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Inside Manotick farmers’ NEWS

market season extended into fall Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

Rideau-Goulbourn and Osgoode youth take advantage of an employment program designed to prepare youth at risk for the work place. – Page 3

CITY HALL FEATURE

The Female Firefighters in Training camp had no shortage of enthusiastic young women taking on the challenge of the firefighter experience. – Page 6

COMMUNITY

More than $7,000 was raised for Metcalfe’s Live and Learn Resource Centre at the Metcalfe Golf club. – Page 7

EMC news – The Manotick farmers’ market has been extended into the fall, thanks to a positive response from its pilot season. The new market was scheduled to wrap up Saturday, August 25, but will now continue every Saturday until Sept. 29. Market organizer and Roots and Shoots Farm manager Robin Turner said feedback was “really positive” and helped draw visitors from across the Ottawa South area. “It’s been really well received by all the local people in Manotick, and its been a popular destination for people from all over Barrhaven, Greely, Osgoode, Riverside South, and even a few people from Ottawa,” Turner said. Since the market began on June 23, visitors have been impressed with the wide variety of produce and fresh food they can get, as well as the unique setting in Manotick’s historic Dickinson Square, Turner said. As part of a partnership with Watson’s Mill, the market is held outside the heritage building each Saturday morning from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Roots and Shoots offers a wide variety of organic produce, and other vendors provide berries and fruit, fresh cheese, eggs, pork, baked goods, local grains and oatmeal. The Hot Potato Company concession truck sells gourmet baked potatoes using local ingredients. This fall, Oven Berry Farm will sell raspberries and saskatoon berries, and Turner is hoping to include a local cranberry vendor as well. Turner said if the market can continue successfully until the end of September, it will be able to attract more vendors next year – particularly a beef farmer who can offer frozen cuts of beef. Watson’s Mill manager

Isabelle Geoffrion said it has been a “resounding success” for Dickinson Square. “Every Saturday morning it’s been very busy down here, but not so busy that there was traffic blocking people from walking around,” she said. “We’ve noticed that visitors come and actually spend more time in the square than they would have.” The mill’s ongoing used book sale has been “extremely successful” on Saturday mornings, and attendance at Watson’s Mill and Dickinson House has been steady, Geoffrion said. All of these elements add up to a big hit, Turner said, “You can have a delicious snack at the Hot Potato Company, you can get your vegetables, cheeses and baked goods, and you can pick up a cheap book. You can set yourself up for a great weekend,” he said. While Turner would like to see the market continue into October, Geoffrion said this year it’s not an option. The occupation license from the city of Ottawa is only valid until the end of September, she said, and this year the mill will not try to extend that contract any further. “This is year one and when you start a new activity you want to have a pilot and really see how things can work, find out who your audience will be,” she said. “For this year... we’re able to extend through September and we’re very pleased by that.” Geoffrion said she definitely supports bringing the market back in 2013, and more details will be worked out at a market wrap-up meeting in October. For more information visit the market’s revamped website at www.manotickfarmersmarket.com. The website was redesigned for free by Whee Works graphic design company, and the logo was designed by Roots and Shoots farmer Jess Weatherhead.

PATRICIA LONERGAN/METROLAND

Full stream ahead Briar Carriere, 2, takes aim at a pylon with the help of her father, Mike. About a dozen youngsters enjoyed the second annual Water in the Park event at McKendry Park in Metcalfe on Aug. 11 to meet firefighters, play in the water, and try their hand at some firefighting techniques.

Poilievre launches petition to stop wind turbine project Staff

EMC news – Nepean-Carleton MP Pierre Poilievre has started a petition to halt plans for an industrial wind turbine site in North Gower until a federal health study is completed. On Friday, August 10 the Conservative MP announced that he has started a petition asking Premier Dalton McGuinty to “put the safety of North Gower residents first,” he said in a statement. The petition follows an open letter to McGuinty in July and a public call for a moratorium on the Ottawa South proposal several weeks ago. “Since my public call for a moratorium on the wind

turbine project proposed for North Gower, many of my constituents have been contacting me to voice their support,” said Poilievre in a press release. “The premier and his ministers of health and environment have both agreed to consider my request and I think that a petition will show them just how much support that a moratorium would have from the general population.” The Marlborough Wind Farm, initiated in 2008 by Prowind Canada, proposes 10 industrial wind turbines close to the village of North Gower. In early July, Health Canada and Statistics Canada announced a joint research study that will explore the relationship between wind

turbine noise and health effects on people living near wind power developments. It is expected to be completed in 2014. The petition asks for any development of the industrial wind turbine complex to be put on hold until the study is complete. It was mailed to thousands of households in the village of North Gower and the surrounding areas in early August. Poilievre is also inviting anyone wishing to sign the petition to drop by his constituency office at 250B Greenbank Road, just north of West Hunt Club Rd. Poilievre believes that the majority of the villagers will be supportive of this call for a moratorium.

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Study drought impact before helping: farmers Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - Local farmers are affected by the drought in different ways, so any help the city can give will have to reflect that, producers say. After visiting the Navan Fair over the Aug. 10 weekend, Mayor Jim Watson sent a memo asking city manager Kent Kirkpatrick to look at ways the city could “dig a bit deeper to provide whatever extra measure of help may be possible” for drought-stricken producers. The city’s finance and economic development committee will examine options on Aug. 27. Thom van Eeghen of the

Elk Ranch in West Carleton said his herd will likely have to be reduced by 30 per cent by the spring because he will almost certainly run out of feed. He is already using his winter stores of food for his elk, van Eeghen said. While his operation is under pressure, van Eeghen said the city should undertake a thorough study to find out the magnitude of the issue before attempting to find a solution. He advocates looking to other municipalities to find out how they have offered assistance.While cash crops are suffering, market produce isn’t doing too poorly, according to Chris Rochon of Rochon Gardens in Edwards.

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The Rochons have an irrigation system for their fruit and vegetable fields as well as greenhouses so they have been able to draw on a nearby river to ensure their eight hectares of crops don’t die. “We’re one of the fortunate ones,” he said. The constant need to rotate irrigation systems will result in higher costs at the end of the year, Rochon said. That might be balanced out by increased revenue if there is more demand for their produce due to other producers’ smaller yields, but it’s too early to say, he added. That’s why it will be important for the city manager to bring back a detailed report, said Rideau-Goulbourn Coun. Scott Moffatt. “It may not be 100 per cent clear what those issues are yet,” he said. Part of the challenge is that farmers are usually reluctant to come to the city with their hand out, so it’s sometimes hard to judge if they could use help and how much. “Farmers don’t necessarily talk about their issues,” Moffatt said. But it’s important to dig down and find out what the impact could be, since farm-

FILE

The City of Ottawa will be looking at ways to assist drought-stricken farmers, but local producers say the city needs to survey farmers and understand the extent of the issues first. ing is a significant industry in Ottawa, he said. Osgoode Coun. Doug Thompson, chairman of the city’s agriculture and rural affairs committee, called the mayor’s request “a bold and much-needed move.” Thompson said the drought has affected different areas of the city in different ways, not to mention different types of farms, so that must be reflected in any solution the city manager brings forward. The east end has suffered more than other sections of the city, Thompson said, while his ward has fared better. RELIEF

The way Thompson sees it, the only option to help farmers financially is to offer deferrals on property taxes. But that’s something the city already does through its farm grant program. “Municipally, I don’t know if there is much more we can do,” Thompson said. The mayor’s memo mentioned the possibility of adapting the farm grant program to more quickly assist farmers who are in the most desperate situations. If nothing else, the city can spread the word about the program to ensure more farmers know they can take advantage of it, Thompson said. Rochon said the city might

want to look at a way to help farmers with a more longterm solution, such as grants to help them to invest in irrigation systems. He said even that could still be a risky move if wetter weather in the future makes the systems redundant. There will be other opportunities to discuss the issue and advocate on farmers’ behalf, Thompson said. Earlier in August, Thompson met with other member of Rural Ontario Municipalities Association as part of the Association of Municipalities of Ontario. Those groups will likely send recommendations to the provincial and federal governments, Thompson said.

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Eight recruits graduate from first youth employment program Program aims to help youth at risk find better, permanent jobs Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

EMC news – The first youth employment program for Rideau-Goulbourn and Osgoode residents helped eight young people graduate with a new set of real-world skills on Friday, Aug. 17. The program, called the Rideau-Osgoode Youth Retail Employment Program (or ROYREP for short), was run through the Pinecrest-Queensway Community Health Centre’s satellite office in south Nepean. Beginning March 13, 12 participants between the ages of 15 and 30 who were unemployed and not in school started their 23-week program with two weeks of pre-employment training where participants learned how to write resumes and use WHMIS. After that, recruits fanned out to their placements around the two rural wards. Businesses ranging from tanning salons, grocery stores and independent shops to catering companies, butcher shops and even a reptile zoo took in the new employees for 20 weeks. Participants worked 27 hours a week and were paid for their time. On top of the work week, participants also met with program facilitators every Wednesday to talk about job skills, hear guest speakers and to earn CPR and first aid, Smart Serve, and Service Excellence certificates. Four participants dropped out halfway through the program, which program co-ordinator Matthew Teghtmeyer

EMMA JACKSON/METROLAND

Youth employment program facilitator Lauren Watkinson works with Mitchell Holder, right, and Brad Lavergne on Aug. 16. The two youth participated in the Rideau-Osgoode Youth Retail Employment Program for a total of 23 weeks, and graduated on Aug. 17. could especially pay off. “I’ll stay there for a long time. They’re talking about putting me through school, for butchery,” he said.

“I’m more confident now, I’m more open. I’m much more social, I like to talk to people. It’s helped a lot.” MITCHELL HOLDER, PROGRAM PARTICIPANT

Greely resident Mitchell Holder said his gains were less material in nature. “I’m more confident now.

