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THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

Moffatt plans positive 2012

Inside CITY

By Emma Jackson

emma.jackson@metroland.com

The City of Ottawa currently offers a variety of sports programs for people of all ages. – Page 2

YEAR-IN-REVIEW

Submitted photo

The spirit of giving Take a look back at some of the top Manotick stories that made headlines in 2011. – Pages 3 & 4

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Manotick Public School Grade 5 students proved the spirit of Christmas is all about giving. The students worked hard promoting, collecting, tallying, boxing and loading 1,745 items that included more than 200 kilograms of non-perishable food items and toiletries such as soap, toothpaste, toothbrushes, and toilet paper that teacher Karen Bowness dropped off to the Vanier Community Centre on Dec. 22.

Osgoode home places close second in ‘Best Christmas lights’ contest By Dosi Cotroneo

EMC News - Many a passer-by could not help but notice the spectacular Christmas light display created by Matt and Tracey Nesrallah at their home on Main Street Osgoode. Boasting 6,992 lights, five inflatables, a 12-foot Christmas tree of light on top of the house and Clark Griswold himself hanging by lights, it’s no surprise that the Nesrallah’s home is Osgoode’s favourite Christmas house. All of this energy and effort was put out by the Nesrallahs this year for a good reason -the Y101 Country FM and Warmth Insulation Christmas Lights Contest. The house that received the most votes online dur-

Submitted photo

This Osgoode home, belonging to Matt and Tracey Nesrallah, placed second in the recent Y101 Country FM and Warmth Insulation Christmas lights contest. ing the week leading up to Christmas would win the grand prize of $500 to

be donated to their favorite charity. The Nesrallah’s chose

the Osgoode Youth Association (O-YA). As families enjoy driving through neighbourhoods all over the city to take in all of the beautiful Christmas decorations over the holiday season, Y101 and Warmth Insulation wanted to encourage residents to get out there and share their holiday warmth with their neighbours and the community by showcasing their homes in their Christmas Lights Contest. Once the last vote was cast and the numbers were tallied, the Nesrallahs learned that they placed an incredibly close second. Visit www.y101fm/contests to view all of the homes that participated.

EMC News - Rideau-Goulbourn ward councillor Scott Moffatt has big plans for his ward in 2012, even though he said he doesn’t really believe in new year’s resolutions. In Manotick, Moffatt said his priority is to start fixing the intersection of South River Drive and Bridge Street, which has been a problem intersection for many years because of increased traffic at rush hour. “I want to get it at least started, because you’re talking about residents being promised something for 20, 30, 40 years and it only gets worse,” he said. “I’m hoping to find the solution that is the long term solution. Not something that’s ok for a couple of years and then we develop new issues, I want to get a solution that’s done.” Moffatt said he will also be watching to make sure the road work approved for the ward in the 2012 budget actually gets done. “I want to see those go out to tender and commence and fix some major road projects in the ward,” he said. As a matter of personal improvement, Moffatt said he wants to get back to residents’ requests faster. He said some questions and requests have taken two or three months to get a response because he gets distracted with other tasks if he doesn’t have the answer to a particular question right away. “If you send me an email and I know the answer, you’re going to get a response right away. But it’s when I don’t know the answer and I need to rely on someone else to get it for me, that’s where I sometimes fail, and I need to be better at that,” he said. Moffatt spent his Christmas in the Ottawa South area with his wife and three young children, including four-monthold Luke. He said his Christmas spirit has changed because of the kids. “Until I had kids, it was just another day. But now it’s different because you see their excitement,” he said.


news

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Many Ontarians still waiting Active holiday for important organ transplant choices – sports for all Special to the EMC

Special to the EMC

EMC News - With the holidays fast approaching – why not think outside the box. Give the gift of an active and healthy lifestyle! Register someone special for a sports program and make it double fun by signing yourself up as well. Get a head start on that New Year’s resolution to get fit or try something new. Registrations are accepted year-round for our sports leagues and skills classes. Whatever your interests, from soccer and volleyball to dragon boating and hiking, City of Ottawa City Wide Sports ensures that nobody is left on the sidelines! Get in the game and play the real sport! Active opportunities for all ages The City of Ottawa’s City Wide Sports and Girls ‘n Women and Sport programs provide quality, FUN and safe opportunities for participation and development in sports and physical activity. We organize classes, leagues, tournaments, girls only, women only, boys only, co-ed and 50-plus activities throughout the City. Never played? Been a

while? Join our Never Too Late sport skill development classes. Learn new skills in a fun and social atmosphere. Get a group of eight or more friends or co-workers together and have a sport party! Girls n’ Women and Sport was endorsed after a 1983 survey determined that girls participated 60% less than males in group oriented activities and competitions. Since that day programs have flourished, giving sport opportunities to many young girls and women. We provide a safe place where girls can be girls, and have fun while getting active and fit. Over 6,000 females have participated in our affordable, accessible sport opportunities. We have a sport for you. The Active Living Club plans activities for men and women who are age 50 plus. Join the group for hiking in the Gatineau’s, cycling tours, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing outings. Make new friends keeping active and healthy at a comfortable pace while exploring our great city. Kidsport fundraiser – helping others have fun Make sure you mark

your calendar to have some sport fun in February. City Wide Sports partners with KidSport Ottawa to make after-school sports programs possible for disadvantaged children and youth. Grants and donations to KidSport ensure that ‘no kid is left on the sidelines’ by providing registration and equipment grants to qualifying children and youth to play organized sport. On Feb. 4 City Wide Sports will be hosting a women’s and co-ed indoor volleyball tournament, with prizes, treats, and fun times. Feb. 11, the second annual Polar Bear Hockey Tournament will take place on the City of Ottawa outdoor rinks. Both these tournaments raise money for Kidsport Ottawa, while sharing good times during our great Canadian winter! Visit citywidesportsottawa.ca to find sport program and league information or call 613-680-2854 and speak with our knowledgeable and friendly staff. Make 2012 your year to choose sport and activity with the City of Ottawa Parks, Recreation and Culture Services.

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EMC News –More than 1,500 Ontario families are hoping for only one gift this holiday season: the gift of life for their loved one. Ontarians are being asked to give the gift of life this holiday and register their consent to donate by visiting www.BeADonor.ca. Online registration only takes three minutes and can potentially save up to eight lives. People who are already registered are urged to speak to their family to inform them of their wish. Doing this helps improve the rate of successful donations. “A signed paper donor card doesn’t mean you are registered,” says Ronnie Gavsie, president and CEO of Trillium Gift of Life Network. “Ontarians should visit www.

BeADonor.ca to register their consent for organ and tissue donation or check to see if they are registered.  By significantly increasing the number of registered donors in Ontario, deaths on the wait list can be eliminated and lives will be saved.” Krystina Henniker and her family have been hoping for a miracle since she was diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy and placed on the heart transplant list in May 2010. The 25 year-old is a Hamilton mother of four who’s own mother died of the same disease in 2000. “Waiting is very hard on the whole family,” explains Joanna Mitchell, mother of six-year-old heart recipient Ryley Mitchell and Krystina’s cousin. “Kids don’t understand why their Mommy can’t

Special to the EMC

EMC News - According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 25 million people have died from HIV/AIDS since the onset of the epidemic roughly 30 years ago. By 2008, more than 33 million people across the globe were living with HIV/AIDS, including more than two million children under age 15. Though great strides have been made with regards to diagnosing and treating HIV/ AIDS, many feel there is still a significant way to go before this deadly disease can be defeated once and for all. One of best assets in the fight against HIV/AIDS is understanding the disease, which can lead to more effective prevention and a greater appreciation of what

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those battling the disease are facing every day. What is HIV? HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It is a virus that infects cells of the immune system, destroying or impairing their function. Once a person is infected, the virus works to progressively deteriorate the body’s immune system, making it difficult for the body to fight infection and disease. The infections that result are known as “opportunistic infections,” as they take advantage of an infected person’s weakened immune system. What is AIDS? AIDS, or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is used to describe the most advanced stages of HIV infection. When a person has AIDS, he or she

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is fighting any of more than 20 opportunistic infections or HIV-related cancers. How is HIV transmitted? The WHO notes that HIV can be transmitted in a number of ways. At the onset of the epidemic, HIV was thought to be transmitted only through sexual intercourse. While HIV can be transmitted through sexual intercourse, including oral sex, there are a number of additional ways the disease can be transmitted, including: * transfusion of contaminated blood * sharing of contaminated needles, syringes or other sharp instruments * between a mother and her infant during pregnancy * childbirth * breastfeeding Who is most at risk of getting HIV? Though no one is immune to HIV, there are some people who are at greater risk of HIV than others. These people include: * injection drug users who share needles * infants born to mothers with HIV who did not receive HIV therapy during the pregnancy * sexually active people who engage in unprotected sex, especially with partners who have additional high-risk behaviors, are HIV-positive or have AIDS * people who received blood transfusions or clotting products between 1977 and 1985, before screening for the HIV virus became standard practice How long does it take before AIDS develops? Once infected with HIV, those infected often want to know how quickly AIDS will develop. That varies depending on the individual. If untreated, those infected with HIV will develop symptoms of HIV-related illness within 5 to 10 years. But the time between an HIV infection and an AIDS diagnosis can be more than a decade.


year in review

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

A look back at the highs and lows of 2011 January

No sooner was it time to head into the attic, garage or storage shed to face the daunting task of untangling, sorting and hanging the old Christmas lights, now it’s time to get back on the ladder, take down the Christmas lights, pack them up and head back into the attic, garage or storage shed, until it’s time to do it all over again next year. Sounds exhausting? It may be for some, but for those residents and business owners who participated in the Business Improvement Area (BIA)-sponsored Manotick Village of Lights contest, the entire production of lighting up Manotick was more than worthwhile. Now that the hustle and bustle of yet another holiday season is coming to a close, it’s time to look forward to a New Year ahead and, hopefully, time for some much-deserved fun and festivities outdoors with family and friends. The perfect antidote to the post-holiday stress, credit card statements, and customer

service fatigue, Shiverfest 2011 is already in the works and is set to take place on Jan. 28 and 29.

New business is new business and old business is old business for newly elected Rideau Ward councillor Scott Moffatt. Moffatt is anxious and ready to dive into the New Year as he pulls up his seat to the council table. While many are compiling that neverending list of New Year’s resolutions, Moffatt has two important items right on the top of his to-do list – the 2011 budget process and the sitting of the city’s newly formed standing committees. It was a lot longer than the average bus trip to the local hockey arena, but for the Ottawa Valley Silver Seven major bantam AA boys, the 10-hour bus ride to Sault Ste. Marie was well worth it. The perfect kick-off to the New Year, the Silver Sevens traveled to the Soo on Thursday, Jan. 6, but the long ride could not contain their excitement and enthusiasm as they were determined to come the victors. It wasn’t your typical birthday party, but then again, Anne Jarrett is not your typical human being. Having recently celebrated her 106th

birthday on January 10, Jarrett is not only unbelievable, but unstoppable.

February

It is not everyday people can make an enormous difference in the life of a family in need, particularly when that family needs a roof over its head, but for local couple Ken Dale and Cindy McDonald, proprietors of Manotick’s Double Decker Bus, they have made it their life’s mission. After traveling to the island of Roatan, off the coast of Honduras, the couple discovered a community in dire need of housing. This realization proved life-changing and Dale immediately committed to helping the people of Roatan. Over the past year, Dale has made numerous trips back to the island and has helped change lives by bringing people together, building friendships and much-needed homes.

