in another partner, but the collaboration has been very open,” she said. SUCCESSFUL START

Lockyer said the agreement’s first six months have been successful despite the wheelchair accessibility issue.

The agreement transferred $379,515 of Para Transpo’s rural budget to the three agencies – Rural Ottawa South Support Services, the Eastern Ottawa Resource Centre and the Western Ottawa Community Resource Centre – to help them increase their service levels. Beginning April 1, the agencies surpassed their target by more than 1,000 new rides, providing an additional 2,512 rides as a result of the city’s funding. The money is covering vehicle maintenance and fuel, as well as extra staff to co-ordinate rides. At the same time, the city put in a flat fare of $8.25 for rural Para Transpo trips. That far is lower than what passengers would have paid before for almost 94 per cent of rural Para Transpo trips. Previously, fares ranged from $4 to $18.25 depending on the distance between stops. By contrast, an urban Para Transpo trip is $3.25 or $4.25. Lockyer said the agencies are trying to use more agency vans instead of volunteers in personal vehicles, because it’s more efficient. A volunteer driver often only takes one client at a time, whereas a van

can take several clients to the same day program at once. This system is also more efficient than Para Transpo, which rarely consolidated trips with multiple clients in one van. This meant that two or three Para Transpo vans would often all arrive at the same location with one passenger each, instead of having the clients come together. Community support services also offer an advantage because they can provide crossborder trips outside the city of Ottawa, Lockyer said. “If you have a client in Osgoode that needs to go to the Winchester hospital, the agencies can do that, where Para Transpo can’t,” she said. But the support services still face challenges in the next six months of the pilot program. Basic marketing is needed to attract former Para Transpo clients, Lockyer said. The agencies are currently offering a “first ride free” program to entice new clients, and are spreading the word that community support service transit is cost effective. Lockyer said that depending on the mileage, some trips are actually cheaper than using Para Transpo, while long distances can be more expensive. The agencies also have a limited schedule, only operating between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. on weekdays, which they are trying to change. Lockyer said they are looking at adding Sunday “church runs.”

FILE PHOTO

Signs for the new rural shopper’s bus routes popped up last year at the same time that OC Transpo was making changes to its rural Para service. The free once-a-week routes offer additional service from the rural areas to urban shopping centres.

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Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

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Your Community Newspaper

NEWS

LHIN requests funding for maternal health centre in Ottawa Steph Willems steph.willems@metroland.com

gram is to consolidate the obstetrical and neonatal programs of those hospitals into one dedicated space. The LHIN board’s position is this will offer the best results for both mothers and their babies and will allow for educational and training opportunities, as well as maternal newborn research. “The blueprint for this came together in 2009 with extensive input from many partners across the region,” said Marie-Josee Trepanier,

interim regional director of the Champlain Maternal Newborn Regional Program. The program was integrated into the Champlain LHIN in 2010. A location for the centre, should it receive ministry funding, has been selected an empty parcel of land located off Alta Vista Drive near the existing General campus and CHEO. Trepanier said the creation of the centre is not to be seen as an indictment of existing facilities, but rather as a way of keeping mothers, fathers and babies together in a dedicated space complete with the latest technology aimed at creating a comfortable en-

vironment. As well, it would bring together the expertise of multiple existing obstetrical and neonatal teams and eliminate the need for the transport team from CHEO to ferry infants around the city depending on what level of care they need. “If a baby is delivered in one of those three hospitals and develops complications … they have to be transferred to one of three sites, depending on the level of care required,” said Trepanier. “With this (plan), there is one location and groups would work together under one roof.” She said she can see cost savings arising from amal-

gamation of services, along with reduced hospital stays for newborns. Part of the plan is to have the building’s sound levels and lighting mimic a baby’s circadian rhythm – a recent healthcare advancement based on new research. Though the process is still in the earliest of stages, members of the maternal newborn program are excited that plans are moving forward after years of work. “This has been years in the planning stage,” said Trepanier. “We’re pleased it has been approved at the Champlain LHIN. Ottawa is one of the only large cities in the country that doesn’t have this type of facility.”

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EMC news - If the Champlain Local Health Integration Network gets its way, Ottawa will see the creation of a new centre devoted to the care of seriously ill or premature infants as well as their mothers. A plan was approved during an Oct. 24 meeting calling for the Champlain Regional Maternal Newborn Program – a program that has

existed under different names since the early 1980s - to proceed with the submission of an initial capital plan to the Ministry of Health and LongTerm Care. Currently, seriously ill or premature infants are taken to one of three hospitals for treatment – the Civic or General campuses of The Ottawa Hospital, or the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario. The aim of the Champlain LHIN and those working in the maternal newborn pro-

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Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

New art exhibit showcases Centre 507 talent EMC news - An upcoming art exhibition at Centretown United Church offers an example of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible when someone is given a little help. Centre 507 will hold its first art exhibit on Nov. 21 to 24 in the churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sanctuary, 507 Bank St. The show, Artistic Expressions Studio Art Exhibition, will showcase Centre 507 artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; work. The show is a direct result of a joint project from Centre 507 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; drop-in centre for people living with poverty, addictions and mental illness â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and Centretown United Church. Centre 507 and church board member, Linda Pollock describes the Studio as a place where the artists have a safe, equipped studio space. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There has been a lot of interest from the Centre 507 clients,â&#x20AC;? Pollock said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is great to watch them all get ready for this show.â&#x20AC;? The program received a one-

time grant from the Watkins Fund for Innovative Ministries, through the United Church Foundation to organize the exhibit. All the Centre 507 artists have made submissions which will be on display. Frequent Centre 507 patron, Jul Liboiron said she has been working around the clock on her pen and ink pieces. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is taking a lot out of me, I am constantly trying to get the work done,â&#x20AC;? Liboiron said. Some of Liboironâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art pieces will also be available to purchase as gift cards. Liboiron has leaned on the two professional Ottawa artists, Glebe painter, sculptor and teacher Lisa Thomas, and Ginger McCoy, painter, ceramic artist, who volunteer at the studio twice a month to offer workshops and mentor the artist-members. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have fun with all of the artists, and they give back to me as much as I give to them,â&#x20AC;? Thomas said.

MICHELLE NASH/METROLAND

Barrhaven resident Nirmolak Saggu will be one of the featured artists at the Centre 507â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first art exhibit. The church is converting its sanctuary room into a gallery for the event, after the show, the space will be available for the program on a regular basis. Thomas said this new space is desperately needed. The current space the artists use for the program and to get ready for the exhibit is the churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preschool room.

Thomas and McCoy must set up and tear down each time the group uses the shared space. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will be great to have a more permanent space, where everyone can just drop in and get started,â&#x20AC;? Thomas said. Pollock said the churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal is to make the room a community space, available for whatever the community

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CORRECTION NOTICE

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Wild Game Meat Cutting

   

DENTAL OFFICE

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The artists who attend the program vary. Some are shy, others are living with mental illnesses, homelessness, or some simply come to the centre because of its multiple activities. All of them however credit the studio art program as a way to both express themselves and grow as individuals. The exhibit will welcome different guests each evening throughout the event, including speaker Ed Broadbent on Nov. 21 at 7 p.m., pianist William Blais on Nov. 22 at 7 p.m. and the Shout Sisters Choir on Nov. 23. After each guest appearance, the audience is invited to view the artwork. The show is open from 7 to 9 p.m. from Nov. 21 to 24.

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needs. Regardless of the amount of space available, most of the artists say they come because the program is enjoyable. Barrhaven resident, Nirmolak Saggu said he makes the trek to the centre for the two hours every other month because it allows him to opportunity to express his creative side. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I am at home, maybe I could get more time to spend on my art, but here, I get to focus and learn new things,â&#x20AC;? Saggu said. Sagguâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strength is pencil sketching. He said he was afraid of using colour until he attended some of the workshops on colour at the centre. Now everything he creates is full of colour.

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Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

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Your Community Newspaper

NEWS

Drop in poppy fundraising expected due to hockey lockout Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - The Kanata Legion and charities it supports will take a hit from the hockey strike this year. With NHL players off the ice, the legion expects to be down about $8,000 from a drop in poppy donations this year. Normally, legion members can distribute poppies during at least three Ottawa Senators games at the Kanata arena, but without hockey this year, poppy sales will be way down, says campaign chairwoman Moira Green. The mood at the legion was somber when members realized there was no chance hockey would start up this fall, Green said. “We were just devastated,” she said. Poppy distribution at Sens games nets about 10 per cent of the total donations the Kanata Legion receives for its poppy campaign each year. In 2011, the Kanata Legion raised a total of $85,930 through poppy distribution. “The fans are always very, very generous … They’re in

a good mood” – especially when the home team is winning, Green said. It wasn’t uncommon for elated fans to drop 20-dollar bills into the collection box, Green said. Although there will be two OHL hockey games played at Scotiabank Place during the poppy campaign, Green said the legion doesn’t expect donations at Ottawa 67’s games to make up for the contributions Sens fans usually give. “If you’re going to a 67’s game, we would really appreciate it,” Green said. “When you’re out shopping, consider giving more.” Poppies will be available during Ottawa 67’s games at Scotiabank Place on Friday, Nov. 9 at 7:30 p.m. vs. the Saginaw Spirit; and on Sunday, Nov. 11 at 2 p.m. vs. the Belleville Bulls. Much of the money raised goes to help veterans. Last year, $10,425 was used by Kanata Legion branch staff to assist veterans. An additional $6,000 provided temporary housing for homeless veterans and $5,600 paid for “comforts” for veterans in

long-term care facilities. A dinner for 88 veterans who live in long-term care facilities was paid for using $1,770 of the money raised in 2011. Veterans from former British Caribbean countries also receive support through the Royal Canadian Legion, so $1,000 from last year’s poppy campaign went to help them. Some of the money also goes back to the community. Poppy campaign funds paid for a $2,655 debrillator for the intensive-care unit at the Queensway-Carleton Hospital. More than $12,000 in bursaries and scholarships was handed out to students studying at local post-secondary institutions. Local cadet organizations received $2,360 and Ottawa drop-in centres, Meals on Wheels and a footcare clinic for seniors received $13,800 in support.

Lack of NHL hockey is expected to impact funds raised by the local poppy campaign. FILE PHOTO

ARE YOU READY FOR WORLD DIABETES DAY NOVEMBER 14TH?

Diabetes Awareness Partners of Ottawa is asking You to wear BLUE on Wednesday November 14th. Do you know of someone that lives with diabetes? You can help support awareness.

2012 Christmas Hamper Program

Want to live well with

Type 2 and Prediabetes? • • • • •

The Christmas season is moving quickly in on us, and before you know it will be here! For some; it is a time of joy, peace and family gatherings. For others, who may be having financial difficulties, it can become a stressful time of year.

Accessible, FREE services Support from experienced nurses and dietitians Group and individual education Day and evening sessions In English, French, Chinese, Spanish, Arabic and more!

Operating out of the Barrhaven Food Cupboard; the Barrhaven Christmas Hamper Program is focused on alleviating some of that stress. They work to pair Schools, Churches, Families, and Businesses that can provide a Christmas Dinner Hamper to a family who may need one! From Nov 1st to Dec 15th Barrhaven families who require assistance may call the Barrhaven Food Cupboard - Christmas Hamper Program at 613-825-4505. They will be asked to leave their name, telephone number and address, and will receive a call back within 48 hours to confirm their contact details etc. As calls are received, the dedicated volunteer team of 15 spend their time, dispatching calls, matching sponsors to families, and performing call backs. In some cases, this committed team actually shop, assemble and deliver the hampers if the Sponsor does not want to be involved. Their goal is to ensure everyone in our community can enjoy a holiday dinner! Over the past few years, the requests for Hampers have grown by approximately 20% per. The Hamper Team coordinated the delivery of more than 100 Christmas Hampers to families in need in 2011!

