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Inside NEWS

An advocacy group wants the city to act quickly to protect area ash trees from the deadly emerald ash borer. – Page 5

CITY HALL FEATURE

Metroland reporters explore the perils of commuting on a bike in the second week of our Cycling the Capital series. – Page 7

COMMUNITY

The second annual Manotick Soapbox Derby is on a roll. New this year, three sponsored carts are available. – Page 9

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Last minute options added to Manotick water main study Community leader says one could open door to box store development Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

EMC news – A last minute change to Manotick’s proposed water main study could spell disaster for the village, said Klaus Beltzner, president of the Manotick Village Community Association. Two new alignment options have been added to the project’s environmental assessment, one of which travels along Spratt Road from Earl Armstrong Road to Mitch Owens Road, with sub-options breaking off at Bridge Street. If the city moves ahead with the Spratt Road route it could open the door to expansion of the village boundary and approval of Trinity Development Group’s longstanding plan to build a box store plaza in that area, said Beltzner. “The provincial policy statement that says if you have services you need to use them. So that will lead to the acceptance of the village boundary going across the river and then they can build their shopping plaza,� Beltzner said. Consultant group Morrison Hershfield Ltd is currently conducting the environmental assessment for a water main that would provide more access to the central water system through Manotick’s core and in the village’s Minto development. Along with the Spratt Road option, the city has also added a possible alignment along Long Island Road, with suboptions turning west along Bridge Street or continuing down Van Vliet Road. Beltzner said the Spratt Road option may seem the

better choice for the community as there would be less impact on traffic, but in reality it sets the stage for big-box development. Originally the study area only included alignment options along River Road, all beginning at Earl Armstrong Road and heading south before breaking off at Bridge Street. This proposed study area was open to public comment until July 31. However at a July 25 meeting the city’s technical advisory committee suggested other options be considered, according to city engineer John Bougadis. “This is a provincial environmental assessment process and it requires thorough examination of all possible options,� he said in an email statement. It was not clear why the options were not included at the beginning of the study. Although the consultation period has officially closed, Bougadis said information about the updated project will be posted at www.ottawa.ca/ manotickwater “in the near future� and residents will be able to comment. Those who have already commented will be emailed the new information. An open house will be held in the fall “once a preferred alternative has been identified,� Bougadis said. COMMUNITY BENEFIT

Beltzner said the Long Island Road option could become an incredible coup for the village. See LONG, page 2

Emma Jackson

The magic of youth Fourteen-year-old magician Gabe Roberge will take the stage both weekends at Midway Magic at the Rideau Carleton Raceway this August, beginning Saturday, Aug. 18. It’s the teenager’s biggest gig ever, and he’ll share the stage with well-known illusiionists like hypnotist Fernandez and Ottawa magician Ian Quick. It’s also the second annual event’s first year at the raceway. For the full story, see page 5.

Greely Players bursary supports performing art students Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

EMC news – Two burgeoning young performers will head to school with 1,000 extra dollars in their pockets, thanks to the Greely Players theatre group. Greely actress Stephanie La Rochelle and Carp clarinet player Natalie Hart both received the amateur theatre group’s annual bursary this summer. Every year, the Greely Players gives bursaries to young performers who will study their craft at a post-secondary institution that fall. Bursary size depends on how many applicants there are,

and how successful the spring production was. Last year, there were eight recipients who each received $500. This year, the young women will get at least $1,000, although group director Anne Peterson said the amount could go up. Hart is a graduate of Canterbury Arts High School’s music program, and is a clarinet player for the Greely Players pit orchestra. She is also active in area orchestras including the Ottawa Youth Orchestra. She will start her Bachelor of music in clarinet at Indiana University this September.

La Rochelle, 17, graduated from St. Mark High School in Manotick this June and is heading to Sheridan College’s performing arts preparation program – that is, unless she is named one of the top 10 competitors vying for the role of Dorothy in CBC’s voter-based talent show, Over the Rainbow airing this September. The show is similar to Canadian Idol, but pits young actresses against each other for the chance to play the lead role in Mirvish’s December production of Wizard of Oz in Toronto. See YOUNG, page 2

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Young actress grateful for theatre’s support Continued from front

La Rochelle is already in the top 20, and is currently attending Dorothy Boot Camp in Toronto. La Rochelle said she couldn’t have done it without the Greely Players. “My love for musical theatre sparked through the Greely Players and I wouldn’t be where I am today...without them,� she said in an email.

“It’s been great hands-on experience of the theatre world, which I aspire to be part of.� She said the bursary is a big help – for her and those who will follow in her footsteps. “It will be of great help towards the payment of my tuition and I think it’s great that they are giving back to the community and helping out students who share their pas-

sion for the theatre arts,� she said. Since 1998, The Greely Players have awarded bursaries to 35 students.

Submitted

Stephanie La Rochelle and Natalie Hart received bursaries from the Greely Players this summer.

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The addition of two possible routes along the road, which runs north-south through the middle of Long Island, could provide an opportunity for cost savings and community beneďŹ t, Beltzner said. Aside from providing potential water hook-ups for the nearby residents, the alignment would also provide an opportunity to combine several city projects together, saving money for the city and inconvenience for area residents, he said. Sometime in the future, Long Island Road is scheduled to be repaved. There are also plans to connect either Van Vliet or South River Drive to Long Island Road beginning

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this fall. If the water main project is aligned along the proposed Long Island/Van Vliet route, all of these projects can be accomplished at once, Beltzner said. The city’s savings could then be used to install sidewalks along Long Island and Van Vliet. “Unfortunately water projects and road projects don’t always go together, but I think in this case it should be a must so we can save money to build the sidewalks which we have no money for,� Beltzner said. Rideau-Goulbourn Coun. Scott Moffatt could not be reached for comment by press time.

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NEWS

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Taste of Manotick offers the flavour of village life Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

“We’re really anticipating this event to grow into something big.� DONNA COOPER, MANOTICK BIA

Cooper said the event is meant to bring residents and visitors out for a “positive experienceâ€? that promotes the village core and creates return shoppers. The idea was born in 2009 when Manotick Main was closed for construction while the water main and sewers were being installed. “The main street was closed and we looked at it as a real opportunity to close the street to have a party. We have a traditional main street, so let’s use it,â€? Cooper said. The following year, the BIA held its ďŹ rst Taste of Manotick with enormous success. Cooper said she hopes that success will continue and allow the event to expand. “We’re really anticipating this event to grow into something big for Manotick,â€? she said. She is in the process of having the event designated an ofďŹ cial festival in Ottawa, which will likely take effect next year. For more information visit www.manotickvillage.ca.

Laura Mueller

Canada’s sweetheart Ottawa’s most decorated athlete, Barbara Ann Scott-King, was joined by Mayor Jim Watson and others to officially open the Barbara Ann Scott Gallery at city hall on Aug. 9. Sandy Hill native Scott-King became the only person to hold the European, North American, Canadian and World championship titles and the Olympic gold simultaneously in 1948. The new gallery on city hall’s first floor features memorabilia from her beginnings with the Minto Figure Skating Club to her ascent to world champion. R0011553827

EMC news – Manotick businesses will offer a sample of the village this weekend with the third-annual Taste of Manotick on Saturday, Aug. 18. From 4 to 9 p.m., Manotick Main Street will close to trafďŹ c while opening up a world of avours, samples and shopping opportunities for visitors. Buskers will juggle between the stalls and patios, and for the ďŹ rst time since the event began in 2010, local bands including the Paper Boys and Tequila will entertain at either end of the festival. “That’s an addition that we’re very excited about,â€? said Manotick Business Improvement Area director Donna Cooper. The road will be closed between Bridge Street and Currier Street, and businesses from across the village will set up booths to showcase their wares, offer samples and talk to new customers. Restaurants will offer special deals, although their samples will not be free this year in an effort to tackle long lines. Manotick Village Butcher owner James Watt has participated in the event since the ďŹ rst year, and said it’s a great way for people to discover all that Manotick has to offer. “It brings a lot of people into Manotick, which is very, very good. People don’t realize what all is in Manotick,â€? he said. As a local resident, he said it’s surprisingly easy to shop locally. “When I need stuff I stay in town. Shopping at small

businesses, you get really good customer service that you’re not going to ďŹ nd at box stores.â€? Since the butcher shop is not technically a restaurant, it will be barbecuing a number of free samples like sausages, sliders and other items, all made using local meat.

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

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NEWS

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Midway Magic travelling to south Ottawa this August Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

EMC news – While the real SuperEx rides its logistical rollercoaster to secure a new home, World’s Finest Shows is bringing a little magic to the nearby Rideau Carleton Raceway this month.

Beginning Thursday, Aug. 16, the raceway’s grassy grounds will be transformed into a wonderland of rides, games and shows to keep the whole family entertained over two weekends until Sunday, Aug. 26. The event is sponsored by

the Central Canada Exhibition Association, which ran SuperEx at Lansdowne Park for more than 120 years until 2010, after which it was cancelled due to the historic site’s redevelopment. SuperEx’s midway provider, World’s Finest Shows,

created last year’s first Midway Magic event to tide families over while SuperEx is on hold. It was hosted at the Ottawa Baseball Stadium in the city’s east end. Joe Pavia, Ottawa representative for World’s Finest Shows, said this year the baseball team didn’t have its lease finalized with the city before World’s Finest Shows needed to decide on a venue, so they went with the raceway. “When we had to make decisions it just wasn’t timely,” he said. While the Rideau Carleton Raceway is not as central as the baseball stadium, Pavia said the venue has some noticeable perks. “The raceway has something we always love to have: it has real grass. And if you’re bringing a family it’s nice to not be on pavement,” he said. He added that the raceway is better equipped with services like water and power. While World’s Finest Shows knew its event was magical last year, this year the organizers have made it more official with a roster of magicians, illusionists and hypnotists taking the stage over the two-weekend fair. Popular hypnotist Fernandez is the star, and will offer his “hypnotic comedy” at 4 and 8 p.m. each day on weekends. Ottawa magician Ian Quick will also offer two shows each day on the weekend, which are “filled with laughs, thrills and jaw-dropping effects,” according to the Midway Magic press release. But it’s Quick’s understudy, 14-year-old Gabe Roberge, that visitors should watch for. The young Sandy Hill magician will perform twice a day on weekends at the biggest gig of his short career. “I’ve never been asked to do this many shows for one

Emma Jackson

Sandy Hill magician Gabe Roberge, 14, will mystify audiences at Midway Magic this August. person, so I’m very excited about that,” said Roberge, who will begin Canterbury High School’s drama program this September. Since he was about four years old, Roberge has lived and breathed magic. His small bedroom is crammed with hundreds of gags, props and books that have made him the magician he is today. His decks of cards alone occupy a four-drawer desktop organizer, sorted into dozens of rows of red and blue decks just waiting to fascinate his next audience. “Magic is everything,” he said. “I spend 24/7 thinking about it, working on it, practicing, trying to find new stuff to add to my show.” His Midway Magic shows will offer family-oriented magic and comedy, where he’ll invite kids on stage to participate in his tricks. He’ll make a two-litre bottle of pop appear out of nowhere, and pull a roll of toilet

paper out of his mouth to get people laughing. “That’s probably the hardest thing for me...just getting people laughing, to all join in and have a good time,” he said. Nixing the traditional cape, top hat and wand for a more casually colourful attire, Roberge considers himself a “modern magician” who combines comedy with fresh magic that will leave his audience awestruck. “I try to keep it away from pulling a rabbit out of a hat and pulling a quarter from a kid’s ear. I try to keep it fresh so people are always interested in what’s happening next,” he said. Roberge will perform twice every Saturday and Sunday during the fair, which runs Thursday, Aug. 16 to Sunday, Aug. 19 and Thursday, Aug. 23 to Sunday, Aug. 26. For complete details and programming schedules visit www.midwaymagic.ca.

