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September 15, 2016 l 40 pages

Truck tunnel moves ahead Michelle Nash Baker

michelle.nash@metroland.com

The possibility of building a downtown truck tunnel has accelerated through the city’s transportation committee. A truck tunnel study examining the feasibility of running a bypass under the city, released on Aug. 17,

found that it was possible to build a tunnel that would link the Macdonald-Cartier Bridge and Highway 417. On Sept. 7 the transportation committee voted to approve the next step — conducting an environmental assessment at a cost of $8 million. See NEXT, page 2

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Next step could take up to three years Continued from page 1

The city and the province shared the tab for the $750,000-study. Of the 11 councillors on the transportation committee, 10 voted in favour of the environmental assessment. Gloucester-South Nepean Coun. Michael Qaqish voted against. City council will vote on the issue on Sept. 21. In an effort to solve some of the downtown core's traffic woes, in 2013, Rideau-Vanier Coun. Mathieu Fleury asked the city's transportation committee and council to partner with the province on a study to bury the truck route, creating a tunnel from the Macdonald-Cartier Bridge to Highway 417. The battle for solving the truck traffic issue has been an ongoing fight for all of Ottawa-Vanier, which banded together earlier in 2013 to fight the National Capital Commission-driven plan to build an east-end interprovincial bridge. In June 2013, the province said it would not support any of the interprovincial routes designated in a NCC study. Since that announcement, Fleury

METROLAND FILE PHOTO

A downtown truck tunnel could be possible, according a press release from the city’s media department on Aug. 17. On Sept. 7, the city’s transportation committee approved funding the next step to making a tunnel a reality. has worked with the ministry to find a permanent solution to the downtown truck problem. The new study relied on the previous NCC study from 2013, which outlined the amount of trucks that drive through the downtown core.

Approximately 2,500 trucks travel through Lowertown on King Edward Avenue on a typical weekday— a number which is expected to increase by one or two per cent each year. The route also sees trucks using Waller and Rideau streets.

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In the past, a tunnel was excluded from interprovincial transportation studies due to "technical and operational" reasons, including the expense of digging through a densely developed area. Lowertown, the community stuck right in the middle of the current truck route, has long asked for a tunnel through the city to fix the problem. A potential tunnel would be two lanes, and run 3.4 kilometres below the Lowertown and Sandy Hill areas. The city estimates the cost of such a tunnel would be between $1.7 billion and $2 billion. Fleury said the cost of the environmental assessment would be a shared cost with the city, the province and the federal governments. Fleury added the need for a tunnel is the responsibility of Ontario’s Ministry of Transportation. “There is a gap existing in the community, other bridges have been funded and this needs to happen,” Fleury said. Currently, Ottawa-Vanier’s MP and MPP seats are vacant. Fleury said his number one priority would be working with all the can-

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didates for those seats to ensure solving the downtown truck problem is a priority for them as well. “I plan to get firm commitments from each candidate,” Fleury said. Former Ottawa-Vanier MPP Madeleine Meilleur said she was committed to finding a real, sustainable solution to the heavy truck problem in downtown Ottawa. The tunnel would run from the bridge to Highway 417 at the Vanier Parkway and Riverside Drive. If a tunnel is built, it would be available for mixed traffic as the demand on the route would be too small to justify a truck only tunnel. The city estimates that it would divert between 20,000 and 25,000 cars and trucks per day. Approximately 35 per cent of the truck traffic currently using downtown streets wouldn’t use the tunnel, according to the city, because they need to make local onstreet deliveries or pickups. The transportation of dangerous goods would be prohibited from using such a tunnel for safety reasons. A downtown truck tunnel is not part of the city’s affordable transportation network plan, as outlined in the 2013 transportation master plan. An environmental assessment could take up to three years to conduct.

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It has been re-opened as of Monday August 22 - just in time for back to school traffic. I had the chance to use the underpass on the day it re-opened. This underpass is a very important connection for both pedestrians and cyclists as it is part of the City’s Cross-Town Bikeway network, a system designed to provide a continuous path for cyclists in the core area.