I’m more open,” said Holder, who served food and drinks at the Hodge Podge Shoppe on Tighe Street in Manotick. “I’m much more social, I like to talk to people. It’s helped a lot.” The 19-year-old said he wasn’t quite ready for college after he graduated from high school, but it was hard to find a job without a car or a license. He now plans to enroll in Hotel and Restaurant Management at Algonquin College for September 2013, and hopes to open his own restaurant. Teghtmeyer said improved confidence is one of the biggest benefits of the program, and has a lasting impact on their ability to land jobs.

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This spring, Teghtmeyer and his staff were looking for an inexpensive van they could use to shuttle participants to their jobs, but that quest never panned out.

While the participants and their families were “really resilient” in their ability to work out rides, he said the problem could be compounded in the winter program. “Some of the participants were riding their bikes, and they won’t be able to do that in November,” Teghtmeyer said. A new session begins September 4, and the resource centre is looking for applicants who would like to participate. An information session about the program will be held August 23 from 9:30 to 11 a.m. at the Manotick Legion. For more information call 613-595-5626 ext 232.

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“A lot of people come in very uncomfortable in their own skin, are having a hard time making eye contact. And at the end they’re just changed people,” Teghtmeyer said. “They’re standing in front of a group of maybe 20 new participants and they’re talking with confidence and giving advice to their peers.” He said the job search and interviewing skills are also key gains.

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said is normal when working with youth at risk. The program is funded by Service Canada, and is geared to young people in the rural area who face extra barriers to employment, such as physical or mental disabilities, a history of mental illness or addictions, past contact with the criminal or social assistance systems, homelessness, or an unfinished high school diploma. Some youth are disadvantaged simply because of the isolated area they live in. Metcalfe resident Brad Lavergne, 26, said transportation is always an issue when looking for work, because without a car there are very few transit options available. Trained as a personal support worker, Lavergne said his field is just too saturated to find work. “I couldn’t gain employment through (working as a personal support worker) no matter how hard I tried. I think lots of people have their PSW qualifications, it’s just a full market,” he said. He said he faces an extra barrier because he has a number of visible tattoos on his arms and neck. He also has two young children, and as a single father that makes leaving home – and paying for daycare – difficult. Lavergne said he was impressed that ROYREP paid his daycare fees while he completed his placement at the Manotick Village Butcher and Little Ray’s Reptile Zoo. He said the best part of the program is that he’s now employed at either site indefinitely, and the butcher shop

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

3


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Cameras on the table for new Para Transpo fleet Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - Para Transpo wants to do something new when it buys a new fleet – ask its customers what they want. Para Transpo provides 519,335 dedicated trips a year using 91 vehicles, a fleet that is nearing the end of its life now that the mini buses are

five years old. In 2011 the city committed to spending $13 million to completely replace the fleet. On Sept. 26, Para Transpo plans to hold two sessions with its customers and key groups representing the interest of riders. The idea is to have people who use Para Transpo make suggestions on the important

Attention: Property Owners, Renters Renovators, D-I-Y’ers

things to consider when putting together a request for a new vehicle supplier, said AJ Ryland, program manager of Para Transpo. The consultations will happen at city hall during the morning and afternoon. “It’s something we haven’t done before. so we’re really happy and excited about doing it,” Ryland said. “We’re

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OC Transpo officials will speak to customers before buying new Para Transpo vehicles. also hoping that this will sort of lay the groundwork for future consultations with our stakeholders for other initiatives we plan to do from time to time, both with Para Transpo and OC Transpo.” Normally, OC Transpo would send out an RFP, or request for proposal, to ask manufacturers what they would be able to provide to Ottawa and at what cost. Then, the transit authority would put together consultations to ask people what they thought about the options. Through the upcoming sessions, OC Transpo is asking customers what they think first, Ryland said. Operators, mechanics, schedulers and other OC Transpo employees will also be consulted. “This is, I think, a bit unusual,” added David Pepper, OC Transpo’s manager of

business and operational services. “In the old world of public procurement, we would come to you after the bid is out and there and everything is done … Para Transpo came to us and said, ‘We’d actually like to talk to our customers before we even put out the proposal.’” Ryland and Pepper made a presentation to the city’s accessibility advisory committee on Aug. 15 to let them know about the consultation and a couple committee members told the men one thing they would likely hear about from Para users: the need for on-board cameras. The committee met the day after a former Para Transpo driver was sentenced to four years in prison on Aug. 14 after he pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting a 26-year-old passenger who has cerebral palsy last May.

“Given that that happened once, I believe Para Transpo should consider strongly putting cameras on their buses,” said advisory committee member Susan Brunet, particularly because many customers have communication or mental disabilities that leave them vulnerable to being taken advantage of. “We hear you on that,” Pepper said. Another committee member, former chairwoman Catherine Gardner, noted that cameras would also offer protection for drivers. “I have been on many buses where the clients have also been abusive and I think it’s a two-way street,” Gardner said. Para Transpo also partners with local taxi companies by offering vouchers for riders to use for a reduced-cost taxi trip.

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Just Kiddin Theatre season postponed to 2013 emma.jackson@metroland.com

EMC news – Metcalfe’s Just Kiddin Theatre has unexpectedly postposed its fall 2012 and spring 2013 season a full year due to “unforseen circumstances.” “The board of directors for Just Kiddin’ Theatre have concluded that the session scheduled for fall 2012 and spring 2013 must be postponed,” a press release from president Laurie Tresa said. “All those who have already registered will be notified with reimbursement information.” The children’s theatre group was scheduled to begin its season on Sept. 2 with a revamped roster of programs to better meet the community’s needs. Last May, theatre director Andrie Nel announced chang-

es to the program line-up that she hoped would create better access to intermediate and advanced theatre opportunities, while maintaining the popular drama programs kids have enjoyed since 2005. It was not clear before press time why the theatre’s season had to be delayed, but Tresa thanked participants for their support. “We thank you all for your past patronage and continued support. Please watch for our announcements informing of our relaunch in the fall of 2013,” she wrote. This September, the popular Mainstage program for kids aged 9 and up was scheduled to continue with two groups of 15 kids, who planned to put on a play in December called Occupational Hazards. For the first time, the Mainstage program was going to

be billed at market rate, rising in price to $400 from a subsidized $100, so that the theatre could expand and hire staff. To offset how productionbased Mainstage had become, Nel created a new program for the fall called Setting the Stage, which offered a “fun skills development and performance combo” where kids could hone their theatre skills while participating in a short play for friends and family at the end of the session. Beginning in October, the children’s theatre planned to also introduce a series of specialty workshops that cover theatre basics. Nel said in May she increasingly felt that experienced young actors who have been with Just Kiddin Theatre for several years need more opportunities for advanced drama. In response, the the-

atre planned to launch an audition-based Repertory Company modelled after community theatre, although priority would still be given to young actors. For more information and for schedule updates, visit www.justkiddintheatre.com.

FILE/METROLAND

Just Kiddin Theatre director Andrie Nel announced program changes in May, but the season has been postponed to the fall of 2013.

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Babysitters, parents to benefit from new directory Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

EMC news â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Babysittersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Club is coming to Osgoode. The Osgoode Youth Association has launched an online babysitting directory for the Osgoode area, which it hopes will help young babysitters and parents connect. Babysitters, pet sitters and house sitters of all ages can apply to have their information posted in the directory on O-YAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, which staff will screen before posting. Osgoode residents can then peruse the site for the sitter who matches their needs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For first-time babysitters, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to get your name out in the community. I think this service will be nice for them because it will give people a chance to look at availability and rates,â&#x20AC;? said O-YA director Nicole McKerracher. The listings will include small biographies where

babysitters can include their interests and hobbies, such as making crafts or playing sports. This will help parents narrow down their choices, McKerracher said. The application process screens potential babysitters for a recognized babysitting certification, and McKerracher said she expects most applicants will have taken O-YAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own Red Cross course. She emphasized that O-YA is simply â&#x20AC;&#x153;the middle manâ&#x20AC;? in the process. Residents will contact sitters directly, she said. McKerracher said she expects to have about 10 listings on the site as â&#x20AC;&#x153;a good base.â&#x20AC;? To find a babysitter or download an application form, visit www.o-ya.ca under the Programs and Events tab. Applications can be delivered to the O-YA centre on Osgoode Main Street, or can be scanned and emailed to McKerracher at o-yacentre@ rogers.com.

EDDIE RWEMA/METROLAND

Nineteen-year-old Emily MacDonald prepares to climb an aerial ladder as part of the exercise the girls are undertaking at the Female Firefighters in Training camp (Camp FFIT) that ran at the Ottawa Fire Services Training Division Building at 898 Industrial Rd., from Aug.13 to 17.

Teen girls experience the life of a firefighter Eddie Rwema eddie.rwema@metroland.com

EMC news - Nineteen-yearold Emily MacDonald hails from a long line of firefighters and wants to be the first female member of the family to join their ranks. The Hunt Club resident,

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

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Organized by the city and Fire Service Women of Ontario, a non-profit association of women in career and volunteer fire departments in Ontario, the camp pushes participants both physically and mentally. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like this to help me become a firefighter in the future,â&#x20AC;? MacDonald said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That would be my dream job for sure.â&#x20AC;? Thirteen-year firefighter veteran and one of the first women to become a firefighter in Ottawa, Louise HineSchmidt is the director of Camp FFIT. To her, the importance of this camp for young women is the empowerment they get from participating. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They come in when they are shy, scared and with no knowledge of what to expect, and when they leave, they realize they can do a lot more than they thought they could,â&#x20AC;? said Hine-Schmidt. The camp had a limited number of spaces and for girls to be considered, they had to fill out an application that asked a number of questions about their intent. Only 24 got a chance to participate in the

program. While at the camp, the girls get to learn about the basic role of a firefighter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They get to try a little bit of everything,â&#x20AC;? said HineSchmidt. Hine-Schmidt is one of the 27 full-time female firefighters in Ottawa. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We do have a lot fewer women firefighters,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have very many women out there as visual role models, so a lot of women donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t consider firefighting as a career and this is a way to show them this is an opportunity they could perhaps pursue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This camp is not about creating new firefighters, or to get girls to a point where they can be firefighters, for me it is about empowering a bunch of 15 to 19-year-old women.â&#x20AC;? For 17-year-old Michaela Comba, firefighting is something she has had a keen interest for a while now. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I personally love to help people and I think this is a great way to do it,â&#x20AC;? said Comba adding that as a girl she wants to prove to people that she can do the same things as men.