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Your Community Newspaper

Too little, too late? Group worries that city’s extra emerald ash borer funding won’t be used in time Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - A local group is urging the city – and fellow residents – to act now before it’s too late to protect ash trees from insect devastation. The city recently pledged an additional $1 million to combat the emerald ash borer, a type of beetle that is killing trees across the city. But that $1 million is going to go to waste if the city doesn’t act soon, according to the Greenspace Alliance. The advocacy group is pushing the city to earmark at least 75 per cent of the new funding towards TreeAzin injections that can protect ash trees from the effects of the EAB for about two years. That amount of money could save an additional 3,000 trees in Ottawa that would otherwise die and have to be chopped down. However, injections must be done before Aug. 31 to be effective, according to Paul Bolan, vice president and operations manager at BioForest Technologies, the company that produces TreeAzin in Canada. But since making the funding announcement on July 8, the city has been

mum on what exactly it plans to do with the money, said Sol Shuster, chairman of the Greenbelt Alliance’s emerald ash borer working group, in a statement. The city has told the group it will announce plans for the money sometime in August, but that leads Shuster to worry the money will mostly be used to cut down and dispose of infected ash trees, instead of trying to save them before September. City staff have the authority to decide how the money for the emerald ash borer strategy is spent, said city spokeswoman Nikki Eaton. But the city refused to provide any detail or breakdown of how the money is being spent, other than that the money allows for an “enhanced plan that includes additional measures.” “There is currently no solid breakdown to provide,” Eaton wrote in an email. “The key is that staff doesn’t need to come back to the (environment) committee with a plan before they spend the additional funds. The extra money is going to be incorporated into the existing emerald ash borer strategy which includes both tree planting and tree injections.”

The city’s forestry department will present to environment committee and council at a later date, likely in the fall, to report how it spent the money, Eaton wrote. There are 10 tree-care companies in Ottawa that can provide TreeAzin treatments and the city could still make an impact through treating trees if it adds more of those contractors to its approved list and sends them all to work in the last few weeks of August. If it’s not done, thousands of city ash trees will be dead by spring, Shuster said. SAVE A TREE

File

Thousands of ash trees have already been cut down across the city to fight the emerald ash borer infestation. erald ash borer, according to Meg Sears, another member of the Greenbelt Alliance ash borer working group. Prolonging the lives of significant but infected ash trees could allow another treatment to be used once it is discovered.

Saving trees has many benefits, according to the Greenspace Alliance. Mature trees provide habitats for wildlife, improve air quality, provide cooling shade to reduce energy costs and boost property values.

The Greenspace Alliance has set up a website with information about the emerald ash borer at saveourashtrees. ca. There is also information on ottawa.ca, which can be found by searching for “emerald ash borer.”

Residents can step in to save a tree, too. The city is allowing citizens to pay for TreeAzin treatments for cityowned trees infected with the emerald ash borer. It costs about $250 per tree to treat with TreeAzin. That treatment is good for two years and experts believe that treatments can be discontinued after six to 10 years. There are also other treatments on the horizon, such as introducing a small, stingless parasitoid wasp, or a fungal pathogen that can kill the em-

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Manotick Brass offers royal salute Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

“patriotic music� like The Maple Leaf Forever and Rule Britannia. Dickinson Square will be decked out for a Diamond Jubilee party and old-fashioned ice cream will be served. The concert will be part of weekend-long activities at Dickinson House, organized by the Rideau Township Historical Society and Watson’s Mill. The event will highlight domestic skills including butter making, laundry, quilting, and ladies’ fancywork. Guided tours of Dickinson House will be available before and after the Diamond Jubilee concert. The demonstrations will focus on life in the 1880s in keeping with the Dickinson

House interpretations, but an outdoor concert – no matter what queen it’s celebrating – still ďŹ ts the theme. “Entertainment wasn’t from a box, it wasn’t from an iPod. It was from the community itself. They had these Sunday gatherings,â€? said Watson’s Mill education ofďŹ cer Cam Trueman, who has been collaborating with the Rideau Township Historical Society to plan the event. While the event is free, Luce said the band will accept any donations toward their trip to the British Channel Islands in September, where the quintet will perform at local churches and other venues and will also take its children’s program to several primary schools. Trueman said this is a per-

Submitted

The Manotick Brass Ensemble will perform a speciallycommissioned piece to celebrate the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee on Sunday, Aug. 19. fect opportunity to see the Manotick Brass before they leave on their trip, adding that it’s also a great example of three local organizations collaborating to create a fun community event. “It’s just bringing more attention to the square to show people there’s more going on. We really want to try and

promote the village as a nice place to spend an afternoon,� he said. For more information about the Manotick Brass Ensemble visit www.manotickbrass. com. For information on Dickinson House, visit www.rideautownshiphistory.org/dickinsonhouse.

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“Worship the Lord in the Beauty of his holiness...�

429 Parkdale at Gladstone Ministers Rev. Dr. Anthony Bailey Barbara Faught - Pastoral Care Melodee Lovering - Youth and Children Worship Service - 10:30 am 613-728-8656 Sunday School for all ages pdale@trytel.com www.parkdaleunitedchurch.ca Nursery Available

Our Saviour Lutheran Church

Come & worship with us Sundays at 10:00am Fellowship & Sunday School after the service

Dominion-Chalmers United Church 355 Cooper Street at O’Connor 613-235-5143 www.dc-church.org

Heb. 13:8 “Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and today, and forever

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Sunday Services: 9am Thursday Eucharist: 10am Nearly New Shop Closed July and August 8 Withrow Avenue 613-224-7178

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613-722-1144 Parkdale United Church

Heaven’s Gate Chapel Tel: (613) 276-5481; (613) 440-5481 1893 Baseline Rd., Ottawa (2nd Floor) Sunday Service 10.30am – 12.30pm Bible study / Night Vigil: Friday 10.00pm – 1.00am Website: heavensgateottawa.org E-mail: heavensgatechapel@yahoo.ca

613.247.8676

(Do not mail the school please)

Worship 10:30 Sundays

The Redeemed Christian Church of God

St. Richard’s Anglican Church

Celebrating 14 years in this area!

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Pleasant Park Baptist

Watch & Pray Ministry Ç˘Č–Ĺ˜_É´ǢsNjɚÞOsÇŁ Çź ˨ŸNjË Ë Ĺ?

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

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2203 Alta Vista Drive

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Rideau Park United Church

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EMC entertainment – Manotick’s historic square will become a vision of oldtime exuberance on Sunday, Aug. 19, as Dickinson House celebrates the Diamond Jubilee with a special concert by the Manotick Brass Ensemble. The brass quintet, led by Martin Luce, will debut a new work commissioned especially for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. The piece was arranged by Ottawa composer E.F. Lloyd Hiscock based on Antoine Dessane’s wind ensemble piece written in Quebec during the 1860s, likely for St-Jean-Baptiste Day celebrations. A Canadian Royal Salute

combines the popular Quebec folk song Vive la Canadienne with God Save the Queen, essentially linking Anglophone and Francophone cultures together, said Luce. Hiscock incorporates key elements of the original work while expanding on Dessane’s idea. “We discovered this piece and thought it would be a nice piece because it coupled Canada with the Crown,� Luce added. From 2 to 3 p.m. guests can enjoy a one-hour program of Canadian and British music to commemorate the Diamond Jubilee year. Along with the new piece, Luce said the selections will range from the era of Canada’s Confederation up to the present time, focussing on


FEATURE

Your Community Newspaper

Cycling the capital City looks to connect its biking routes Ottawa’s new cycling ‘links’ are making it a leader in connecting cycling facilities Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - By the end of this month, there should be a ramp allowing people to wheel their bike up beside the stairs to get up the hill to cross Hartwell Locks. It’s a small, simple addition, and although it has taken eight years to make it happen, it will allow thousands of cyclists to use the locks to cross the Rideau Canal, particularly during the National Capital Commission’s Sunday Bike Days. It’s just one of thousands of small projects completed each year to tweak conditions to make life easier for cyclists in Ottawa, says Robin Bennett, the city’s project manager of cycling programs. Ottawa’s extensive network of pathways and decent complement of painted bicycle lanes allow the city to boast that it is one of the most bikefriendly cities in the country. But if the city wants to hit its target of 12,000 trips taken by bike in 2021 (there were 4,500 in 2001), it needs to link those cycling routes together. Things like the new “bike box” at the north end of Bay Street at Wellington Street are the type of thing that really work to connect cycling

Laura Mueller

Innovative cycling fixes like this new ‘bike box’ at Bay Street and Wellington Street are helping put Ottawa out front of other Ontario municipalities when it comes to bicycle infrastructure. routes, said Colin Simpson, a transportation planner at the city and project manager of the Laurier segregated bicycle lane. “It’s a great addition because it supports an important feeder line,” he said. A left turn at busy Wellington Street is the most intimidating part of cycling from Ottawa’s downtown, including the east-west Laurier segregated lane to the Ottawa River pathway and the Portage Bridge to Gatineau. Adding a bike box there to give cyclists the priority to turn left before cars is a way to make all the rest of the city and NCC pathways and lanes

more accessible and easier to use, Simpson said. Segregated lanes are the way of the future, participants heard at the Velo-City bicycle conference in Vancouver this June. They are what make the difference between improving conditions for people who already cycle, and getting new people on the roads, said Simpson, who attended the conference. “We hear from people who are taking up cycling because of this lane,” said Alex deVries, vice president of the local advocacy group, Citizens for Safe Cycling. Unlike segregated lanes,

bike boxes don’t need a trial period or “pilot project,” – they can just be done right away. That’s something Simpson wants to see more of. “We need to go further and do it faster,” he said. CYCLING LEADER

With mysterious and novel things like bike boxes popping up in Ottawa, the city is fast becoming recognized as a leader in cycling infrastructure. Buffered bike lanes on Bay Street are another Ottawa first on Simpson’s list. He wants to make the painted lines of an existing northbound bicycle lane on Bay Street wider by

painting a wider diagonal strip to the left of the bike lane, causing cars to leave more buffer room for cyclists. Another big first will be a grade-separated bicycle track along Churchill Avenue between Byron and Carling. When that road is reconstructed next year, it will have a raised track between the sidewalk and vehicle lanes that will give cyclists a feeling of safety similar to riding on the sidewalk. Being among the first in the province to construct these types of cycling facilities is giving Ottawa the edge in helping plan the provincial rules for cycling infrastructure. The upcoming bike facility guidelines, referred to as Book 18, will be completed by the end of the year, thanks in large part to the efforts of city transportation planner Robert Grimwood. “It puts us in a position to provide input on implementation … It gives us a chance to be leaders,” Grimwood said. “Ottawa has very clearly been the most engaged municipality.” There are 13 municipalities participating in drafting Book 18, which for the first time will include guidelines for how to build bicycle lanes of different styles, bike signals, “crossrides” (intersection crosswalks that cyclists are allowed to bike though) and all manner of infrastructure that could be built for bikes. Book 18 won’t provide hard and fast rules, but Grimwood said the Ontario Traffic Manual, which the document will become part of, is considered the “Bible” of infrastructure planning. “It will be used,” he said.