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The Overbrook Community Garden is starting the fall harvest season off right. It hosted a healthy food tasting event at the Overbrook Community Centre on Sept. 8. The event welcomed both a healthy food advisor from Ottawa Public Health and the Ottawa Public Library’s new program, A La Carte. Sherry Lalonde, a food literacy specialist for A La Carte, said promoting food literacy has been going well. “At events we promote food literacy, as well as offer menus, programs, and activities,” Lalonde said. So far, A La Carte has visited one other community garden, Centre 507 and will visit Nanny Goat Hill Community Garden on Sept. 10. Working alongside the Mini Bookmobile, Lalonde promotes recipe books as well as offers tips to help raise awareness about how people are connected to the food they eat and grow. Sheila Perry, who started the garden in the neighbourhood, has been working with the community to create partnerships with the garden. Perry said this event is one of the great things the garden can do to bring organizations and information to the community. Overbrook gardener, Del Langille has enjoyed the experience.

“I would say I have harvested about 40 pounds of food,” Langille said. A long-time gardener, but a firsttime community gardener, Langille said its been great to walk down from where he lives on Donald Street to the garden on Quill Street early in the morning. Langille boasts, that even with the dry summer, he has been successful growing tomatoes, Swiss chard and green beans to name a few. Attending the food literacy event, Langille said, is a good way to learn about what to do with his harvest. Overbrook resident Jane-Anne Dugas, healthy food advisor from Ottawa Public Health, offered up a kale salad for the event. “It’s about showing people simple recipes that can be created from your own garden,” Dugas said. A La Carte programing will host events across the city until February 2018, when its funding runs out.Listings and events are available at biblioottawalibrary.ca. The Overbrook Community Garden will be hosting a second fall event, Canning and Jarring 101 at Loblaws Vanier on Sept. 16 from 6 to 8 p.m. The event will focus on food preservation and will offer participants two recipes to follow. A tasting and light snack will be provided. To register email Kim Duncan, pccookingschool.vanier@ loblaw.ca or contact Margaret Hughes at Margaret.hughes@loblaw.ca.

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I’m pleased to announce that the underpass, which connects Sandy Hill to Centretown, opened right on schedule. This underpass, which passes under Nicholas Street and the Transitway between the University of Ottawa and Colonel By Drive, was closed in early May for LRT construction.

It’s important to keep in mind that the campus station and the future LRT station is still under construction but it is safe for users. The current design is functional and temporary; beautification will be in place at a later date. We look forward to further improvements to this site as the LRT comes to life. Further improvements will be coming to Somerset Street East in the form of advisory bike lanes. These lanes are a new concept for Canada but they have been used for years in Europe and some American cities. These lanes are dashed painted lines as opposed to a solid line outlining a bike lane. They are used for roads that have low traffic volume/ speed and are too narrow for traditional bike lanes. Cars are allowed to use the advisory bike lanes only when passing a vehicle going in the opposite direction. Somerset Street East is a popular route for cyclists with the underpass at one end and the Adàwe Crossing at the other. Both these projects will make cycling more convenient through the City’s core. STAY CONNECTED | RESTEZ INFORMÉS

mathieufleury.ca 613 580-2482 mathieu.fleury@ottawa.ca @Mathieufleury Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016

3


OCH lounge transformed with splash of colour Michelle Nash Baker

michelle.nash@metroland.com

When it comes to quick renovation, a fresh coat of paint can make all the difference. For one room in a Lowertown Ottawa Community Housing building – that’s the hope. More than 10 volunteers from Hintonburgh-based business Malenka Originals gathered on Sept. 8 in the lounge of 215 Wurtemburg St. armed with paintbrushes and aprons ready to not only put a fresh coat of paint on the walls, but also to transform a number of furniture pieces. “We wanted to make a difference and give back to the community,” said owner, Katrina Barclay. Barclay said she hopes the small update to the room will make the space more welcoming. That’s what Gerry Carriere, president of the tenants association, said is the goal. “It helps get rid of the negativity,” Carriere said. About 120 Ottawa Community Housing tenants live in the building and Carriere added the room is barely used by residents, and he