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whose father and both her grandfathers were firefighters, said her father really wants her to be a firefighter, which is why she signed up for the Female Firefighters in Training camp - or Camp FFIT - that ran at the Ottawa Fire Services training division building at 898 Industrial Rd., from Aug.13 to 17. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My dad has been a firefighter for a long time and I have grown up around this and I would like to try it out,â&#x20AC;? said MacDonald. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would be the first girl in my family to be a firefighter.â&#x20AC;? More than 20 teenagers had the chance to bang down doors, perform search and rescue operations in the dark, lift ladders and climb up the side of a 11-metre-tall building last week, all while wearing up to 23 kilograms of firefighter gear. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is about being able to actually try out what the firefighters do in everyday situations and see if I would actually enjoy doing what they do,â&#x20AC;? said MacDonald. The course, now in its third year, is designed to give young women the chance to see what being a firefighter is about.


COMMUNITY

Your Community Newspaper

Tournament raises $7,000 for Metcalfe resource centre Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

EMC community - More than 80 golfers hit the green at the Metcalfe Golf Course on Aug. 15, raising more than $7,000 for the Live and Learn Resource Centre in Metcalfe. Resource centre director Marlene Shepheard said she was shocked by the amount raised at the first annual charity tournament. “I think my goal was $2,000 ... I just took a moment. I was just completely overwhelmed with the support,” Shepheard said. She said the money will be used to support programs like the Ready to Learn kindergarten prep program, a weekly literacy program for tots, and

the regular pre-natal and baby bonding classes. She said $7,000 is roughly what the centre pays for rent at the old Metcalfe Town Hall. “If you think of it that way, it will keep our doors open for a year,” she said. Golfers included Coun. Doug Thompson and his nephew Mark, Coun. Scott Moffatt, and an entire team from the Osgoode Carleton Snowmobile Trail Club. A number of local developers also had teams on the green, including Monarch and Guildcrest Homes. Shepheard said she is looking forward to doing this event next year and into the future, to continue supporting the centre. “I love golfing and I love my job,” she said.

PHOTOS BY EMMA JACKSON/METROLAND

ABOVE: Richard and Matthew Cheslock golf with the Osgoode Carleton Snowmobile Trail Club’s team during the first annual Live and Learn Resource Centre charity golf tournament on Wednesday, Aug. 15. RIGHT: Metcalfe resident Brian Mouland takes a swing during the first annual Live and Learn Resource Centre charity golf tournament. The event raised about $7,000 for the Metcalfe centre, which offers a number of family programs.

EMMA JACKSON/METROLAND

From left: Ted Phillips and Michelle Taggart, with the Taggart group of companies, joined Kitchissippi Coun. Katherine Hobbs and Osgoode Coun. Doug Thompson on the golf course on Aug. 15 in support of the Live and Learn Resource Centre in Metcalfe.

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To Advertise in the

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emconline.ca Mike Stoodley 613-688-1675 Email: mstoodley@theemc.ca We also provide flyer printing & distribution services Discover how WagJag can develop new marketing opportunities for your business. Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

7


OPINION

Your Community Newspaper

EDITORIAL

Time to put a stop to naming carousel

H

uman beings in general attach a lot of significance to names. Names allow us to organize our world in such a way that we can communicate effectively â&#x20AC;&#x201C; when we say words like city hall or rabbit, we are all on the same page. This applies to most of us. What appears to be the exception, at least in Canada, is the political class, which apparently doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t attach the same value to names like the

rest of us. It seems politicians cannot resist the urge to apply new names to things that already have names. Last week, the federal government, through the National Capital Commission, decided to rename the Ottawa River Parkway as the Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway. According to the NCC, the name change answers the call of Canadians to â&#x20AC;&#x153;use our sites, our lands and our assets

to tell our Canadian story.â&#x20AC;? This announcement, according to Ottawa WestNepean MP John Baird, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is timely as we celebrate 145 years since (Macdonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) election as Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first prime minister.â&#x20AC;? One cannot help but note that Macdonald was a conservative prime minister. We surely wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be seeing the Aviation Parkway renamed the Sir Wilfrid Laurier Parkway in 2016, marking 120 years since that former prime

minister was first elected. But renaming things is not an exercise any of our politicians should be spending their time and our money on â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $60,000 in the case of the parkway. Not only are there numerous things â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a bridge, an airport, a school, a historic building â&#x20AC;&#x201C; already named after Macdonald in the city, it plays havoc with the way we collectively understand our city. Most of us who live in

Ottawa will refer to the River Parkway for decades to come. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what we know it as, what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re familiar with. It will cause confusion amongst visitors to our city, who run the risk of being told by a local resident to take the river parkway to get downtown, only to search in vain for a road that has been renamed. All of this for $60,000, money that could have saved at least one public service job in this city from federal spending cuts. This is a scenario Ottawa residents are familiar with. Recently, College Coun. Rick Chiarelli sought to have

Robertson Road in Bells Corners renamed Lloyd Francis Boulevard â&#x20AC;&#x201C; another decision made for political reasons, not practical ones. Fortunately that proposal was shot down when members of the public caught wind of the plan. When it comes to the federal government and the NCC, the public doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the same level of influence and we are now stuck with the decision. Is it not enough that new buildings, roads, bridges and the like are named subject to political whim? Our leaders can do better than to occupy their time playing with our societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s placemarkers.

COLUMN

Stressing out the kids BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse

T

he other day, my six-year-old was whining about the cool temperature of the lake following the rain. Normally I try to be empathetic about these things. On this occasion, however, I told him in the nicest possible way to suck it up. When his older brother came along and splashed water over both of us, I just shivered and laughed away the tears of the younger offspring. Sound mean? Maybe. But this incident of acute stress and others like it may actually serve to make my son a more resilient adult. According to recent science in physiology, kids that experience stress on a regular basis are better equipped to handle situations that are new, uncertain and out of their control. The key, of course, is to make sure stresses are shortlived, followed by periods of rest and recovery. Canadian author and former Wall Street trader John Coates summarizes the reasons why in his book, The Hour Between Dog and Wolf: Risk-taking, Gut Feelings and the Biology of Boom and Bust. An economist, Coates is certainly not writing about child-rearing. In fact, the bookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s focus is on traders and their role in financial market volatility. But he does a great job of summarizing the science of stress, providing examples that are universally applicable. The book is a rich study of how our biology plays a role in decision-making. To put it simply, when humans are faced with the unknown, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just our brains, but our bodies that respond, argues Coates. In the process, there is a rich release of hormones that prepare our bodies for movement â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a surge of adrenalin, testosterone or glucose, for example. Individu-

als who are genetically and developmentally conditioned to handle stress are more likely to keep this hormonal interplay in balance. Those who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t will falter when faced with the slightest uncertainties in life. Coates cites one study, for example, conducted at the Rockefeller lab in the United States. In the study, rats that were repeatedly exposed to short periods of stress developed a â&#x20AC;&#x153;hardier physiology and an increased immunity to the damaging effects of further stresses.â&#x20AC;? But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fine balance. For in the same study, rats exposed to chronic stress â&#x20AC;&#x153;came to suffer both physical illness and learned helplessness.â&#x20AC;? While Coates acknowledges it may be difficult for individuals to condition themselves to handle stress, he turns to sports medicine for some answers on how we may better prepare ourselves to cope. As physical beings, it really comes down to giving our bodies the opportunity to stretch ourselves physically. It makes sense then that the easiest way to trigger stress in our bodies is through exercise â&#x20AC;&#x201C; forcing our heart rates up, pushing our muscles to their limits and expanding our lung capacity. But Coates also makes an argument for forcing our bodies and brains to tap into our ancient physiological flight-or-fight response by exposing ourselves to extreme temperatures. Submerging oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face in cold water, for example, can actually have the effect of slowing our heart rates and in turn calming our bodies and minds to better deal with whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to come. So while my â&#x20AC;&#x153;suck-it-upâ&#x20AC;? mentality may have seemed harsh at the time, I take comfort in knowing that allowing my child to experience a harmless incident of stress may contribute to making him an all-around tougher individual. And as so often happens with children, it was a matter of minutes following the splash incident before my son was frolicking away in the icy lake, the previous moment of acute stress seemingly forgotten. The magic formula of stress-recovery-stress-recovery was complete when he followed his swim by exposing his body to the scorching sun before diving into the icy lake once again.

Editorial Policy The Manotick EMC welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at www.yourottawaregion.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to patricia.lonergan@metroland.com , fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to Manotick EMC, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa, ON, K2E 7L2.

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57 Auriga Drive, Suite 103 Ottawa, ON, K2E 8B2 613-723-5970 Vice President & Regional Publisher: Mike Mount Group Publisher: Duncan Weir Regional General Manager: Peter Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary Regional Managing Editor: Ryland Coyne

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Web Poll THIS WEEKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S POLL QUESTION

How should the city deal with the emerald ash borer infestation?

A) Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fitting tribute to Sir John A. Macdonald, our first prime minister.

A) Treat the trees event if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an expensive option.

33%

B) It was a terrible decision to rename the road â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it will only cause confusion.

B) Cut down the affected trees and hope the bugs donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t spread further.

50%

C) Wait until the damage is done and re-plant trees other than ash.

17%

D) What are emerald ash borers?

0%

C) We shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be spending money to rename anything in this city. D) It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bother me either way.