Location in Your Community •

Nepean, Rideau, & Osgoode Community Resource Centre (in Merivale Mall)

South Nepean Community Health Centre (in Cedarview Square)

The new 2012 Hamper Program Coordinator, Colleen Turner says; “We have an abundance of generous people and businesses in Barrhaven, so once again we are reaching out to the community to please call 613-825-4505 if you can donate a Hamper this year” “We want to ensure we can provide hampers to those families who might be experiencing difficulties this year, so that everyone can enjoy the Season!”

The Community Diabetes Education Program of Ottawa Want to Participate? Please call to register:

(613) 233 - 6655 For more information, visit us online at : www.diabeteseducation.ca



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The Community Diabetes Education Program of Ottawa is funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care.

“That was way to easy!”

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Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012


2012

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www.BarrhavenSantaClausParade.com

Craft Christmas Gift Sale At the Nepean Sportsplex This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Craft Christmas Gift Sale will display unique one of a kind items by talented artisans, designers, and artists. Their creations include custom made jewellery, exquisite ďŹ ne art, original handmade clothing, delectable gourmet food, magniďŹ cent pottery creations and festive Christmas decorations. The Craft Christmas Gift Sale runs from November 7 to 11 at the Nepean Sportsplex. As Ottawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s longest running craft show, the 39th Craft Christmas Gift Sale is held annually at the Nepean Sportsplex. The show assists over 140 talented artisans from around the country in selling distinctive products to Ottawa residents and visitors. Artisans travel from British Columbia, the Maritimes, Ontario, and Quebec to sell their incredible creations. Many of your favourite vendors will be returning with new exceptional items, along with new vendors displaying their extraordinary talents. Take advantage of our 2 for 1 coupon included below. Bring a friend to the Sale on Sunday, November 11 from 12 noon to 5 p.m. and enjoy the extensive selection of holiday gift ideas and for that someone special or for yourself! The Craft Christmas Gift Sale opens Wednesday, November 7 at 10 a.m. at the Nepean Sportsplex, 1701 Woodroffe Avenue where there is plenty of free parking. For more information, please visit ottawa.ca/recreation.

JENNIFER MCINTOSH/METROLAND

Calling for college students Natalya Golovaneva checks out some products made by students in the welding fabrication program at Algonquin College on Nov. 1. More than 3,500 high school students flocked to the college for their annual open house.

R0011709404-1101

39th Annual

Craft Christmas Gift Sale

Nepean Sportsplex, 1701 Woodroffe Ave.

November 7 - 11, 2012

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Show Hours: Wed. - Fri. 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sun. noon - 5 p.m. Admission: Adults & Students $7.50 Seniors $3.75 Children (under 12) Free Free Admission Wed. & Thurs. 10 - 11 a.m. CASH BOX OFFICE ONLY

Free Parking

ottawa.ca/recreation 2012054S01

Craft Christmas Gift Sale Nepean Sportsplex - 1701 Woodroffe Ave

2 for 1 Coupon Sunday November 11th ONLY! 12 noon - 5pm

Barrhaven Town Centre Community Square Plaza 3777 Strandherd Dr., Barrhaven

Beside Shoppers Drug Mart, Kemptville

613-825-6100

613-258-6100

Receive one free admission to the Craft Christmas Gift Sale when an Adult or Student admission is purchased. Redemption with original coupon - no photocopies accepted.

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Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Low turnout at city budget consultations Lack of criticism indicates support for ‘stability’ budget: mayor Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC - A sparse turnout and a series of lengthy thankyou speeches characterized a low-key city budget public consultation on Nov. 1. Fewer than 10 questions were posed to city staff during the afternoon meeting at city hall – the third of four consultations scheduled around Ottawa to discuss the city’s spending plan for 2013. Mayor Jim Watson said the lack of attendance indicates general satisfaction with the budget, whereas in years past, hundreds of angry residents would show up in protest when they didn’t like something in the budget proposal. “I think there is generally a sense that people are glad this isn’t a slash-and-burn exercise,” Watson said. “It’s not a particularly flashy budget, which I think at this time in our economic stage, people are looking for that kind of stable approach.” Watson said the city has scheduled one afternoon budget consultation in each of the past couple of years to give an

opportunity for people who can’t come out to the rest of the meetings in the evening. “We wanted to give people an option of one afternoon because all the other meetings are in the evenings,” Watson said. In 2011, the daytime consultation was the most heavily attended, Watson said. That wasn’t the case this year, with fewer than 20 members of the public in attendance at the 4 p.m. meeting. The session began with a presentation from city staff about the draft 2013 budget, which is scheduled to be debated by council and put to a vote on Nov. 28. The city’s “stay the course” draft budget means the average homeowner in the urban area would pay an extra $67 on the municipal portion of their tax bill next year. It’s the smallest tax increase in six years and at 2.09 per cent, it falls below city council’s commitment to keep tax hikes to 2.5 per cent each year. The mayor said it’s a plan that mostly sees city services maintained and the continua-

LAURA MUELLER/METROLAND

City manager Kent Kirkpatrick, Mayor Jim Watson and city treasurer Marian Simulik appear at a media briefing after presenting the city’s draft 2013 budget on Oct. 24. tion of existing projects, but not a lot of new spending. Representatives from the National Capital Heavy Construction Association continued their campaign to urge city officials to spend more on infrastructure renewal. Former mayoral candidate Mike McGuire bemoaned the city’s move to biweekly garbage pickup and questioned the amount of money it would save the city. He was also concerned about the

city’s debt level, saying there is never a “good time” to borrow money. City treasurer Marian Simulik called McGuire’s comments “alarmist” and said Ottawa’s debt is nowhere near a crisis level and is actually low per capita when compared to other large Canadian cities. But most of the residents in attendance had positive things to say about the city’s spending on the arts, heritage and

culture. Watson said people thanking him for the $1 million investment in the Arts, Heritage and Culture Plan had become a reoccurring theme during the consultations. “I think they were pleasantly surprised that we had passed that arts report that asked for $1 million and in fact we’re delivering on it,” Watson said. “I think there was almost a bit of surprise that: ‘Oh good, they said one thing and they

actually did it.’” In the past, councils would pass reports and then forget about funding them by the time the budget rolled around, Watson said. “In years gone by there were massive cuts proposed to arts and culture, so it’s nice to have turned the corner and brought in a budget that doesn’t have a lot of big cuts and doesn’t have a lot of big spending, but is very much balanced,” he said.

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Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012


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Thursday November 8, 2012

Grannies gather to support generic drug bill Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

LAURA MUELLER/METROLAND

Despite rainy weather, Nepean’s Jo Hopkins was one of approximately 100 supporters of grandmother-to-grandmother campaigns gathered on Parliament Hill on Nov. 1 to rally for a bill to amend Canada’s access to medication legislation.

EMC news - Grandmothers gathered on Parliament Hill last Thursday hoping to change how Canada sends generic drugs to sick people in the developing world. The Grandmothers Advocacy Network (GRAN) organized the Nov. 8 rally, which included participants from 27 Ottawa region Grandmothers to Grandmothers fundraising

groups as well as area religious groups, social advocates and politicians. The group was asking the Canadian government to pass Bill C-398, which would reform Canada’s Access to Medicines Regime passed in 2004 to allow the sale of generic drugs to developing countries. That bill proved too full of red tape, and only one shipment of life-saving drugs has ever left our shores since it passed. Bill C-398 would clear the

way to an easier administrative process so that more medicine, such as drugs for managing HIV/AIDS, can leave Canada and help curb the acute public health problems in Africa and other developing regions. The reform bill has already passed the House of Commons once, but died in the Senate when the Conservative government prorogued Parliament in 2011. See SEND, page 33

Hydro Ottawa crews help U.S. utilities after Hurricane Sandy A group of 13 Hydro Ottawa power line maintainers are in Connecticut to assist Northeast Utilities in restoring power to approximately 354,000 residents after Hurricane Sandy caused significant damage to the area. “Hydro Ottawa offered assistance without hesitation. Restoring power is a specialized skill and the electricity industry supports each other in these times of need,” said Bryce Conrad, Hydro Ottawa’s President and Chief Executive Officer. Ottawa escaped the storm relatively unscathed. At its peak the storm knocked out power to approximately 3,000 Hydro Ottawa customers in the Casselman, Blackburn Hamlet, Crystal Beach and Merivale areas. Crews worked to successfully restore power across the city and our now able to support other communities in need of help. The Hydro Ottawa crews are working outside Danielson, Connecticut where high winds and falling trees have downed power lines and damaged poles. “When power outages occur, Hydro Ottawa employees go above and beyond to ensure public safety and to get the power back on as soon as possible,” added Conrad. “I am proud that these crews will be using these talents to help our U.S. neighbours.” This is the first time Hydro Ottawa has dispatched crews to the United States. During past widespread power outages, crews have assisted utilities in Ontario and Quebec. The 13 power line maintainers join 12 Hydro Ottawa contract forestry workers who are clearing trees in Connecticut to restore the power.

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,ESTWEFORGET City announces Remembrance Day schedule changes EMC news - The City of Ottawa reminds residents of the following schedule changes for Remembrance Day (Sunday, Nov. 11). The flags at all City of Ottawa will be lowered to half-mast from sunrise to sunset to honour the memory of all Canadians who have served their country in time of war. Client services: UÊ -ˆ˜ViÊ,i“i“LÀ>˜ViÊ >ÞÊv>Ãʜ˜Ê>Ê-՘`>Þ]ÊOttawa City Hall and all seven Client Service Centres]ʈ˜VÕ`ˆ˜}Ê Ì…iÊGovernment Service Centres located at 110 Laurier Avenue West]Ê܈ÊLiÊVœÃi`ʜ˜Êœ˜`>Þ]Ê œÛ°Ê £Ó°Ê ÕȘiÃÃÊ܈ÊÀiÃՓiÊ>ÃÊÕÃÕ>Êœ˜Ê/ÕiÃ`>Þ]Ê œÛ°Ê£Î° UÊ /…iÊ ˆÌÞ½ÃÊProvincial Offences Court]ʏœV>Ìi`Ê>ÌÊ£ääÊ

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Garbage and recycling:

Remembe

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A Day of

Remembrance

We

Remember

“They shall grow not old, As we that are left grow old; Age shall not weary them, Nor the years condemn. All the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them.”

Every November 11th, Canadians pause in a silent moment of remembrance

– Lawrence Binyon, For the Fallen (1914)

Ottawa West - Nepean

JOHN BAIRD

For information regarding Remembrance Day events in Ottawa West-Nepean, please contact my community office:

for the men and women who served their country during wartime and in the cause of peace. More than 1,500,000 Canadians served overseas—in the First World War (1914-18), the Second World War (1939-45), and the Korean War (1950-53). More than 100,000 died. We honour their sacrifice and the sacrifices of our soldiers today, who serve so we may live in peace.

Bob Chiarelli, MPP

OTTAWA WEST-NEPEAN www.johnbaird.com 30

Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

1108.R0011726852

MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT

201 - 2249 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K2B 7E9 T: 613-721-8075 | F: 613-721-5756 | E: bchiarelli.mpp.co@liberal.ola.org


,ESTWEFORGET City Remembrance Day Schedule continued from page 30

Ottawa Public Health: UÊ Ottawa Public Health Information Line (OPHIL)Ê>˜`Ê -ʏˆ˜iÊqÊVœÃi`Ê œ˜`>Þ]Ê œÛi“LiÀÊ£Ó UÊ Sexual Health Centre and clinicsÊ>ÀiÊ VœÃi`Êœ˜`>Þ]Ê œÛ°Ê£ÓÆʅœÜiÛiÀ]Ê̅iÊ -ˆÌiʓœLˆiÊÛ>˜Ê܈ÊLiʜ«iÀ>̈˜}ʜ˜Ê>Ê Ài}Տ>ÀÊÃV…i`ՏiÊvÀœ“ÊxÊ«°“°ÌœÊ££\ÎäÊ «°“°Ê UÊ Dental ClinicsÊqÊ œÃi`Êœ˜`>Þ]ÊÊ œÛ°Ê£Ó UÊ Baby Express Drop-insÊqÊ œÃi`Ê œ˜`>Þ]Ê œÛ°Ê£Ó

The City of Ottawa informs residents of the following parades and ceremonies being held in the various communities in and around Ottawa commemorating Remembrance Day.