Hair Day event took the school by storm as hundreds of students came to class coiffed with zany, crazy hairdos in all shapes, colours and sizes. Osgoode residents of all ages came out in droves to the O-YA Centre on Saturday, Feb. 5 to take part in the nowfamous, highly anticipated annual Snow Bowl event.

Inquiring minds want to know – is the emergency room at Winchester District Memorial Hospital closing, or is it just anther rumor run out of control? On Friday, Feb. 11, Nepean Carleton MPP Lisa MacLeod and deputy PC leader Christine Elliot travelled to Winchester to tear a strip off of the Liberal govern-

Longtime Osgoode resident, Dorothy (Dot) Brownrigg, was honored with an official presentation of the Silver Cross Medal through the Department of Veterans Affairs at the Osgoode Legion.

ment and the Champlain Local Health Integration Network (LHIN - Eastern Ontario’s health authority), accusing them of planning to shut down the community hospital’s emergency room. Provincial Conservative leader Tim Hudak went to the front lines and fired the first shot in the election battle for Local Health Integration Networks (LHIN). Speaking in the parking lot of the Champlain LHIN offices in Gloucester on Wednesday, Feb. 16 Hudak promised he would get rid of the LHINs if elected.

March

The Greely branch of the

Ottawa Public Library (OPL) will soon move to its new home. The last day of operation at the existing branch will be Saturday, March 5. It’s official. There will be a Shoppers Drug Mart store and a medical clinic opening up at the famous four-corners intersection in Manotick. It’s been ages since mention has been made of the proposed project to be constructed at Mitch Owens Drive and River Road, but as of Wednesday, Feb. 23, the City of Ottawa Agricultural and Rural Affairs Committee (ARAC) consented, without debate, that the proposal will proceed. See Manotick page 4

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EMC - Thursday, January 5, 2012 3


YEAR IN REVIEW MANOTICK From page 3

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For parents of young children preparing to start kindergarten this fall, the new full-day kindergarten programs may bring on a fury of mixed emotions. Convenient for some, anxiety-producing for others, no matter what the scenario, this Sept. 29 schools in the Ottawa Carleton District School Board and 17 schools in the Ottawa Carleton Catholic School Board opened their doors for full time kindergarten, both junior and

senior. In the Ottawa south rural communities, Greely Elementary School, Metcalfe Public School and St. Catherine’s Catholic School in Metcalfe were included in the new program. The ice at the Manotick Curling Centre was a sea of pink on Saturday, March 5, as women curlers from all across the city and the province came out to take part in the Women’s Invitational Bonspiel. Despite concern the ruling would open a “Pandora’s box” for future trail use, two

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

city committees passed a policy allowing snowmobiles to use rural multi-use pathways last week. After 40 years in the health care industry, Trudy Reid, chief executive officer of the Winchester District Memorial Hospital, announced her retirement last week and effective June 30, 2011, she will have completed seven years at the helm of the Winchester District Memorial Hospital. Ontario Court Justice Célynne Dorval condemned Samira Daoud’s actions the day she struck and killed Alex Hayes, but that won’t bring comfort to the grieving community of Greely. Six years in prison versus a life sentence of grief and sorrow sums up the Canadian judicial system following Samira Daoud’s sentencing on Friday, March 18. The repeat drinking and driving offender may be out on the street in as little as three years, while a young life is forever gone and a mother’s sorrow continues into infinity. In an effort to cut $22 million from Ottawa’s Transit Services budget OC Transpo

officials have proposed the most drastic changes seen in the bus service’s history according to the chair of the Transit Commission.

April It was standing room only as Nepean-Carleton MP Pierre Poilievre officially opened his new campaign office at 2900 Woodroffe Ave. in the Earl Mulligan Plaza. Residents of all ages turned out for the event eager to hear a few words from Poilievre and to volunteer, request lawn signs, or donate money to the campaign effort. What good is a school playground if 200 young students cannot play on a safe structure during their recess and lunch times? This is the dire dilemma for staff and parents of the Greely Elementary School community. Last week, the City of Ottawa released the results of its public consultation meetings conducted over the past few months. According to the findings in the Ottawa Solid Waste Service Level Review report, the city’s recommended changes

to residential and curbside waste collection services are expected to save taxpayers $9 million dollars annually, or a 10 per cent reduction from the current tax bill associated with waste collection. The sight of vandalized campaign signs in Manotick, Greely, Kars, Metcalfe, Osgoode and South Nepean are of grave concern to local residents, and especially for Nepean-Carleton Federal Liberal candidate, Ryan Keon. A family night out on Friday, April 8, turned into tragedy for the Lucuik family of Manotick. More than 100 people gathered along Tighe and Dickinson streets as they watched flames engulf the family’s garage, before spreading to their home. It wasn’t your typical City of Ottawa public consultation meeting held at the Manotick Arena on the evening of Tuesday, April 19. More than 60 concerned Manotick residents attended the last of 14 public meetings the city has been hosting at rural villages throughout the region.

May

It was a double-dose of excitement for students and staff at Manotick Public School, as award-winning Ottawa author and Silver Birch nominee, Kate Jaimet visited students on Wednesday, April 20. For seven years, Father Joe Leclair stood at the pulpit of St. Leonard’s Catholic Church in Manotick, drawing in record crowds with his charisma and gifted storytelling. It was a shock and disappointment to his loyal congregation when he announced he was being relocated into the city, to Ottawa’s Blessed Sacrament Parish. Enthusiastic supporters at Greenfield’s Pub in Barrhaven cheered Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre as he arrived to celebrate his fourth consecutive win in Nepean-Carleton Monday night. The recent outdoor water ban affecting Barrhaven, Riverside South and Manotick is creating quite a storm. It was National Garage Sale for Shelter Day on Saturday, May 14 at Royal Lepage offices across Canada, and in Manotick, members of Royal Lepage Team Realty and Royal Lepage Gale Real Estate were out braving the rain as seasoned garage-sale-aholics turned out in droves to help support the cause.

June It had to have been one of the most exciting days in the history of North Gower. A dream for every Canadian hockey fan, the coveted Stanley Cup travelled to Danbury Way in North Gower, to the home of Kevin McNamara. Parents, friends, and neighbours of the Manotick Public School community are invited to attend the soonto-be 70-year-old school’s first annual spring fair on the school grounds on Saturday, June 18 from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. This fun-filled family day is set to raise funds to replace two of the school’s playstructures. Between being sworn in as one of 28 parliamentary secretaries and attending his eighth Dickinson Day Parade, Nepean-Carleton MP Pierre Poilievre has had a very busy start to his first month of re-election. The accelerated work schedule on the Woodroffe Avenue water main replacement has yielded more good results, and news, allowing the outdoor water ban to end by the middle of July - two weeks earlier than the last revision. It was a happy day in Greely as local politicians were joined by City of Ottawa Public Library staff, members of the media and many book lovers during the official opening of the new Greely Library Branch.

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EMC - Thursday, January 5, 2012

The first annual Manotick Public School spring fair took place on the school grounds on Saturday, June 18.


YEAR IN REVIEW

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

Recalling the names making news in 2011 January

The local army cadet troupe has an unusual, but not unwelcome, problem. They are doing so well and becoming so popular they have outgrown their current space. “We’re kind of exploding,” said Capt. Tim McKee, leader of the 3018 Army Cadet Corps. While it’s a good problem to have, it’s beginning to become a less than ideal situation. East-end councillors are urging their constituents to have their voices heard on a proposal they all say they will not be supporting. City of Ottawa staff have laid out a proposal for weekly waste collection that would move green bin collection to a weekly schedule year round, have black and blue boxes collected together every week and see regular garbage collected on a bi-weekly basis – an option which has raised the hackles of local representatives. As the closure of the Cyrville Road bridge draws closer, plans are being finalized to help residents and business owners deal with a nearly year-long disruption. After a contract is awarded next month, construction is expected to being in March and the aging overpass will

be shut down for about 10 months while the Ontario Ministry of Transportation replaces the structure with a wider and longer version. The construction is part of a larger plan to expand Hwy. 417. Although there has been cause for concern in the past over the east end not receiving their fair share of investment, the new draft budget for the City of Ottawa may signal a change. “This is the best budget the east end has seen in a long time,” said Cumberland Coun. Stephen Blais. With a recommended tax increase of 2.45 per cent for the urban and suburban areas and 2.4 per cent in rural areas, the draft budget is almost “verbatim of (his) platform,” said Beacon Hill-Cyrville Coun. Tim Tierney. “Overall, I’m very happy with it.

February

The spreading of the holiday spirit continued last week as the Gloucester North Lions’ Club presented their portion of Christmas cheer. The Lions gifted the Ottawa Children’s Treatment Centre (OCTC) with the $5,000 they raised from last yearís Magical Village display. “We can’t say enough,” said Lori Raycroft, director of finance and facilities planning at the OCTC. “This is a significant amount for us.”

said John Shea, OrléansCumberland trustee for the Ottawa Carleton District School Board (OCDSB). At their Jan. 25 meeting, the public board included a school on the south side of the Blackburn Bypass on the report sent to the Ministry of Education. The $14-million project would see a 500-pupil school built for 2013. Blackburn Hamlet residents are being asked to keep an eye out for unusual people or activity after a rash of breakand-enter incidents, according to the Ottawa Police Service (OPS). The thieves are targeting established, single-family homes north of Innes Road on Bearbrook Road and Eastpark Drive. Since last June, police have noticed approximately 16 of these particular crimes they would classify as related, said Sgt. Mike Noonan of the east divisionís break-andenter team. Years of self-confidence and self-promotion have paid off for an Orléans-based real estate agent who now finds himself preparing to shoot the second season of a successful television show. The W Network has tapped All For Nothing? – produced by Ottawaís own Mountain Road Productions – for 26 new episodes; double the

order for the first season. The show, which pits two sets of homeowners against each other to raise the market value of their houses in two weeks, is co-hosted by eastend resident Paul Rushforth and award-winning interior designer Penny Southam.

March

A project designed to ease pressures on hospitals and provide local medical services for east-end residents got another charge of forward momentum after a city vote last week. Azoning by-law amendment for the land slated to house the new Orléans Health Hub was approved by city council in a Feb. 23 vote. Despite concern the ruling would open a “Pandora’s box” for future trail use, two city committees passed a policy allowing snowmobiles to use rural multi-use pathways last week. The March 3 joint meeting of the Agriculture and Rural Affairs and Transportation committees was a lengthy affair that saw almost 20 public delegations speak about who should be able to use the trail system. Ottawa students are officially the most generous cuddlers in the world, according to an international record organization.

BELIEVE BECAUSE IT WORKS

Two new elementary schools in Avalon are among the top projects for the English school boards, according to their recently approved lists of capital priorities. “This is exciting news,”

Long-time library advocate Lori Nash was recognized last week by having a meeting room at the Cumberland branch of the Ottawa Public Library (OPL) named in her honour.

Last week, the Ottawa Catholic School Board (OCSB) received their certificates from the Guinness World Record for having the worldís largest bear hug. In May 2010, 15 schools participated in Bear Hug III for a total of 10,554 huggers along the Rideau Canal. The original bear hug, held April 23, 2004, was held in Orléans in honour of a former St. Mattís student who passed away from cancer.

April

The east end will have a new face to get to know in the community, now that a vacancy in local policing has been filled. Following Const. Henri Lanctôt’s move from to the media relations department of the Ottawa Police Service (OPS) in January, the OrléansCumberland community police centre has been looking for a new officer to fill his shoes. That person is Const. Caroline Tessier, who began as the new community police officer three weeks ago.