To vote in our web polls, visit us at www.yourottawaregion.com/community/cityofottawa

DISPLAY ADVERTISING: Caroline Grist - Kanata - 221-6215 Gisele Godin - Kanata - 221-6214 Dave Pennett - Ottawa West - 221-6209 Dave Badham - Orleans - 688-1652 Cindy Manor - Ottawa South - 688-1478 Emily Warren - Ottawa West - 688-1659 Geoff Hamilton - Ottawa East - 688-1488 Valerie Rochon - Barrhaven - 688-1669 Jill Martin - Nepean - 688-1665 Mike Stoodley - Stittsville - 688-1675 Stephanie Jamieson - Renfrew - 432-3655 Dave Gallagher - Renfrew - 432-3655 Leslie Osborne - Arnprior / WC - 623-6571

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

PREVIOUS POLL SUMMARY

What do you think of the decision to rename the Ottawa River Parkway?

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SALES: Sharon Russell - 613-688-1483 Kevin Cameron - 613-221-6224 Adrienne Barr - 613-623-6571 EDITORIAL: Managing Editor: Patricia Lonergan 613-221-6261 patricia.lonergan@metroland.com NEWS EDITOR: Joe Morin JOEMORIN METROLANDCOM 613-258-3451 REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER: Emma Jackson EMMAJACKSON METROLANDCOM    POLITICAL REPORTER: Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com, 613-221-6162

THE DEADLINE FOR DISPLAY ADVERTISING IS THURSDAY 10:00 AM

s !DVERTISINGRATESANDTERMSANDCONDITIONSAREACCORDINGTO the rate card in effect at time advertising published. s 4HEADVERTISERAGREESTHATTHEPUBLISHERSHALLNOTBELIABLE for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount charged for the space actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of its servants or otherwise... and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount charged for such advertisement. s 4HEADVERTISERAGREESTHATTHECOPYRIGHTOFALLADVERTISEMENTS prepared by the Publisher be vested in the Publisher and that those advertisements cannot be reproduced without the permission of the Publisher. s 4HE0UBLISHERRESERVESTHERIGHTTOEDIT REVISEORREJECT any advertisement.

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9


SENIORS

Your Community Newspaper

Plotting out sibling revenge

M

y brother Emerson had a way of getting me to do

his bidding. Unless I was really on my toes, I often paid dearly for not doing exactly what he wanted. But that hot summer day, when all the chores had been done in the barns, my three brothers were attempting to play ball on the flat piece of barnyard behind the silo. With only three of them, there wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t much chance of a very good game. Emerson wandered over to where I was sitting in the grape arbour with my dolls spread out around me. The shade of the vines

made a nice cool spot for me to spend an hour or so at my favourite pastime: playing house or school with my beloved dolls. They came in all shapes and sizes, some with soft rag-stuffed bodies, one with a beautiful china face, a couple showing their age and missing a part, but all dear to me. Emerson sidled closer and I knew what he wanted. He wanted me to head over to the silo and play ball. Well, not really play. What he wanted was me to run and catch the ball when one of them batted it out beyond the yard. Well, I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t having any part of a game in which I would never be allowed an even role -- forget R0011567237

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MARY COOK Mary Cookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Memories that I could never hit the ball in the first place. It was the very idea that I was just to be there for their convenience and I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t having any part of it. I turned him down flat. Emerson stomped away to where Everett and Earl were waiting to see if I could be talked into being their fall guy. Well, they had another thing coming. To make sure they knew I meant business, I decided to have a tea party with my dolls. I propped them all up in a sitting position and headed into the house to bring out my little set of tin dishes. I decided I might as well make a little lunch while I was at it and so stopped long enough to butter a slice of bread, cut it into small pieces and headed back out to the grape arbour. What I saw when I returned turned my blood to ice water - there was just an empty space where I had left my dolls. I knew without

Ottawa: 613-552-4082

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10

Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

looking that three sets of eyes would be turned in my direction. I flew into a rage and cleared the rail fence in one leap. Of course, the three brothers denied everything, but a dead giveaway was when Emerson said if I played ball for a bit, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d tell me where they were. Well, when he saw I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t interest in that deal and was heading into the house to tell Mother, he pointed towards the sand box, which was gravel from our pit Father had brought up on the stone boat for me to play in. There buried in the sand, all in a row like little soldiers, Emerson had buried every doll right up to its neck with just the heads sticking out of the sand. I clawed until I got them all out. It must have taken me an hour to wash them clean of the sand and grit. I ran into the house to tell Mother what my brother had done. I was pretty sure Everett and Earl would have

had no part in the deed. Mother said it was too hot to sort out my problems with my brothers and besides, she said, I knew what she thought of tattlers. That meant unless you actually showed signs of being physically wounded with blood running from your nose, she wanted no part of our childhood battles. So I would be left to my own devices when it came to dealing with Emerson. I plotted in earnest how I could best get rid of him without showing signs that I had done it. Poison was an option, but I had no idea what a poison was or if we had any on the farm. But I realized I was no match for my big strapping brother. I would just have to protect my dolls as best I could. That night, I did as I always did before I went upstairs to bed. I put them in the parlour where they slept every night, telling each and every one of them they were safe there. But after I went to bed and my sister Audrey had blown out the lamp, I lay perfectly still until I was sure she was asleep beside me. Then I crept downstairs. I had to make two trips, but I carried every last doll upstairs and put them under my bed where I knew they would be safe. I finally fell asleep, still plotting how I was going to deal with Emerson and make him pay dearly for his dastardly deed.

Veterans health looking up at Perley Rideau EMC news - Barbara Ann Scott-King, Grete Hale and retired general Rick Hillier are the honorary co-chairs of the Perley and Rideau Veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Health Centre Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new campaign to expand its programs and services. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Building Choices, Enriching Lives is an exciting campaign to raise funds to help meet the need for more housing for seniors including veterans,â&#x20AC;? said managing director Daniel Clapin. Both Hale and Scott-King are seniors and are well aware of the issues that are facing seniors today. The Perley and Rideau Veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Health Centre has embarked on a bold new strategy to create a â&#x20AC;&#x153;seniors villageâ&#x20AC;? and to provide a broader continuum of care for seniors and veterans alike. A significant component of the strategy is the construction of specially designed apartment buildings, one of which will be opening in January and the other in October 2013. The apartments offer seniors the privacy of independent apartment living or the security of assisted living for those who want to maintain their independence but need help with some daily activities, and as one of the first apartment clusters in Ontario for those in the early to mid-stages of dementia.


 

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

11


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Ottawa students take part in Arctic adventure Returning home, students vow to spread their knowledge to their peers Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - Imagine being so close to a polar bear, it is possible to rub its big white belly or climbing over sea ice in the middle of the summer. Imagine learning all about the Arctic in the Arctic. For three Ottawa students, none of this required their imagination as they had the opportunity to participate in

an Arctic expedition which each of them credit with changing the way they see life on Earth and the fragile nature of the environment. The Students on Ice Arctic Youth Expedition departed from Ottawa on July 30 with 75 students from eight different countries and returned to the Canadian Museum of Nature on Aug. 13 to take part in a welcome home event. Although most were a tad

tired, many of the students could not find the words to describe what they had experienced. “I sometimes think that I live in a bubble and I wanted to lean about what is beyond the bubble,” said Michela Panarella, a student from Orléans. “From this trip, I have learned just how big this world is and the impact we can have on it.” The program began in 2001, founded by Geoff Green, a

Canadian environmentalist. Through funding from the Canadian Museum of Nature, there have been 12 expeditions to date. The museum sent three scientists on the expedition and Margaret Beckel, the museum’s president, also had the opportunity to spend some time with the students in Iqaluit before they embarked on the sea expedition portion of the journey. The museum said the part-

HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF

nership with Students on Ice is an example of the museum’s dedication to the Arctic. “We really truly believe that understanding the Arctic is critical to understanding our place here,” Beckel said. Green, a veteran of 80 Antarctic expeditions and 36 Arctic expeditions started the program to offer students a chance to connect with nature, understand the importance and complexities of the Arctic and have a larger understanding of their individual roles back in their own communities. For Crystal Beach siblings Sam and Yasmine Anderson, the experience has left them almost speechless. Sam, 16, the student trustee for the Ottawa Carleton District School Board, will bring what he learned back to his fellow students. “It will be hard to make people understand what you went through and I don’t want to be like a professor, but it is important to illustrate the awe

I felt and hope it will convey to the students,” he said. Yasmine, 14, said she wants to bring a similar message to younger students. Both said the trip has made a huge impact in their lives. Since the program’s inception, it has taken more than 2,000 students, teachers and scientists to the Arctic, but this year’s trip almost was cancelled because of excessive sea ice in the Iqaluit harbour, preventing access to the ship. After a two-day delay, a special request to the Canadian Coast Guard was granted. and it ferried the group to their ship. Green said he was almost brought to tears by the generosity offered to his expedition. “I don’t know what we would have done,” Green said. Once on board, the students experienced an Arctic swim, visited remote Inuit communities and took a voyage across the Davis Strait to visit and explore Greenland.

Mom, can we go to another one? MICHELLE NASH/METROLAND

Brother and sister Sam and Yasmine Anderson are looking forward to relaying all that they learned on their 10 day trip with Students on Ice Arctic Youth Expedition from July 30 to Aug. 10 to students in Ottawa.

Get the whole Ottawa story by visiting our 10 community museums. They’re affordable, easy to find, fun to visit and offer hands-on activities that kids love.

Start your trip at ottawamuseumnetwork.ca Check out what’s happening: Billings Estate National Historic Site

Nepean Museum

Can You Dig it? Archaeology Camp Wednesday, August 29 2:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m.

Early Settler School Sunday, September 30 1:00-4:00 p.m.

Bytown Museum

Osgoode Township Historical Society and Museum

Cumberland Heritage Village Museum 1930’s Drive In Movie Night Friday, August 31 from 8:00 p.m.