Parades and Ceremonies: UÊ

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i˜œÌ>«…ÊvœÀÊ̅iÊViÀi“œ˜ˆ>ÊÃiÀۈVi° œvÊ̅iÊOttawa Public LibraryÊ܈ÊLiÊ UÊ MetcalfeÊqÊ£ä\{xÊ>°“°Ê̜ʘœœ˜]Ê VœÃi`ʜ˜Ê,i“i“LÀ>˜ViÊ >Þ]Ê-՘`>Þ]Ê ViÀi“œ˜ˆ>ÊÃiÀۈViÊ>ÌÊ̅iÊiÌV>viÊ œÛ°Ê££°Ê,i}Տ>ÀʅœÕÀÃÊ܈ÊÀiÃՓiʜ˜Ê

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i˜œÌ>«…ʈ˜ÊvÀœ˜ÌʜvÊ՘ˆVˆ«>Ê Ո`ˆ˜}° RichmondÊqÊ£ä\{xÊ>°“Ê̜ʣ£\{xÊ>°“°]Ê ,œÞ>Ê >˜>`ˆ>˜Êi}ˆœ˜Ê­,ˆV…“œ˜`Ê À>˜V…ÊÈÓx®]Ê*iÀ̅Ê-ÌÀiiÌÊLiÌÜii˜Ê ̅iÊ,ˆV…“œ˜`Ê-…œ««ˆ˜}Ê*>â>Ê>˜`Ê Ì…iÊ,ˆV…“œ˜`Êi“œÀˆ>Ê*>ÀŽÊvœÀÊ̅iÊ ViÀi“œ˜ˆ>ÊÃiÀۈVi° StittsvilleÊqÊ£\{xÊ«°“°Ê̜ÊÓ\{xÊ«°“°]Ê ,œÞ>Ê >˜>`ˆ>˜Êi}ˆœ˜Ê­-̈ÌÌÃۈiÊ >˜`Ê ˆÃÌÀˆVÌÊ À>˜V…ÊÈ£n®]ʘœÀ̅ʜ˜Ê -̈ÌÌÃۈiÊ>ˆ˜Ê-ÌÀiiÌÊLiÌÜii˜Ê̅iÊ,œÞ>Ê

Lest We Forget www SteveDesroches ca www.SteveDesroches.ca 1108.R0011728129

To all the men and women who have served Canada, your service and your sacrifice is remembered and appreciated.

Deputy Mayor City Councillor Gloucester-South Nepean Steve.Desroches@Ottawa.ca (613) 580-2751

Councillor Keith Egli Ward 9 Knoxdale - Merivale Telephone: 613.580.2479 Email: ward9@ottawa.ca www.keithegli.ca Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

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NEWS

Send bill to committee: Grannies Continued from page 29

ganization). They canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford the (brand-name) prices.â&#x20AC;? Johnson said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not clear where the Conservative government stands on the bill, despite it passing with a majority before the last election. The bill was tabled by NDP MP HĂŠlène Laverdière. The Grandmothers Advocacy Network and the Grandmothers to Grandmothers campaign - two separate groups who often work together â&#x20AC;&#x201C; have grown from Canadian advocate Stephen

Lewisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; realization that grandmothers are carrying the burden of Africaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AIDS epidemic. Millions of people died of AIDS, leaving grandmothers to bury their adult children and then raise as many as 15 grandchildren by themselves. Lewis brought some of these grandmothers to Canada to share their stories, and the Canadian grandmothers were moved to action. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once the connection was made ... doing nothing is not an option,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said.

LAURA MUELLER/METROLAND

Grandmothers from across Canada participate in the rally on Parliament Hill.

7Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;-VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\Ă&#x17D;ä

Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x201C;ÂŤÂ?>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;7Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x160;ÂŁÂŁ\ÂŁx

Real God. Real People. Real Church.

Join us Sundays at 10:30 7275 Parkway Rd. Greely, ON 613-821-1056

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;`i>Ă&#x2022;ÂŤ>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;°V>Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;ÂŁxĂ&#x2C6;

www.parkwayroad.com

The West Ottawa Church of Christ

Service Time: Sundays at 10:30 AM

meets every Sunday at The Old Forge Community Resource Centre 2730 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K2B 7J1

Location: St. Thomas More Catholic School, 1620 Blohm Drive

Sunday Services: Bible Study at 10:00 AM - Worship Service at 11:00 AM A warm welcome awaits you For Information Call 613-224-8507

We are a small church in the city of Ottawa with a big heart for God and for people. newhopeottawa.co

R0011293030

Worship services Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

ËĄË&#x;ˤÂľÇ&#x2039;ssĹ&#x2DC;EĹ&#x2DC;Ĩ Ç&#x160;Ÿ_Ę°šǟǟÉ  ɠɠɠʳɠŸŸ_É&#x161;ÄśsʳŸĹ&#x2DC;ĘłO ʚ˼ˠˢʺ˧˥˨Ë&#x161;˥ˢ˼˥ NĂ&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Äś_OÇ&#x2039;sĆźÇ&#x2039;ŸÉ&#x161;Ă&#x17E;_s_ĘłƝĜsÇŁsOĜĜŸÇ&#x2039;É&#x161;Ă&#x17E;ÇŁĂ&#x17E;ÇźČ&#x2013;ÇŁŸĹ&#x2DC;Ë&#x161;ÄśĂ&#x17E;Ĺ&#x2DC;sĘł

Gloucester South Seniors Centre

DČ&#x2013;Ă&#x17E;Äś_Ă&#x17E;Ĺ&#x2DC;ÂśĹ&#x2DC;Č&#x2013;ÇźĂ&#x152;sĹ&#x2DC;ÇźĂ&#x17E;OĘ°Ç&#x2039;sĜǟĂ&#x17E;ŸĹ&#x2DC;Ĝʰ_Ă&#x17E;É&#x161;sÇ&#x2039;ÇŁsOĂ&#x152;Č&#x2013;Ç&#x2039;OĂ&#x152;Ęł

Worship 10:30 Sundays

Invites you to our worship service with Rev. Dean Noakes Sundays at 11am 414 Pleasant Park Road 613 733-4886 pleasantparkbaptist.org

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ǢČ&#x2013;Ĺ&#x2DC;_É´ǢsÇ&#x2039;É&#x161;Ă&#x17E;OsÇŁ Çź ˨ŸÇ&#x2039;Ë Ë Ĺ?

4550 Bank Street (at Leitrim Rd.) (613) 277-8621 Come for an encouraging Word! R0011292837

Minister - Rev. William Ball Organist - Alan Thomas Nusery & Sunday School, Loop audio, Wheelchair access

470 Roosevelt Ave. Westboro www.mywestminster.ca

429 Parkdale at Gladstone Ministers Rev. Dr. Anthony Bailey Barbara Faught - Pastoral Care Melodee Lovering - Youth and Children Worship Service - 10:30 am 613-728-8656 Sunday School for all ages pdale@trytel.com www.parkdaleunitedchurch.ca Nursery Available

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Heavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gate Chapel Heb. 13:8 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and today, and forever

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Sunday Services 9 am Teen Breakfast Club Adult Sunday School (Childcare provided) 10 am Worship Service Nursery and Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sunday School

in Metcalfe on 8th Line - only 17 mins from HWY 417  sWWW3AINT#ATHERINE-ETCALFECA

Sunday Worship - 10:00 a.m. Nursery and Sunday School

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NOT YOUR AVERAGE ANGLICANS

R0011606435

Riverside United Church

St Aidanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church

Sunday Worship at 11:00am Refreshments / fellowship following service

Arlington Woods Free Methodist Church

St. Timothyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Presbyterian Church 2400 Alta Vista Drive (613) 733 0131 Sunday Worship at 10:00 a.m. Sunday School; Ample parking; OC Transpo route 8 A warm welcome awaits you. Minister: Alex Mitchell sttimothys@on.aibn.com www.sttimsottawa.com

St. Richardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss our Annual Christmas Bazaar Nov 17th 9am - 2pm

www.saintrichards.ca â&#x20AC;&#x153;Worship the Lord in the Beauty of his holiness...â&#x20AC;?

Come together at Anglican Church of Canada

www.stlukesottawa.ca

Sundays 10am Choral Eucharist with Sunday School & Nusery 3:30pm Contemplative Eucharist

All are welcome without exception. R0011292656

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5338 Bank Street, Ottawa 613-822-2197 www.olvis.ca Masses: Saturday 5:00 pm Sunday with Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Liturgy: 9:00 & 11:00 am Weekdays: Wed. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Fri. 9:00 am Now open for rentals: www.avisitationbanquetcentre.com 613-822-1777

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OUR LADY OF THE VISITATION PARISH

Sunday Services: 8am and 10am Thursday Eucharist: 10am Nearly New Shop/Book Nook Open Thursday, Fridays 1pm - 3:30pm and ďŹ rst Saturday of each month: 10am - Noon 8 Withrow Avenue 613-224-7178

760 Somerset West

613-235-3416

All are welcome to come hear the good news in a spiritually uplifting mix of traditional and forward looking Christian worship led by the Reverend Richard Vroom with Sunday morning services at 8:30 and 10. Two blocks north of Carlingwood Shopping Centre on Lockhart Avenue at Prince Charles Road.

225 McClellan Road, Nepean ON 613-596-9390 www.awfmc.ca

www.magma.ca/~ruc (613)733-7735 R0011292719

Holy Eucharist 8:00 am & 10:30 am 10:30 am - Play Area for Under 5 934 Hamlet Road (near St Laurent & Smyth) 613 733 0102 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; staidans@bellnet.ca

3191 Riverside Dr (at Walkley)

R0011588383

St. Michael and All Angels Anglican Church 2112 Bel-Air Drive (613) 224 0526 Join us for regular services Beginning September 9 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sundays at 8:00 & 10:00 a.m. Church school and youth group Rector: Rev. Dr. Linda Privitera â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Everyone welcome â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Come as you are â&#x20AC;&#x201C; www.stmichaelandallangels.ca

1108.R0011716623

at lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ĂŠglise Ste-Anne Welcomes you to the traditional Latin Mass Sunday Masses: 8:30 a.m. Low Mass 10:30 a.m. High Mass (with Gregorian chant) 6:30 p.m. Low Mass For the Mass times please see www.st.-clementottawa.ca 528 Old St. Patrick St. Ottawa ON K1N 5L5 (613) 565.9656

R0011701400

St. Clement Church/Paroisse St. ClĂŠment

November 11th: Judgement

Come Join Us: (Located corner of Breadner Blvd. and Deniverville Pvt.)

Venez-vous joindre Ă nous (SituĂŠe au coin du boul. Breadner et Pvt. Deniverville)

R0011622275

St Catherine of Siena Catholic Church

265549/0605 R0011293022

10 Chesterton Drive, Ottawa (Meadowlands and Chesterton) Tel: 613-225-6648 parkwoodchurch.ca

Minister: James T. Hurd Everyone Welcome

The Church Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Always Longed For... Anticipates a Great Future. Come join us!

R0011721871

Only south Ottawa Mass convenient for those who travel, work weekends and sleep in!

Service protestant avec lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ĂŠcole du dimanche 09:30 Messe Catholique romaine avec la liturgie pour enfants 11:15

Protestant Worship with Sunday School 09:30 Roman Catholic Mass with Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Liturgy 11:15

faith@magma.ca www.magma.ca/~faith

R0011293044

R0011386374

355 Cooper Street at Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor 613-235-5143 www.dc-church.org

Sunday 7 pm Mass Now Available!