Local hockey players met their northern match last week when a former Ottawa Senator brought his crop of young athletes to town. Former NHL player and Olympian Joé Juneau spent a week in Ottawa over the March Break with 12 female hockey players from the northern Quebec region of Nunavik.

The city has taken another step to further the improvement of experience of east-end commuters.

A place where the community can learn and share each other’s company has been named in honour of a woman who has given so much of herself to the city.

See Orléans page 6

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YEAR IN REVIEW

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

culminated in a surprise win in a recent fitness competition. Orléans resident Brigitte Dompierre walked away with second prize in the fitness model category during the Ultimate Fitness Experience Chaos competition held in Montreal May 14. It was her first competition.

last week. A near-capacity crowd packed the Harold Shenkman Hall April 21, to hear statements from, and ask questions of Liberal candidate David Bertschi, Conservative candidate Royal Galipeau and Green candidate Paul Maillet. NDP candidate Martine Cenatus did not participate.

ORLÉANS From page 5

Last week, the Transportation committee unanimously carried a motion put forward by Cumberland Coun. Stephen Blais to partner with the provincial government to initiate an environmental assessment (EA) to expand Highway 174 to six lanes between the split at Highway 414 and Trim Road.

May

If highway traffic has commuters down, there is another way to travel from the east end to downtown. Last week, city councillors Bob Monette and Rainer Bloess, along with members of the Ottawa Police Service and east end Pathway Patrol volunteers, marked the opening of a recently completed stretch of paved pathways. These paths, which were paved between Résidence St. Louis to 10th Line Road, join with National Capital Commission paths create a fully paved connection between Petrie Island and Parliament Hill.

An overwhelming majority of council approved the move to twice-monthly garbage pick up and even those who voted against, hinted they were voting with the will of their constituents as opposed to what they thought was best for the city. In an 18 to 4 vote, the City of Ottawa agreed to waste services changes that include twice-monthly garbage pick up during the Wednesday, April 13 council meeting. The planned changes, which include an increased pick up of green bins containing organic waste, will save the city an expected $9 million per year over the next six years.

A couple of weeks worth of friendly competition has led to a substantial haul for a local food bank.

The candidates running for the federal Ottawa-Orléans seat not only faced each other, but also a passionate crowd at the Shenkman Arts Centre

June

File photo

The students and staff at St. Peter Catholic High School wrapped up their annual Canley Cup last week. The

The opening weekend of the month was a busy couple of days in the east end with both the second annual Orléans Festival and the long-running Blackburn Hamlet Fun Fair. Here, Loyal Kigabiro entertains the crowd at the main stage outside of the Shenkman Arts Centre. While a proposal for a Habitat for Humanity development was mainly met with support, there were some concerns from future potential neighbours. Last week, the national capital region branch of the housing charity met with residents to discuss their upcoming application to build 11 homes at 2129 Nantes St. “We wanted to talk to the community before a big billboard goes up saying an application has been made,” said Murray Chown, senior project manager with Novatech Engineering Consultants.

food drive has run for at least a decade and this year, the goal was to bring in 35,000 cans. By the time the school’s roughly 1,800 students delivered the food, walking from their Charlemagne Avenue school to the Centrum Boulevard food bank, they had brought in 41,744 items. Despite sweeping changes made to the national political landscape, the local races suggest a desire to stay the course. According to Elections Canada results, incumbent Conservative MP Royal Galipeau reclaimed his Ottawa-Orléans seat in the House of Commons Monday, May 2.

A local woman’s mission to get back in shape after the birth of her second child has

A provincial investment prevented an infrastructure project from becoming a “road to nowhere.” Last Friday, the provincial government announced a new $22 million contribution to complete the Hunt Club Road extension at Hawthorne Road to Highway 417, where a new interchange will be built. A local group of musicians didn’t strike out, but rather struck gold with their entry for a recent competition. Orléans-based Black Cherry took the top prize in a contest to compose an original theme song for the Ottawa Fat Cats baseball club. The Fat Cats, which opened their season May 8, opened the field to local musicians to create a new jingle for the team to use in the stadium and in promotional materials.

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frequently frustrated by the congestion on Highway 417 were given a glimmer of light at the end of the tunnel with the announcement by the provincial government of funding to expand the roadway. Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty paid a visit to the city’s east end last week to announce up to $200 million to widen Highway 417 from Nicholas Street to Highway 174. Construction is expected to start next year for completion by 2015. The work of an energetic parents’ council and a little boost from the city means students at Alain-Fortin Catholic Elementary School will have a new place to play. Only a year after opening, the French school has raised enough money to order both junior and senior playstructures for their yard ñ a project with a total cost of about $55,000. Very few new schools are built with playstructures, explained Cumberland Coun. Stephen Blais. This time next year, almost 80 seniors will have an affordable new place to call home in the city’s east end after four years of planning.

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editorial

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Winter woes are here once again EMC Editorial – Christmas has come and gone. Now, if only winter would do the same. Perhaps we shouldn’t be too critical of the coldest, sloppiest and most uncomfortable season of the year considering we made it through November and most of December with mild temperatures and little to no snowfall. The 10-plus centimetres experienced late last month, however, was just enough of an inconvenience to reinforce our opinion that winter, for the most part, is nothing short of a royal pain in the butt. Our apologies to those of you who look forward to and actually find winter enjoyable. We’re by no means ignorant to the fact that many popular activities such as skiing, skating, snowmobiling, hockey, tobogganing and simple snowman building would be impossible without winter. It should also be noted that we are in no way condemning anyone who participates in these and other winter-related pastimes. Perhaps we simply view these activities as expendable if the sacrifice were to lead to warm, sunny skies 365 days of the year. Before we go any further, we know what many of you are likely thinking. This is Canada, winter comes with the territory, so learn to live with it and stop complaining. We get it. We know winter is unavoidable when you live in this part of the world. But, that doesn’t mean we have to like it. Don’t even get us started on freezing rain. Winter is a reality that rears its ugly head every time we have to postpone the start of our daily routine to shovel a mountain of the white stuff and brave the bitter winds while rescuing our vehicles from the prison of ice and snow. Once we’ve accomplished this and finally take to the roads, a typical morning commute can often transform into Death Race 2000. If you’re not careful, you could end up in the ditch, could damage your vehicle, suffer an injury – or worse. During a recent winter storm, more than 70 collisions were reported throughout the city in a seven-hour time period. Obviously many of these were probably avoidable if more motorists used common sense and drove accordingly. On the other hand, it’s also obvious there would not have been so many collisions if it was a clear, summer day. The truth of the matter, however, is winter is upon us and it’s going to be here for a while. We might as well make the most of it ... but it isn’t going to be easy.

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Letters Policy

Do you have an opinion on something you’ve read in the EMC or a community issue you would like to share with our readers? Send us a Letter to the Editor to jdavies@theemc.ca. All letters are subject to editing due to grammar, length and legal reasons.

Journalist reflects on his service to community I’m not good with goodbye’s even on the best of days, which makes writing a farewell column to my readers all the more difficult. But that is what this column will be. Reporters may be the face of a publication within a community, but like employees of any business, they are just as vulnerable to the everyday workings of the business world. That’s simply the nature of the industry and free enterprise as a whole. Over the last two years it has been my pleasure to serve the people of Nepean and Barrhaven, the latter community being an area I watched grow and mature even before I entered the world of journalism. I use the word ‘serve’ because I do see reporting as a public service, albeit one that doesn’t

Strange but true

By steph willems

offer the securities of the official government PS. Any reporter who doesn’t see their job in this light is doing a disservice to his or her readers. During my time at the EMC I have covered such a wide variety of events and met a staggering number of individuals deserving of coverage and community support; listing (or naming) them would take more space than these pages could handle. Rarely did a week go by without encountering a breaking story

or personal interview that left me eager to get back to my computer, consult my inner lexicon and carefully decide which words to use to describe the experience. A friend attending school in Toronto recently sent me a Facebook message remarking on the number of times he saw Barrhaven listed in online news coverage. That’s something to say for a suburban community in Ottawa, especially coming from someone residing in the Centre of the Universe. In the journalism world, hours are often long and accolades in short supply, to the point where friends might ask why you put up with it. That’s where the public service part of the equation comes in. Reporters, like artists, keep doing what they’re

Advertising Sales: Sales Co-ordinator: Carly McGhie 613-688-1479 cmcghie@perfprint.ca Expanded Market Coverage

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doing because of a passion to facilitate community-wide knowledge through the accurate dispensing of information. Knowledge is power, they say, and keeping up to date with current events and neighbourhood happenings – knowing the issues – allows readers to harness that power. Then there’s the emotional level. Reporters often go that extra mile and give up their weekend or evening not because they’re required to, but because they want a story to be covered, because the person, group, event, issue or cause profiled deserves exposure. Without it coverage and exposure, the eventual outcome of the story might not be as happy a one as could be. As part of a community, a community journalist plays a

ADMINISTRATION: Crystal Foster 613-723-5970 Production: 613-723-5970 ottprepress@thenewsemc.ca EDITORIAL: Managing Editor: Patricia Lonergan 613-221-6261 patricia.lonergan@metroland.com Managing Editor: Ryland Coyne rcoyne@perfprint.ca Associate Editor: Theresa Fritz

Member of: Ontario Community Newspapers Association, Canadian Community, Newspapers Association, Ontario Press Council, Association of Free Community Papers

role and occupies a place just like a resident with a street address in the neighbourhood in question. A sense of community – or ‘belonging’, if you will - is the biggest ‘perk’ for any journalist. After all, don’t we all want to belong? If faceto-face interaction isn’t your thing, then journalism likely isn’t for you. I’m reminded of my biggest accolade, which ironically came hot on the heels of the news of the business transaction that led to my departure. I met with a Kanata resident who showed up at my office one day – Flora Mesher Riley, a native of Labrador who was raising funds for her brother’s cancer treatment back home – who was appealing for help in her quest. It was the third brother of hers to contract

News editor: Joe Morin joe.morin@metroland.com 613-258-3451 Reporter/Photographer: Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com 613-221-6181 Political Reporter: Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com 613-221-6162

The deadline for display advertising is thursday 10:00 AM

cancer in the last three years, and the emotions she wore were clear to see. Having visited Labrador twice before and knowing the sincerity of those living there and the trust they place in others, I was glad to be able to help in any way I could. Advance coverage of two fundraisers followed, and after meeting family members who drove to Barrhaven from Goose Bay/Happy Valley at one of the events, Riley and the Mesher family thanked me for my assistance. I was surprised when she arrived at my office one last time to present me with a plaque she had had made, officially thanking me for my generosity. See Steph page 15

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EMC - Thursday, January 5, 2012 7


seniors

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

Uncle Jack’s dress suits made for wonderful sewing creations EMC Lifestyle –  Mother admitted that she wasn’t much of a sewer. And yet her old treadle singer machine was used almost daily. She made many of the clothes we wore, and it never occurred to us to criticize her for the job she did. She did the best she could. And I know now that it mustn’t have been an easy task to turn bleached flour bags into middy blouses, bloomers, and school dresses. But she learned early that sewing was something she had to master. As well as the flour bag fashions, Mother sometimes was able to afford an odd piece of print from Walker’s Store in Renfrew. It came on big fat bolts, and sold for 25 cents a yard. She would buy a yard when money permitted, and the bright print would offer a welcomed relief to the stark white of the bleached flour bags. We’d end up with a band of colour around our bloomer legs, or in the collars and cuffs on our blouses and dresses. And if there was enough left over, Mother would make big floppy bows which sat across the top of my sister’s and my head like a folded newspaper. We thought the bows were wonderful.