Diefenbunker: Canada’s Cold War Museum Spy Camp: The Science Behind Spying August 27- 31 8:30 a.m.-4:30p.m. daily

Goulbourn Museum Family Craft Day- Autumn, Apples and Acorns Sunday, September 9 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Market-goers will be able to sample and enjoy tasty concoctions especially created by local chefs from the area’s abundance.

Fall Harvest Festival Saturday, September 15 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Sunday, September 9th 12 - 4 pm

Pinhey’s Point Historic Site

Riverside Park, Reuben Crescent, Kemptville

Stories of the Ottawa River Valley Saturday, August 25 7:30 p.m.- 9:00 p.m.

c GREAT LOCAL FOOD c LIVE MUSIC c CHILDREN’S ACTIVITIES c

Vanier Museopark

Advanced tickets are available 2 – 4 pm at the market on August 26th and September 2nd $10 for 10 tasters Tickets are limited!

Life Stories: Making Storyboards Wednesday, September 19 from 7:00 p.m.

Watson’s Mill Ghost Hunting at the Mill! Saturday, August 25 9:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.

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Ottawa Storytellers at Bytown Museum Every Thursday night from 7:00 p.m.

We are bringing together our farmers and chefs from the Kemptville area to celebrate the local harvest.

PROCEEDS GOING TO THE KEMPTVILLE KINSMEN R0011565868

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

www.kemptvillefarmersmarket.ca


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R0011529509

R0011567122

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Enroll by September 15, 2012 and we will add 2 bonus hours in October 2012 at no additional cost. Just bring this ad with you to your scheduled appointment.

1547 Merivale Rd. (Emerald Plaza) 471 Hazeldean Rd. (@ Castlefrank Rd.)

Offer expires Sept 15/12. Valid at participating centres only.

613-727-9636

May not be combined with other offers.

SylvanLearning.ca

2%!$).' -!4( 72)4).' 345$93+),,3 &2%.#( 5.)6%23)4902%0!.$-/2% Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

13


"UUFOUJPO BACK-to-SCHOOL 'BMM3FHJTUSBUJPO

Save on back-to-school clothes shopping The back to school season can be bittersweet. Parents may miss having their youngsters around the house when summer officially ends, but it’s also fun for parents to watch kids partake in all that

school has to offer.One of the things few parents look forward come the end of summer vacation is back-toschool shopping. Such shopping can be costly, especially when it’s time to outfit kids

with new wardrobes. While a complete wardrobe overhaul might not be necessary, kids typically need to replace a few items they’ve outgrown since the start of summer break. There are several ways

How far they go is up to them... How they get there is up to you. At the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board, we have the programs and staff you need to get them there, including Full-Day Kindergarten and Extended Day Programs offered in 55 schools this September!

School Starts Tuesday, September 4, 2012 Register Any Time

parents can save on back-toschool clothes. * Get a head start. Parents can save themselves some money by shopping early for their children’s back-toschool wardrobes. Though kids may experience a growth spurt during the summer, shop for items, like socks, that they aren’t likely to grow out of before the back-to-school season begins. This affords you time to comparison shop and spread out the cost of replacing your child’s wardrobe instead of being hit with one big bill all at once. * Establish a budget. Without a budget, it’s easy for parents to overspend on backto-school clothing, especially for those parents who wait until the last minute and simply buy the first things they see. Establish a budget, ideally several weeks before your child’s first day of school. Having a budget in place reduces the likelihood that you will overspend, and developing the budget early helps you spread out your spending.

www.ocdsb.ca R0011567567

parents of ever-growing youngsters can appreciate. Kids will like the name-brand gear, while Moms and Dads will enjoying not having to pay name-brand prices. A consignment store with significant inventory might sell anything from blue jeans and T-shirts to sneakers, shoes and jackets. * Swap clothes with other families. Clothing swaps between families have grown increasingly popular as more and more parents look to save money on rising clothing costs for their kids. Typically, families will swap clothes, including jackets, if their kids are similar in age and one

youngster has outgrown his or her clothes. If you can’t find a family to swap with, visit your local community center or church to see if it has a clothing swap program. * Shop online. A relatively new way for parents to save on back to school clothing is to shop online. A popular store’s Web site might offer discounts that their brickand-mortar store does not. Parents can also scour a host of coupon Web sites to find special codes they can use at checkout. These codes might offer free shipping or a percentage off the bill when consumers spend a certain

* Shop at consignment stores. Consignment stores offer name-brand clothing at discounted prices, something

Personal Support Worker

CLASSES STARTING SOON Program Objective This program provides the theoretical knowledge and the practical skills required to enter the healthcare field as a Personal Support Worker.

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0802 R0011526284

Career Opportunities Graduates can find employment within: UÊœ˜}‡/iÀ“Ê >ÀiÊ Facilities UÊ,ïÀi“i˜ÌÊœ“iÃÉ ,iÈ`i˜Vià UÊÀœÕ«Êœ“ià UʜëˆÌ>Ã UÊ}i˜VˆiÃÊ«ÀœÛˆ`ˆ˜}Ê œ“iV>ÀiÊ-iÀۈViÊ

NEXT CLASS

STARTS

SEPTEMBER 4TH

Come and visit our NEW LOCATION... 1830 Bank St. 613-722-7811

14

Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

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www.algonquinacademy.com


CURL AT THE HUNT New Members get 2 SEASONS FOR THE PRICE OF ONE

Limited time offer. New members pay the full regular membership fee in August 2012 and get their curling membership for two full seasons, 2012-2013 and 2013-2014.

Daytime Curling Membership

This membership is available to people who wish to participate in daytime leagues only (Tues-Sat). Daytime Curling Memberships - 2 seasons for $660 Daytime Spouse can be added for an additional $330

Associate Intermediate Membership Curlers aged 19-40.

New Associate Intermediates - 2 seasons for $440 Intermediate Spouse can be added for $212

Fully Privileged Membership Curlers aged 41+.

OPEN HOUSE Friday, September 7th 7pm-9pm

New Members - 2 seasons for $880 Curling Spouse can be added for $430

Learn to Curl Program - $350

The Learn To Curl program is designed for those that want to learn the game. This Wednesday league plays at 8pm and features weekly instruction & membership privileges. 2 FOR 1 offer not available for Learn to Curl.

Membership Benefits

R0011566550/0823

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No Initiation Fees Complimentary Custom Hunt Club Broom for New Members Year-round access to the Clubhouse facilities Ample free parking Annual Golfer/Curler Event on our Championship Golf Course Modern Locker Rooms

Prices are subject to HST. Quantities may be limited. Call 613-736-1102 or go to www.ottawahuntclub.org for details.

You

on this ice.

ÜÜÜ°œÌÌ>Ü>…Õ˜ÌVÕL°œÀ}ÊÊÊÈ£ÎUÇÎÈU££äÓ Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

15


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Warm welcome for Ottawa Olympians Brier Dodge brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC sports - Ottawa-area Olympians weren’t expecting fanfare when they stepped into the arrivals area at the city’s airport on Aug. 13, but they certainly received a warm welcome. Sprinter Gavin Smellie said he was just going to jump in a taxi to go home, but was surprised to see friends and the Ottawa police pipe and drum band waiting for him. Silver medalist rower Conlin McCabe, from Brockville, wasn’t expecting to see so many people before he headed home. “This never happens in our sport,” he said. “This is awesome, thank you.” McCabe came out wearing his silver medal, and though he never took his eyes off it, he was quick to allow several dozen waiting fans the opportunity to try it on and take a photo with him. Sprinters Gavin Smellie and Oluwasegun Makinde, both 4x100-metre team members, though Makinde took the role of alternate, said they were prepared to take a month break before heading back to the track to train with Ottawa

BRIER DODGE

Conlin McCabe lets a young fan try on his silver medal. Lions coach Glenroy Gilbert. Gilbert, who also returned on the same flight from London as the Olympic relay coach, trains Smellie in Ottawa, though he represents the

Toronto-based Flying Angels track club. Many members of the Lions were there to greet them, wearing club clothing and holding custom made signs

Check out these preowned tractors!

that had been hanging in the office during the Games. “We’ll come back, 2016, we’ll be there,” said Orléans’ Makinde, one of the younger athletes on the team. “The highlight was winning a bronze for about seven minutes (before) getting disqualified.” He said that the team is already aiming for redemption at the 2016 Games, and achieving a taste of the third place finish has them aiming for the gold in the future. “It was a great feeling, the atmosphere was great, the whole Olympics – I experienced that,” Smellie said. “Running in front of thousands of people in the stands, with millions of people watching on television.” He thought the commotion would be over, but he got one last taste of the Olympic excitement when he entered the arrivals area. Several of the athletes stopped to look around to try and figure out what exactly was going on before it sank in. “I really didn’t expect this at all,” Smellie said. “So I’m really thankful, really thankful to the city of Ottawa and everybody here right now.” It’s now back to real life for athletes like Makinde, who attends the University of Ottawa. He said he’ll spend his month break getting ready to go back to school. “I have to get my books and stuff together,” he said. “Get ready to focus on that.”

New photography exhibit explores identity Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC entertainment - A new exhibit at the Carleton University Art Gallery features photograpy by a Vanier artist exploring the meaning of identity. Cara Tierney’s Go Forth and Multiply opens on Aug. 27 and takes a look at selfidentity as a fluid concept in society. The purpose of this show, Tierney said, is to allow the audience to create their own interpretation and understanding of what personal identity is. “Looking at identity and the definition of identity is idealistic,” Tierney said. “I found it is not a singular thing, but something with multiple layers.” All the photographs feature multiple images of Tierney, stitched together in a variety of ways. “The fact that I’m multiplying myself is I’m trying to make up for the omission of all the queer people who haven’t had their time in the sun,” the photographer said. This exhibition is the end result of Tierney’s masters studies in fine arts at the University of Ottawa. The project’s backbone, the artist explained, came from personal

experiences. “When I came out, I had a real hard time identifying with the word lesbian,” Tierney said. “I identify as queer - the word is fluid, it is accepting, people can be diverse and different which leaves me open to be anything I want.” Tierney said being queer is not about a gender. The artist described the word as an umbrella term, a one-sizedfits-all which Tierney feels comfortable fitting into. That is what the exhibition is all about, Tierney said: taking identity, throwing it out the window and letting people be anything they want to be. Used to performing on stage, Tierney said taking another form of exhibition, one which leaves reaction and praise at a distance, is proving to be a bit hard, but something the artist is looking forward to all the same. “To have this photo show at Carleton is amazing,” Tierney said. The artist is also not going to stop with one show. Tierney plans to stay behind the camera and also take the stage again in the future. “I plan on sticking with this artist thing, applying for grants and making it be a 247 job for me.”