613.224.1971 R0011292835

Les Services de lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;aumĂ´nerie des Forces canadiennes Services du dimanche de la chapelle militaire

The Canadian Forces Chaplain Services Military Chapel Sunday Services

43 Meadowlands Dr. W. Ottawa

R0011519531

Sunday Services Worship Service10:30am Sundays Prayer Circle Tuesday at 11:30 Rev.10:30 Jamesa.m. Murray

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Dominion-Chalmers United Church

Come & worship with us Sundays at 10:00am Fellowship & Sunday School after the service

ALL WELCOME Sundays at 10:30 a.m. The Salvation Army Community Church Meeting at St. Andrew School 201 Crestway Dr. 613-440-7555 Barrhaven www.sawoodroffe.org

Email: admin@mywestminister.ca

613-722-1144 Parkdale United Church

The Redeemed Christian Church of God

Tel: (613) 276-5481; (613) 440-5481 1893 Baseline Rd., Ottawa (2nd Floor) Sunday Service 10.30am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12.30pm Bible study / Night Vigil: Friday 10.00pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1.00am Website: heavensgateottawa.org E-mail: heavensgatechapel@yahoo.ca

613.247.8676

(Do not mail the school please)

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Pleasant Park Baptist Watch & Pray Ministry

Celebrating 14 years in this area!

R0011293034

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Rideau Park United Church

R0011292694

R0011723803

Organizer Bonnie Johnson said in the short term they want the House to approve sending the bill to committee for review, which could take up to two years. If it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go to committee soon, the bill could die in 2015 when another election is called. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the meantime, two thirds of the kids in Sub-Saharan Africa wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have access to drugs,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. The original bill was passed

in 2004 in response to the World Trade Organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ruling that generic versions of brand-name drugs can be manufactured without the patent holderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s permission for export to countries where they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t manufacture the drugs themselves. Johnson said there has been a lot of misinformation about the Access to Medicines Regime, regarding its cost to tax payers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a no-tax bill,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The country buys the drugs and they get the funding from the Global Fund (charitable or-

For all your church advertising needs email srussell @ thenewsemc.ca Call: 613-688-1483

Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

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35


NEWS

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Hydro Ottawa crews help U.S. EMC news - A group of 13 Hydro Ottawa power line maintainers are in Connecticut to assist Northeast Utilities in restoring power to about 354,000 residents after Superstorm Sandy caused significant damage to the area. “Restoring power is a specialized skill and the electricity industry supports each other in these times of need,” said Bryce Conrad, Hydro Ottawa’s president and chief executive officer. Ottawa escaped the storm relatively unscathed. At its peak the storm knocked out power to approximately 3,000 Hydro Ottawa customers in the Casselman, Blackburn Hamlet, Crystal Beach and Merivale areas. Crews

worked to successfully restore power across the city and are now able to support other communities in need of help. The Hydro Ottawa crews are working outside Danielson, Ct., where high winds and falling trees have downed power lines and damaged poles. This is the first time Hydro Ottawa has dispatched crews to the United States. During past widespread power outages, crews have assisted utilities in Ontario and Quebec. The 13 power line maintainers join 12 Hydro Ottawa contract forestry workers who are clearing trees in Connecticut to restore the power.

R0011609187_0913

EMMA JACKSON/METROLAND

Condors roost

The Perth BIA presents Christmas Begins in Perth

Open House November 21, 2012

The Festival of Lights

Colonel By Secondary School International Baccalaureate Program

Thursday, November 22 6-8pm

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Program gives students the extra advantage to succeed in their post-secondary career through an intellectually rigorous, pre-university course of study. Our program has students reaching beyond normal expectations to enrich their academic base and social consciousness. Students graduating with an IB diploma are top entry candidates to university, often qualifying for university credits and advanced standing on acceptance.

Bonfire in the Tay Basin Fireworks Lighting of the Community Trees at the Best Western Plus, Perth

Colonel By’s IB Diploma program is one of the largest and most successful in North America. Many of Colonel By’s IB graduates are top candidates for scholarships, both nationally and internationally.

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R0011728095_1108

Kyle Lafreniere, left, joined Capital City Condors founder Shana Perkins and teammate Robbie Laforest at the Special Needs Fair at the Montgomery Legion on Nov. 4. Organizations, businesses and support groups gathered to offer a one-stop shop for those looking for special needs services. Lafreniere and Laforest were promoting their hockey team, which is for people with special needs aged six and up. Lefreniere, 18, said his favourite part is scoring a goal, but he loves being part of a team. ‘We have so much fun. We go around the ice and practise passing the puck,’ he said.

Saturday, November 24 Mary Bada Principal Colonel By SS

Lewis Harthun Coordinator, IB Program Colonel By SS

www.ocdsb.ca

36

Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

Neil Yorke-Slader Superintendent of Instruction OCDSB

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Visit www.ibcb.ca for complete program and application information.

Festival of Good Cheer

Free Yoga Class Morning Run Glamour Boudoir Photos Candlelight Walk

Saturday, November 24 10am-3pm

Tickets and Info @ 613-264-1190 Early Bird Special $45 Before November 13

Shopping Fair in the Crystal Palace Demos, Discounts and Dining at Local Shops and Restaurants

Check Girls’ Getaway Weekend Perth on Facebook for More Events


Your Community Newspaper

NEWS

Raceway celebrates 50 years in face of uncertain future Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

EMC news – The Rideau Carleton Raceway opened its doors in 1962, and while the track has remained a steady 5/8ths of a mile, the rest of the facility has been growing ever since. Alongside live harness racing three days a week, the track on Albion Road south of Ottawa has spent the past 50 years turning itself into a successful entertainment centre. In 2000, the entire building was overhauled when the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation partnered with the raceway to bring more than 1,200 slot machines to the centre. In 2011, the slots facility also added a number of virtual gaming tables offering black jack, baccarat and roulette. The raceway has also added many ‘simulcast’ racing stations for patrons who want to bet at tracks across the continent. A large bingo hall on the third floor has also been added, which benefits 28 local charities. The dining room has been reconfigured since the raceway was first built, and accommodates 650 people – an advantage for the many community groups who use the space to fundraise for their various charities and causes. Countless ‘Night at the Races’ fundraisers have been held for charities, and 25 countrythemed nights were held in the past year, with Italy and Switzerland proving some of the most popular. The site has also hosted 16 Gloucester Fairs and the now-defunct Capital Hoedown. Many a successful horse has crossed the finish line here, including Majestic Sun, who holds the Canadian record for fastest mile, Bestofbest Hanover and Intimidate. Canadian hall of fame driver Hervé Filion “cut his teeth” here, as did many other successful drivers, said track announcer and spokesperson Norm Borg. The life-long racing fan said the game is changing, but the racetrack is adapting and continues to be a pillar in the community. “It’s become a family tradition for a lot of families, and it’s been passed on for generations,” Borg said. On Thursdays, Fridays and Sundays, the dining room and grand stand are packed with people out for a good time – and Borg said they can get rowdy in their excitement to see their horse win. Many people who come to the races don’t know much about harness racing – and don’t care to – and are there simply to enjoy the atmosphere and perhaps put $20 on a horse they can cheer for. “You can not beat this economical, value-added family entertainment,” Borg said.

for kids and fans, and even had drivers from the 1960s come to tell their stories. It’s a bittersweet time to be celebrating a 50th anniversary, Borg said, ever since the Ontario government ended its Slots at Raceways program in an effort to save about $345 million it said could be better used for health care and education programs. Now, the OLG is looking to build a new casino in Ottawa and would prefer it to be located downtown instead of at the raceway. But Borg said he’s feeling a bit better since Premier Dalton McGuinty stepped down on Oct. 15. “It’s getting a little sweeter, we’re going to have a change of governance if not a change of government, and there’s every indication that the alternative attitudes are different,” Borg said. “I’m feeling a little better today than I was in March (when the Slots at Racetracks program was cancelled).” Borg is confident the race-

track has another 50 years left in her. He said the horse racing game is changing with improved technology like simulcasting from other racetracks across North America, but it also has an opportunity to attract new fans through the through spillover from its bingo hall, current slot machine patrons and families who come for the Sunday buffet. “There will be fewer racetracks, but we will survive and benefit from the shrinkage,” he said.

The Rideau Carleton Raceway marked its 50th anniversary last week with a children’s fun zone overlooking the track. With Halloween just around the corner, kids were encouraged to dress in costume. At right, raceway employee Rebecca Ferriss joins Doug and Debby Pearson, who brought their granddaughter Skylyn Thomas out for some pre-Halloween fun. STEPH WILLEMS/METROLAND

Uncertain future On the weekend of Oct. 27, the raceway held two days of 50th anniversary celebrations

R0011692428

Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

37


Your Community Newspaper

NEWS

Solutions sought for Bronson bike danger Cyclist’s death sparks renewed interest in reducing ‘speedway’ risk Steph Willems steph.willems@metroland.com

exit lane. The roadway is constrained by the distinctly different uses of the two eras it bridges - a dense, pre-war neighbourhood with narrow avenues giving way to a wideopen, high speed postwar commuter corridor. “There is a long-standing series of problems with the pedestrian crosswalk at Carleton and Sunnyside Avenue and the speed of vehicles approaching it,” said Chernushenko. “Bronson has turned from a liveable street into a

speedway. For both the city’s and the neighbourhood’s needs, it needs to be turned back into a liveable street.” The time is now to propose the long-term solution, he said, as the city will be reconstructing that area of Bronson (Holmwood Avenue to Carling Avenue) in the coming years. Currently, work is being completed from Somerset Street to Catherine Street. “The timing is right,” said Chernushenko, who said he would like to aim for smooth

traffic flow and enhanced safety over outright speed for motorists. While a long-term fix such as raised bike lanes – such as the ones proposed for Churchill Avenue in the west end - and increased signage could be that solution, there remains the need to do something in the near term to protect cyclists in this key area. Chrenushenko said an operational safety review of the See RENEWED, page 39

R0011666020_1108

EMC news - The Oct. 18 death of Krista Johnson on Bronson Avenue has prompted calls for new measures to reduce the dangers to cyclists on Ottawa streets. In the wake of the Car-

leton student’s death in the southbound lanes of Bronson north of the canal bridge – a notorious danger zone for cyclists –cycling advocate and Capital Coun. David Chernushenko has floated some possible solutions, making it clear, however, that such measures would be

a stop-gap solution until a permanent fix can be implemented. Bronson Avenue carries a large number of Carleton University students to and from their residences to the north, but it is also is a heavily-travelled route for commuters heading to the suburbs. The poor design of the road in the area where Johnson died incorporates a speed limit increase, a shallow turn, reduced visibility and a bike lane that crossed through an

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NEWS

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Renewed interest in cycling danger follows student’s death Continued from page 38

area is already “informally being initiated by staff” in advance of the formal motion he plans to bring forward at the next transportation committee. The study will document what works and what doesn’t in that area of Bronson. Cyclists departing from Carleton often take the southbound lanes north in order to avoid waiting at the Sunnyside crosswalk for a signal, then having to cross back across Bronson at Holmwood further north. Johnson was travelling north in the southbound bike lane when a southbound vehicle that was merging into the turn lane collided with her. A half-hour of observation at the accident site a few days later, lasting from 7:30 to 8 p.m. on a weekday, showed more cyclists using the southbound sidewalk to head north than those using the northbound bike lanes and sidewalk combined. In all cases, cyclists were cautious crossing the bridge and either slowed or dismounted their bikes upon encountering a pedestrian. Given the “exceptionally wide” nature of the Bronson sidewalk leading north to Holmwood, Chernushenko said he would like to see a bike lane painted on the sidewalk to allow cyclists access to half of that space.

Carleton graduate student Colum Grove-White, calling for a dedicated cycling bridge to be built in the area. Late last week, the petition had collected 1,508 signatures. On that site, commenter Peter Anderson called the Bronson bridge a “dangerous missing link in Ottawa’s cycling infrastructure,” – a gap between the university campus and the Percy Street bike lane that runs the length of Centretown and the Glebe.