Battle lines drawn over Ottawa’s bicycle lanes laura mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - Not unlike neighbourhoods rallying against tall buildings, there are groups who say they like bike lanes – just not here. While cyclists can argue that small changes and a few painted lines can make all the difference in getting new cyclists on the road, some counter that maybe that’s not the best idea, and maybe the lanes aren’t making them any safer. Or, perhaps the benefits to a few cyclists don’t outweigh the frustration bicycle lanes might cause for others, such as residents, businesses or motorists. Two such groups are BBRAGFAR (Bay/Bronson Residents Action Group for

Fair Access to the Road) and the Responsible Cycling Coalition (RCC). Both make it their main business to oppose the city’s two-year pilot project testing out a curb-separated bicycle lane on Laurier Avenue West. While both groups are similar in size (around five to eight people) and in their ability to garner media attention, they oppose the bike lane for very different reasons. PARKING

For some residents of Laurier Avenue West, seeing two lines of curbs bisecting the street when they look out their windows is hard to swallow. At the west end of the street, between Lyon and

Bronson, there used to be 69 parking spaces. Now there are none. The city says that section of Centretown now has more parking than before (124 spaces replaced 122), despite the removal of spaces on Laurier, because new street parking was created on adjacent streets. But that’s no comfort for many Laurier residents, who number around 2,000 in several buildings. Their concern is represented by the cumbersomely named BBRAGFAR, a small group that says there are not enough cyclists using the bike lane in their section of the street to warrant leaving the curbs up for another year of the pilot project.

“A service for which we pay taxes was taken away from us for the sake of a few cyclists,” said Norm King, one of BBRAGFAR’s five members. They want the city to keep the segregated lane farther east, but convert it into a “sharrow,” a painted shared car and bike lane, and allow parking over the sharrow markings when it’s not rush hour (Toronto is piloting that idea on College Street). There’s less traffic and therefore less risk of injury to cyclists on those blocks, so there is no need for a segregated lane – parking would be more beneficial, King says. BBRAGFAR also bemoans the lack of consultation before the lanes were put in.

But King admits he did know about the handful of public meetings he could have attended to express his opinion – but he thinks the city had a responsibility to come meet directly with Laurier residents, and no one did. Seeing snow removed from the bike lanes at the same time as the rest of the street – often before sidewalks are cleared – only serves to add to their frustration, King says. There are many elderly or disabled folks residing in the area, and the alternate loading and drop off zones don’t serve them as well as the parking spaces they grew accustomed to enjoying. See BIKE, page 12

Cycling snafus

Cutting across 400-series highway on-ramps to continue straight on a road or bike lane is a daunting risk for cyclists.

Cycling lanes that disappear or appear out of nowhere, like this one in the middle of O’Connor Street, create collision potential.

Sharrow markings in lanes that aren’t wide enough for both bikes and cars, like at Laurier and Elgin, create risk.

Debris or crumbling asphalt in a bike lane or near the curb can force cyclists into the traffic lane For more or to report an issue: ottawabikingproblems.ca

What routes do you use for your commute? Tell us your cycling experiences at: www.yourottawaregion.com Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

7


OPINION

Your Community Newspaper

EDITORIAL

Drought comes with a price for everyone

Y

ear after year we are seeing less predictable weather. It’s costing the farmers dearly this year and the dry times will cost us all over the coming months and years. Adapting our actions to deal with climate change is a simpler task than adapting our lives to deal with weather that can damage our economy. The price we pay for fruits and vegetables will be the

first effect felt by consumers. If dry weather becomes the new normal, some produce may not be available at all or the season will be shorter. Because local corn and hay feeds cows but is in short supply, farmers across much of Canada and the central United States will likely be forced to sell off beef cattle. There could be a glut and prices might drop in the short term which could be followed by a spike.

Unpredictable weather may mean unpredictable beef prices. Beyond the food on our tables, there will be other, less obvious effects if dry, hot weather becomes the norm. At Pinto Valley Ranch in Fitzroy Harbour, the owners plan to sell nearly half their horses because feeding them hay at current prices isn’t possible. That will mean reduced opportunities for Ottawa kids to try riding,

which in turn will almost certainly mean fewer riders for the equestrian industry in the future. If watering bans become the new normal, backyard gardens and community allotment gardens won’t be able to provide as much food for city folk. That in turn increases demand for imported foods. If we’re forced to stop watering lawns, they will die and homeowners will have to invest in drought resistant

plants or pave the front yard. Golf courses are suffering and the cost of installing irrigation systems could be the difference between staying in business or shutting down for some course owners. The sports fields used by children and adults are in rough shape because of the dry weather. When the quality of play drops far enough, we’ll need to add the cost of resodding fields to the property tax bill. All those costs for con-

sumers pale in comparison with the trouble ahead for farmers. Some plants do well in wet weather while others can survive dry times, but what can farmers plant when the weather is completely unpredictable? If our summers are going to be extreme – dry, wet, hot or cold – we will all pay dearly. It makes investment in climate science seem like a good deal.

COLUMN

Protecting our most precious commodity – sleep BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse We recently had one of those Sunday afternoons where our newborn screamed as only a colicky baby can for 15 minutes. In the same quarter of an hour, my six- and seven-yearold boys started wrestling to the death on their bedroom floor, the cat vomited at my feet from the humidity, just as Ottawa received its first significant rainfall in over a month and water started pouring through the living room ceiling. The aftermath was not pretty. No resilience, no problem-solving, no understanding or empathy for the poor cat. To put it simply, we all freaked out. Much of this – or at least our reactions to it – could have been prevented by a good night’s sleep the night before. Unfortunately, with a two-week-old baby on hand, my husband and I had spent the better part of midnight to 5 a.m. rocking or feeding or singing to our crying baby. We were exhausted. I decided that day that I had to take matters in hand. There would be no more five- hour overnight stretches of screaming baby. I vowed that

from 10 p.m. until 6 a.m., I would not leave my bed, and the baby would be by my side, and she would learn to respect the precious commodity of sleep in our household. Who says you can’t sleep train a newborn? At the risk of jinxing a good thing, my method has worked. Little Darling seems to sense that it’s time for bed as soon as the TV goes off, the lullabies go on, the lights go down and we put our jammies on before the last feed of the day. Granted she tends to fall asleep in my arms, me propped upright for most of the night on a collection of cushions and pillows. But you know what? We’re sleeping. We’re sleeping so well, in fact, that I often wake up in a panic because five or six hours have gone by without interruption. I check to make sure Little Darling is still breathing – she is —and then proceed to wake her for a feed. At 6 a.m. I get up, make coffee and open the curtains before waking Little Darling for the day. She doesn’t have an opportunity to cry. She wakes up slowly as I talk to her, change her, tickle her toes and take her to the daytime feeding station in the living room. The boys generally help out with the final part of the daytime announcement by banging out the White Stripes on piano or guitar and then wrestling to the death on the living room floor. It’s only been a week. And you know babies have a tendency to alter their routines just as you get used to things. At the same time, a week is a third of Little Darling’s life. And frankly, at this stage of the game, I’ll celebrate whatever sleep I can get.

Catch up on the latest

D) What are ash borers?

Editorial Policy The Manotick EMC welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at www.yourottawaregion.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to patricia.lonergan@metroland.com , fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to The Manotick EMC, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa, ON, K2E 7L2.

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57 Auriga Drive, Suite 103 Ottawa, ON, K2E 8B2 613-723-5970 Vice President & Regional Publisher: Mike Mount Group Publisher: Duncan Weir Regional General Manager: Peter Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary Regional Managing Editor: Ryland Coyne

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A) Treat the trees even if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an expensive option.

C) Wait until the damage is done and replant trees other than ash.

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THIS WEEKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S POLL QUESTION

How should the city deal with the emerald ash borer infestation?

B) Cut down affected trees and hope the bugs donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t spread further.

Community News

MANOTICK

Web Poll

Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

Last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s question: How often do you use your bicycle to get around town?

A) Every day. My bicycle is my primary mode of transportation. B) Often. I cycle to work every once in a while or recreationally. C) Occasionally. I ride my bike a few times each year, but not frequently. D) Never â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even own I bicycle.

To vote in our web polls, visit us at www.yourottawaregion.com/community/cityofottawa

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PREVIOUS POLL SUMMARY

Due to a technical problem, last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poll question did not appear on our website.

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COMMUNITY

Your Community Newspaper

Ready, set, go... Manotick soapbox derby still open for registration Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

EMC news â&#x20AC;&#x201C; New soapbox racers are invited to challenge the reigning champs at the second-annual soapbox derby in Manotick on Sunday, Aug. 26. The event will send more than 40 riders careening down

Beaverwood Roadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slopes for a chance at being crowned Manotickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soapbox champion. This year, the Manotick Village Community Association has made the event more accessible with three carts made from kits sponsored by the Manotick Lions, Kiwanis

Emma Jackson

Nick Armstrong will ride in one of the sponsored soapbox carts this year, which are being offered for the first time through the Manotick Legion, Kiwanis and Lions.

and Legion which will be available for kids who otherwise may not be able to afford building or buying their own cart. Up to four kids per cart will be accepted to ride in each of the sponsored carts, as the carts race four times between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Osgoode and North Gower resident Nick Armstrong will be driving the Legion cart in at least one race, and said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s excited to try the sport. While the 11-year-old Kars on the Rideau Public School student is used to vehicles with motors â&#x20AC;&#x201C; particularly his dirt bike which he enjoys taking down hills with his father â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Armstrong said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s willing to try â&#x20AC;&#x153;anything with wheels.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like cars and stuff that goes on wheels. My dad and mom told me about it so I wanted to try it,â&#x20AC;? he said. Father Trevor Armstrong said it was Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother Darlene Miller, who lives in Osgoode, who applied for him to ride in the sponsored cart, but he said he thinks itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good way for Nick to get a taste of the event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good way to enter into it, to try it without committing to it. And if he likes it then possibly weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll build one for next year and away we

File

Ten-year-old Kacey Charland took an early lead with seven-year-old Joey Brower close behind at last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soapbox Derby on Sept. 18 at the Manotick annual Picnic in the Park event in Centennial Park. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event will take place on Beaverwood Road on Sunday, Aug. 26. go,â&#x20AC;? he said. Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s younger sister Hannah would also race next year if the family built a cart. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s competition has been expanded to include awards for the best decorated cart and the funniest cart, said organizer Allan Haan. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also an award for the most innovative cart, even if it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t win the race. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re acting on recommendations we received last year,â&#x20AC;? said Haan. The organizing committee

is also improving its detour signage in response to complaints last year. Since Beaverwood had to be blocked off for the ridersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; safety, residents trying to get to the arena were frustrated by the lack of detour information, Haan said. This year the signs will be more frequent and visible, and volunteers will hand out maps to outline the detour into the arena parking lot. Riders can register for the event at www.manotickvca. org. It costs $25 to participate.