PET OF THE WEEK

2007 New Holland T7030 Tractor UÊ£]nnÎʅœÕÀà UÊÊ ÝVii˜ÌÊÊ Vœ˜`ˆÌˆœ˜ UÊÊœÕÀÊiiVÌÀˆVÊ Ài“œÌiÃ

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$95,000 Fixe Finance OAC

2009 New Holland T8040 Tractor UÊÓ]™näʅœÕÀà UÊÊ ÝVii˜ÌÊÊ Vœ˜`ˆÌˆœ˜ UÊÊ Õ>ÃÊvÀœ˜ÌÊÊ EÊL>VŽ

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$157,000

Shockey

Shockey is a much loved, robust 1 year old male addopted on Valentines’ Day from the SPCA. Named after Jeremy Shockey of the NFL, he is an extremely fast and agile cat who can jump through railings to gain access to the floor above. His favorite song is ‘Shock the Monkey” by Peter Gabriel. Being a thoughtful cat he never wakes his owners in the morning, he’s partial to an evening cuddle but, is never clingy. He recently broke a desperate addiction to cat treats, and his favourite past-time is GETTING ROWDY!! 9dndji]^c`ndjgeZi^hXjiZZcdj\]idWZÆI=:E:ID;I=:L::@Ç4HjWb^iVe^XijgZVcYh]dgi W^d\gVe]nd[ndjgeZiidÒcYdjiH^beanZbV^aid/X[dhiZg5i]ZcZlhZbX#XVViiZci^dcÆEZid[i]ZLZZ`Ç

R0011567738_0823

32 County Road 17 Jasper, Ontario K0G 1G0 613-283-1758 613-283-9952 Fax jeff@smithsequip.com www.smithsequip.com Monday-Friday 8:00-5:00, Saturday 8:00-12:00, Sunday Closed

16

Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

Time to make a grooming appointment

12-5303 Canotek Rd.(613) 745-5808 WWW.TLC4DOGS.COM

0823

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Sunday Worship 10:00am Wednesday Chapel Service 7:15pm

Real God. Real People. Real Church. 7275 Parkway Rd. Greely, ON 613-821-1056

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www.parkwayroad.com

meets every Sunday at The Old Forge Community Resource Centre 2730 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K2B 7J1

Location: St. Thomas More Catholic School, 1620 Blohm Drive

Sunday Services: Bible Study at 10:00 AM - Worship Service at 11:00 AM

R0011292988

Join us Sundays at 10:30

Service Time: Sundays at 10:30 AM

A warm welcome awaits you For Information Call 613-224-8507

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R0011292738

Invites you to our worship service with Rev. Dean Noakes Sundays at 11am, 10 am in July/August 414 Pleasant Park Road 613 733-4886

Worship services Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

ËĄË&#x;ˤÂľÇ&#x2039;ssĹ&#x2DC;EĹ&#x2DC;Ĩ Ç&#x160;Ÿ_Ę°šǟǟÉ  ɠɠɠʳɠŸŸ_É&#x161;ÄśsʳŸĹ&#x2DC;ĘłO ʚ˼ˠˢʺ˧˥˨Ë&#x161;˥ˢ˼˥ NĂ&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Äś_OÇ&#x2039;sĆźÇ&#x2039;ŸÉ&#x161;Ă&#x17E;_s_ĘłƝĜsÇŁsOĜĜŸÇ&#x2039;É&#x161;Ă&#x17E;ÇŁĂ&#x17E;ÇźČ&#x2013;ÇŁŸĹ&#x2DC;Ë&#x161;ÄśĂ&#x17E;Ĺ&#x2DC;sĘł

Gloucester South Seniors Centre 4550 Bank Street (at Leitrim Rd.) (613) 277-8621 Come for an encouraging Word! R0011292837

DČ&#x2013;Ă&#x17E;Äś_Ă&#x17E;Ĺ&#x2DC;ÂśĹ&#x2DC;Č&#x2013;ÇźĂ&#x152;sĹ&#x2DC;ÇźĂ&#x17E;OĘ°Ç&#x2039;sĜǟĂ&#x17E;ŸĹ&#x2DC;Ĝʰ_Ă&#x17E;É&#x161;sÇ&#x2039;ÇŁsOĂ&#x152;Č&#x2013;Ç&#x2039;OĂ&#x152;Ęł

R0011293030

Minister - Rev. William Ball Organist - Alan Thomas Nusery & Sunday School, Loop audio, Wheelchair access

470 Roosevelt Ave. Westboro www.mywestminster.ca

Only south Ottawa Mass convenient for those who travel, work weekends and sleep in! R0011292813

Sunday Services Worship Service10:30am Sundays Prayer Circle Tuesday at 11:30 10:30 a.m. Rev. James Murray

R0011293014

St Catherine of Siena Catholic Church in Metcalfe on 8th Line - only 17 mins from HWY 417  sWWW3AINT#ATHERINE-ETCALFECA

265549/0605 R0011293022

ALL WELCOME Sundays at 10:30 a.m. The Salvation Army Community Church Meeting at St. Andrew School 201 Crestway Dr. 613-440-7555 Barrhaven www.sawoodroffe.org

You are specially invited to our Sunday Worship Service

R0011496534

Military Chapel Sunday Services at Uplands! Protestant Worship with Sunday School 09:30 Roman Catholic Mass with Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Liturgy 11:00

Come Join Us! (Located at Breadner at DeNiverville) G%%&&'.',&&

Riverside United Church 3191 Riverside Dr (at Walkley)

Sunday Worship at 9:30am R0011571599

Sunday Services 9 am Teen Breakfast Club (starts 9/9) Adult Sunday School (Childcare provided) 10 am Worship Service Arlington Woods Nursery Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sunday School

Holy Eucharist 8:00 am & 10:30 am 9:30 am - Play Area for Under 5 934 Hamlet Road (near St Laurent & Smyth) 613 733 0102 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; staidans@bellnet.ca

2784 Cedarview Road (at FallowďŹ eld) www.cedarview.ca Tel:613.825.5393

R0011293026

Minister: James T. Hurd Everyone Welcome

Worship Services at 10:00am every Sunday in July and August Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs available see website for more details

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St Aidanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church R0011469497

Sunday Worship - 10:00 a.m. Nursery and Sunday School August 26th: Responding to the Voice of the Lord Midweek Fellowship Wednesdays 7 p.m.

R0011568283

10 Chesterton Drive, Ottawa (Meadowlands and Chesterton) Tel: 613-225-6648 parkwoodchurch.ca

SPECIAL INVITATION R0011414050

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faith@magma.ca www.magma.ca/~faith R0011519531

Dominion-Chalmers United Church

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613.224.1971

Sunday 7 pm Mass Now Available!

Sunday Worship & Sunday School 10:30 a.m.

715 Roosevelt Ave. (at Carling at Cole) Pastor: Rev. Marek Sabol 6ISITHTTPWWWOURSAVIOUROTTAWACOMs  

43 Meadowlands Dr. W. Ottawa

R0011292835

429 Parkdale at Gladstone Ministers Rev. Dr. Anthony Bailey Barbara Faught - Pastoral Care Melodee Lovering - Youth and Children Worship Service - 10:30 am 613-728-8656 Sunday School for all ages pdale@trytel.com www.parkdaleunitedchurch.ca Nursery Available

Our Saviour Lutheran Church

Come & worship with us Sundays at 10:00am Fellowship & Sunday School after the service

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Worship the Lord in the Beauty of his holiness...â&#x20AC;?

355 Cooper Street at Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor 613-235-5143 www.dc-church.org

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Sunday Services: 9am Thursday Eucharist: 10am Nearly New Shop Closed July and August 8 Withrow Avenue 613-224-7178

Email: admin@mywestminister.ca

613-722-1144 Parkdale United Church

Heb. 13:8 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and today, and forever

Tel: (613) 276-5481; (613) 440-5481 1893 Baseline Rd., Ottawa (2nd Floor) Sunday Service 10.30am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12.30pm Bible study / Night Vigil: Friday 10.00pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1.00am Website: heavensgateottawa.org E-mail: heavensgatechapel@yahoo.ca

613.247.8676

(Do not mail the school please)

Worship 10:30 Sundays

The Redeemed Christian Church of God

Heavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gate Chapel

St. Richardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church

Celebrating 14 years in this area!

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Pleasant Park Baptist

Watch & Pray Ministry ǢČ&#x2013;Ĺ&#x2DC;_É´ǢsÇ&#x2039;É&#x161;Ă&#x17E;OsÇŁ Çź ˨ŸÇ&#x2039;Ë Ë Ĺ?

We are a small church in the city of Ottawa with a big heart for God and for people. newhopeottawa.co

R0011293034

2203 Alta Vista Drive

The West Ottawa Church of Christ

R0011292694

R0011567602 R0011539656

Rideau Park United Church

Refreshments / fellowship following service www.magma.ca/~ruc (613)733-7735

Free Methodist Church

R0011564398

225 McClennan Road, Nepean ON 613-596-9390 www.awfmc.ca

Place your Church Services Ad Here email srussell@thenewsemc.ca Call: 613-688-1483

SUNDAYS 2-4 PM

Be a Superhero

Brave participants rappel and raise funds to takepart in this exciting and unique event. Anyone (over 18 years of age) may register to rappel at

www.thedropzone.ca

DROP ZONE

June to Thanksgiving

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2012

RIVERSIDE PARK

O T T A W A

presented by

361 QUEEN STREET, THE NATIONAL HOTEL & SUITES OTTAWA

Thank you to our sponsors:

or (613)226-3051 ext.222 National Hero Sponsor

ROCK GYM

R0011567825

for a day and rappel down an 18-storey building for Easter Seals kids!