And always in the handme-down boxes that came twice a year from Aunt Lizzie in Regina would be one or two of Uncle Jack’s well-worn but still good dress suits. Uncle Jack was a conductor on the CPR and we thought he and Aunt Lizzie must surely be the most wealthy people in Regina to send us so many clothes that they or their two sons no longer fancied. And because Uncle Jack was short and stocky, and my three brothers were tall and lean, the dress suits never fitted anyone. They probably would have fitted father if Mother knew how to alter them down. But she didn’t. And besides Father was as short as Uncle Jack but he was as slight as a reed. And he always thought the suits were much too grand to wear to the Lutheran church which was just about the only place Father ever considered important enough to wear something other than his bib overalls. But that doesn’t mean for a minute that the suits weren’t put to good use. Mother would take every last stitch of sewing out of the suits until there was just a pile of pieces. The buttons would be put in

Mary Cook’s Memories BY MARY COOK

the button box, and the lining handled with the same care as the suits themselves. Audrey and I were often pressed into service, and it was a job neither of us minded. Mother would use the big cutting scissors, Audrey the barbering sheers, and I would use the little cuticle scissors which I was not allowed to touch at any other time. Once the entire suit was taken apart, and all the pieces examined closely to see that there were no holes anywhere. Mother would order Audrey to set up the ironing board. This was simply a wide board which Father tapered at one end, and Mother padded with old long underwear and the whole thing covered with a flour bag case. The ironing board was set on the backs of two kitchen chairs, and I don’t think we ever owned one that stood on its own until long

after we moved from the farm. Mother would dampen a tea towel and every piece of the suit would be pressed flat on the wrong side to get rid of all the wrinkles and seams. And what she ended up with, was a pile of material that no longer resembled Uncle Jack’s suit which had come in the handme-down box from Regina. I’m sure there were store bought patterns available, but I never knew Mother to have any. Instead she used big pieces of heavy brown paper that come into the house with our weekly supplies. She would take an old skirt we had worn until it was threadbare, and placing it out flat on a piece of Uncle Jack’s suit, she would cut all around it until she had a reasonable resemblance to the original skirt. I don’t think she did much pinning. If the old skirt fit us, she was sure the new one would

fit just as well. Audrey and I longed for a zipper in the side. But I don’t ever recall having a zipper in anything all the time we lived on the farm. Instead, Mother would flap the side piece over, cut out a hole for the button, dig out a button from the button box, turn up the hem, and we were usually able to wear the skirt the next day. She never used the right side of the material, and for that Audrey and I were grateful. Because Uncle Jack had a passion for wide striped suits, and both my sister and I knew that anything made from wide striped woollen material back in the 30s would immediately point to a hand-me-down. For some reason the pattern of the material seemed to be only on one side. And so the finished garment was always plain black or navy blue...and once I remember I had a jumper that was brown, and if I turned it inside out, it would be plain to see that Uncle Jack had parted with a brown and beige tweed suit. So Audrey and I were always grateful that Mother elected to use the inside of the material in our makeovers. There was never enough material to make pants for my

City’s 55 sledding hills are now open

Story idea? Do you have a upcoming event in your neighbourhood that other readers should know about? Anything from news to arts to winning sports teams can be reported in your community newspaper by contacting us. Please contact jdavies@theemc.ca and let us know about your story idea.

Special to the EMC

EMC News - The City of Ottawa has opened its 55 approved sledding hills. Approved sledding hill locations and safety tips are listed on ottawa.ca. The ice pad located in front of Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Dr. is also open for skating. To learn more about outdoor rinks in your community, please call 613580-2590 or visit ottawa.ca/ skiing. Residents are reminded to keep safety in mind, and to wear helmets while participating in winter activities such as sledding and skating.

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EMC - Thursday, January 5, 2012

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brothers, which they lamented about for years. Once Emerson insisted on trying on a loud plaid suit that had come in the box. He said it fitted him perfectly. Mother made him go upstairs in the hall to look in the mirror to see how ridiculous he looked with the legs almost to his knees and the sleeves ending at his elbow. At the time Emerson announced he hated Uncle Jack and said he belonged in a circus because he was so short. The things Mother made from Uncle Jack’s clothes never quite fitted us right. Mother had trouble getting the hems even so that they were either too short in the front, or too long in the back. The waist bands were bulky, and any attempt she made at creating anything as fancy as a pleat always ended up in a disaster. But to Audrey and me, our made over clothes were marvelous. We hid the waists with our sweaters, and hoisted the skirts in the front and tugged at the backs to make them even. It mattered not to us that the material had once be worn on a distant uncle’s back. To us the ill-fitting clothes were brand new and very much a symbol of the 30s.


FOOD

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

How to disinfect water in You can tell a good recipe case of an emergency from the spills on the page EMC News - When a weather emergency occurs, the effects can prove devastating. Natural disasters like hurricanes have turned cities upside down, oods have caused the deaths of thousands and snowstorms have shut communities down for days. A weather emergency, be it a natural disaster or a heavy storm, can contaminate the local supply of drinking water and disrupt the wastewater disposal system. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, such a disruption or contamination can directly threaten a person’s health. As a result, it’s important for men and women to know how to disinfect their drinking water should an emergency occur and the supply be at risk. The easiest way to avoid health issues that arise from a contaminated water supply is to keep plenty of bottled water on hand and use as drinking water and when cooking. So long as the bottled water has not been exposed to ood waters, it will be safe to drink. If an emergency strikes and you don’t have any bottled water at home,

don’t panic. Boiling water can help make the water safe, killing most types of disease-causing organisms that might be present. Boil water for one minute before allowing it cool and then store in containers for later use. In an emergency situation, the water could very well be cloudy. This is also not a cause for panic. Instead, ďŹ lter the water through clean cloths or just allow it to settle. When allowed to settle, chances are the cloudy water will clear up within minutes. Once it does, use the clear water when boiling. If there’s no means to boiling the water, you can use household bleach as a disinfectant. Bleach is effective at killing some, but not all, disease-causing organisms that might be in the water. If the water is cloudy, ďŹ lter it through clean cloths or allow it to settle before attempting to disinfect it. Once the water is clear, use this clear water for disinfection. When ready to disinfect the water, the EPA recommends adding 1/8 teaspoon (or roughly eight drops) of regular, unscented liquid household bleach for each

gallon of water. Do not use non-chlorine bleach to disinfect water. Once added, stir the bleach and water mixture well, then let it stand for 30 minutes before use. Once disinfected, store the water in clean containers with covers. The treated water should have a slight odor of chlorine. If it does not, repeat the process and allow the water to stand for an additional 15 minutes. After this step, if the treated water exhibits a strong odor of chlorine or tastes strongly of chlorine, allow the water to stand exposed to the air for a few hours or pour the water from one clean container to another several times. For those who rely on well water, in the case of a ood have the water tested and disinfected once the ood waters have receded. Should a weather emergency occur and the water supply be disrupted or contaminated, heed the advice of local health departments or public water systems. More information about disinfecting water and surviving a weather emergency is available at www.epa.gov.

EMC Lifestyle – When you open a cookbook, you can always tell which recipes are the ones that get used a lot. Those are always the pages with the most drips, spots and spills on them. That’s how I usually ďŹ nd the recipe for this oatmeal bread. There are enough spills on this page to make it stiffer than the other pages, a sure sign that we like the recipe. Made with oats, orange juice, orange peel and raisins, this bread machine loaf is great for an afternoon or

Food ‘n Stuff PAT TREW

evening snack. At breakfast, it’s good toasted. And it can also be used for a very different, very tasty French toast on Sunday morning. Orange Oatmeal Bread One cup water 1/2 tsp. salt 1/3 cup orange juice

Two tbsp. vegetable oil Two tbsp. white sugar Three cups all-purpose our One cup oatmeal (not instant) One tsp. grated orange peel 1/2 cup raisins Two tsp. bread machine yeast Place all the ingredients in your bread machine in the order given. Use either the regular or delay cycle, and start the machine. When done, turn the loaf out of the pan and cool for one hour before cutting.

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” TS OF KE “TOKRI$F PIN ERS! 8 5 PPETIZ 2F INIS $ RICE A P F L • MARTTLE OR WINE A T &H U T O BO NIGHT PRICE ON ANY 2 ENTREES. GIRLS IGHT •W1IT/2H PURCHASE OF Y ONIE DATE N NDA $11 A TO Y FSU ESTIC A D IT FOR N E OF DOM IZ U S CHERS OW’ STAR

sat

PET OF THE WEEK

1124.370248

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Generally dogs grow out of this behavior as they age from puppies into adult dogs. Others can learn to become confident and cease many of the submissive acts. Until dogs grow out of certain submissive behaviors, there are strategies that dog owners can employ to help alleviate the problem of submissive urination. * Determine the cause of the behavior and try to avoid gestures or things that will trigger the urination. For example, some dogs urinate out of excitement or a lot of activity at the door. Minimizing excitement at the

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Submitted photo

Bending down when addressing a dog that has exhibited submissive behavior can make a dog feel more comfortable and less intimidated.

door can help fix the problem. * Bend down when addressing the dog. Stooping over a dog can seem aggressive. Going down to his level can put a person on the terms of the dog and reduce feelings of intimidation. * Don’t yell at a dog for submissive urination. Simply ignore it occurred and wipe up the mess. Drawing angry attention to the incident can exacerbate the problem. * Some dogs do not like direct eye contact. If a dog urinates from direct eye contact, avoid it and gradually work to develop the dog’s confidence with praise when he is looked at in the eyes. * Loud, booming voices may trigger urination. Some dogs feel men are dominant and get nervous around them. Household residents should speak calmly around the dog, including when greeting the dog. Submissive urination and housetraining problems are two separate issues that require different tactics.

ing around the tank could see their snail population explode. Feeding fish only what they can eat in five minutes tends to reduce food waste and snail overpopulation. Snail predators in the tank can also keep snails in check. There are some fish that feed on snails, such as the Clown Loach and Pufferfish. For those who feel that snails have gotten out of control, there are some ways to remove snails from the tank. Pet stores sell chemical products that can kill off the snails. The trouble is they also may get rid of beneficial bacteria in the tank or harm other fish as well.

tank may contribute to snail reproduction. Aquatic snails have both hermaphroditic (both sexual organs on one snail) and heterosexual reproduction. Most snails lay eggs. However, a notable exception to this is the Malaysian Trumpet Snail, which is a live-bearer. With the right conditions in the tank, snails can bloom very quickly, which is often why they get a bad rap. Snails tend to feed on decaying plant matter, excess food and even some dead fish, traits that can be beneficial in the tank to an extent. Individuals who over-feed their fish and have excess flakes ly-

tues

EMC Lifestyle - Some dogs urinate as a way to show loyalty and submissiveness to their owners. It’s not an issue of housebreaking, but can be a nuisance nonetheless. Understanding the behavior can help alleviate it. Dogs are animals who instinctively operate in pack behavior. There are animals who are the alphas, exhibiting dominant behavior, while others fall in line behind and take the submissive role. There are different signals of submission. A dog may lower his ears, lower the posture of his body, roll over, or urinate. A dog who urinates at the feet of his owners is showing in no uncertain terms that he knows the owner is the boss. It’s actually a compliment to the owner but may not be viewed as such. Dog owners often chastise a dog for submissive urination, but this can only compound the problem. Showing the dog any sign of aggression can only make the urination worse.