Southbound traffic on Bronson Avenue crosses over the bike lane where Carleton University student Krista Johnson died following a collision on Oct. 18. Cyclists have demanded that safety be increased in the perilous area near the Bronson Bridge. The ‘ghost bike’ memorial set up following Johnson’s death can be seen at the left. STEPH WILLEMS/METROLAND

R0011709656/1101

“Safety comes above speed of someone’s commute ... You can have a smarter city that moves people through good design.” COUN. DAVID CHERNUSHENKO

For pedestrian safety, cyclists would have to yield to those on foot. A reduction of the posted traffic speed from 60 kilometres per hour to 50 km/h in the area, along with a flashing speed board (indicating a driver’s current speed), are other short term options. “Safety comes above speed of someone’s commute,” said Chernushenko, who stated he would normally advocate against bikes on sidewalks. “You can have a smarter city that moves people through good design.” In July of this year, the advocacy group Citizens for Safe Cycling outlined their top five choices for the most dangerous cycling spots in Ottawa. Bronson Avenue was not on the list. In the wake of Johnson’s death, the group’s president Hans Moor stated that measures need to be taken to improve the condition of bike lanes, increase signage to alert drivers to the presence of bike lanes, and challenged cyclists to take ownership of their own safety. A petition has been created at www.change.org by Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

39


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

No passports needed for cultural experience South Korean ambassador welcomes thousands into home for charity Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

MICHELLE NASH/METROLAND

South Korean Ambassador Cho Hee-yong and his wife, Lee Yang show off one of the many bits of Korean culture at their home in Rockcliffe Park. The Hae-Tae, Hee-yong said, fights off danger and stops disasters. The ambassador’s home is one of the stops on this year’s the Hospice for May Court’s Home for the Holidays tour.

EMC news - The South Korean ambassador is offering residents of Ottawa a rare opportunity to visit a portion of his homeland without needing a passport. To mark the 50th anniversary of South Korea-Canada diplomatic relations, the ambassador’s home at 540 Acacia Ave. in Rockcliffe Park will participate in the popular Homes for the Holidays tour in support of the Hospice at May Court. The way Ambassador Cho Hee-yong sees it, ticket holders get to take an afternoon tour of a piece of Korea without having to go through air-

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port security or bringing along a passport. “There are not a lot of opportunities to invite Canadian friends into our home, but this time, our friends can come onto Korean territory without their passport,” Hee-yong said. The ambassador and his wife, Lee Yang, arrived in Ottawa only three months ago and new to the diplomatic position, the couple were more than happy to participate in the event. “It is a shame to enjoy this wonderful house just all to ourselves,” Yang said. Homes for the Holidays, a charity house tour event, helps support palliative and end-oflife care programs at the Hospice at May Court. Now in its 10th year, Jana Rand, manager of fund development for the hospice, noted the fundraiser aims to raise $150,000 for the hospice, only a small fraction of the $1.3 million the organization needs to raise to run its programming. “It is our largest fundraiser of the year,” Rand said. “We need the funding to help keep our doors open.” The participation from the South Korean Embassy will unofficially launch celebrations to mark the 50th anniversary of South Korean-Canadian relations. In 2013, the embassy will host a number of events, which mark the importance of the relationship between the two countries. “Since the Korean War, we have developed a great partnership,” he said. “Now is a good time to share our experiences and our home with others.” Hee-yong boasts that with more than 15,000 South Koreans visiting Canada each month and more than 1,000 teaching visas issued to Canadians just last week, the relationship is only getting stronger. “It is very encouraging, the exchange of young people between the two countries,” he said. The building is a remark-

able stone home in Rockcliffe Park, originally purchased by the government of South Korea in 1979. The embassy, Hee-yong explained, is decorated for both Canadians and Koreans. “It is harmonizing the Korean culture and the Canadian culture,” he said. “If you are Canadian you can enjoy the Korean art and culture, if you are Korean, you have a chance to learn a little about Canadian culture.” Seven homes across Manotick, the Glebe and Rockcliffe Park have been chosen for the tour this year, which allows residents to visit the special homes all dressed up for Christmas while supporting the Old Ottawa South palliative care centre. The hospice aimed to have all the homes offer something different for the ticket holders. One of the Glebe homes on the tour, 196 Glebe Ave., features a garden designed by Oprah Winfrey’s resident gardener. One of the Manotick homes on the tour this year, located at 5572 Carrison Dr., is a French country-style home designed by U.S. architect Jack Arnold. The three-day event begins on Nov. 9 at 10 a.m. and unlike some of the homeowners, Hee-yong and Yang will be in the home during the tours to share some of their knowledge about Korea and the house. To help things run smoothly, nearly 300 volunteers are needed to help the hundreds of visitors. The homes are decorated with flowers from local florists, all of whom donate their time and their stock to the cause. “It is amazing what they can do with the homes,” Rand said. The May Court Club of Ottawa, located in front of the hospice, will also take part in the tour, offering a pit-stop for ticket holders, to grab a coffee or tea, or a dessert. Rand said the May Court Club boutique will sell jams and jellies and crafts throughout the weekend. Tickets for the Nov. 9 to 11 event are $40 and can be purchased at the hospice, at 114 Cameron Ave., online at www.hospicemaycourt.com or at one of the organization’s fundraiser’s partners, listed on the hospice’s website.


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SENIORS R0011705475

Sugar bowl more than just egg money Annual Christmas Bazaar and Craft Sale Saturday, November 17th 9 a.m. to 2 p.m Lynwood Park Lodge 1 Eaton Street (Bells Corners) For more information call

613-596-6969

I

t was a blue sugar bowl. Much larger than the one we used every day on the kitchen table. Father said it had been in his family as long as he could remember. It wasn’t used for sugar anymore, though. It was where Mother kept her egg money. It had a matching jug too, but it just stood beside the sugar bowl and was never used. I figured the reason Mother used the sugar bowl for her egg money and not the jug was because it had a lid on it. To protect what was inside, sort of. Goodness knows we kids would never dare go into the sugar bowl without permission, although sometimes, if we had tired of looking around the Eaton’s catalogue in an evening of sitting around the kitchen table, Mother would let me take down the sugar bowl and count her egg money. Mother never heard of egg money when she moved to that back woods farm in Renfrew County after living 18 years in New York. But it was Aunt Bertha and Mrs. Beam, too, who told her about saving a penny here and a penny there. It was to be hers alone. Mrs. Beam snorted when she told mother about it being hers alone though. Sadly Mother soon found out what she meant. Now, about the egg money. It was Mother’s challenge to keep money in the sugar bowl. That meant that every

of the few coins she had worked so hard to accumulate. Father never had more than a few cents in his overall pockets. So when something wore out, like it often did on the farm or a new piece of harness was needed, inner tubes to replace the well-patched ones on the car or even maybe a new plow point, it was into the egg money Father would go. There would be so much sadness on such a day. I always dreaded being in the kitchen when that happened. Father would come in from the barns, stop just inside the kitchen door and pause as if he was undecided where he was heading. If Mother was busy at the stove or at the wash tub, she would pause for just a moment and a look of sadness would come over her face. Father would slowly walk over to the cupboard and take down the blue bowl and take out a few coins or one or two of the bills, cram them into his pocket and quietly leave the house. Not a word would be spoken. We would hear him leave the yard in the wagon or buggy and I would know he was headed into Renfrew or to Briscoe’s General Store with a few coins from Mother’s egg money to get what was needed to keep the farm going. It was at those times that I would know once again Mother’s dream of a trip back to her beloved New York was as far away as ever.

MARY COOK Mary Cook’s Memories week she went into Renfrew and peddled her wares doorto-door. At the first, Mother thought that that meant just peddling eggs. But Aunt Bertha was quick to show her how she could add greatly to her egg money. “It’s not just from selling eggs, you know,” she told Mother. Everyone in Renfrew likes a fresh chicken now and again Aunt Bertha said. Soon Mother added sticky buns, freshly churned butter and homemade soap to her wares. Once she tried selling small braided rugs and hand sewn aprons, but she soon found out the women of Renfrew were just as busy as she was making rugs and aprons. Aunt Bertha said the money could be used for anything she wanted: new print from Walker Store or maybe a fresh pair of lisle stockings. But Mother had other plans for her egg money. She longed to go back to New York. Not to stay of course, which was always a fear deep in my heart, because she talked about the place so often and I knew how much she missed the life she once led. No, it would be just for a

visit, to spend a few days with her friend Rosie and maybe go to an opera again or visit the museums she loved. Yes, she longed for just one trip back to New York and her wish was that one day there would be enough egg money in the blue sugar bowl to go back for a visit. Often, at night, she would take the bowl down from the back-to-the-wall cupboard and spread the money out on the oilcloth on the kitchen table. She would count and stack the coins in order and if there were any bills, she would flatten them out and put a salt shaker on them to hold them flat. Then she would write the amount and the date on a slip of paper and tuck it into the sugar bowl with the money and back it would go on the shelf in the cupboard. There would be a big sigh. Never would there be enough money for the trip back to New York. It wasn’t because she would dip into it for something frivolous like silk stockings or a new hat -- the reason was much simpler than that. It would be because Father would have had to have some

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Chipotle beef cups a spicy appetizer EMC lifestyle - Chipotles are dried smoked jalapeno peppers in a spicy tomato vinegar sauce (adobo sauce). They are quite spicy and add a rich, smoky flavour. You won’t need the entire can, so freeze the remaining in a resealable bag or freezer container for another use, such as chili or pulled pork, or dress up mayonnaise for a dip. Preparation Time: 20 minutes. Cooking Time: 10 minutes. Servings: 8 INGREDIENTS:

• 1 can (186 mL/215 g) chipotles in adobo sauce • 1 tomato • 1 pound (454 g) extra lean ground beef • 1 onion, diced • 2 tsp (10 mL) all-purpose flour • 1 tsp (5 mL) each ground cumin and chili powder • 1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt • 1/4 tsp (1 mL) pepper • 1/2 cup (125 mL) approx. shredded old cheddar • 1/2 cup (125 mL) approx. guacamole • 1/3 cup (75 mL) approx. light sour cream • Tortilla chips • Fresh cilantro leaves

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Annual ceramics show at Glebe Community Centre Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - Potters and ceramic artists are preparing to unite for their annual craft and gallery show in the Glebe this coming weekend. The show, called 260 Fingers, will take place from Nov. 9 to 11 at the Glebe Community Centre and welcomes artists from across Ontario and Quebec in addition to the Ottawa area. Almonte potter Chandler Swain started the show with fellow potters nine years ago. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wanted to pull together artists from the region for potters to have a place to show their work,â&#x20AC;? Swain said. This show, she said, is different than a typical exhibitions found taking place at larger venues in the city. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of crafts shows that happen in the convention centres are run by people who make a profit on them and they are really huge and they charge an admission fee,â&#x20AC;? Swain said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ours is non-profit and run by artists. It is collaborative and it is all for the love of the craft.â&#x20AC;? The show is funded by artists from areas as diverse as

Manotick, Centretown and West Carleton. Along with what the artists contribute, other costs of running the show are supported by members of the Glebe business community and the Canada Council Art Bank. The show also offers free admission.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;...it is collaborative and all for the love of the craft.â&#x20AC;? CHANDLER SWAIN ALMONTE POTTER

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to (charge for admission),â&#x20AC;? Swain said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to create a place that is welcoming.â&#x20AC;? A potter now for 30 years, she said the show grew from an original group of 26 artists to an invitational-only exhibition. Swain said it is the atmosphere which sets it apart from other, larger shows in the region. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a show where the artists get to mount their best work,â&#x20AC;? Swain said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This one is unique in that the people who are recognized as the

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Ottawa potters show their work

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FOR SALE

KANATA Available Immediately

Grass Fed local Beef for sale, sides, quarters or custom freezer packages. Call now for November delivery 613-622-0004 www.gableridgefarm.ca

EDUCATION & TRAINING

Grade 9 EQAO Study If you are a student or the parent of a student who has received their official Grade 9 EQAO score, please consider participating in a short interview about the meaning of that score. Contact the researcher at 613-292-3728 for information. Participants will receive a $20 gift card to Chapters.