The inaugural event in 2011 had 48 riders and Haan said he expects to have about the same number again this year. The derby is part of the community associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual Picnic in the Park, which will take place the same day at Centennial Park beside the arena. The free event features a free barbecue and family events. To apply for a spot on a sponsored cart, contact Haan at derby@manotickvca.org.

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

9


SENIORS

Your Community Newspaper

Ice box brought various wonders for little Mary

I

f it hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been for the ice house and the Barnett ice box grandfather bought, we would not have had a way to keep food from spoiling. But the ice house served another purpose as well, even though we kids were forbidden to use it for anything other than to store ice from the Bonnechere River, and retrieve a block when necessary. It was a retreat on a hot day, but we had to sneak in and sneak out, as we were warned any unnecessary opening of the door would cause the ice to melt. The ice house was always built on the north side of a building, in our case it was the little barn used to house the sheep. It was further shaded too, by two big elm trees on either side, which were probably there more by accident than design. It was made of straight upand-down lumber, which had weathered to black from more than a century of use. There were no windows and the door was narrow and wide enough

MARY COOK Mary Cookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Memories only to allow one body to go in at a time with the iron tongs to retrieve a block of ice when the one in the kitchen had melted down, ďŹ lling the basin under the ice box with water. When the winter was at its coldest, and the river had frozen solid, father would cut huge blocks of ice, pile them on the ďŹ&#x201A;at bottom sleigh, and haul the load to the ice house. He would be at the job for days: drilling, sawing, and stacking the blocks in the ice house in neat rows. Once he had enough that he thought we could survive until the next year, he made many trips to the saw mill for sawdust. Every square inch of ice was covered with the sawdust to protect it from the little bit of summer warmth that penetrated the wood walls.

It was usually Audrey or Everett who were sent for a new block of ice. The ice house was pitchblack inside, and so they worked by feel rather than by seeing what they were doing. When the house was built, a big wood slip lock was made to keep the door secure, and which could be used to open and close the door from either inside or out. That was a great comfort to me, as I was always terriďŹ ed of being locked inside some place and not being able to get out. That door was supposed to be opened only when a block of ice was being taken out. But that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean that was always the case. Although I was much too timid to do this on my own, I

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knew that my brothers would often slip into the ice house and spread out on the top blocks to cool off on a blistering hot summer day. They would wait until father was in a ďŹ eld, and mother was busy in the kitchen, and then they would sneak open the big wood slip lock and put as much ďŹ&#x201A;esh as they could onto the ice. They had to be very careful to rid themselves of any sawdust when they emerged, however. Even a smidgen stuck to their overalls told the story of their adventure in the ice house, and they would be given a lecture on the evils of disobedience. The ice wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t only for the ice box. Mother made big jugs of iced tea, and Audrey would be sent for shards of ice, which would be washed thoroughly in a clean bowl, and then dropped into the tea. We had never heard of ice cubes in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;30â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. For reasons which escaped me at the time, ice for the cold drink was never taken from

the ice box. Then on asking my older, and much wiser sister, why the ice had to come from the ice house and not the ice box, Audrey said â&#x20AC;&#x153;it was fresherâ&#x20AC;?, which made perfect sense to me. We could never afford an ice box. But when grandfather saw the many hardships mother had to endure when she married a back-woods farmer after living so long in a big city, he bought a brand new wood ice box in Renfrew, and as well as keeping our food fresh, it served as a nice piece of furniture for the kitchen. It sat kitty-corner and mother always had a potted plant on the top of it, which at the time, I thought brought a touch of elegance to the kitchen. Since I was the youngest of ďŹ ve, I was given jobs mother thought I was capable of doing. One was emptying the melted ice water from under the ice box. It dripped into a large white porcelain basin and I was always checking it

because it was sure to spill it on the kitchen ďŹ&#x201A;oor. So several times a day, I got down on my belly, and stuck my hand in the basin to see if it was ready to be emptied. In the winter time, the water was poured into the reservoir on the end of the Findlay Oval. Anything we could do to cut down on dragging water from the pump out in the yard when the snow was knee deep, we did it. But in the summer, the water was poured on the garden, or on motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ&#x201A;ower beds. It was no small blessing that I never really appreciated back then; but we had the river, and so we had ice. We had an ice house to store it in, and so were always able to keep our perishables fresh, we had a grandfather who had enough money to buy us an ice box. We had a neighbour who was willing to let us cart away as much sawdust as we needed. We were poor, but in many ways we were blessed. Yes, indeed, we were blessed.

Findlay Creek Medical Centre booming, accepting new patients

REAL ESTA TE STARTER HO M ranch. Grea E. 2-bedroom t location . Just reduced. Call Wendy 555.3210

Brier Dodge brier.dodge@metroland.com

    

EMC news â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Business is booming at Findlay Creek Medical Centre. More than 7,500 patients have registered with family doctors at the privatelyowned clinic since it opened last February. Since then, the clinic has expanded its services, adding an audiologist and a psychologist to its staff, with plans to hire an obstetriciangynecologist in the fall. The clinic is still accepting new patients, with the capacity to bring in up to 20,000 patients, depending on doctorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; preferences. Everyone who has applied for a family doctor at Find-

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room for surgeries that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t require anesthesia, and a lab for registered patients. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being a family clinic, that means not having to wait,â&#x20AC;? Almendrades said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It has that walk-in quality.â&#x20AC;? It also has ďŹ&#x201A;exible hours, operating with several evenings a week and weekend appointments available. When the clinic ďŹ rst opened, it was ďŹ&#x201A;ooded with online registrations and the website couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t handle the trafďŹ c. It has since switched to paper registration, but the clinic is continuing to grow. For more information, the clinic is on Facebook, and its website address is www. ottawamedicalcliniccentre. com.

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lay Creek has been able to register with one of the doctors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still sending out waves of acceptance letters,â&#x20AC;? said assistant director Alejandro Almendrades. He said the clinic is getting calls from all over the city â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and even outside the city limits â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with requests for family doctors. Findlay Creek was chosen as the location for the medical centre because it had one of the largest demands in the city, along with the OrlĂŠans/ Cumberland and Stittsville/ Carp areas. While the clinic does not accept walk-ins, it has urgent-care appointments available for registered patients. They also have a day

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

11


FEATURE

Your Community Newspaper

Bike lanes pit cyclists against cyclists ... and drivers Continued from page 7

It’s difficult for people with mobility concerns to cross over the barriers in the middle of the street, King added. “The use of bicycles isn’t the issue,” King said. “We just don’t want to have the front of our buildings blockaded for no reason.” “Our chair has a bike,” King adds, referring to Janine Hutt, the head of BBRAGFAR. VEHICULAR CYCLISTS

Improving the Integrity of our Immigration System Since the Conservative government came into power in 2006, a key priority has been to improve Canada’s immigration policies to promote legitimate immigration while reducing the abusers of our generous system. I am proud to say that, in the past 6 years, we have made several positive steps forward, especially when it comes to combating fraud. Prior to 2011, the regulation of immigration consultants was not consistent, and there were widespread complaints about some advisors duping clients and stealing their money. To address this issue, our Conservative government has worked hard to pass legislation requiring that immigration consultants be held accountable to the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council. This, along with a global advertising campaign, has greatly reduced the number of people falling victim to crooked consultants. Marriages of convenience have been another threat to the integrity of our immigration system. While some people are duped into marriage fraud, others intend to commit fraud for malicious purposes. To help prevent this in the future, our Conservative government has implemented a restriction on sponsored spouses and partners. Now, they must wait five years from the date they became permanent residents before they can sponsor a new spouse or partner. There are also plans to implement a conditional permanent residence for sponsored spouses and partners, requiring that they live with their sponsor for at least two years or risk losing their status.

For Kanata resident Avery Burdett, there’s a big risk in encouraging inexperienced cyclists to get on the road by offering them a false sense of security in a bike lane – a mirage that’s heightened on Laurier because of the curb separating cyclists from vehicles. Burdett is a founding member of the RCC, and for him, driving (and he is careful to use that word) a bicycle is a simple and time-tested process – it’s just not one that most people bother to educate themselves about. And it’s not a skill that most people are encouraged to learn, he says. He’s what’s referred to as a vehicular cyclist, and following the principles set out by John Forester in Effective Cycling in 1976, he treats his bike like a car on the road. It’s a theory based on

Laura Mueller

Cyclists should learn how to ‘drive’ their bicycles before hitting the road, according to Avery Burdett, a founding member of the Responsible Cycling Coalition. research that shows being a skilled cyclist is the best way to prevent injury or death, Burdett says. He rides with confidence because he knows how to, Burdett says. He has taken the nationally-syndicated Can-Bike training course and he has spent years riding the roads with other cyclists in the Ottawa Bicycle Club. That’s what he thinks everyone else should do before hitting the road. He says the focus on building infrastructure for bicycles

is purely political: “They want to get people out of cars – and it’s not going to work … It has to be recognized that skills will reduce the risk of people getting injured. We’re the thorn in the side of their plans.” Still, Burdett wouldn’t be upset to see more cyclists on the road – as long as they are trained to the exacting standards he holds himself to. “No one who is a committed cyclist would want to discourage people from getting on a bike,” he said.

More recently, the Conservative government has introduced legislation to expedite the removal of foreign criminals from Canada and to enhance the safety and security of all Canadians by making it more difficult for these people to enter the country in the first place. These criminals will have fewer options to appeal and this ensures that they cannot endlessly abuse our system. Finally, we strengthened the value of Canadian citizenship. The Conservative government introduced a first generation limitation to hereditary citizenship, so that citizenship can only be passed on to one generation born outside Canada. This ensures that all citizens of this nation have a true connection to our country. We added the requirement that all applicants demonstrate an adequate knowledge of English or French, as well as an understanding of Canadian values. Citizenship and Immigration Canada is also investigating nearly 7,300 people for fraudulently obtaining their citizenship, revoking their status on a scale like never before. I will continue to fight in Parliament for the rights of legitimate immigrants and new Canadians. We live in the greatest country in the world, and it is important to all Canadians that we continue to work on improving the integrity of our immigration system. Pierre Poilievre MP, Nepean-Carleton

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

He says improvements to roads and intersections could make it easier for people to cycle – but those improvements would also benefit all road users and motorists, he added. ADVOCACY

Cycling advocacy in Ottawa seemed to go through a shift starting about four years ago. That’s when Hans Moor took over as president of Citizens for Safe Cycling (CfSC), and it’s also around the time when the group handed over Can-Bike training courses to be run by the city. “It’s not the same group as it was,” said Burdett, who was once involved with CfSC. “It’s basically an environmental group now.” Moor, who moved to Ottawa from Holland in 1998, says his first decade or so in Ottawa gave him the impression that the people who cycle here are mainly focused on an athletic pursuit. But after he took over the advocacy group, he noticed that there were many cyclists in Ottawa who shared his mindset: that riding a bike is simply an efficient, healthy and safe way to get around. “Our message is a bit more moderate than in the past – it appeals to more people,” Moor said. Moor likens the range of cycling groups to the different types of motorists. That includes everyone from regular commuters to Formula One racecar drivers, he says. “Elite” cycling groups like RCC represent the cycling equivalent of Formula One drivers. CfSC leans more to the average commuter. CfSC doesn’t disagree with everything other groups are saying (Moor also thinks that more money could be spent on cycling education), but he’s reluctant to get into debates with groups that hold an opposing view. In the end, Moor says his impression is that not many decision makers listen to the anti-bike lane or elite vehicular cycling groups. “It doesn’t have much of an impact on where cycling is going in Ottawa.”