EMC News - The home aquarium enthusiast hopes his or her fish tank is one that enables marine life to happily grow inside of its confined perimeters. An aquarium that is relatively self-sufficient, requiring only routine cleaning and feeding, is often the goal. With this in mind, many enthusiasts set to recreate the natural ecosystem that would be present in the wild, including predators, prey and scavengers to keep the tank in top form. A snail is a creature that naturally scours the tank and often fish tank lovers introduce them to the tank with mixed results. Snails are mollusks, meaning they have a soft body and a protective shell. There are more than 80,000 known varieties of snails, many of which are marine animals. Most marine snails are scavengers that feed on decaying plants, dead fish and algae. Some are carnivorous and look to feed on other creatures like themselves. Because they are known to scour the tank, snails can be beneficial to the aquarium environment. But snails have earned a bad reputation in aquarium circles. That’s because, if left unchecked, snails can proliferate quickly and become a tank nuisance. Snails prefer alkaline water, which keeps their shell strong and healthy. An alkaline

fri

Special to the EMC

Special to the EMC

sun

Submissive urination ... what exactly is it?

‘M $4 • PIT AR $5 ESTIC • CAES F DOM O S T MIXED DRINKS 1.0 OZ. • MARTINIS 1.5 OZ. PINTS 20 OZ. • PIN

Pet Adoptions ANIMALS OF CHRISTMAS DUSTY

Dusty, is a much-loved five-year-old pet parrot that flew the coop when he was spooked by the sound of a loud plane overhead. He went missing from his family’s home for two weeks this past summer. The family was devastated and feared that he would never return. Two weeks later, Dusty was found and brought to the OHS. A joyous reunion with his owners soon followed thanks to the dedicated OHS staff.

O.C.

ID#A089606

O.C. (for Orange Cat) is five years old, and one of the longest residents at the OHS. O.C. was brought to the shelter as a stray last July. Over those five months, shelter staff have come to know this orange tabby very well and observed that he’s definitely a loner. With that in mind, and in order to keep him relaxed and happy to receive visitors at the shelter, O.C. is now housed in a cat condo all his own while he waits patiently for a forever home.

KRINGLE

Prettyface Prettyface is our six year old cat. She aspires to be a model, enjoys long walks at night, field mice, and long afternoon naps. She has a lot of attitude, confidence, and is the boss of the house. When she does become a model, she will certainly be a diva.

1229.380709

12-5303 Canotek Rd.(613) 745-5808 WWW.TLC4DOGS.COM

ROBYN

This four-year-old Collie/German Shepherd mix was transferred from another shelter to the OHS. Robyn is always on the go! She’s very intelligent and active, but while in the Adoption Centre, the OHS Canine Behaviour Specialist observed that she was becoming more and more restless and stressed. To keep her busy and stimulated, an enrichment program was developed for her. OHS volunteer dog walkers implemented the program and successfully worked with Robyn to keep her relaxed and to teach her basic commands, until she was adopted into her forever home.

0105

Do you think your pet is cute enough to be “THE PET OF THE WEEK”? Submit a picture and short biography of your pet to find out! Simply email to: cfoster@thenewsemc.ca attention “Pet of the Week”

ID#A138464

Kringle is a three-month-old Great Dane mix who was recently rescued by the OHS RIS team following a call from a member of the public who spotted him loose and injured in the neighbourhood. Kringle couldn’t stand or walk when he was brought in. He had bumps and small lesions on his snout and was in a great deal of pain. The OHS veterinarian gave him pain medication and diagnosed him with an uncommon condition, known as Juvenile Cellulitis. He was immediately treated with medication for this condition and Kringle is now recuperating in the home of a foster volunteer and will continue to be monitored by the OHS veterinarian until he’s ready for his own forever home.

Please note: The Ottawa Humane Society has many other companion animals available for adoption. Featured animals are adopted quickly! To learn more about adopting an animal from the Ottawa Humane Society please contact us: Website: www.ottawahumane.ca Email: Adoptions@ottawahumane.ca Telephone: (613) 725-3166 x258 EMC - Thursday, January 5, 2012 11


FOR RENT Merrickville- house, 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, completely renovated throughout. 6 appliances. Yard, shed, parking. No smoking. Pets negotiable. $1,100. (613)269-2788. Info: www.378heritage.com

FOR SALE

HELP WANTED

3768 Hwy 43 W, Smiths Falls. New Mattress Sale. Ontario made. Factory Direct. No HST until Christmas. Single starting at $150/set, Doubles starting $189/set, Queen sets from $299. Open 10 am-5 pm daily until Christmas! 10 Models in stock including Firm, Pocketcoil & Pillowtop. We also sell Used Furniture & Appliances. (613)284-8281 www.usedbedsale.homestea d.com/index.html

Log cabin shells for sale. Hand-crafted using dove tail joinery from white pine timbers, 12-14” hewn faces, all material seasoned for a miniumum of 1 year. 3 sizes available: 16x20’, 18x22’, 20x24’, 1 storey or 1.5 storey with loft. Buildings can be joined together for more living space. Starting from $12,000. Log shells can be delivered and erected in the spring by an award winning, local builder. Visit logfarmtimberframes.com or call Scott Kelly at (613)851-3893.

Looking for persons willing to speak to small groups, 1 on 1 presentations. A car and internet necessary. Diana (866)306-5858.

Disability Products. Buy and Sell stair lifts, scooters, bath lifts, patient lifts, hospital beds, etc. Call Silver Cross Ottawa (613)231-3549.

Sell Your House “As Is”, For a Fair Price, On The Date Of Your Choice www.WeBuy OttawaHouses.com 24 hr message (613)482-6556 X104.

ANNOUNCEMENT

ANNOUNCEMENT

Firewood- Cut, split and delivered or picked up. Dry seasoned hardwood or softwood from $50/face cord. Phone Greg Knops (613)658-3358, cell (613)340-1045.

ANNOUNCEMENT

%HFRPHD0HGLFDO/DERUDWRU\ $VVLVWDQW 7HFKQLFLDQ 

Graduate in 11 months and start working in: • A physician’s office or clinic • A diagnostic testing laboratory • A public health laboratory (including Blood Services)

Professional Caregivers (Foster Parents) and Child/Youth Workers Wanted. Connor Homes in now hiring in your area. Please visit our website www.connorhomes.com and check out the career section. Email resumes to: sarah@connorhomes.com

Call Now for More Information!

1-866-628-6128 www.EverestToday.ca

No diploma or GED? Career training could be your answer to success.**

Ottawa East • Ottawa West

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

Providing Quality Education in Ontario for More Than 40 years

16 Convenient Locations in Ontario Career services assistance available to graduates. Financial assistance may be available for those who qualify. Morning and afternoon classes available. *Graduates are eligible to write the OSMT certification examination. **Some programs require Grade 12 credits as prerequisites.

ANNOUNCEMENT

ANNOUNCEMENT

ANNOUNCEMENT

ANNOUNCEMENT

0105.380530

ANNOUNCEMENT

www.emcclassified.ca

Career Training

FOR SALE

FARM Hyland Seeds- Corn, soyabeans, forage seed, white beans and cereals. Overseeding available. Phone Greg Knops, (613)658-3358, (613)340-1045, cell.

CLASSIFIED

R0011235310

Your Community Newspaper

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

meets every Sunday at The Old Forge Community Resource Centre 2730 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K2B 7J1

A warm welcome awaits you For Information Call 613-224-8507

313666-0129

Come A n g ltogether i c a n C h u r c h o f at Canada

www.stlukesottawa.ca www.stlukesottawa.ca

10am Choral Eucharist with Sunday School & Nusery

Sundays 10am Choral Eucharist with Sunday School & Nusery 3:30pm Contemplative 3:30pm Eucharist Contemplative Eucharist 3:30pm Contemplative 10am with Sunday School & Nusery Eucharist 10 Chesterton Drive,Choral Ottawa Eucharist 3:30pm Contemplative Eucharist 3:30pm Contemplative Eucharist All are welcome without exception. All are welcome

All are welcome without exception. 613-235-3416 760 Somerset West exception. All are welcome without 760 Somerset West

1014.322233

Sunday Worship - 10:00 a.m. Nursery and Sunday School January 8th - Good Delivery People

760 West Somerset West 760 Somerset 0105.380521

613-235-3416

Riverside United Church

3191 Riverside Dr. (at Walkley) without exception.

Sunday Worship & Sunday School at 11:00 a.m.

613-235-3416 www.magma.ca/~ruc (613) 733-7735

760 Somerset West 613-235-3416 613-235-3416

Refreshments/Fellowship following the service.

Invites you to our worship service with Rev. Dean Noakes Sundays at 11am 414 Pleasant Park Road 613 733-4886 pleasantparkbaptist.org

Worship services Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

1229.380414

Gloucester South Seniors Centre 4550 Bank Street (at Leitrim Rd.) (613) 277-8621 Come for an encouraging Word! 380166-1208

1110.369768

715 Roosevelt Ave. (2 blocks north of Carling and Cole) Pastor: Rev. Marek Sabol (613) 722- 0802 Visit: http://www.oursaviourottawa.com

Military Chapel Sunday Services at Uplands!

0105.380519 1020.371452

Sunday Service 10:00 am Nursery and Church School provided Website: www.knoxmanotick.ca

Pastor: Rev. Kelly Graham Knox church office: 613-692-4228

Dominion-Chalmers United Church 355 Cooper Street at O’Connor 613-235-5143 www.dc-church.org

265549/0605 348602-0707

Come & worship with us Sundays at 10:00am Fellowship & Sunday School after the service 43 Meadowlands Dr. W. Ottawa

613.224.1971 1229.380511

faith@magma.ca www.magma.ca/~faith

ALL WELCOME Sundays at 10:30 a.m. The Salvation Army Community Church Meeting at St. Andrew School 201 Crestway Dr. 613-440-7555 Barrhaven www.sawoodroffe.org

Real God. Real People. Real Church.

Protestant Worship with Sunday School 09:30 Roman Catholic Mass with Children’s Liturgy 11:00

Join us Sundays at 10:30

7275 Parkway Rd. Greely, ON 613-821-1056

Come Join Us!

www.parkwayroad.com

(Located at Breadner at DeNiverville) 1117.369775 The Redeemed Christian Church of God

Heaven’s Gate Chapel Heb. 13:8 “Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and today, and forever

Tel: (613) 276-5481; (613) 440-5481 202 – 100 Malvern Drive Nepean, Sunday Service 10.30am – 12.30pm Bible study / Night Vigil: Friday 10.00pm – 1.00am Website: heavensgateottawa.org E-mail: heavensgatechapel@yahoo.ca

0818.362691

Sunday Services Worship Service10:30am Sundays Prayer Circle Tuesday at 11:30 10:30 a.m. Rev. James Murray

429 Parkdale at Gladstone Ministers Rev. Dr. Anthony Bailey Barbara Faught - Pastoral Care Melodee Lovering - Youth and Children Worship Service - 10:30 am 613-728-8656 Sunday School for all ages pdale@trytel.com www.parkdaleunitedchurch.ca Nursery Available

361256-0908

5533 Dickinson St., Manotick, Ontario

“A friendly church with a warm welcome”

Sunday Worship & Sunday School 10:00 a.m.

0714.348835

1110.369772

Our Saviour Lutheran Church

KNOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Parkdale United Church

Pleasant Park Baptist

Watch & Pray Ministry

Email: admin@mywestminister.ca

613-722-1144

0127.353011

All are welcome without exception.