R0021456921_0621

August 30th & September 6th: The Church Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Always Longed For... Starts September 16

REUBEN CRESCENT 50+ local vendors offering produce, meats, bread & baked goods, arts & crafts and more! www.kemptvillefarmersmarket.ca

Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

17


Your Community Newspaper

FIREWOOD Firewood- Cut, split and delivered or picked up. Dry seasoned hardwood or softwood from $50/face cord. Phone Greg Knops (613)658-3358, cell (613)340-1045.

CLASSIFIED

FOR RENT

800 sq ft, 1 bedroom between North Gower and Kars. Ground level. Private entrance, yard, appliances and utilities included. Seniors preferred. $825/month. Available September 1. 613-800-2330.

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

FOR SALE

Antique book case must see to appreciate. Best offer. Yamaha electric Org $200. Garden tools for sale. 613-254-5358.

2008 Toro PowerMax Snow Thrower. 28â&#x20AC;? electric start plus steering $1350.00 Day: (613)526-1001, after 6 pm (613)821-3670.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Motel in Westport- 16 units with a 1 bedroom owners residence and a 18 hole mini golf. 613-539-8072. $349,900.00

COMMERCIAL RENT Kemptville, corner of Prescott and Asa, 500 sq. ft. commercial property $500/month. (613)296-3455.

HELP WANTED

Apples, cider and apple products. Smyths Apple Orchard, 613-652-2477. Updates, specials and coupons at www.smythsapples.com. Open daily til April 1st. Disability Products. Buy and Sell stair lifts, scooters, bath lifts, patient lifts, hospital beds, etc. Call Silver Cross Ottawa (613)231-3549. Two cemetery plots, including interment and base. Capital Memorial Gardens, Nepean. Selling well below current cost. (613)838-8728

HELP WANTED

Youths!

HELP WANTED

Attention: Do you have 5-15 hours/week? Turn it into $5000/month on your computer. Online training, flexible hours. www.debsminioffice.com Go Get Holdings Inc. has openings for: Assistant Manager for its Thai Garden Buffet Restaurant at 201 Queen Street, Ottawa and Thai Cuisine cooks for its Green Papaya Restaurant at 246 Queen Street, Ottawa, Ontario. Must have at least three years experience and credible credentials related to the above positions. Demonstrable ability to communicate in Thai preferred. Salaries starting at $17.50 and $15.50, respectively. Send resumes to vagobuyan@gmail.com Home Builder Requires construction Labourers & carpenters. Must have own transportation, please fax resume to (613)523-3547. School Bus Drivers Wanted. 2 School Routes in North Gower, Stittsville Area. Contact Lisa at 613-489-3742.

NOTICES

HELP WANTED

Looking for persons willing to speak to small groups, 1 on 1 presentations. A car and internet necessary. Diana (866)306-5858.

Bunâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bunnies Daycare- A Quality Home Daycare. Nepean (Chapman Mills) www.buns-bunnies.weebly.com. Call us at 613-366-2012.

Saint Germain Foundation Ottawa. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Am Activityâ&#x20AC;? Original Assended Master Instruction on the Laws of Life, given as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Glad Free Gift of Love for all mankindâ&#x20AC;? We welcome interested individuals who wish to know more of this Assended Master Teaching. To inquire please call (613)596-8180 (613)834-8896.

DOG SITTING Experienced retired breeder providing lots of TLC. My home. Smaller dogs only. References available. $17-$20 daily Marg 613-721-1530

HELP WANTED

308527

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As a team, you will both be responsible for customer service, cleaning, minor repairs and maintenance of the interior and exterior of a residential property in Ottawa. Related experience and good communication and computer abilities are a must. A competitive salary and beneďŹ ts package, including on-site accommodation, await you!

Â&#x201E;

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18

Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

Please apply on-line at minto.com or fax your resumes to (613) 788-2758, attention: Jensa. $%$#!!'%!' (# !!%%!#('  )($#!-'!(#('+!!$#((



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Superintendent Team

AUCTIONS

AUCTIONS

Paul Switzer, Auctioneer/Appraiser    s   semail: info@switzerauction.com

Or apply on-line at YourOttawaRegion.com

Fort McMurray

WORK WANTED To give yourselves some extra time allow us to take a grime. Call 613-262-2243, Tatiana.

SALE FEATURE: WINCHESTER MODEL 21 GRAND AMERICAN

Call Today 613.221.6247 613 .221.6247

         

Need a car or truck and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get financed? Whatever your credit issues we can help. Guaranteed financing is available to everyone regardless of credit history. Call today, drive tomorrow. Call Joseph 613-200-0100.

FROM SEVERAL ESTATES, COLLECTIBLE COMMERATIVES, TARGET AND HUNTING. OVER 250 NEW AND USED, RIFLES, SHOTGUNS, HANDGUNS, CROSSBOWS, AMMUNITION, FEATURES: ARTILLERY LUGER, IMI DESERT EAGLE, BERETTA A390, WALTHER PP AND PPKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S, 1911 COLTS, WWII UNIFORMS, WWI AND WWII MEDALS AND AWARDS, GERMAN U-BOAT BINOCULARS, RIFLES AND SHOTGUNS BY WINCHESTER, REMINGTON, SAVAGE, MARLIN, MAUSER, CARCANO, LEE ENFIELD, BROWNING & BERETTA, CANE SWORD BY HALL & SON DATED 1848, ANTIQUE RIFLES, FLINTLOCKS & MUSKETS: SNIDER ENFIELD, BALLARD, WERNOL See our complete listing with pictures at: www.switzersauction.com Check back for regular updates. We have room for your quality consignments in this and future sales Terms: Cash, Visa, Master Card, Interac, 10% Buyers Premium

Deliver Right In Your Own Neighbourhood Papers Are Dropped Off At Your Door Great Family Activity No Collections Thursday Deliveries

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

AUCTIONS

2009 Grand Caravan. Sto-ingo. Certified, e-tested. Red. 113,000 kms. $12,900; 1992 Road Trek motorhome. Good condition. Certified, e-tested. $9,500. 613-542-0683.

(Viewing at 8 AM) at Switzerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Auction Centre, 25414 Highway 62, 13 km south of Bancroft, Ont

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for Carriers to deliver our newspaper!

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Seasonal Camping

FIREARMS AUCTION SATURDAY, AUGUST 25TH, 10:00 AM

Seniors!

Routes Available!

HELP WANTED

COTTAGES FOR RENT

Nice family trailer in excellent condition. Must see! Must sell! Call 613-548-8998 or 613-483-8503.

Keep Your Weekends Free!

HELP WANTED

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Open House South Shore Homes. Modular homes, cottages, garden suites. 9 homes open for viewing. August 25th 10-4 pm. 405 Lake View Rd., Drummond North Elmsley. 613-264-0604

HELP WANTED

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TRAILERS / RVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

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MUSIC

HELP WANTED

COMING EVENTS

TRAILERS / RVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

MARINE

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VEHICLES PETS

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

19


BUSINESS DIRECTORY

BOOKING: FRIDAY 9:30AM FINAL APPROVAL: FRIDAY NOON

COMPUTER HOUSE CALLS

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We come to you! Seniors Especially Welcome

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REACH UP TO 279,000 HOMES EVERY WEEK CALL SHARON AT 613-688-1483 or email srussell@thenewsemc.ca Fax: 613-723-1862 20

Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012


FOOD

R0011567396 Your Community Newspaper

Sausage and spaghetti a winning combination

T

his casserole is a good example of how to make a change in a recipe and end up with a dish that tastes just as good, if not better, than the original. The original version of this was called turkey tetrazzini for obvious reasons. It was perfect for using up the leftovers at Christmas and we really enjoyed it. The problem, of course, is that I don’t always have turkey on hand. So I tried making it with chicken. That version was good, but required cooking the chicken first. That was all right, unless I came home from work too tired to bother. Next I tried making it with tuna which can often be substituted for chicken, particularly in casseroles. That was quick and simple and became a regular supper casserole at our table. Recently I tried yet another variation. I had bought a package of bulk sausage for another recipe. Because sausage is so rich, I planned to use only half of the package in that casserole. Since bulk sausage only comes frozen, having thawed it, I had to use it up. So this time I made the ever-changing tetrazzini casserole with sausage. It was just as tasty as any of the earlier versions.

PAT TREW Food ‘n’ Stuff I finally realized the reason this casserole always tastes so good, no matter what I use, is the sauce that goes in it. Made with mushrooms, onion, mushroom soup, cheese and Worcestershire sauce, it has a delicious and distinctive flavour, due largely to the Worcestershire sauce. This casserole also calls for cooked spaghetti, which makes it a filling, delicious dish for a family meal, potluck supper or company dinner. The version I give here describes how to make it with sausage. If you prefer, substitute one to two cups of cooked, cut-up turkey or chicken, or one can of tuna. SAUSAGE TETRAZZINI

3 cups cooked, drained spaghetti (enough for four people) 1/2 package of bulk sausage meat, thawed 1 can sliced mushrooms, drained 1/2 onion, chopped

1 can cream of mushroom soup 2/3 cup milk 1/2 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 1 1/2 cups grated cheddar cheese 2 cups crushed corn flakes Cook the sausage in a frying pan, breaking up the meat with a spoon. Drain off all the fat. Add the mushrooms and onion to the pan and cook until the onion is tender -- about three to four minutes. Spread in the bottom of a large casserole dish. Using either your microwave oven or a saucepan on the stove, combine the soup, milk, Worcestershire sauce and cheese. Heat, stirring often, until the cheese is melted. Stir the cheese sauce into the spaghetti and pour this over the sausage. Sprinkle the crushed corn flakes on tops, and bake at 350 F (175 C) for 30 to 40 minutes. Serves four.