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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Animal sanctuary suffering from hay shortage Drought conditions affecting more than farmers’ crops Jessica Cunha jessica.cunha@metroland.com

Jessica Cunha/Metroland

Greenwoods Academy Summer campers Suhana Akhter, Auyona Reza and Natalie Craciun check out alpaca Rico from the Galloping Goat Farm-Constance Creek Wildlife Refuge on Aug. 2.

EMC news - Farmers aren’t the only ones being hit hard during the drought. The Galloping Goat Farm, a sanctuary for abandoned farm animals located in Dunrobin and part of the Constance Creek Wildlife Refuge, is suffering from a hay shortage, said founder Lynne Rowe. Rowe usually purchases small loads of hay every couple of weeks, but with a lack of water comes a shortage in crops. “There’s nothing in the west-end area,” she said, adding her current supply of hay will last about another week. Farmers are selling less hay than usual because they’re unsure if they’ll get a second cut this season, she said. And those with the means are buying the farm food in bulk – something Rowe is unable to do. The farm sanctuary is only able to buy small loads of hay at a time due to financial restrictions. “Hay is our biggest expense,” she said, adding the

farm goes through about 50 bales a week. “It seems like in this region, some people have been buying up all the hay in bulk so it is very hard to find a supplier, especially because finances restrict us from buying huge quantities at a time.” She added that the only advertisements she’s seen for hay are around the Prescott and Cumberland areas, and “many won’t deliver small loads this far.” Rowe is hoping the community can help her raise some much needed funding. “We need to do some fundraising to buy as much hay as possible before winter,” she said. “I’m hoping for help from the community…help spread the word to people who love animals.” Rowe said she will be hosting a garage and bake sale to raise funds for hay on Saturday, Aug. 11, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The farm, located at 2494 Dunrobin Rd., will also be open to the public during that time. “For charities like this to survive, we really need com-

munity support,” she said. Without additional funding, Rowe said she’s worried she won’t be able to feed the many animals who call her farmland home, and is looking at possibly fostering some of her animals out to other farms so “they have hay over the winter.” EDUCATIONAL

The Galloping Goat Farm provides hands-on education to the public through classroom learning, a summer camp and walking tours. The farm hosted a very successful pilot summer camp last month, said Rowe. People can also book tours of the farm, where they can visit with and learn about the various animals. “We give people hands-on experience,” said Rowe, adding students can also fulfill their high school volunteer hours through the farm. Holy Trinity Catholic High School student Celeste Filiatreault, 15, and Elsie Levedev, 15, who studies at Cantebury High School, are just two of the more than 20 volunteers who help out around the farm. “They put in huge amounts of hours,” said Rowe about her volunteers. For more information, visit ccwr.ca/GGF/GGF.html.

PET OF THE WEEK

City seeks submissions for

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Hi, our names are Jaga and Azlan, we are two young Highland Lynx kittens that come from Québec. We look very different although we are brothers, and also bestfriends! Our mission - protect the house from any small intruders! And in the meantime practice on everything, like shadows and small rolling objects. We also have a big brother golden Retriever named Charlie, we all love to play and sleep together, he still doesn’t like to cuddle as much as we do, but it’s a work in progress!


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Desmond Devoy

Lindsay Blewett, left, a sex worker and volunteer with POWER (Prostitutes of Ottawa/Gatineau Work, Educate, Resist) gave a presentation called XXX Workshop: Realities, Issues and Challenges for Service Providers at an event hosted by Lanark County Interval House. POWER chairwoman Emily Symons, right, also spoke at the event.

Survival: the realities of sex work life Desmond Devoy desmond.devoy@metroland.com

EMC news - No little girl wants to grow up to become a sex worker. But when that little girl grows up and has a little girl of her own to feed, she may feel she has no choice to buy food or pay the rent. Having sex to pay for baby formula may not be the most palatable reason why a woman would go into sex work, but it is one of the reasons why Lanark County Interval House brought the issue into

sharp focus at a presentation on the trade in Carleton Place last month. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because we are a rural community we think that sex work does not happen in Lanark County,â&#x20AC;? said Erin LeeTodd, executive director of Interval House. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is absolutely a reality in Lanark Countyâ&#x20AC;Ś We all need to be mindful that it is happening.â&#x20AC;? Lindsay Blewett is a sex worker and a volunteer with POWER (Prostitutes of Ottawa/Gatineau Work, Educate, Resist). She said she hoped

her presentation would give the assembled service providers some insight into her work. Her presentation, entitled XXX Workshop: Realities, Issues and Challenges for Service Providers, was shared at the Carleton Place Canoe Club on June 14. POLICE ISSUES

The POWER presenters expressed frustration with dealing with the Ottawa police. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The police really do not

want to work with us,â&#x20AC;? said Blewett. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We tried to call for a moratorium on street sweeps on hookers. We were rejected.â&#x20AC;? Several years ago, the Ottawa police started a John Letter program, which was sent to johns who had been caught soliciting from prostitutes. But many sex workers did not approve of this method. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The John Letters re-stigmatize workers,â&#x20AC;? said POWER chairwoman Emily Symons. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The letters were not helpful at all. The perception I get from the police force over and over again is, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to work with you.â&#x20AC;? Blewett went further, stating that police assertions that â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re collaborating with sex workers,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; is a total joke. They contacted us once.â&#x20AC;? Insp. Uday Jaswal of the Ottawa police central district said he has met Symons over coffee and that the department has been in contact with them a number of times, both formally and informally. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are able to report bad dates and assaults to police,â&#x20AC;? said Jaswal, who pointed out officers have been assigned â&#x20AC;&#x153;to meet these women where they are atâ&#x20AC;? to better understand the situation. OLDEST PROFESSION

Blewett said she wished she had some insight into the sex worker trade before she entered her profession. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do any research,â&#x20AC;? said Blewett. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just jumped inâ&#x20AC;Ś consequences be

damned.â&#x20AC;? Symons noted that prostitution was the so-called oldest profession for a reason, and that a financial incentive in exchange for sex should not be stigmatized. Other business transactions that involve an intimate relationship of another sort â&#x20AC;&#x201C; think day care â&#x20AC;&#x201C; are seen differently than prostitution. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to give that respect to sex work,â&#x20AC;? said Symons. Lee-Todd said there has been an ongoing debate about whether or not sex work should be considered a form of violence against women within the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shelter community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People will be firmly rooted on either side,â&#x20AC;? Lee-Todd said, with some in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;abolitionistâ&#x20AC;? camp, while others consider it â&#x20AC;&#x153;valuable work.â&#x20AC;? She added itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to open the dialogue and think differently, outside of stereotypes, and have a discussion about a difficult subject. Stefanie Lomatski, executive director of the Ottawa Coalition to End Violence Against Women, said some who work in the trade do so out of necessity, not by choice. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If women do not have enough money to get to the end of the month, they may have to go that route,â&#x20AC;? said Lomatski. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Survival sex is not in that realm of choice or free agency. Not all women are in a position to make a choice.â&#x20AC;? Another stereotype the women sought to dispel was

the issue of safe sex and STDs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sex workers use condoms more so than the general public,â&#x20AC;? said Symons. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our body is our tool to make money.â&#x20AC;? Rob Boyd of the Sandy Hill Community Health Centreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oasis program in downtown Ottawa, agreed that â&#x20AC;&#x153;if you are practicing safer sexâ&#x20AC;Ś there is minimal to no risk.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most (sex workers) would do their best to protect their own health,â&#x20AC;? said Boyd, noting they pick up free condoms at his Ottawa clinic, though he added that some men do pay extra for sex without protection. While medical help for sex workers is an ongoing issue, the women revealed that accessing mental health resources is also a concern for them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My therapist was convinced that I was depressed because I was a sex worker,â&#x20AC;? said Blewett. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything keeps coming back to our work.â&#x20AC;? Boyd said his clinic tries to create a â&#x20AC;&#x153;stigma-free zoneâ&#x20AC;Śto provide a space where people are safe to disclose and they will be respected for who they are. People can talk about what they are doing, even if it is illegal.â&#x20AC;? While a HIV diagnosis has to be reported to the public health authorities, Boydâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clinic goes the extra mile to allow street people and prostitutes feel safe by having a womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clinic one day a week, staffed only by women, allowing only female clients to attend on that day.

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SPORTS

Your Community Newspaper

Eddie Rwema

Fury defender named MVP Ottawa Fury Women defender Kathryn Williamson receives the Most Valuable Player honours from Amanda Duffy, senior director of the W-League on July 29. Williamson was recognized for her outstanding, consistent and reliable force in the finals that saw Ottawa Fury win the championship for the very first time after 13 years.

Metroland partners with 2015 Pan Am and Parapan Am Games Star Media Group and Metroland Media Group, which includes the EMC group of newspapers, announced they have been named the Official Print and Online Media Supplier by the Toronto Organizing Committee for the 2015 Pan American and Parapan American Games (TO2015). As an official sponsor, the Star Media Group and Metroland Media will have exclusive rights as the print and online media supplier for the 2015 Games, which will be held in Toronto and surrounding communities. “It is an honour to be media sponsors for these Games,” said Ian Oliver, president of Metroland Media Group, which includes more than 100 newspapers across Ontario, including such publications as The Hamilton Spectator and the Mississauga News. “We will strive to deliver news relating to the 2015 Games that readers in all of the communities that we serve can use.” “We are delighted to be media sponsors for this major event in Toronto, in Ontario and in Canada,” said John Cruickshank, publisher of the Toronto Star and president of Star Media Group. “Our goal is to provide Canadians from coast to coast with comprehensive, balanced news and in-depth information about the Games.” Star Media Group and Metroland Media Group will provide TO2015 with promotional space in the Toronto Star, Metro, Metroland community newspapers and other publications and online properties, plus value-in-kind alR001154439_0809

16

Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

locations of printing and distribution services related to the 2015 Games. “Star Media Group and Metroland Media are the very definition of engaged, community-rooted media,” said Ian Troop, CEO of TO2015. “Their market leadership, their prominence, their reach, and above all their profound commitment to community-building make them the ideal partner for an ambitious project like Toronto 2015. More than anything else, these will be the People’s Games – an open, accessible celebration, not just of sports and athletic achievement, but of our unparalleled diversity and boundless dynamism. The Star Media Group and Metroland Media walk that talk every day in their media projects. Perfect partners for this important endeavour.” The Pan American Games are one of the world’s largest international multi-sport events, held every four years for athletes of the 41 member nations of the Pan American Sports Organization (PASO). The Games comprise all Olympic Summer Games sports, as well as traditional Pan American sports. The TORONTO 2015 Pan American/Parapan American Games will draw 10,000 athletes and officials and feature 48 sports in municipalities across the Greater Golden Horseshoe area. The TORONTO 2015 Pan American Games will take place July 10-26 and the Parapan American Games Aug. 7-14. For more information about the Games, please visit TORONTO2015.org.