470 Roosevelt Ave. Westboro www.mywestminster.ca

273400-0925

(Meadowlands and Chesterton) Tel: 613-225-6648 parkwoodchurch.ca

0217.352787

Anglican Church of Canada

Anglican Church of Canada

Building an authentic, relational, diverse church.

Minister: James T. Hurd Everyone Welcome

Minister - Rev. William Ball Organist - Alan Thomas Nusery & Sunday School, Loop audio, Wheelchair access

Anglican Church of Canada

205 Greenbank Road, Ottawa www.woodvale.on.ca (613) 829-2362 Child care provided. Please call or visit us on-line.

613.247.8676 (Do not mail the school please)

Worship 10:30 Sundays

368457-0908

368459-0908

Sunday Services at 9 or 11 AM

Celebrating 14 years in this area!

westminster presbyterian church

Anglican Church of Canada

Come Cometogether together Sundays Come together at atat Sundays www.stlukesottawa.ca www.stlukesottawa.ca Sundays 10am Choral Eucharist with10am Sunday School & Nusery Choral Eucharist with Sunday School & Nusery Sundays www.stlukesottawa.ca

We are a small church in the city of Ottawa with a big heart for God and for people. newhopeottawa.co

Place your Church Services Ad Here for Only $10/week Call Sharon 613-688-1483 12

EMC - Thursday, January 5, 2012

265247

0105.380524

613-733-3156 Come together at

Location: St. Thomas More Catholic School, 1620 Blohm Drive

Sunday Services: Bible Study at 10:00 AM - Worship Service at 11:00 AM

0217.335268

Holy Eucharist 8:00 am & 10:30 am 10:30 am - Play Area for Under 5 934 Hamlet Road (near St Laurent & Smyth) 613 733 0102 – staidans@bellnet.ca

www.rideaupark.ca

Service Time: Sundays at 10:30 AM

156615

2203 Alta Vista Drive Worship and Sunday School - 9:30 am Traditional Worship 11:15 am

The West Ottawa Church of Christ

St Aidan’s Anglican Church

1028.335029

Rideau Park United Church


Client Copy

Saturday, May 28th, 2011

Position: RN/PSW

3x60 AR4 2x59 AR3

Napanee Beaver Napanee Guide Thursday, June 2nd, 2011

CLASSIFIED

Please review your contact information carefully before approving. Vendors is not responsible for incorrect PHONE: AgencyAdRep: Fran contact information. 1-888-967-3237

Section: Careers

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CAREER OPPORTUNITY

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HELP WANTED

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

www.emcclassified.ca

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HELP WANTED

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contact information.

Manager of Ambulatory and Diagnostic Services Permanent, Full Time Radiology Technologist Temporary, Part-Time (0.5 FTE) for approximately 9 months

Qualifications: • The successful candidate must be a graduate of a certified X-Ray Technologist program • Registered and a member in good standing with CAMRT and CMRTO.

needed immediately!

record of social innovation and breakthrough clinical practices.

Registered Nurse Sign-on Bonus available (Napanee)

Guaranteed Hours (75 Hours – Bi-weekly) Nursing We have Part-time openings for– Visiting positions in Ottawa and Saint Elizabeth has been a trusted name in Canadian health care for more surrounding than a century area and is a leader in responding to client, family and system – Part-time

Personal Support Workers needs. As an award-winning not-for-profit and charitable organization, Saint

PSW Certificate and ownfor transportation is required. Elizabeth is known its track record of social innovation and breakthrough Positions availableOur in: Kingston East &than West, Northnurses, Brook, rehab Denbigh, clinical practices. team of more 5,000 therapists, Cloyne & Kaladar personal support workers and crisis intervention staff deliver nearly five Location: 30 Colonnade Road, North Suite 225, Nepean Please your resume to Human Resources: million health care visitsforward annually.

HEALTH CARE JOB FAIR

Work available 7 days per week, 24hrs per day, based on your availability

Tuesday 10th – 10am – 3pm Email:January hresources@saintelizabeth.com

ApplyNurse online at www.saintelizabeth.com Registered Sign-on Bonus available (Napanee) Personal Support Workers

If you are interested in joining the Carefor team, please submit your resume quoting reference #PSW-EMC to:

We thank all applicants for their interest; however, only those selected for an & interview be contacted. PSW Certificate ownwill transportation required

Guaranteed Hours (75 Hours – Bi-weekly) – Visiting Nursing

Personal Support Workers – Part-time www.saintelizabeth.com On-site interviews will be held for qualified applicants (Please bring references and 2 pieces of photo ID) PSW Certificate and own transportation is required. Positions available in: Kingston East & West, North Brook, Denbigh, Cloyne & Kaladar

Please to forward your resume to Human Resources: If you are unable attend, please forward your resume to: Email: hresources@saintelizabeth.com Human Resources quoting #EMC-0105 Apply online at www.saintelizabeth.com E-mail: hresources@saintelizabeth.com We thank all applicants for their interest; however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

0105.380371

Radiology Technologist, Temporary Part-Time (0.5 FTE) for Approximately 9 months

Personal suPPort Workers, DeveloPmental service Workers, anD community suPPort Workers

1027.371732

The Arnprior & District Memorial Hospital is located in the Town of Arnprior, less than 30 minutes northwest of Ottawa. There are approximately 300 staff, 260 volunteers, and a growing number of medical staff providing exemplary care to over 30,000 residents of West Ottawa, McNab/Braeside, Arnprior and portions of Mississippi Mills. Manager of Ambulatory and Diagnostic Services, Permanent Full Time The incumbent will be responsible for managing all resources and staff while providing leadership to support the daily operations of Diagnostic Imaging in the disciplines of: General Radiology, Mammography, Ultrasound, Bone Densitometry, and Ambulatory Care inclusive of ECHO, ECG, Cardio, Pulmonary, Urotherapy, Telehealth, Speech Language Pathology, and clerical support staff. This position also provides development and training of staff; maintain quality controls and assist in policy and standards development for Diagnostic and Ambulatory Services. Qualifications: • Minimum 5 years managerial experience in a hospital clinical environment. • Certificate of competence and member in good standing in a related field (i.e., CAMRT, CMRTO, CNO, CSRT) • Demonstrated experience in supervising/managing in a clinical environment • Excellent computer knowledge and skills with understanding of standards within the Diagnostic Services and Ambulatory Care departments. • Excellent oral and written communication skills with the ability to relate well to diverse groups of healthcare workers • Proficient on MS-Word, Outlook, Excel, Powerpoint and Meditech. • Ability to work under pressure and on concurrent, multidisciplinary projects

Saint Elizabeth has been a trusted name in Canadian health care for more than a century and is a leader in responding to client, family and system Saint has been not-for-profit a trusted name in Canadian healthSaint care needs.Elizabeth As an award-winning and charitable organization, for more isthan a century and is a ofleader in responding to client, Elizabeth known for its track record social innovation and breakthrough clinical and practices. Our needs. team of As more 5,000 nurses, rehab therapists, family system anthan award-winning not-for-profit personal support workers and crisis intervention staff deliver nearly five and charitable million health careorganization, visits annually. Saint Elizabeth is known for its track

www.saintelizabeth.com

717 Richmond Street, Suite 300, London ON N6A 1S2 Applications will be accepted up to and including Friday January 13, 2012. Tel: 519 433 9492 • Fax: 519 433 1205 • Toll Free: 1 866 587 0786 0105.380746

Please apply to: Elaine Drabik, Human Resources Generalist Arnprior and District Memorial Hospital Corporation 350 John Street N, Arnprior ON, K7S 2P6 Email: careers@arnpriorhospital.com or by Fax: 613-623-4844

717 Richmond Street, Suite 300, London ON N6A 1S2 Tel: 519 433 9492 • Fax: 519 433 1205 • Toll Free: 1 866 587 0786

FOR SALE

HELP WANTED

3768 Hwy 43 W, Smiths Falls. New Mattress Sale. Ontario made. Factory Direct. No HST until Christmas. Single starting at $150/set, Doubles starting $189/set, Queen sets from $299. Open 10 am-5 pm daily until Christmas! 10 Models in stock including Firm, Pocketcoil & Pillowtop. We also sell Used Furniture & Appliances. (613)284-8281 www.usedbedsale.homestead. com/index.html

HELP WANTED

News EMC Classifieds Get Results!

Personal suPPort Workers, DeveloPmental service Workers, anD community suPPort Workers

FOR SALE

HELP WANTED

Disability Products. Buy and Sell stair lifts, scooters, bath lifts, patient lifts, hospital beds, etc. Call Silver Cross Ottawa (613)231-3549.

Looking for persons willing to speak to small groups, 1 on 1 presentations. A car and internet necessary. Diana (866)3065858.

Log cabin shells for sale. Hand-crafted using dove tail joinery from white pine timbers, 12-14” hewn faces, all material seasoned for a miniumum of 1 year. 3 sizes available: 16x20’, 18x22’, 20x24’, 1 storey or 1.5 storey with loft. Buildings can be joined together for more living space. Starting from $12,000. Log shells can be delivered and erected in the spring by an award winning, local builder. Visit logfarmtimberframes.com or call Scott Kelly at (613)851-3893.

Professional Caregivers (Foster Parents) and Child/Youth Work-ers Wanted. Connor Homes in now hiring in your area. Please visit our website www.connorhomes.com and check out the career section. Email resumes to: sarah@connorhomes.com

News EMC Classifieds Get Results!

needed immediately!

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Career Training

%HFRPHD0HGLFDO/DERUDWRU\ $VVLVWDQW 7HFKQLFLDQ 

Graduate in 11 months and start working in: • A physician’s office or clinic • A diagnostic testing laboratory • A public health laboratory (including Blood Services)

1-866-628-6128

Work available 7 days per week, 24hrs per day, based on your availability 1027.371732

If you are interested in joining the Carefor team, please submit your resume quoting reference #PSW-EMC to:

www.EverestToday.ca

No diploma or GED? Career training could be your answer to success.**

Ottawa East • Ottawa West Providing Quality Education in Ontario for More Than 40 years

16 Convenient Locations in Ontario Career services assistance available to graduates. Financial assistance may be available for those who qualify. Morning and afternoon classes available. *Graduates are eligible to write the OSMT certification examination. **Some programs require Grade 12 credits as prerequisites.

R0011235310

Call Now for More Information!

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Manager of Ambulatory and Diagnostic Services Permanent, Full Time Radiology Technologist Temporary, Part-Time (0.5 FTE) for approximately 9 months The Arnprior & District Memorial Hospital is located in the Town of Arnprior, less than 30 minutes northwest of Ottawa. There are approximately 300 staff, 260 volunteers, and a growing number of medical staff providing exemplary care to over 30,000 residents of West Ottawa, McNab/Braeside, Arnprior and portions of Mississippi Mills. Manager of Ambulatory and Diagnostic Services, Permanent Full Time The incumbent will be responsible for managing all resources and staff while providing leadership to support the daily operations of Diagnostic Imaging in the disciplines of: General Radiology, Mammography, Ultrasound, Bone Densitometry, and Ambulatory Care inclusive of ECHO, ECG, Cardio, Pulmonary, Urotherapy, Telehealth, Speech Language Pathology, and clerical support staff. This position also provides development and training of staff; maintain quality controls and assist in policy and standards development for Diagnostic and Ambulatory Services. Qualifications: • Minimum 5 years managerial experience in a hospital clinical environment. • Certificate of competence and member in good standing in a related field (i.e., CAMRT, CMRTO, CNO, CSRT) • Demonstrated experience in supervising/managing in a clinical environment • Excellent computer knowledge and skills with understanding of standards within the Diagnostic Services and Ambulatory Care departments. • Excellent oral and written communication skills with the ability to relate well to diverse groups of healthcare workers • Proficient on MS-Word, Outlook, Excel, Powerpoint and Meditech. • Ability to work under pressure and on concurrent, multidisciplinary projects

Radiology Technologist, Temporary Part-Time (0.5 FTE) for Approximately 9 months

Qualifications: • The successful candidate must be a graduate of a certified X-Ray Technologist program • Registered and a member in good standing with CAMRT and CMRTO. Applications will be accepted up to and including Friday January 13, 2012.