FOR RENT

3 bedroom townhouse, 1.5 baths, 2 appliances, unfinished basement, one parking spot. $1038 per month plus utilities.

613-831-3445 613-257-8629 www.rankinterrace.com FOR SALE

KANATA RENTAL TOWNHOMES

3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Bathrooms, 5 appliances and more, located in established area, on site management office, 323 Steeplechase Dr. (just off Stonehaven Dr) Kanata, K2M 2N6, call 613-592-0548

Apples, cider and apple products. Smyths Apple Orchard, 613-652-2477. Updates, specials and coupons at www.smythsapples.com. Open daily til April 1st. Disability Products. Buy and Sell stair lifts, scooters, bath lifts, patient lifts, hospital beds, etc. Call Silver Cross Ottawa (613)231-3549.

GARAGE SALE

FOR RENT

*HOT TUB (SPA) Covers-Best Price. Best quality. All shapes and colours. Call 1-866-652-6837. www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper Over-sized Lazy Boy lift chair/recliner, Brown cloth, just like new! (used 2 months). Asking $1000.00 please call: (613)822-0831.

HELP WANTED

www.ontariojobsathome.com

Safe receive support and necessary equipment

Educational ongoing training your pay cheque is guaranteed Call today:

613.825.9425 weewatch.com Serving Ottawa West and Barrhaven

HELP WANTED

GARAGE SALE

175277_0212

Eastern Ontario’s Largest Indoor Flea Market

Mchaffies Flea Market

Earn an income from home, be independent and provide quality care

Reliable

HOMEWORKERS NEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!! Full & Part Time Positions Are Available - On-Line Data Entry, Typing Work, Home Assemblers, Mystery Shoppers, Online Surveys, Others. No Experience Needed! -

150 booths Open Every Sunday All Year 8am-4pm Hwy. #31 – 2 kms north of 401

www.emcclassified.ca

Looking for persons willing to speak to small groups, 1 on 1 presentations. A car and internet necessary. Diana (866)306-5858. We are looking for key people to expand our Financial Services business in this area. Experience not necessary, We will train. For an interview call 613-762-9519.

GARAGE SALE

CL419629?1108

 i>Ê>ÀŽiÌ One of the Largest in the Ottawa Valley!

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0 sq ft LARGE SELECTION OF and Outdoor Huge 10,0o0wroom! QUALITY FURNITURE Building! Indoor Sh

7i`‡-՘ʙ>“Ê̜Ê{«“ÊUÊ613-284-2000ÊUÊÃÌÀiiÌyi>“>ÀŽiÌJ…œÌ“>ˆ°Vœ“

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5 MILES SOUTH OF SMITHS FALLS CORNER OF HWY 15 & BAY ROAD HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

CL348453/0301

Seasoned maple and oak, free delivery, Member of BBB. Volume Discounts!

CLASSIFIED CL365991

Your Community Newspaper

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED AZ DRIVERS enjoy the advantage of driving for a leading international truckload carrier great pay, benefits and bonuses; steady miles; driver friendly freight; safe equipment; and weekly pay. Ask about our TEXAS Team program and our Lease Program! Just a few reasons why Celadon Canada was voted One of the Best Fleets to Drive For in North America for 2012! Hiring Company Drivers & Owner Operators. Cross-Border & IntraCanada Lanes. Call recruiting at 1-800-332-0515 www.celadoncanada.com Rinaldo’s Manotick, seeking a motivated hardworking creative hair stylist. Experience and asset. Apply within or fax resume to (613)692-1611. Overhead Door Technician Established overhead door company looking for experienced technicians/installers. Welding and electrical ability an asset. Top wages/great benefits. Send resume to jordan@alparsons.on.ca or fax 613-798-2187.

HELP WANTED

$1350

Position Available: Sales Consultant

$1150

EMC Community News Group is currently looking for a dedicated Digital Media Sales Consultant in Ottawa.

$1050

As part of this Team you will be focused on selling WagJag.com which is a leading Canadian online brand in the flash sale marketing space. WagJag.com offers amazing deals on restaurants, spas, fashion, activities, and events on behalf of a growing number of retailers in Canada.

$950

If you are a self-motivated sales professional and want to build a career in the dynamic industry of digital media advertising, forward your resume to Tom.O’Malley@metroland.com by Nov 23rd, 2012. THE POSITION: • Identify and cold call prospects to develop new business • Negotiate and structure sales agreements • Develop and build strong relationships with clients • Respond promptly to sales enquiries, and provide thorough customer follow up • Consistently deliver against aggressive targets • Attend occasional marketing/business building events which could take place outside of regular hours As part of the Digital Media Sales Consultant role, you will be required to handle credit card information. Metroland Media is a PCI compliant company and requires people in this role to take PCI training to handle cards in a safe and compliant manner. ABOUT YOU: • 1-5 years experience in sales/account management with a proven history of achieving/surpassing sales targets • Experience in digital advertising media sales preferred • Strong negotiation, presentation, and telephone skills • Experience in, and high comfort level with, cold calling to develop new business • Ability to build and develop effective relationships with clients and within the sales team • Solid organizational and time management skills • Ability to work in a fast-paced, dead-line oriented environment • Strong written and verbal communication skills

46

Valid Driver’s License and a reliable automobile essential

We thank all applicants, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted!

Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

CL390071-1108

0301.332055


part/full time

Moncionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Independent 671 River Rd., Ottawa 613-822-4749

MORTGAGES

HUNTING SUPPLIES

ARTS/CRAFT/FLEA MRKT

MUSIC ARTS/CRAFT/FLEA MRKT

9 Rossland Ave. (corner of Merivale & Rossland)

November 17, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

CL389263-1108

St. Richardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Christmas Bazaar

613-224-7178 / www.saintrichards.ca

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

CUSTOMER/OFFICE SUPPORT REPRESENTATIVE LOCATION â&#x20AC;&#x201C; OTTAWA, ON STATUS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FULL TIME Best Theratronics Ltd. is a Canadian company of TeamBestâ&#x201E;˘. We became a member of the Best family in May 2008. We manufacture external beam therapy units and self-contained blood irradiators. We have created a new product line of cyclotrons (B14p, B35p and the B70p) for radioisotope production. The team brings with it a diverse range of knowledge from around the world. TeamBestâ&#x201E;˘ is driven by one primary goal - to provide the best products and services to customers. KEY RESPONSIBILITIES: The incumbent will assist in the setup and day to day co-ordination of activities for Best NDT, new member of TeamBest. Responsibilities include but are not limited to: s !SSISTINTHECREATIONOFQUOTATIONSFORNEWCUSTOMERS s 2ECEIVEORDERSFROMCUSTOMERSANDASSISTINTHEPLACEMENT of orders with vendors s #REATEINVOICESFOR"EST.$4 s 4RACKINVENTORYLEVELSFORCOMPONENTSREQUIREDFORUPCOMING orders s !SSISTINTHECREATIONANDIMPLEMENTATIONOFSYSTEMSAND procedures to facilitate the work s !SSISTINTHEFOLLOWUPANDTRACKINGOFPROJECTS s !SSISTWITHADMINISTRATIVETASKSINCLUDINGTRANSLATIONS s #OMMUNICATEWITHCURRENTANDPROSPECTIVECUSTOMERS s !TTENDSTOMISCELLANEOUSRELATEDTASKSASREQUIRED SKILLS AND QUALIFICATIONS: s #OLLEGE$IPLOMAIN"USINESSOR/FlCE!DMINISTRATION REQUIRED s 4HEPREFERREDCANDIDATEWILLHAVEAMINIMUMOF YEARS related experience s 0AST/RDER0ROCESSINGEXPERIENCEANASSET s !BILITYTOWORKINAFAST PACEDENVIRONMENTWITHCHANGING priorities s !BILITYTOPERFORMWITHCONTINUOUSATTENTIONTODETAIL s "ILINGUALISM%NGLISH&RENCH ISREQUIRED s -ULTILINGUALSKILLS)TALIAN WOULDBEDESIRABLE s %XCELLENTORGANIZATIONALSKILLSANDABILITYTOHANDLEMULTIPLE priorities and meet strict deadlines s #OMPUTERLITERATEIN-ICROSOFTAPPLICATIONSREQUIRED

Dancing Voices Community Choir meets Thursdays in Kanata for the pure joy of singing together, no experience necessary, everyone welcome. Call Tracy: 613-435-5413.

COMING EVENTS Melissa Stylianou Quintet with Special Guest Megan Hamilton. Friday November 16, 7:30 pm Chalmers United Church, 212 Barrie St. Kingston Students/Seniors $10, Adults $20 www.queensu.ca/pao or 613-533-2558.

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

200 Pickwick Dr. is the home for you! $359,000. In a sought after, mature neighbourhood with no rear neighbours and walking path behind. Neutral colors and all appliances included. MLS #849468. Contact Sonya Crites, Coldwell Banker First Ottawa. www.buyandsellwithsonya.com

Official Sponsor to Welcome Wagon Ottawa Region

BABY PROGRAM

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

CL388682

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Still Hiring School Bus Drivers Call today!

613-688-0653

Free Training

www.ďŹ rststudentcanada.com

Proudly Promoting National School Bus Safety Week

CNC MILL MACHINIST

The EMC Community Newspaper is currently hiring a full-time position for a Retail Advertising Sales Representative. The Metroland/EMC is a growing printing and publishing company which includes sectors such as printing, direct mail, specialty publications and a growing number of community newspapers. This is a great opportunity if you would like to be part of our team and work in a positive, exciting environment.

(Brockville Plant)

James Ross Limited is a metal fabricator of innovative cleaning equipment for the Pulp and Paper industry.

Want the best job in Brockville? You will be responsible for their new Nicolas Correa Axia 11.5 meter planner mill. â&#x153;&#x201C; â&#x153;&#x201C; â&#x153;&#x201C; â&#x153;&#x201C;

Certified machinist training, 3 years experience and scheduling exposure Machine custom and complex parts and equipment with high tolerances Ability to read job packets and understand complex blueprints CNC programming for lathes and milling machines essential

This is undoubtedly the most modern CNC Machine in Eastern Ontario. If you feel you are up to the challenge, then drop off, mail or e-mail your resume to:

We offer an attractive compensation package. All applicants must have their own vehicles.

C.W. ARMSTRONG P.O. BOX 773 201 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 84 KING STREET WEST BROCKVILLE, ON K6V 5W1 e-mail: c.w.armstrong@ripnet.com or call (613) 498-2290 View this exciting machine on google: Nicolas Correa Presentation Video

As part of the Retail Advertising Sales role, you will be required to handle credit card information. Metroland Media is a PCI compliant company and requires people in this role to take PCI training to handle cards in a safe and compliant manner.

0LEASE%MAIL2ESUMETOcmcghie@theemc.ca by Thursday, November 30th, 2012

Redeem this coupon at the Kanata Kourier-Standard OfďŹ ce Attention: ClassiďŹ ed Department 80 Colonnade Rd N. Nepean, ON K2E7L2 Ph:(613) 224-3330 Fax: (613) 224-2265

HELP WANTED

Retail Advertising Sales Representative

NOTICES

Place Your Birth Announcement in your Community Newspaper (includes photo & 100 words) and recieve your Welcome Wagon FREE information and GIFTS from local businesses. x) ta s lu (p Please register on line at www.havingababy.ca or call 1-866-283-7583

2003 Pontiac Grand Prix SE 4 door, 195,000kms. 6 cylinder 3.1, full load. Lady Highway Driven. Has GT look. $2500.00 or OBO as is. Kevin 613-485-6680

HELP WANTED

NOTICES

IF YOU ARE EXPECTING OR HAVE A NEW BABY

VEHICLES



Send A Load to the dump, cheap. Clean up clutter, garage sale leftovers or leaf and yard waste. 613-256-4613.