Sunday August 26-Post time 6:30 pm


FOOD

Your Community Newspaper

Making Greek bread is easy with a breadmaker

O

ne of Jeff’s aunts gave me this recipe for Greekstyle bread made in the bread machine. I tried it one day when we were having a light summer supper, and we thoroughly enjoyed the flavour combination of feta cheese, black olives and oregano. The bread is moist and keeps well for a couple of days. We didn’t quite finish the first loaf however before the last couple of slices were starting to get a bit dry. I had cooked a turkey a couple of days before and was making hot turkey sandwiches for supper. I decided to use the last of the Greek bread as the bottom layer for the sandwich since the turkey gravy would help to moisten it. The distinctive flavour of the bread transformed the hot turkey sandwiches into an entirely new and tasty dish. It was so good that I expect I’ll be making this recipe whenever I have leftover tur-

PAT TREW Food ‘n’ Stuff key. This bread is also great for sandwiches. I used it one day for tuna sandwiches, and, like the turkey sandwich, they had an entirely different flavour. The amount given here makes a small loaf, about one pound. The amounts shown in brackets make a larger loaf. Jeff’s aunt recommended using a sweet bread setting on the breadmaker. I’ve also baked this using the dry milk setting when I substituted skim milk powder and water for the milk. The bread turned out fine both ways. You can leave out the black olives, but the bread will be just a bit drier.

GREEK BREAD

• 2/3 cup milk (1 cup) •1 Tbsp. olive oil or vegetable oil (2 Tbsp.) •1/2 tsp. salt (1 tsp. salt) •2 cups flour (3 cups) •1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese (2/3 cup) • 3 Tbsp. black olives, pitted and sliced (1/4 cup) • 2 tsp. sugar (2 tsp.) • 1 tsp. oregano (1 1/2 tsp.) • 1 1/2 tsp. bread machine yeast (1 1/2 tsp.) Place all ingredients in the bread machine in the order given. Follow your machine’s directions for baking. As soon as the bread is done, turn out on a wire rack to cool before cutting.

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17


Your Community Newspaper

COMMERCIAL RENT

CLASSIFIED

FOR SALE

Kemptville, corner of Prescott and Asa, 500 sq. ft. commercial property $500/month. (613)296-3455.

FARM

613259-2723

Hyland Seeds- Corn, soyabeans, forage seed, white beans and cereals. Overseeding available. Phone Greg Knops, (613)658-3358, (613)340-1045, cell.

ALL HARDWOOD Cut, Split, Delivered

GARAGE SALE Garage Sale Sat. Aug.18 @ 50 Dallaire Crescent, Richmond, 8 am to noon. Downsizing....so many things have to go!

FOR SALE Disability Products. Buy and Sell stair lifts, scooters, bath lifts, patient lifts, hospital beds, etc. Call Silver Cross Ottawa (613)231-3549. Firewood- Cut, split and delivered or picked up. Dry seasoned hardwood or softwood from $50/face cord. Phone Greg Knops (613)658-3358, cell (613)340-1045.

HELP WANTED

370778/0216

Two cemetery plots, including interment and base. Capital Memorial Gardens, Nepean. Selling well below current cost. (613)838-8728

HELP WANTED Attention: Do you have 5-15 hours/week? Turn it into $5000/month on your computer. Online training, flexible hours. www.debsminioffice.com

HELP WANTED

Go Get Holdings Inc. has openings for: Assistant Manager for its Thai Garden Buffet Restaurant at 201 Queen Street, Ottawa and Thai Cuisine cooks for its Green Papaya Restaurant at 246 Queen Street, Ottawa, Ontario. Must have at least three years experience and credible credentials related to the above positions. Demonstrable ability to communicate in Thai preferred. Salaries starting at $17.50 and $15.50, respectively. Send resumes to vagobuyan@gmail.com

School Bus Drivers Wanted. 2 School Routes in North Gower, Stittsville Area. Contact Lisa at 613-489-3742.

Home Builder Requires construction Labourers & carpenters. Must have own transportation, please fax resume to (613)523-3547. Looking for persons willing to speak to small groups, 1 on 1 presentations. A car and internet necessary. Diana (866)306-5858.

HELP WANTED

Youths!

Bun’s Bunnies Daycare- A Quality Home Daycare. Nepean (Chapman Mills) www.buns-bunnies.weebly.com. Call us at 613-366-2012.

HELP WANTED

Adults!

MUSIC

Oliver Smith Music- Musical instruction with piano, guitar, bass and theory. 613-233-3458. Located downtown Ottawa off Main and Lees.

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

www.emcclassified.ca

VACATION/COTTAGES

Christie Lake Cottages, cottages still available for August. 613-267-3470. www.christie lakecottages.com

TRAILERS / RV’S VEHICLES COTTAGES FOR RENT White Cedars Tourist Park Constant Lake/Eganville Fully Outfitted Waterfront 2 and 3 bedrooms Cottages. Until Thanksgiving weekend. 613-649-2255 www.whitecedars.com

Seasonal Camping White Cedars Tourist Park Constant Lake/Eganville 2013 Seasonal Sites Available Now Big Lots, 3 Services Great Rate for balance of 2012 Season By Appointment Only 613-649-2255 www.whitecedars.com

2009 Grand Caravan. Sto-ingo. Certified, e-tested. Red. 113,000 kms. $12,900; 1992 Road Trek motorhome. Good condition. Certified, e-tested. $9,500. 613-542-0683.

WANTED Local Gold Buyer. I will meet you & pay cash on the spot for your old gold, silver, platinum. HarryBuysGold@gmail.com

WORK WANTED To give yourselves some extra time allow us to take a grime. Call 613-262-2243, Tatiana.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

AUCTIONS

AUCTIONS

AUCTIONS

UPCOMING AUCTIONS

Seniors!

“Call or email to Book Your Auction Today”

Earn Extra Money!

Friday August 17 & Saturday August 18, 2012 - Real Estate OPEN HOUSE

Keep Your Weekends Free!

Routes Available!

4 Jessie Street, Perth - Auctioneer will be onsite Friday 4-8 PM as well as Saturday From NOON - 3 PM to show this Spacious Executive Style Home. 4 + Bedrooms, Attached 2 Car Garage, Rear enclosed Patio, Owner is Extremely motivated. This Property MUST BE SEEN!

We’re looking for Carriers to deliver our newspaper!

• • • • •

****** Saturday August 18 & Sunday August 19 2012 - Real Estate OPEN HOUSE

Deliver Right In Your Own Neighbourhood Papers Are Dropped Off At Your Door Great Family Activity No Collections Thursday Deliveries

181 Robert Run, Perth - From Perth Take Rideau Ferry Rd. Turn Right On Clifford Cres., & Left on Robert Run, for Don & Trudy Switzer - Auctioneer will be onsite Saturday 4 PM - 8 PM as well as Sunday August 19 Noon - 4 Pm To show this Unique Spacious 3+2 Bedroom Split Level Home - This home has been completely Renovated and is ready to move in. Included with the sale of this real estate are all Appliances, 7 Person Spa located on the back large deck with deeded access to Jebbs Creek which leads to Otty Lake. 2012 Taxes $2798.28

Call Today 613.221.6247 613 .221.6247 Or apply on-line at YourOttawaRegion.com 308527

****** Sunday August 19, 2012 - Consignment Hall Auction. Auction Starts at NOON (Preview from 11am) at our Hall 182 Glenview Road, Smiths Falls (Drummond North Elmsley Twp). Local Estates, Consignments & More! See Web for more info. ****** Tuesday August 28, 2012 - Real Estate Auction. Real Estate sells at 6 p.m. SHARP. 181 Robert Run, Perth (Drummond North Elmsley Twp). Unique Spacious 3+2 Bedroom Split Level Home - This home has been completely Renovated and is ready to move in. Included with the sale of this real estate are all Appliances, 7 Person Spa located on the back large deck with deeded access to Jebbs Creek which leads to Otty Lake. 2012 Taxes $2798.28. ****** Wednesday August 29, 2012 - On Site Auction For Howard & Rosemary Pratt. 345 Glen Tay Side Road, From Perth Turn Right on South Street (turns into Scotch Line Road) and turn Right on Glen Tay Side Road. Auction Starts at 6 PM (Preview from 5 PM). The Pratts have sold their home and are downsizing. Join us in this Clean Short Auction Sale & Expect Surprises the day of the Auction as items are still being sorted in preparation for this sale! Lawn Tractor, Lawn Roller, Garage Related Items, Household Furniture, patio Furniture & Much More!

DAN PETERS AUCTION

Dan Peters CPPA Auctioneer & Certified Appraiser Amanda Todd CPPA Auctioneer & Certified Appraiser (613) 284-8281 or Auction Hall (613) 284-1234 email: info@danpetersauction.com Website: www.danpetersauction.com 18

Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

CL390585_0816

***** Thursday August 30, 2012 - Real Esate Auction. Real Estate sells at 6 p.m. SHARP. 4 Jessie St., Perth. Spacious Executive Style Home. 4 + Bedrooms, Attached 2 Car Garage, Rear enclosed Patio, Owner is Extremely motivated. This Property MUST BE SEEN!