Please apply to: Elaine Drabik, Human Resources Generalist Arnprior and District Memorial Hospital Corporation 350 John Street N, Arnprior ON, K7S 2P6 Email: careers@arnpriorhospital.com or by Fax: 613-623-4844 EMC - Thursday, January 5, 2012

0105.380746

FOR RENT Merrickville- house, 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, completely renovated throughout. 6 appliances. Yard, shed, parking. No smoking. Pets negotiable. $1,100. (613)269-2788. Info: www.378heritage.com

13


Client Copy Please review your contact information carefully before HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

CLASSIFIED

approving. Ad Vendors is not responsible for incorrect contact information.

Your Community Newspaper Saint Elizabeth has been a trusted name in Canadian health care for more

than a century and is a leader in responding to client, family and system Saint has been not-for-profit a trusted name in Canadian healthSaint care needs.Elizabeth As an award-winning and charitable organization, for more isthan a century and is a ofleader in responding to client, Elizabeth known for its track record social innovation and breakthrough clinical and practices. Our needs. team of As more 5,000 nurses, rehab therapists, family system anthan award-winning not-for-profit personal support workers and crisis intervention staff deliver nearly five and charitable million health careorganization, visits annually. Saint Elizabeth is known for its track record of social innovation and breakthrough clinical practices.

HELP WANTED

Algonquin Careers Academy requires an outstanding instructor to teach the Accounting and Payroll Administrator program. If you are an experienced accountant, have a passion for teaching with at least 3 years of teaching experience, and the required industry certifications including CPA payroll, please email your resume to: Mary Soye mps.search@rogers.com

Guaranteed Hours (75 Hours – Bi-weekly) Nursing We have Part-time openings for– Visiting positions in Ottawa and Saint Elizabeth has been a trusted name in Canadian health care for more surrounding area than a century and is a leader in responding to client, family and system – Part-time

Personal Support Workers needs. As an award-winning not-for-profit and charitable organization, Saint

PSW Certificate and ownfor transportation is required. Elizabeth is known its track record of social innovation and breakthrough Positions availableOur in: Kingston East &than West, Northnurses, Brook, rehab Denbigh, clinical practices. team of more 5,000 therapists, Cloyne & Kaladar personal support workers and crisis intervention staff deliver nearly five Location: 30 Colonnade Road, North Suite 225, Nepean Please your resume to Human Resources: million health care visitsforward annually.

HEALTH CARE JOB FAIR

Tuesday 10th – 10am – 3pm Email:January hresources@saintelizabeth.com

ApplyNurse online at www.saintelizabeth.com Registered Sign-on Bonus available (Napanee) Personal Support Workers We thank all applicants for their interest; however, only those selected for an & interview be contacted. PSW Certificate ownwill transportation required

Guaranteed Hours (75 Hours – Bi-weekly) – Visiting Nursing

Personal Support Workers – Part-time www.saintelizabeth.com On-site interviews will be held for qualified applicants (Please bring references and 2 pieces of photo ID) PSW Certificate and own transportation is required. Positions available in: Kingston East & West, North Brook, Denbigh, Cloyne & Kaladar

0105.380371

an interview will be contacted.

www.saintelizabeth.com

1830 Bank Street 613-722-7811

17 Richmond Street, Suite 300, London ON N6A 1S2 9492 • Fax: 519 433 1205 • Toll Free: 1 866 587 0786 ANNOUNCEMENT

HELP WANTED

Accounting Instructor

Registered Nurse Sign-on Bonus available (Napanee)

Please to forward your resume to Human Resources: If you are unable attend, please forward your resume to: Email: hresources@saintelizabeth.com Human Resources quoting #EMC-0105 Apply online at www.saintelizabeth.com E-mail: hresources@saintelizabeth.com We thank all applicants for their interest; however, only those selected for

HELP WANTED

0105_380644

HELP WANTED

www.algonquinacademy.com

ANNOUNCEMENT

ANNOUNCEMENT

ANNOUNCEMENT

ANNOUNCEMENT

ANNOUNCEMENT

17 Richmond Street, Suite 300, London ON N6A 1S2 9492 • Fax: 519 433 1205 • Toll Free: 1 866 587 0786 380529-0105

Anglican Parish of Bearbrook, Navan & Vars

Sunday Worship

Trinity (8785 Russell Rd., Bearbrook) St. Mary’s (3480 Trim Rd., Navan) Navan Community Sunday School St. Andrew’s (1900 Devine Rd., Vars)

Sunday 10:30 am - Children Welcome Séraphin-Marion Elementary Public School 2147 Loyola Avenue (off Shefford) • www.uufo.org

356102-1202

1485 Triole Street Ottawa Ont. K1B 3S4

Dominion-Chalmers United Church 355 Cooper Street at O’Connor 613-235-5143 www.dc-church.org

265549/0605 348602-0707

0818.362707

KNOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Mon.-Fri. 8:00 am Sat. 4:00 pm Sun. 9:00 am & 10:30 am 12:00 pm Filipino

PERPETUAL HELP EVENING DEVOTION – WED 6:15 PM – 7 PM

“Come Pray with Us” 320 Olmstead St. Vanier (613) 746-8503

Elgin at Lisgar 613-238-4774 http://www.knoxottawa@bellnet.ca www.knoxottawa.ca Sunday Worship 11 AM Sunday School Serving Christ in the heart of the Nation’s Capital

Minister: Rev. Ed Gratton Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. Sunday School/Nursery During Worship

360 Kennedy Lane E., Orleans

1013.367797

Sunday School For Children 4-12 yrs. Nursery & Youth Group 125 MacKay Street, Ottawa • 613 745-7834

www.stbartsottawa.ca

0106.357979

8:15am & 10:30am

Worship 10:30 am 0930.322366

613-236-0617 www.glebestjames.ca glebestjames.church@bellnet.ca

ST. HELEN’S ANGLICAN CHURCH

Sunday Worship 8, 9:15, 11 1234 Prestone Dr, Orleans (1 block west of 10th Line, 1 block south of St. Joseph) 613-824-2010 www.sthelens.ca

613-837-6784 www.queenswoodunited.org

St Bartholomew’s Anglican Church

Ministers: Rev. Dr. Christine Johnson Stephanie Langill - Youth and Children Rev. George Clifford - Pastoral Care Lyon Street South and First Robert Palmai - Music �

0714.348835

214632/0711

Celebrate with Sundays @ 10am Teen programs, Sunday School & Nursery Available 1111 Orleans Boulevard 613-837-4321 Check us out at: www.orleansunitedchurch.com

0105.380518

Sunday Services Worship Service10:30am Sundays Prayer Circle Tuesday at 11:30 Rev.10:30 Jamesa.m. Murray

1124.379428

Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary Parish

Come and celebrate God’s love with us.

613-695-5099

Join Us: Sunday Service 11:30am www.newconvenant.ca

1110.369784

1220 old Tenth Line Rd orleans, oN K1E3W7 Phone: 613-824-9260 www.graceorleans.ca pastordan@graceorleans.ca

2476 Old Montreal Rd., Cumberland Tel: 613-859-4738

QUEENSWOOD UNITED CHURCH

Affiliated with Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada

362693.0818

St. Mark’s Anglican Church

MASSES:

Phone: 613-740-0607 Website: www.citychuch.net

INvITES You To WoRShIP SuNDAYS AT 10:45Am

Canon Jim Beall

Sunday Eucharist 10:00 a.m. Sunday School

10:30AM Family Sunday Service

GRACE PRESBYTERIAN ChuRCh

St. Columba Anglican Church

Come Grow With Us

City Chuch 155 Carillon Street, Vanier

Info: 613-216-2200 or www.bvnanglican.ca

24 Sandridge Road, Manor Park, Ottawa Tel: 613-749-5103

Regular Worship – Sunday, 1000 hrs Choir Practice - Thursday, 1830 hrs

8:30 a.m. 10:00 a.m. 9:45am 11:30 a.m.

0915.368690

A liberal spiritual community nourishing compassion through exploration, dialogue and social action

1006.367646

357317-0203

Reverend Canon John Wilker-Blakley

1202.356056

Unitarian Fellowship of Ottawa

Bilberry Creek Baptist

480 Charlemagne Blvd., Orleans 613-824-3131 • www.bilberry.org

1206.356154

Capital City Church 1123 Old Montreal Rd. phone: 613.833.1700 www.capitalcitychurch.ca

Worship Time: 11:00 Bible Classes: 9:45 Mom & Tots: Thursday’s 10:30am

Our Service Times:

Services at 9:00 am every Sunday All are welcome to join us in faith and fellowship. 14

EMC - Thursday, January 5, 2012

A Church in the Heart of Vanier 206 Montreal Rd. Sunday Communion at 9:00 am in English Also at 11:00 am (in English and Inuktitut) 613-746-8815 www.stmargaretsvanier.ca

Sundays at 10am & Wednesdays at 7pm Childcare available at all services

359331-0414

613-590-0677 stmarys@rogers.com stmarysblackburn.ca

0519.340804

2750 Navan Rd. (2 minutes South of Innes)

St. Margaret’s Anglican Church

1230_356218

St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Church

Generation Impact Youth Group meets every Friday at 7pm

Place your Church Services

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

www.emcclassified.ca


BUSINESS DIRECTORY

BOOKING: FRIDAY 9:30AM FINAL APPROVAL: FRIDAY NOON

APPLIANCES APPLIANCE REPAIRS

BASEMENTS

Leaking Basements!! since 1976

r

Seniors Especially Welcome

613-761-8919

209644/0207

613-836-4082 DAN BURNETT

Free Estimates • All Work Guaranteed

ELECTRIC

INSULATION

317049/0506

estimates@electric-solutions.ca info@electric-solutions.ca

1013.367796

• Spray Foam • Attic Upgrades

• Thermal Barrier • EcoBatts

Custom Home Specialists

613-843-1592 Toll Free 1-855-843-1592 www.insultech.ca

A+ Accredited

ISSUE DATE: JULY13

Please verify and return this proof with any corrections.

613-762-5577

Failure to return proof with any changes PRIOR to the PROOF DEADLINE

(Monday 5:00 pm on the week of publication), shall be deemed by Ottawa News as an unconditional acceptance of the ad by the Client, and the Client herein agrees to pay for the ad in full.

ONE PROOF PER AD PLEASE.