$28.00

Hochelaga Inn- Kingston ON. Save 50% on your second night stay- Nov. 8 to Nov 30. Carriage House excluded. 2 guests per room. No cancellations www.hochelagainn.com

$%$#!!'%!' (# !!%%!#('  )($#!-'!(#('+!!$#((

Qualitative, Professional House Cleaning. Detail oriented and thoroughness guaranteed. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll keep your home neat and tidy. Insured and bonded. Call 613-262-2243. Tatiana.

MOTHERS....

Homemade Dog Treats Healthy homemade dog treats, made to order. Several flavors, easy to freeze. Email me for a list and prices. Please Contact loveofmax@gmail.com

TRAVEL/VACAT/COTTG

Please apply on-line at minto.com or fax your resumes to (613) 788-2758, attention: Jensa.

Weddings, Baptisms & Funerals, location of your choice. Also available small weddings, my home, weekdays. The Rev. Alan Gallichan. 613-726-0400.

NOTICES

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

      

Superintendent Team As a team, you will both be responsible for customer service, cleaning, minor repairs and maintenance of the interior and exterior of a residential property in Ottawa. Related experience and good communication and computer abilities are a must. A competitive salary and beneďŹ ts package, including on-site accommodation, await you!

Need a car or truck and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get financed? Whatever your credit issues we can help. Guaranteed financing is available to everyone regardless of credit history. Call today, drive tomorrow. Call Joseph 613-200-0100.

WORK WANTED

German Shepherd Pups black or sable DDR workline AKC parents vet check health guarantee $450. (613)802-2757 strongbond@msn.com

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

         

HELP WANTED

DOG SITTING Experienced retired breeder providing lots of TLC. My home. Smaller dogs only. References available. $17-$20 daily Marg 613-721-1530

Experience and skills s4WOYEARSSELLINGRETAILADVERTISING s%XCELLENTLISTENINGSKILLS s!BILITYTODElNECUSTOMERNEEDS s!BILITYTOBUILDSTRONGCUSTOMERRELATIONSHIPS s!BILITYTOPLANAHEAD STAYFOCUSEDANDORGANIZED s!BLETORESPONDQUICKLYTOCUSTOMERNEEDSCONCERNS s!BLETOSOURCEOUTDECISIONMAKERSTOPROMOTEOUR publications

!LLAPPLICANTSSHOULDAPPLYINWRITINGWITHACOVERLETTERAND resume to Human Resources: %MAILJOBS THERATRONICSCAOR&AX   ./4%/NLYSUCCESSFULCANDIDATESSHALLBECONTACTEDFOR interviews. CL389710

HELP WANTED

$$MONEY$$ Consolidate Debts Mortgages to 90% No income, Bad credit OK! Better Option Mortgage #10969 1-800-282-1169 www.mortgageontario.com

Dog For Sale Healthy 1 year old Morky available. If interested call 613-744-7970 for details.

WEDDING

HELP WANTED

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

PRODUCTION/ GRAPHIC DESIGNERS visit: mannionpetroleum.com

NOW HIRING CL403636_1108

Send resumĂŠ to isauve@thenewsemc.ca or by regular mail to: The EMC 57 Auriga Dr., Suite 103 Ottawa, ON K2E 8B2 Attention: Irene SauvĂŠ Deadlines for resumes: Nov 23rd, 2012

OBT1, OBT2, OBT3 PM2, PM3

Health Programs, Social Programs, Business Programs, Technology Programs





 

PO Box 754, Almonte, K0A 1A0

TRILCOSTW1231

CL390075

Contact:

seanmannion@sympatico.ca Fax 613-256-6245

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Offering diplomas in:

EXCELLENT REMUNERATION

No phone calls please. Only those selected to be interviewed will be contacted. Metroland Media is a PCI compliant company and requires people who will be required to handle credit card information to take PCI training to handle cards in a safe and compliant manner.

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Better futures begin here.

PART-TIME POSITION AVAILABLE The ideal candidate will have a graphic design diploma or relevant experience . ProďŹ ciency in Adobe InDesign, Photoshop & Illustrator required.

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

CL390495

Rehabilitation Health & Home Services available. Please call. Office: (613)726-6723 email: ovrehab@rogers.com

Hunter Safety Canadian Firearms Courses, Carp, November 23, 24 and 25. Wenda Cochran 613-256-2409.

REMOVE YOUR CRIMINAL RECORD 100,000+ have used our service since 1989. BBB A+ rating. US Waiver allows you to travel to the US, or apply for a Record Suspension (Pardon) - professional & affordable Call 1-8-NOW PARDON (1-866-972-7366) www.removeyourrecord.com

VEHICLES

312327

Applehill Stables 6115 Prince of Wales Drive offers riding lessons (beginner-advanced), leasing, boarding with huge indoor arena. 613-489-2446 email applehillstables@rogers.com

CL336316

Night crew

PETS

NOTICES

CL401612

LIVESTOCK

HELP WANTED

CL390066-1108

HELP WANTED

 75 Albert Street, Suite 101 | Ottawa, ON K1P 5E7

Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

47


L>C

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Simply e-mail or mail in your favourite holiday recipe (with a picture if possible) by November 12, 2012. Be sure to send it with your name, address, and phone number. If chosen, we will publish your recipe in our

e p i c e R

Holiday Favourites 2012

Holiday Recipe Favourites Supplement Book on December 6, 2012

B6CN;67JADJH EG>O:HID7:LDC Complete Place Setting for 12

($940 Value)

Ma Cuisine or for the chef in your life. amateur or professional.

269 Dalhousie St. (Corner of Murray)

613-789-9225

(1) $300 Gift Certificate and (1 of 3) $100 Gift Certificates 1430 Prince of Wales Dr. (at Meadowlands in the Rideauview Mall)

2 Night Stay at Historical B&B Including Breakfast 408 East St., Prescott www.avd.ca/thecolonelsinn/

Pandora Bracelet

Your Community Newspaper

Your community’s favourite holiday recipes for 2012.

FREE

take one

($250 Value) Le’s Jewellery 2446 Bank St. (at Hunt Club Rd.) ȣΰÇÎΰÎnnnÊÊUÊÊÜÜÜ°iÍiÜiiÀÞ°V>

$200 Gift Basket from Elmvale Shopping Centre

$200 Gift Basket from Westgate Shopping Centre

Contest Rules: 1.

Employees of participating sponsors and their immediate families and Performance Printing / EMC employees are not eligible to compete in this contest. 2. Contestants must abide these general contests rules and all specific rules applied to contests to be eligible to win available prizes. 3. Prize winner selection is by random draw. Winners must correctly answer a skill-testing question to win. Prize winners will be contacted by telephone. 4. Winners must bear some form of identification in order to claim their prize. 5. There is no cash surrender value to prizes and they must be accepted as awarded. 6. The EMC and participating companies assume no responsibility whatsoever damages, be they physical or monetary, injury or death, as a result of this contest or any part of it. 7. The EMC and participating retailers reserve the right to limit the numbers of entries received from any particular contestant(s). 8. The EMC and the participating companies reserve the right to change, rearrange, and/or alter any of there contests policies at any time whatsoever without prior notice. Also these contest rules are subject if necessary to comply with the rules, regulations, and the laws of the federal, Provincial, and local government bodies. 9. Ads will be published September 20, 27, October 4, 11,18, 25, November 1, 8, 2012. 10. One entry per household.

$200 Gift Basket from Lincoln Fields Shopping Centre

$150 Gourmet Gift Basket 1321 Wellington St. 722-8753 www.bagelshop.ca

$100 Gift Certificate Signature Centre 499 Terry Fox Dr., Kanata www.tagalongtoys.ca

$100 Gift Certificate 418 Moodie Dr. (just south of Robertson Rd)

NOTE: All recipes must be typed or neatly handwritten. All others will not be accepted. Photocopies from books and magazines will not be accepted.

SEW for IT!

E-MAIL US AT:

XdciZhi5i]ZcZlhZbX#XV 48

Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

R0011694137

Or mail O il tto 57 Auriga A i Dr., D Suite S it 103, 103 Ottawa, Ott Ont. O t K2E 8B2


Your Community Newspaper

NEWS

Get rid of hazardous waste, snow EMC news - If it’s corrosive, flammable or poisonous it’s hazardous waste. These types of products contaminate water and landfills and should never be poured down the drain or put out with your regular garbage. The City of Ottawa is hosting the following hazardous waste depot for residents of Ottawa. To find out what products are considered household hazardous waste, or for additional information, visit ot-

tawa.ca. Depot hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m on Saturday, Nov.10, at Drain-All Ltd., 2705 Stevenage Dr., between Hawthorne Road and Russell Road, south of Walkley Road GET HELP CLEARING SNOW

Need help clearing your driveway and/or walkway during the winter? The City of Ottawa’s Snow Go program provides a matching service for seniors

and people with disabilities looking to hire an individual or contractor to clear snow from private driveways and walkways. Eligible low-income seniors and people with disabilities may also apply to receive financial assistance to pay for a portion of their snow removal costs through the Snow Go assist program. For more information, including eligibility criteria and application process, visit ottawa.ca/snowgo or call 311.

Christmas Beer & Wine Special For NEW customers presenting this coupon

Brew Your Own Beer!

20* Off

$

Each Batch

Each Batch

Each 48 Litre Batch of Beer Only $115

Starts at $69.99 per 23 Litre batch

R0011731815-1108

10*Off

$

Brew Your Own Wine!

Sale S Sal ale le E Ends nds nd ds Nove N November ovem mb m ber 3 30th, 0th 2 0th 0t 2012 012 01 2

Catch up on the latest

Brewer’s Delight

Community News

149 Bentley Ave. Unit 1D Nepean, Ontario Call 613-225-0563 • www.brewersdelight.com

with your local EMC.

Pet Adoptions SPIRIT

HOPE

ID#A144528

ID#A147562

Spirit is a neutered male, black Border Collie and Retriever flat coat dog who is about 9 years old. He was brought to the shelter as a stray on October 10, but is now available for adoption. Spirit is looking for a quiet family, as he is a “kick back and relax” kind of fellow. Spirit has a polite and somewhat independent disposition and welcomes any gentle, friendly approach with a wag of his tail. He is a special needs dog, since he suffers from degenerative joint disease (arthritis). Many dogs of his age will develop joint disease just like his, and it can be very successfully managed. He will need an experienced owner to show him the ropes, and to make sure he knows he doesn’t rule the world! Pete would not be well-suited to apartment living, as he likes to share his opinions on many subjects, which the neighbors may not wish to hear.

PET OF THE WEEK

Hope is a spayed female, black and white Domestic Shorthair cay. She is a 4 month old kitten who was brought to the shelter as a stray on August 19. Hope is full of energy and loves to play with her toys, and litter mates. She is looking for a forever home that can provide her with many spots from which she can observe the world. This loving little lady would love a home in which she could receive as many kisses as possible. If you think you have found your next companion animal in the Adoption Centre, please contact our Customer Service Supervisor at 613-725-3166 or cssupervisor@ottawahumane.ca. The Ottawa Humane Society Adoption Centre is open weekdays 11:00 – 7:00 and Saturdays 10:00 – 5:00.