Your Community Newspaper

HELP WANTED

CLASSIFIED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Rural Ottawa South Support Services (ROSSS) is a community support agency funded by the Local Health Integration Network (LHIN), the City of Ottawa, the United Way and others. The agency assists seniors and adults with physical disabilities. ROSSS has an opening for a Finance OfямБcer. Position: Finance OfямБcer Status: Permanent Full Time Reports to: Executive Director, Rural Ottawa Support Services Duties and Responsibilities: Accounting and Financial Administration s0REPARESMONTH ENDCLOSElLEINCLUDINGRELATEDJOURNALENTRIESASREQUIRED s0REPARESMONTHLYACCOUNTRECONCILIATIONSANDRELATEDLEADSHEETS s2EVIEWSMONTHLY4RIAL"ALANCETOENSUREACCURACYANDCOMPLETENESS s0REPARESREVIEWSTHEMONTHLYBANKRECONCILIATIONFORAPPROVALBYTHE%$ s0REPARESMONTHLYANDYEARLYANALYSISOFSTATISTICALDATAASASSIGNED s0REPARES-ONTHLY)NCOME3TATEMENT "ALANCE3HEET ANDOTHERPERTINENTREPORTSASASSIGNED s0REPARESFORREVIEWANDSUBMISSION MONTHLY QUARTERLYANDANNUALREPORTINGREQUIREMENTSSUCHAS1UARTERLYREPORTSs /(234RIAL"ALANCESUBMISSION4#HARITABLE&INANCIAL2ETURNANNUAL4SANDSUMMARYETC s2EVIEWSINVOICESFROMASSIGNEDPROVIDERSANDPREPARESASSOCIATEDREPORTSANDRELATEDINVOICES s%NSURESPAYMENTOFAPPROVEDINVOICESINATIMELYMANNER s/VERSEESANDVERIlESACCOUNTSRECEIVABLEANDACCOUNTSPAYABLEFUNCTIONS s0REPARESBANKDEPOSITSANDCASHRECEIPTS s2EVIEWSTHEOUTPUTFROMTHEE 0AYROLLSYSTEMANDINITIATESADJUSTMENTSASREQUIRED s-AINTAINSDONATIONRECEIPTSCONTROLSYSTEM s5NDERTHEDIRECTIONOFTHE%XECUTIVE$IRECTOR PREPARESTHEVARIOUSBUDGETSREQUIREDINCLUDINGTHEANNUALFUNDING REQUESTSUBMISSIONS s0REPARESTHEREQUIREDDOCUMENTSFORTHEANNUALEXTERNALlNANCIALAUDITANDLIAISESWITHTHEAUDITORS s-ONITORSANDMAKESRECOMMENDATIONSTOTHE%$ IMPROVEMENTSRELATEDTOlNANCIALOPERATIONSANDINTERNALCONTROLS s0ARTICIPATESININTERNALANDEXTERNALMEETINGSASREQUIRED s/THERGENERALACCOUNTINGFUNCTIONS ORPREPARATIONANALYSISOFREPORTSASMAYBEASSIGNED

PHONE:

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www.emcclassiямБed.ca

HELP WANTED

PART-TIME RECRUITMENT FAIR The Ottawa Senators Hockey Club and Scotiabank Place want your help in creating raving fans for life! We are a welcoming workplace and look forward to strengthening our team with you for the up-coming season. WHEN: Thursday, August 23, 5 - 7 pm Friday, August 24, 10 am - 1 pm and 4 - 6 pm WHERE:Scotiabank Place, Gate 2 (VIP Entrance), Coliseum Rooms Please bring several copies of your resume and 3 work-related references. For more information, visit ottawasenators.com CL367072

Competencies s%FFECTIVEINTERPERSONALANDCOMMUNICATIONSKILLSANDISASTRONGTEAMPLAYER s%XCELLENTORGANIZATIONALANDTIMEMANAGEMENTSKILLS s0OSITIVEATTITUDEANDAWILLINGNESSTOTAKEPERSONALRESPONSIBILITYFORTHERESULTSOFONESEFFORTS s3TRONGANALYTICSWITHANATTENTIONTODETAIL s!BILITYTOMEETDEADLINES SETPRIORITIES ANDMULTI TASK s/PENTOADDRESSINGPROBLEMSANDCONCERNSASTHEYOCCUR s!BILITYTOFOCUSONTHERIGHTPRIORITIESUNDERPRESSURE s7ORKSWELLINDEPENDENTLYANDWITHOTHERSBYRELATINGINACOOPERATIVEANDETHICALMANNER s$EMONSTRATEDCOMMITMENTTOFACILITATECHANGEANDPROMOTEOPPORTUNITIESFORPRACTICEIMPROVEMENT QualiямБcations %DUCATION -INIMUMOFATWO YEARDIPLOMAFROMANACCREDITEDCOLLEGEORUNIVERSITYINOFlCEBUSINESSADMINISTRATION +NOWLEDGE %XPERIENCEAND3KILL 4WOnTHREEYEARSRELATEDACCOUNTINGEXPERIENCE #OMPREHENSIVEWORKINGKNOWLEDGEOFACCOUNTINGSOFTWARE PROlCIENCYWITH3IMPLY!CCOUNTINGSYSTEM 1UICK"OOKS %XCELLENTCOMPUTERSKILLS 7INDOWS -ICROSOFT/FlCEINCLUDING7ORD %XCEL /UTLOOK /PERATIONAL2EQUIREMENTS Criminal Reference check !SSETS %XPERIENCEWORKINGINTHENON PROlTSECTOR %XPERIENCEUSINGTHEREPORTINGSYSTEM.ESDA4RAK 6ALIDUNRESTRICTED/NTARIO$RIVERS,ICENSE )FYOUFEELTHATYOUWOULDLIKETOJOINOURTEAMPLEASESENDYOURRESUMEANDACOVERLETTERTOTHE%XECUTIVE$IRECTOROF 2/333nancy.wilson@rosss.ca. Only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted. Deadline for applying to this position is August 22nd 2012

CL367876

Network

ADVERTISE ACROSS ONTARIO OR ACROSS THE COUNTRY! For more information contact your local newspaper.

STEEL BUILDINGS

HEALTH

BUSINESS OPPS.

PERSONALS

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

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Connect with Ontarians тАУ extend your business reach! www.networkclassified.org Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

19


BUSINESS DIRECTORY

DEADLINES:

BOOKING: FRIDAY 9:30AM FINAL APPROVAL: FRIDAY NOON

CLEANING

DRYWALL

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COMPUTER HOUSE CALLS

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CLEANING SERVICES

* Solar Pannels Wind Gen/Inverters Equipment * Geothermal Systems Commercial & Residential * Air ďŹ lters Commercial & Residential * Electric Motors * Variable Frequency Drives * Air source Heat Pumps (House & Pool) * Commercial Refrigeration AC & Chillers * Custom Built Electrical Panels * Steam HumidiďŹ ers * Motor Soft starts * Thermography * Air Balancing * Motor Controllers & PLC * Geothermal Supplies G%%&&)+%.'(

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20

Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Ottawa businessman helping others overcome dyslexia Jessica Cunha jessica.cunha@metroland.com

Jessica Cunha

Carl Nigi runs Kanata-based business Overcoming Dyslexia. After getting help himself at age 39, Nigi is working to help others realize their full potential.

Leah Edwards knew her sons were struggling with traditional learning. Both Blair, 16, and Kyle, 18, had learned their alphabet and knew their colours before starting school. But once they entered the classroom, they started to fall behind. “As soon as they started school, they forgot all of that,” she said, adding they were diagnosed with ADD and put on what she called a “huge amount of medication.” “It was a band-aid,” Edwards said. “My children weren’t wild…just a lot of trouble and difficulties at school.” Edwards found out about Nigi’s program about a year ago when she was taking her eldest to scuba diving lessons at the Nepean Sportsplex. Before starting the program, “Blair was (reading) at a soft Grade 2 (level),” said Edwards. “By the end of

week. Despite that, she said it’s the best decision the family ever made. “I love the program, I’m glad we did it,” said Edwards. “It is the best thing I ever did for my kids.” TOOLS FOR SUCCESS

In his first year as a facilitator, Nigi said he came across a 12-year-old boy who was about three years behind his grade level when it came to reading. “When I asked about problems in schools, he said, ‘Well, I don’t know. I think I’ve got brain damage or something,’”

MISUNDERSTOOD

Nigi said dyslexia is often misunderstood in the traditional education system. Students may be labeled as inattentive, lazy, or as a problem child. “These kids are being marginalized, (they’re) not given enough help in school,” he said. “A non dyslexic telling a dyslexic what their experience is going to be is a little like a man telling a woman what her experience in pregnancy is going to be,” said Nigi. “I can’t give her the benefit of my wisdom because I don’t have any.” The Davis program offers insight from the point of view of a dyslexic. “What the program says is this isn’t a disability. It’s actually a talent – a perceptual talent. If we do some very simple things and practice some very simple things we can actually overcome it,” said Nigi, dyslexics of all ages. “The disability part becomes a thing of the past.” For more information, visit www.overcomingdyslexia.ca.

September 15 to October 15, 2012 Take part in the annual Cleaning the Capital campaign brought to you by the City of Ottawa and Tim Hortons. Be one of thousands of participants who keep Ottawa clean, green, graffiti-free and litter-free.. Join your friends and neighbours to clean up a park, schoolyard or other public area in your community. Step 1: Register Register your cleanup project by visiting ottawa.ca/clean or calling 3-1-1 before October 15. We’ll provide you with a cleanup kit with everything you need to get started. Step 2: Your cleanup project Join your friends and neighbours for a cleanup project in your neighbourhood such as a park, schoolyard, ravine or any public area that may need to be tidied up. Step 3: Win prizes! Participants have a chance to win great prizes, including early bird prizes if you register before September 15.

You can register until October 15, 2012.

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‘BRILLIANT’

his first day he was at a midGrade 7 level. Not only had he learned the alphabet, he’d mastered the alphabet.” When the family went out to celebrate Kyle’s 18th birthday this year, Blair read the menu for the first time, said Edwards, adding it was a big accomplishment. As for Kyle, he is heading off to King Campus for college for underwater commercial skills this fall, one of 40 students selected worldwide. “If someone had ever told me that Kyle would be med free, I would have told you, you were on crack,” said Edwards, adding both sons are off medications. “We are really thrilled that he has these skills, we know he’s going to be successful.” She added that before the program, Kyle wouldn’t have been able to attend post-secondary school away from home because of his lack of focus. Now, she isn’t worried that he will have to take care of himself. “It’s not just an academic program; it’s a life skills program,” she said. “It really sets them up…they will thrive instead of just getting by.” She added the program is not an instant fix and those taking the program have to want to be there. “It’s not a cake walk,” Edwards said, adding the family generally works on four to five words a session, twice a

to go off his medications. He said the boy’s mother was thrilled, and called to let Nigi know that, “His worst days after the program are like his best days on medication.”

ottawa.ca/clean

2010018040

2012078115-03

he said. “We use (the word) dyslexia because it was the first name ever given to what people now call languagebased learning disabilities.” The program boasts a 97 per cent success rate, said the 44-year-old, who now runs Overcoming Dyslexia in Kanata. “Helping other dyslexics so they didn’t have to have my experiences is a positive thing,” Nigi said.