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 23, 2012

21


Local events and happenings over the coming weeks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: manotick@metroland.com

August 25: Check out the fall plant sale on Saturday, Aug. 25 from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Scobie Farm at 6274 Rideau Valley Dr. N. (six kilometres south of downtown Manotick). Find a good selection of quality hostas, grasses, hardy mums, sedums and other perennials. Proceeds to Trinity United Church in Kars. Watsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mill is hosting Ottawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first ghost hunting day camp. From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. families can become â&#x20AC;&#x153;ghost detectivesâ&#x20AC;? as Haunted Ottawa Paranormal Society shows participants the tricks of the trade in Ghost Hunting. Cost is $25 for non-members, $20 for members and $15 for Connexion Card holders. Advance registration is required. Call 613-692-6455 to register. Friends of the Central Experimental Farm will host Art on the Farm with artists working in various mediums from 10 a.m to 4 p.m. They will display and sell their original works under the trees. For more information call 613-230-3276, or visit www.friendsofthefarm.ca.

August 26: The Manotick Village Community Association will hold an old-fashioned soapbox derby on Sunday, Aug. 26 as one of the fun events of

Picnic-in-the-Park. The derby will take place on Beaverwood Road next to Centennial Park in Manotick from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Inspection and participant arrival registration commences at 8 a.m. at the top of Maple Street. Winners will be announced immediately after completion of all the races. Pre-registration is required. Visit www. manotickvca.org for more information and for registration forms. Watsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mill hosts its August Raise the Roof concert featuring Keith Glass of Prairie Oyster on Sunday, Aug. 26. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Concert starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20 per person, or $50 per family. Join us at Watsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mill for the concert. Call for more details: 613692-6455. Light refreshments and sweets available. Event proceeds to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Raise the Roofâ&#x20AC;? campaign. Please note: this is alcohol free, family friendly event.

September 8: The Winchester District Memorial Hospital Foundation will host the Heel and Wheel for Local Cancer Care on Sept 8, beginning in Greely, Osgoode and a number of Winchester locations. By bike or by foot, everyone will arrive at the hospital around 4 p.m. for a celebration. Register at www.wdmh. on.ca/foundation.

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

$62 for an adult varsity pass to all home Ravens games played on Carleton University campus.

OPTION TWO - $31 for a childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (6 to 12) varsity pass a value of $250 (adult) $125 (child) OPTION THREE - $150 for a family pass (2 adults, 2 children) a value of $750

September 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9: Check out the 16th annual Discovery Tour in Kars and North Gower. From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day, enjoy the scenery of farms, forests and the Rideau, sample award winning restaurants, and learn about the diverse art and farm products that come from the area. Visit studios where artists work, walk in a pumpkin patch, pat an alpaca or take in a bit of history. Visit discovery-tour.ca for more information.

September 17: Calling all golfers for Habitat for Humanity National Capital Regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual Chipping In golf tournament at Cedarhill Golf and Country Club. Come out for a fun day of networking, prizes and friendly competition while raising much-needed funds for Habitat for Humanity National Capital Region to build homes and build hope across the region. Call Gail at 613-749-9950 ext. 223, email fundraising@habitatncr.com or go to www.habitatncr.com.

September 22: Rural Ottawa South Support Services (ROSSS) will host its first annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walk of Careâ&#x20AC;? fun day and fundraiser. On Saturday, September 22, help rural seniors and adults with disabilities by joining ROSSS in a 5-km sponsored walk along Osgoodeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s multiuse pathway followed by a barbecue, games, prizes and entertainment. Register at www.rosss.ca or contact ROSSS at 613-692-4697 to register in person before September 22.

September 30: Get ready for race weekend in south Ottawa at the Rideau Carleton Raceway. The races

include a half marathon, half marathon relay, 10-, five- and two-kilometre family fun run and walk. To register for this event, please visit www. southottawaraceday.ca

Ongoing: Free skateboarding and sports drop-in from Rural South Recreation from noon to 7 p.m., Tuesday to Sunday. Call 613-580-2424 ext. 30235 for locations and more information or visit www.ottawa. ca/ruralsouth. Effective August 1 Rural Ottawa South Support Services (ROSSS) is taking over as the provider of community support services in the former township of Goulbourn, including Richmond, Munster and Ashton. As volunteers continue to be at the heart of our organization and assist with the delivery of our services, we currently are looking for many volunteer transportation drivers in this new catchment area. Call 613-692-4697 for more information. Watsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mill in Manotick hosts a farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; market on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fresh local produce, eggs, cheese, meats and more. Call for details: 613-692-6455. Visit www. manotickfarmersmarket.com. Visit the Watsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mill usedbook sale from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. Thousands of titles, great selection, tidy and affordable â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all in support of the mill. Call 613-692-6455 for details. Old Time Music and Country Dance takes place on the first Friday of every month at the Greely Community Centre, 1448 Meadow Dr. from 7:30 to 11:30 p.m. The cost is $5 per person at the door and free for musicians and

singers. Yearly memberships available. Come and have a good time. Is your daughter looking for a place to do fun things with her friends, make new friends in the community and try new things? Check out Girl Guides. Every week, girls ages five through 17 meet to learn everything from camping to acting, all in the company of friends they can trust, and women they can look up to.Visit www.girlguides.ca to find a unit near you and to register for the next guiding year. The small but mightily talented Osgoode Olde Tyme Fiddlers Association invites you to its traditional old-tyme fiddle and country music dance at the Osgoode Community Centre, every fourth Friday of the month from 7:30 to 11:30 p.m. Bring your fiddle, guitar and musical talents. All new members welcome. Tickets are $5 per person for non-musicians, available at the door. For more information call 613224-9888. Ottawa Newcomersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Club invites women new to Ottawa to join our activities and meet some new friends. Activities include: bridge, scrabble, walks, luncheons and dinners, book club, sightseeing, travel cafes and craft hours. For more information call 613860-0548 or email ottawa newcomers@hotmail.ca. Gloucester South Seniors, 4550 Bank St., Leitrim, offers a full schedule of activities every week, including contract bridge, carpet bowling, euchre, five hundred, shuffleboard and chess. Membership is $15 per year. The club is easily accessible by OC Transpo Route 144 and has free parking. Info at 613-8210414.

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Too late for university? Think again! Carleton University Bridging Program offers mature students a way to qualify for university admission, improve academic skills, and build confidence. Only $200 for a 12-week, part-time course. Register now for September. Call 613-520-2600 ext. 1024 or visit www.carleton.ca/cie.

Mondays and Thursdays: The Gloucester South Seniors Chess Club, 4550 Bank St. (at Leitrim Road) meets every Monday and Thursday at 7 p.m. Immediate openings available for more chess aficionados. Please contact Robert MacDougal at 613821-1930 for more information.

Wednesdays: Enjoy Scottish country dancing for fun, friendship and fitness. Share the music and joy of dance. You do not have to be Scottish. You do not have to wear a kilt â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but you can. No experience or partner is required. Meet Wednesday evenings at Manotick United Church from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. For information, contact Marie at 613-8261221 or email Osgoodedance scottish@gmail.com. Want to meet new friends? Have a great workout? Come to The MET (Metropolitan Bible Church) every Wednesday from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. for a free womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fitness class with a certified fitness instructor. Includes a fiveminute inspirational fit tip. Any questions? Contact the church office at 613-2388182.

Thursdays: Every Thursday starting at 6:30 p.m. there is bingo at the Osgoode Legion located at 3284 Sunstrum St. in Osgoode. All money raised at these weekly events goes back to the community. Bring your â&#x20AC;&#x153;dabbersâ&#x20AC;? and come out to support your local Legion bingo! Every second Thursday: Join ROSSS for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s For Dinner?â&#x20AC;? cooking class at Moncionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Your Independent Grocer at noon followed by one hour of grocery shopping. You will attend a food demonstration, sample the creation and receive a copy of the recipe. You will then have one hour of grocery shopping. Transportation service includes door-to-door service in Osgoode, Metcalfe and Greely for $7. For more information call 613-8211101.


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When your kids just gotta dance, the City of Ottawa offers a variety of classes and activities that will keep their toes tapping and body rocking. The choices go on for pages and pages in the Recreation eGuide available at ottawa.ca Dancing is great exercise for kids of all ages. For younger children, it’s a fun introduction to physical fitness and many key skills that will serve them throughout life, such as coordination, balance, flexibility, strength, stamina, discipline and memory. They will also learn to follow instructions and develop an appreciation for different styles of music. Through programs such as Music and Movement and Creative Movement, toddlers as young as three can explore their natural response to music and rhythm while expanding their creative scope and gaining confidence in their abilities. These programs provide a fun and casual approach to practicing basic and fine motor skills and learning about body awareness and space.

own choreography and experiment with a variety performance styles. Classes such as Acrobatic Dance combines dance steps and combos with free floor gymnastics. Give your child the chance to express, move and create through dance! It is said that Socrates learned to dance when he was 70 because he felt that an essential part of himself had been neglected. Affordable and conveniently located in your neighbhourhood, a dance class this fall ensures that your child won’t have to wait that long!

Fall Classes start soon! Browse online at ottawa.ca/recreation to discover affordable fall and winter programs. Visit your favourite facility where knowledgeable and friendly staff will help you discover your next adventure. You can also call 3-1-1 for more details.

Classes in pre-ballet, jazz and hip hop will teach your tiny dancer the fundamentals and techniques of specific dance styles. It’s a great introduction to more formal and focused dance classes. A performance for an admiring audience of moms, dads and family members completes the session. Older children also have a variety of dance styles to choose from. Whichever strikes their fancy, we’ve got them covered - Broadway, contemporary and hip hop, our classes cover the gamut of styles made popular by television dance shows. Have a child interested in learning a bit of everything? A Dance Mix class allows your child to create his or her

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