Ottawa Humane Society cracks down on cold weather cruelty The Ottawa Humane Society (OHS) wishes to remind pet owners that plunging winter temperatures can be dangerous and even life-threatening for pets. While the OHS strongly recommends that you bring your dog inside in extreme temperatures, owners of outside dogs need to be especially vigilant about providing appropriate care on days like this. “The OHS will have zero tolerance for animals left outside without adequate shelter from the elements, or an ample supply of fresh water during these cold months,” says OHS Inspector Miriam Smith. “If we find a dog left outside without adequate shelter or water, in intolerable conditions with no owner around, the dog will be removed for its own safety and animal cruelty charges may be laid.” Dogs that live outside require as a minimum a doghouse soundly built of weatherproof materials facing away from prevailing winds. It should be elevated and insulated, with a door flap and bedding of straw or wood shavings. Animals that are outside need a constant source of fresh water, so check your dog’s bowl often to ensure it hasn’t frozen. Keep your animals away from ice-covered bodies of water— even small ponds you think may be frozen over. Although many

surfaces may appear solid, ice is often uneven and thin in places, and your pet may fall in and possibly suffer hypothermia or even death. It’s best to limit the amount of outdoor time for any animal in frigid temperatures, so take your dog for lots of quick short walks instead of one long one. Consider a sweater or coat for your pet on cold days when you go out, especially if your dog is very young or old, or is sick or short-coated. Be sure to wipe down its paws each time you return home to remove chemicals or salt often used to melt ice and snow. These can be poisonous if ingested and can irritate sensitive feet. The OHS recommends that cat owners should always keep their cats indoors year round. If your cat does go outdoors, make sure it’s only for short periods, and ensure your cat is inside overnight. Remember never to leave an animal in an unheated car for long periods of time, and be sure to knock on the car hood each time you start the engine to scare any cats away. Cats often crawl under car hoods to find warmth and can be injured or killed by a starting motor. If you see an animal in distress or without adequate shelter from the cold, call the OHS Emergency Unit at (613) 725-1532.

9dndji]^c`ndjgeZi^hXjiZZcdj\]idWZÆI=:E:ID;I=:L::@Ç4HjWb^iVe^XijgZVcYh]dgi W^d\gVe]nd[ndjgeZiidÒcYdjiH^beanZbV^aid/X[dhiZg5i]ZcZlhZbX#XVViiZci^dcÆEZid[i]ZLZZ`Ç

Time to make a grooming appointment

1108.R0011723836

Please note: The Ottawa Humane Society has many other companion animals available for adoption. Featured animals are adopted quickly! To learn more about adopting an animal from the Ottawa Humane Society please contact us: Website: lll#diiVlV]jbVcZ#XV Email: 6Ydei^dch5diiVlV]jbVcZ#XV Telephone:+&(,'*"(&++m'*-

Cedar

My name is Finley and I am 6 years old. This is my new puppy “Cedar” she is a nippy princess. Cedar likes to chew everything and she really likes to chew the couch pillows. When she’s out for a walk she likes to eat grass, leaves and dirt. Cedar is a good girl though, she never barks. We love her lots. 1108

R0011729110

Cannot be combined with other discounts

12-5303 Canotek Rd.(613) 745-5808 WWW.TLC4DOGS.COM Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

49


Local events and happenings over the coming weeks — free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: nepean@metroland.com

Nov. 9 Dr. Cindy Blackstock share her inspirational message on behalf of aboriginal children and youth at 6:30 p.m., at Barrhaven United Church, 3013 Jockvale Rd. Blackstock is the executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society and associate professor at the University of Alberta. Contact: buc@ magma.ca or 613-825-1707. All welcome.

Nov. 14 Christian Women’s Central Club invites you and your friends to a fall dessert buf-

fet with silent auction, bake table and various items for sale at bargain prices at 1 p.m. Lynda-Jean Coffin from Beaconsfield, Que., speaks on Living Your Life to the Fullest. Cost is $6.00 and $2 for first timers. St. Paul’s Church, 971 Woodroffe Ave.. RSVP: 613-228-8004. All women welcome!

Baker and Nepean Sportsplex will act as home base. Parents: consider taking your daughter to check it out and introduce her to what will likely become her new passion. If you like hockey, you are going to love ringette. For more information, visit the Nepean Ringette Association website at www. nepeanringette.ca.

Nov 15 to 18

Nov. 16

Nepean Ringette Association annual tournament with 110 teams from across Canada. Arenas across Nepean and Ottawa will feature this fastpaced, Canadian game. Walter

Annual bazaar at Stillwater Creek Retirement Community, 2018 Robertson Rd. from 9 am.m to 1 p.m. with baking, knitted items, books, jewelry, cards, gifts and a silent auc-

tion.

Nov. 17 Holly Days Bazaar at Christ Church Bells Corners, 3861 Old Richmond Rd., from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Christmas crafts, gift baskets, wreaths, garlands, knitting silent auction and more. Lunch available

Nov. 19 Manordale-Woodvale Community Association annual general meeting from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Margret Rywak Building, 68 Knoxdale

Rd. The agenda will include the election of the executive for the upcoming year, a review of our past year’s activities and our plans for next year.

while donating to a special cause. Please call Lion Doreen at 613-825-0384 to register your team.

Through Nov. 30

Nov. 25 Family Bowling Fun Day for Memory Boxes for CHEO sponsored by the Barrhaven Lions Club from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Merivale Bowling Centre, 1916 Merivale Rd. Cost is $25 for bowlers which includes the cost of bowling, shoes and a snack and $10 for non-bowlers. Everyone is invited to attend to enjoy a fun afternoon

Toilet paper. Diapers. Powdered milk. Soup. Because some holiday wish lists are more basic than others, the Christmas Hamper Project of Ottawa is now signing up donors. Adopt a hamper for someone who will be alone during the holidays, For more information see www.christmashamperproject. com.

Congratulations Myers Hyundai, Bell Corners! The Myers Hyundai employees began their United Way fundraiser on October 22nd, 2012. In total they raised over $4100! They sold popcorn, held a raffle for an edible arrangement and their last event on Friday, November 2nd raised over $2100. On November 2nd the Myers Hyundai Used Car Manager, Oscar Schuurmans, shaved his hair, moustache and beard to raise funds for the United Way. Oscar had his moustache and beard for over 25 years! BELLS CORNERS

1025.R0011691267

R0011728167-1108

La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries invites you to visit the Minto Dream Home and view the spectacular array of La-Z-Boy furniture on display. Enter for a chance to win a $1000 gift certificate from La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries.

No purchase necessary but we encourage you to buy your Dream of A Lifetime Lottery ticket today to help the kids at CHEO. For lottery info visit www.dreamofalifetime.ca

to win at the Minto Dream Home located at 110 Grey Willow Drive or at the B A L L OT Enter following La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries locations: NEPEAN 545 West Hunt Club Rd.

GLOUCESTER Corner of Innes & Cyrville KINGSTON 770 Gardiners Rd. RioCan Centre Name: Address: Email: Phone: Draw to take place on Monday November 19, 2012

FURNITURE GALLERIES®

1108.R0011719225

Dinakar Vaidya, CFP Financial Advisor

Life doesn’t stand still and neither should your investments.

To see if rebalancing your investment portfolio makes sense for you, call or stop by today. 50

Rebalancing your portfolio can help your investments keep up with your changing needs. Over the long term, time can have as much of an effect on you as it does on your investments. Whether it’s marriage, children or the inescapable fact that you’re older now, things change. While you can’t hold back tomorrow, you can make sure your investments match your current circumstances and goals. That way, your portfolio can continue to work for you in the future. Fortunately, getting back on track can be simple. A complimentary Edward Jones Portfolio Review can help you identify where your investments stand in relation to your goals and how to get them moving in the right direction. This way, you can keep time on your side.

Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

R0011636394

13-1821 Robertson Road, Stafford Centre, Bells Corners, Nepean, ON K2H 8X3 613-828-3919 dinakar.vaidya@edwardjones.com Member - Canadian Investor Protection Fund

MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING


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CLUES DOWN 1. Mexican wattle & daub hut 2. __ Green: playwright 3. Building for autos 4. Rum and lime or lemon juice 5. Two spiral-horned African antelopes 6. Jubilant delight 7. Cyclic 8. Fiddler crabs 9. Vehicle carrying many passengers 11. Dream sleep 13. Afghan Persian language 16. Gnawing small mammal 18. B1 deficiency disease 21. Not out 24. Chancellor Von Bismarck 26. RCO group of atoms 27. Cony

29. Makes a gas less dense 30. Instances of disease 34. A story 35. Surmounted 36. Cloisonned 37. Counterfoil 38. Kept cattle together 39. Computer screen material 43. Ancient calculator 44. Cuddle 46. District nurse 47. Employee stock ownership plan 50. Distributed game cards 52. Murres genus 53. Tear apart violently 55. Umbrella support 56. Athlete who plays for pay 57. Small amount

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CLUES ACROSS 1. Army legal branch 4. Dekagram 7. Underwater ship 10. 6th Jewish month 12. __ lang syne, good old days 14. European money 15. Remover of an apple’s center 17. The content of cognition 18. Bleats 19. “l836 siege” of U.S. 20. Inquiries 22. Bottled gas 23. Dutch painter Gerrit 25. An invasion or hostile attack 28. Misbeliever 31. South American Indiana 32. Bone cavities 33. Hound sounds

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Christmas Brunch

Breakfast Buffet Starting Sunday, October 21st, 2012 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

$14.95 Your best drive is only minutes from downtown

Sunday, December 16th - 10:30 am - 1:30 pm Please join us by reserving at 613.825.2186 ext. 224 or jennifer@cedarhillgolf.com

$21.95+HST

Restaurant open Thursday through Sunday. The Million dollar view is free!

www.cedarhillgolf.com

56 Cedarhill Drive (near Barrhaven) Ottawa, Ontario, K2R 1C5

613.825.2186 Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

R0011717317

Join us at Cedarhill for....

51


Need to get yourself back and relax? Centered?

At BarrhavenYoga, our specialized instructors are qualified to meet your individual needs. We offer classes for all ages and levels of ability, including Intro to Yoga and Yoga for 50+/ Seniors sessions. For more info, call Eryn at 613-724-9642 or email barrhavenyoga@gmail.com

BRASS Benefits of Yoga include: MONKEY • Weight loss • Increased energy • Stress relief • Muscular tone

It’s at the Centre

• Enhanced concentration • Deep sleep

Enjoying the little things in life

LookingLooking for somefor finea last minute item? clothing, gentlemen?

GREENBANK % MEN’S WEAR

5off

Your purchase when you spend $10 or more.

It’s at the Centre

greenbankhuntclubcentre.com

Want to know Is it time trim howfortoamake a style? special,andhandmade Christmas cards?

ARLINGTON Think Christmas! BARBER SHOP Make your own unique

It’s at the Centre

Christmas Cards Check our Calendar for the workshops schedule www.heathersstamping.com

Food

Services

Finance

Specialty

General

Fashion

Authentic Vietnamese Pho House HASI Bakery Metro M&M Meat Shops Mother Hubbard’s Health & Natural Food 1-for-1 Pizza PJ Quigley’s Bar & Grill The Joy of Gluten Free Subway Tim Horton’s

Assist 2 Sell CMS Global Travel Dr. Neil Fukumoto & Dr. Patricia Tanaka - dentist Nepean Animal Hospital Premier Dry Cleaners & Shoe Repair Pierre Poilievre, MP South-West Counselling Centre Speech, Voice, Language Clinic Yards Unlimited Landscaping Inc.

Bank of Montreal Peter Goold Insurance Van Mansum Insurance Edward D. Jones & Co.

Brass Monkey Cruzado Dentures Cellular Pro Greenbank Flowers & Gifts Heather’s Stamping Heaven Delightful Taste Barrhaven Yoga The Joy of Gluten Free

Pet Valu Shoppers Drug Mart Comfort Shoes Plus Your Friendly Dollar Store

Bella’s Glamour Studio Elegance Hair Design Greenbank Men’s Wear & Tailoring Arlington Barber Shop Valdemar Jewellers Maternity Essentials

250 Greenbank at Hunt Club www.greenbankhuntclubcentre.com R0011717326

52

Nepean-Barrhaven EMC - Thursday, November 8, 2012

Nepean Barrhaven EMC  

November 8, 2012

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