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EMC news – An Ottawa businessman is using his experience with dyslexia to help others realize their full potential. Carl Nigi, originally from England, left school at the age of 16 to begin working. “I was reading at about a seven-year-old level,” he said. “I was basically a functioning illiterate.” He knew by age 10 that he had a problem. “I remember I had conversations about it,” he said. “I tried everything that educators and specialists offered, and I mean everything. I spent thousands of dollars doing it.” Nigi said specialists were able to diagnose the symptoms but offered little in the way of support. “They were never able to give me anything helpful to actually overcome it,” he said. “It was only after joining the workforce that I realized I wasn’t stupid.” He went back to college in his 20s to learn fine-furniture making – working with his hands and working with tools was something he was good at. One day, a teacher put a name to his problem. “My teacher said, ‘Look, Carl, you are dyslexic,’” Nigi said, adding an official diagnosis was the only thing that saved him from failing the course. At age 21, Nigi was officially diagnosed as severely dyslexic, but he didn’t find the help he needed until 18 years later. Nigi was 39 years old when he found help with the Davis Dyslexia Correction program. The program was developed by Ron Davis – a severely dyslexic adult – to correct reading learning disabilities. Now Nigi is a facilitator. The program offers help for people diagnosed with a number of learning disabilities, including learning math and writing, attention deficit disorder (ADD) and attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD). “It gets to the root cause of dyslexia, ADD, ADHD, non verbal learning disabilities,”

said Nigi, adding the boy’s admission hurt him emotionally. By the end of the one-week program, Nigi had the boy reading at his grade level. “It gives them tools that they can basically understand and overcome the problems of their dyslexia, or ADD, or ADHD and give them understanding and success. And that’s far bigger than a cure,” said Nigi. Dyslexics are usually visual, multi-dimensional thinkers, who are highly creative, said Nigi, adding that’s why the Davis program calls dyslexics gifted. “Creativity is the way dyslexics learn, the way they think. If someone is highly skilled and creative we call them gifted,” he said. “If we try to cure dyslexia, really cure it, it would be like trying to cure somebody of their sense of humour.” However, Nigi said he finds he is often contacted as a last resort. “That’s usually what I find, people come try me after they’ve tried everything else and it’s failed.” Nigi treated a 14-year-old male who was reading at a Grade 2 level. He had been diagnosed with ADD and put on medications. “I had him reading at a good Grade 7, soft Grade 8, and that’s just in one week,” he said, adding the teen was able

http://www.ottawa.ca

Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

21


Local events and happenings over the coming weeks — free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: manotick@metroland.com

You and your family and friends are invited to a free showing of the movie Courageous at Trinity Bible church, 4101 Stagecoach Rd., Osgoode on Saturday, Aug. 18 or Thursday, Aug. 23 from 6 to 8 p.m.

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Visit the Osgoode Township Museum for an adult workshop to discover how to use doilies and other household items to create fun and attractive lamp shades and summer lanterns for inside your home and outside on your patio or

SUNDAYS 2-4 PM June to Thanksgiving

RIVERSIDE PARK REUBEN CRESCENT 40+ local vendors offering produce, meats, bread & baked goods, arts & crafts and more! THIS SUNDAY ENTER TO WIN A BASKET OF FRESH, LOCAL PRODUCE & HANDCRAFTS VALUED AT OVER $100! SAVE THE DATE! Sunday September 9th

12 - 4 pm 3RD ANNUAL MARKET PLATES Area restaurants and chefs pair up with our farmers to offer samples from the local harvest. More details to follow!

www.kemptvillefarmersmarket.ca 22

balcony. The program runs from 1 to 4 p.m. The cost for this workshop is $25 per person. All materials will be provided. Please call 613821-4062 to register.

August 19: The Manotick Brass Ensemble will present a public concert in Dickinson Square from 2 to 3 p.m. in honour of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee. Dickinson Square will be decked out for a Diamond Jubilee party and old-fashioned ice cream will be served. For more information about the Manotick Brass, visit www.manotick brass.com For information on Dickinson House, visit www.rideautownshiphistory. org/dickinsonhouse or phone 613-692-2241.

ext 20157.

August 25: Check out the fall plant sale on Saturday, Aug. 25 from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Scobie Farm at 6274 Rideau Valley Dr. N. (six kilometres south of downtown Manotick). Find a good selection of quality hostas, grasses, hardy mums, sedums and other perennials. Proceeds to Trinity United Church in Kars. Friends of the Central Experimental Farm will host Art on the Farm with artists working in various mediums from 10 a.m to 4 p.m. They will display and sell their original works under the trees. For more information call 613-230-3276, or visit www.friendsofthefarm.ca.

Aug. 20 – 25:

August 26:

The Ottawa Public Library’s Metcalfe Branch will be closed from Monday, Aug. 20 to Saturday, Aug. 25 to install new flooring. The book drop will be available during the closure. The nearest alternate service locations are the Greely, Osgoode and Vernon branches. For more information, contact InfoService at 613-580-2940 or InfoService @BiblioOttawaLibrary.ca or visit BiblioOttawaLibrary.ca.

The Manotick Village Community Association will hold an old-fashioned soapbox derby on Sunday, Aug. 26 as one of the fun events of Picnic-in-the-Park. The derby will take place on Beaverwood Road next to Centennial Park in Manotick from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Inspection and participant arrival registration commences at 8 a.m. at the top of Maple Street. Winners will be announced immediately after completion of all the races. Pre-registration is required. Visit www. manotickvca.org.

August 21: The City of Ottawa will host an open house to discuss designs for a new neighbourhood park in the Shadow Ridge Phase 2 development in Greely on Tuesday, Aug. 21. Residents will have a chance to ask questions and provide feedback from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Greely Community Centre. For more information contact Jennifer Hemmings at 613-580-2424

Stories of the Ottawa River Valley Pinhey’s Point Historic Site, 270 Pinhey’s Point Road Saturday, August 18, 2012 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Bring a blanket or a lawn chair and settle in for an evening of traditional folk tales. Enjoy the smell of the bonfire and the taste of roasted marshmallows while taking in the history of the Ottawa Valley! 613-832-4347

September 17: Calling all golfers for Habitat for Humanity National Capital Region’s annual Chipping In golf tournament at Cedarhill Golf and Country Club. Come out for a fun day of networking, prizes and friendly competition while raising much-needed funds for Habitat for Humanity National Capital Region to build homes and build hope across the region. Call Gail at 613-749-9950 ext. 223, email fundraising@habitatncr.com or go to www.habitatncr.com.

September 30: Get ready for race weekend in south Ottawa at the Rideau Carleton Raceway. The races include a half marathon, half

marathon relay, 10-, five- and two-kilometre family fun run and walk. To register for this event, please visit www. southottawaraceday.ca

Ongoing: Free skateboarding and sports drop-in from Rural South Recreation from noon to 7 p.m., Tuesday to Sunday. Call 613-580-2424 ext. 30235 for locations and more information or visit www.ottawa. ca/ruralsouth. Effective August 1 Rural Ottawa South Support Services (ROSSS) is taking over as the provider of community support services in the former township of Goulbourn, including Richmond, Munster and Ashton. As volunteers continue to be at the heart of our organization and assist with the delivery of our services, we currently are looking for volunteer transportation drivers in this new catchment area. Call 613-692-4697 for more information. Bonding With Baby: A four-week session focusing on infant massage and baby sign language. From July 19 to Aug. 9, enjoy a weekly session from 1 to 2:30 p.m. every Tuesday at the Live and Learn Resource Centre in Metcalfe. Incorporated in the workshops will be information on your baby’s development from the Parents as Teachers program. The Live and Learn Resource Centre in Metcalfe has organized a number of playgroups in the park throughout the rural Ottawa south area this summer. Kids and parents are welcome to join staff from Rural Family Connections in the park for a few hours of fun: • Aug.14: Rowan Park, 9 to 11 a.m. • Aug. 16: Edwards Park, 9 to 11 a.m. • Aug. 21: Kenmore Park, 9 to 11 a.m. • Aug. 23: Rowan Park, 9 to 11 a.m. Watson’s Mill in Manotick hosts a farmers’ market on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fresh local produce, eggs, cheese, meats and more. Call for details:

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Manotick EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Enjoy a Taste of Manotick this Saturday, August 18. The Main Street will be open to pedestrians only from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. Local businesses will line the street showcasing all that the village has to offer, from specialty/gift stores to clothing shops and many other services. There will be tasting, samples, draws and demonstrations. All the restaurants will be open to serve you a variety of menus. Come out and enjoy music, entertainment and food at its best.

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August 18:

613-692-6455. Visit www. manotickfarmersmarket.com. Visit the Watson’s Mill usedbook sale from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. Thousands of titles, great selection, tidy and affordable – all in support of the mill. Call 613-692-6455 for details. Old Time Music and Country Dance takes place on the first Friday of every month at the Greely Community Centre, 1448 Meadow Dr. from 7:30 to 11:30 p.m. The cost is $5 per person at the door and free for musicians and singers. Yearly memberships available. Come and have a good time. Is your daughter looking for a place to do fun things with her friends, make new friends in the community and try new things? Check out Girl Guides. Every week, girls ages five through 17 meet to learn everything from camping to acting, all in the company of friends they can trust, and women they can look up to.Visit www.girlguides.ca to find a unit near you and to register for the next guiding year. The small but mighty talented Osgoode Olde Tyme Fiddlers Association invites you to its traditional old-tyme fiddle and country music dance at the Osgoode Community Centre, every fourth Friday of the month from 7:30 to 11:30 p.m. Bring your fiddle, guitar and musical talents. All new members welcome. Tickets are $5 per person for nonmusicians, available at the door. For more information call 613-224-9888. Ottawa Newcomers’ Club invites women new to Ottawa to join our activities and meet some new friends. Activities include: bridge, scrabble, walks, luncheons and dinners, book club, sightseeing, travel cafes and craft hours. For more information call 613-860-0548 or ottawa newcomers@hotmail.ca. Gloucester South Seniors, 4550 Bank St., Leitrim, offers a full schedule of activities every week, including contract bridge, carpet bowling, euchre, five hundred, shuffleboard and chess. Membership is $15 per year. The club is easily accessible by OC Transpo Route 144 and has free parking. Info at 613-8210414. Too late for university? Think again! Carleton University Bridging Program offers mature students a way to qualify for university admission, improve academic skills, and build confidence.

Only $200 for a 12-week, part-time course. Register now for September. Call 613-520-2600 ext. 1024 or visit www.carleton.ca/cie.

Mondays and Thursdays: The Gloucester South Seniors Chess Club, 4550 Bank St. (at Leitrim Road) meets every Monday and Thursday at 7 p.m. Immediate openings available for more chess aficionados. Please contact Robert MacDougal at 613821-1930 for more information.

Wednesdays: Enjoy Scottish country dancing for fun, friendship and fitness. Share the music and joy of dance. You do not have to be Scottish. You do not have to wear a kilt – but you can. No experience or partner is required. Meet Wednesday evenings at Manotick United Church from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. For information, contact Marie at 613-8261221 or email Osgoodedance scottish@gmail.com. Want to meet new friends? Have a great workout? Come to The MET (Metropolitan Bible Church) every Wednesday from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. for a free women’s fitness class with a certified fitness instructor. Includes a fiveminute inspirational fit tip. Any questions? Contact the church office at 613-2388182. Come out to play euchre every Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. at the Greely and District Legion Branch 627, 8021 Mitch Owens Rd., Gloucester. Admission is $5 for eight games.

Thursdays: Every Thursday starting at 6:30 p.m. there is bingo at the Osgoode Legion located at 3284 Sunstrum St. in Osgoode. All money raised at these weekly events goes back to the community. Bring your “dabbers” and come out to support your local Legion bingo! Every second Thursday: Join ROSSS for “What’s For Dinner?” cooking class at Moncion’s Your Independent Grocer at noon followed by one hour of grocery shopping. You will attend a food demonstration, sample the creation and receive a copy of the recipe. You will then have one hour of grocery shopping. Transportation service includes door-to-door service in Osgoode, Metcalfe and Greely for $7. For more information call 613-8211101.


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