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR • 18 Yrs. EXPERIENCE • QUALITY WORKMANSHIP 2 YR GUARANTEE • ON TIME! ON BUDGET! • STIPPLE REPAIRS • AIRLESS SPRAYING • Free Written Estimates • No Charge for Minor Preparation Date • Free Upgrade to ‘Lifemaster’ Top-Line Paint

313785-0212

723-1862

www.axcellpainting.com

steph From page 7

It was something that never occurred during my career, but I was nearly moved to tears by the sincerity of the gesture. Admittedly, I was a little embarrassed at the attention, as the spotlight is never supposed to be shone on the reporter by the subject of the story. However, it served as a reminder, not just to myself but for everyone else in the room, that being a reporter is truly a public service and not just a job – that real people with real

380152-1201

PAINTING IssUE DATE: JUNE 8

advertising material needs approval

Painting

Please verify and return this proof with any corrections.   Failure to return proof with any changes PRIOR to the PROOF DEADlINE  

JUNK REMOVAL

ADVERTISING MATERIAL NEEDS APPROVAL

PLEASE FAX BACK A.S.A.P. WITH ANY CORRECTIONS TO

CALL TODAY! 613.869.7886

All types

unconditional acceptance of the ad by the client, and the client herein agrees to pay for the ad in full. painting interior

IMMEDIATE ATTENTION REQUIRED

Signature

FREE SCOTCH GUARD

20 years experience (Monday 5:00 pm on the week of publication) , shall be deemed by Ottawa News as an  of plastering

PAINTING

West: ROB

Tony Garcia 613-237-8902

*Limited time offer

JUNK REMOVAL

license #7005601

(613) 627-1034 1034

• Tune-ups and Troubleshooting • Virus, Trojan, Spyware Elimination & Protection • Restoring Systems • Networking • One-on-One Tutoring

IMMEDIATE ATTENTION REQUIRED  

ElEctricsolutions ELECTRIC SOLUTIONS Father/Son-in-law Father/Son-in-law DROPPING RATES To Build Clientele Licensed Electricians • 40 Years Experience Knowledge of All Electrical Matters Accepting Small or Largee FREE Jobs to Build Our Name ESTIMATE S Many References

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“Whirlpool & Maytag Authorized” “Maytag Authorized”

ServiceS We Offer:

problems and concerns are the focus of our work, and that exposing them to the generosity of their own community can be rewarding to everyone involved, including ourselves. To everyone who took the time to answer my questions over the past two years, and to all those who treated me like part of the community, thank you. It was a pleasure to serve the communities of Nepean and Barrhaven, and the warmth and generosity exuded by the residents I met was the best payment I could have received.

ONE PROOF PER AD PlEAsE. Bin We Remove Rentals Available

Almost Anything from Anywhere!

exterior residential & commercial

1215.38019

s r

Foundation CraCks WindoW Well drainage WeePing tile

152560

• REPAIRS TO GAS & ELECTRIC APPLIANCES • OVER 25 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE • GOVERNMENT CERTIFIED • LICENSED GAS FITTER • SENIOR DISCOUNTS

CARPET CLEANING

352778-0210

APPLIANCE & REFRIGERATION

613-688-1483

CARPET CLEANING CL

COMPUTER HOUSE CALLS

267688/0327

Your Community Newspaper 0105.380528

DEADLINES:

signature                                                                                                   Date

free estimates

PlEAsE FAX bAck A.s.A.P. wITh ANy cORREcTIONs TO  723-1862

613-825-0707

15% Winter Discount

2 year warranty on workmanship

613-733-6336

CALL SHARON AT 613-688-1483 or email srussell@thenewsemc.ca Fax: 613-723-1862

Read Online at www.emconline.ca Booking Deadline Friday 11:00 AM

Vitamin D might help fight symptoms of depression Special to the EMC

EMC News - People experiencing the blues, feelings of depression and other mood disorders might be able to use vitamin D to alleviate symptoms of depression. New studies point to low blood levels of vitamin D as a culprit in depression. Simply increasing these levels offers marked improvement. A study conducted by VU University Medical Center

in Amsterdam found that low levels of vitamin D may be linked to depression and other psychiatric illnesses. The Amsterdam research, which tracked over 1,200 people aged 65 to 95, showed that blood vitamin D levels were 14 percent lower in individuals with major and minor depression compared with non-depressed participants. A study in the United States indicated that vitamin

and maintenance of strong bones. It has also recently been discovered to be of crucial importance to several aspects of overall health. Being deficient in vitamin D has been linked to a number of disorders, including cancer, autoimmune disease, diabetes, and now depression. Vitamin D, also known as the “sunshine vitamin,” is one of the few vitamins the body can produce.

D deficiency occurred more often in certain people, including African-Americans, city dwellers, the obese, and those suffering from depression. People with vitamin D levels below 20 ng/mL had an 85 percent increased risk of depression compared to those with vitamin D levels greater than 30 ng/mL. Vitamin D has long been recognized as a nutrient essential to the development

4

# JUNIOR A HOCKEY

Come join us at the

Navan Arena

UP-COMING HOME GAMES Sun Jan 8th @3:00pm versus Ottawa Jr Senators. Sun Jan 15th @3:00pm versus Brockville Braves.

1295 Colonial Road

STATS

Games Played: Goals: Assists: Total Points: Penalty Minutes:

http://www.cumberlandgrads.com

29 5 15 20 22 mins

Kevin Lough Position: Defence

Hometown: Ottawa, Ontario Birth Date: March 4, 1992 Height: 5’ 11”

Weight: 180 lbs 0105.380645

EMC - Thursday, January 5, 2012 15


9”L X 21.5”H

Do you sometimes suffer from vaginal yeast infections?

STAR PRODUCTS S DE LA SEMAINE E T T E D E V OS WEEKLY

Several women are familiar with the discomfort caused by vaginal yeast infections (vaginitis), having suffered about at least once in their lifetime. Women in their child bearing years are especially at risk of this type of infection. Symptoms include: vulvar itching, white vaginal discharge, pain, irritation and burning sensation. Certain factors may cause a chemical imbalance leading to the onset of a vaginal yeast infection such as, taking antibiotics, menstruation, pregnancy, diabetes, certain products that can be irritating to the skin, etc. This imbalance leads to the proliferation of a fungus called Candida Albicans, which is usually the cause of the infection. If you think you are suffering from a vaginal yeast infection, here are a few tips: Do not begin treatment of the vaginal yeast infection on your own, unless a doctor has confirmed the diagnosis in the past and you recognize the symptoms which characterize this type of infection; Try to identify the cause of the infection, if there is one, and find a solution to avoid recurring infections; The use of an antifungal cream such as MONISTAT®, is a quick and effective way of treating a yeast infection. Several over the counter products are available to treat yeast infections gently and easily, be it in ovule form, a fast-melting suppository or a cream; Always talk to your pharmacist when choosing an antifungal product and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for optimal effectiveness.

N

ea. ch.

ARCTIC POWER

Liquid laundry detergent Détersif liquide 32 loads 32 brassées 1,47 L

3

PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

• LADY SPEED STICK • SPEED STICK

5

3$ 6

Bathroom tissue Papier hygiénique 8 double rolls /rouleaux doubles

3

UNITS PER CUSTOMER UNITÉS PAR CLIENT

• CLAIROL L’IMAGE

Shampoo or conditioner Shampooing ou revitalisant, 700 ml

4

UNITS PER CUSTOMER UNITÉS PAR CLIENT

99 ea. ch.

30

PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

ORAL-B

• Toothbrush/brosse à dents • Dental floss/soie dentaire

CREST

Toothpaste /dentifrice Selected products/produits sélectionnés

4$ for pour

Vendredi, samedi et dimanche 6, 7 et 8 janvier 2012

20X

RABAIS DE

3

+5

5

% OFF

with the purchase of $30 or more

of

Details/détails p. 4

digital prints photos numériques

ALWAYS

■ 4ÈME: AF ❏ 3ÈME: FVG

NESTLÉ

Good Start /Bon Départ Oméga 3 & 6 Powder/poudre 640 g, 730 g

PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

3

99

3

PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

23

99

DURACELL

❏ 2ÈME: LB ❏ PLANIPUB : MT ❏ 1ÈRE épreuve : GV

5

2

16

w

EMC - Thursday, January 5, 2012

120105_PJC_p3.indd 1

1

99 per pack l’emb.

Valid from JANUARY 6 to 12, 2012 En vigueur du 6 au 12 JANVIER 2012

w

w

.

NEW! NOUVEAU !

PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

j

FRI./VEN.

6

e

60 different files and more of the same size 60 fichiers différents ou plus de même format.

29

Now with your Mac OS X 10.5 and following models. *Approximate sizes. Excluding instant prints from the digital printing kiosk and those from the Jean Coutu application for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. Price valid in store and at www.jeancoutu.com Some restrictions apply. Details in store./Maintenant à partir de votre Mac OS X 10.5* et plus. *Dimensions approximatives. Excluant les impressions instantanées au kiosque d’impression numérique et celles de l’application Jean Coutu pour iPhone, iPod Touch et iPad. Prix en vigueur en succursale et au www.jeancoutu.com. Certaines restrictions s’appliquent. Détails en succursale.

ea. ch.

SAT./SAM.

7

a

CirCulaires Complètes toujours disponibles en suCCursales

4x6*

Soft drink Boisson gazeuse 2L

per pack l’emb.

Complete flyer always available in store

ea. ch.

• PEPSI • SEVEN-UP

Coppertop Alkaline batteries Piles alcalines AA x 8, AAA x 4 C x 4, D x 4, 9v x 2

3

COSMETIC products

à l’achat de 30$ ou plus de produits COSMÉTIQUES

Infinity Feminine pads Serviettes hygiéniques

3

per pack l’emb.

Friday, Saturday and Sunday, January 6, 7 and 8, 2012

Selected skin care and make-up products Produits de soins et de maquillage sélectionnés

• HERBAL ESSENCES

PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

MARCELLE

Custom color Création couleur Haircolour gel Gel colorant

3 8

3

CHARMIN

99

www.jeancoutu.com/photo SUN./DIM.

8

n

MON./LUN.

9

c

TUE./MAR.

10

o

WED./MER.

11

u

NO S

Now with your Mac OS X 10.5 and following models. *Approximate sizes. Excluding instant prints from the digital printing kiosk and those from the Jean Coutu application for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. Price valid in store and at www.jeancoutu.com Some restrictions apply. Details in store. Maintenant à partir de votre Mac OS X 10.5* et plus. Dimensions approximatives. Excluant les impressions instantanées au kiosque d’impression numérique et celles de l’application Jean Coutu pour iPhone, iPod Touch et iPad Jean Coutu. Prix en vigueur en succursale et au www.jeancoutu.com. Certaines restrictions s’appliquent. Détails en succursale.

THU./JEU.

12

t

STAR PRODUCTS 2701 st. joseph WEEKLY blvd E D VE TTES orleans, on K1C 1G4 ph: 613-837-8689 fax: 613-837-6087

ONT.

u

Bathroom tissue Papier hygiénique Double rolls Rouleaux doubles, 24

3

PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

Gluten free 11-12-14 8:29 Sans PM gluten

DE LA SEMA INE

NEW! NOUVEAU !

www.jeancoutu.com/photo

P. 3 ONT

for pour

11”L X 21.5”H

Selected deodorants Déodorants sélectionnés

Super offer! Super offre !

DOVE

Anti-perspirant Antisudorifique 74 g

9

99.

CURTIS DVD player

with progressive scanning Compact format

Lecteur DVD

avec balayage progressif Format compact

3

PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

19

c 99 o

DEGREE

Selected deodorants Déodorants sélectionnés

2$

m

for pour

Q-TIPS

Cotton swabs Cotons-tiges 400-pack Emballage de 400

4

5

UNITS PER CUSTOMER UNITÉS PAR CLIENTS

0105.380324

3

49


Jan 5, 2012