hopes that this will change that. The paint and supplies were donated by Annie Sloan Interiors, a decorative painting company from England that has more than 1,600 independent distributors in more than 45 countries, including Barclay’s business, which sells pieces of refreshed furniture as well as holds workshops on painting. It was Barclay’s workshop students who volunteered their time. Cindy Hodgins and Teresa Shevel, an Orleans resident, said they answered Barclay’s call for volunteers because they wanted to give back. “I hope they enjoy the space,” Hodgins said, who by day is a research analyst, adding she loves taking old furniture and turning it into something new. MICHELLE NASH BAKER/METROLAND On hand at the beginning of Cindy Hodgins of Kanata and Teresa Shevel, an Orléans resident, volunteers from Malenka Originals, help the day were Mayor Jim Watson, refresh an old radio cabinet on Sept. 8 in the lounge of 215 Wurtemburg St. as part of an event aimed at Rideau-Vanier Coun. Mathieu updating the Ottawa Community Housing building. Fleury and OCH executive officer This particular project is thanks all over the world for 25 spaces to clay said, after the same group of Stephane Giguere. Fleury said a recent meeting volunteers helped refresh furniture to an Annie Sloan community be chosen and transformed with project launched earlier this year, Sloan’s products and expertise. with the tenants association ad- for Syrian refugees in February. The project at 215 Wurtemburg “It was easy to find volunteers, the 25 Project to celebrate the 25th dressed the need for the update. This is Malenka Originals first I had a base of good people who year of Chalk Paint – a paint Sloan is the only Canadian location that was chosen to be a part of the 25 time volunteering with OCH. It is a wanted to continue to help,” Bar- created. Applications were received from Project. partnership which developed, Bar- clay said.

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Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016


Opportunity for business to tap into government supply chains Nov. 8 event to take place at the Shenkman Arts Centre Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

The eastern end of the city will be home to a reverse trade show in November, where businesses can pitch their products and ser-

vices to government buyers. The Supply Ontario Reverse Trade show will be held on Nov. 8 at the Shenkman Arts Centre. “You get to sit down with the people who are actually doing the buys; provincial, federal,” said Lynne Groulx, senior business advisor with the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development and Growth. She said they are also trying to get municipal and health care representatives to attend the event as well.

Ottawa-Orléans MPP MarieFrance Lalonde, who also serves as Minister of Government and Consumer Services, said the event is an opportunity for business owners to show off the potential within the community. “It brings a lot of government officials here in this space,” she told business people at the Orléans Chamber of Commerce breakfast on Sept. 8. “It’s a wonderful opportunity for you to engage with officials in the industry.”

Groulx said many local business have some sort of product or service that could be pitched. “You don’t have to be selling five million units of something, it could be local, so come see what this thing is about, come see how you could fit in the supply chain,” she said of local businesses. Registration to attend the event is required ahead of time, but there is no cost to attend. For registration and information, visit https://www.doingbusiness. mgs.gov.on.ca.

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Rideau High students could move to Gloucester in 2017 Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

Ottawa school trustees had to gather for a second night to handle discussions over school accommodation reviews that could lead to some school closures in the city. The English public board trustees met on Sept. 9 to discuss the proposed Rideau High School closure, which is part of a eastern secondary review that included Gloucester High School and Colonel By Secondary School. It’s considered an urgent accommodation review because of the vast number of excess spaces between the three schools. Rideau and Gloucester both only at 45 per cent capacity. The urgency comes from the lack of programming that can be offered with small student populations. Without enough students, the right combination of classes at different academic levels can’t be offered. And the lack of variety can easily spill over into the extracurricular programs. “I think it’s tremendously important for students to have those choices and those opportunities,”

6

trustee Lynn Scott said at the meeting. “When a school gets down below 800 students, the difference is huge. You might not be able to get the right kind of English that’s going to work for you, you might not be able to get the right type of math and science. As much as I dislike closing schools, I think it’s really, really important to make sure every school is big enough to support reasonable course choice.” DOING WELL

Colonel By is doing well, with a large student population, primarily because of the International Baccalaureate (IB) program. It doesn’t have space to move in students from another school, and moving the Colonel By population to Gloucester would create a larger than ideal student population, so moving students from or into Colonel By was taken off the table. The only change Colonel By will see is to the catchment area for its IB program, as it’s proposed to also operate the program in a second, western area.

Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016

See LOW, page 7

BRIER DODGE/METROLAND

Trustees including Sandra Schwartz (left) voted to move forward with staff’s recommendations under the east secondary review on Sept. 9.


Low numbers at some schools make situation urgent Continued from page 6

The board report said Rideau and Gloucester are having problems offering certain classes students are interested in, or need — so they may be only offered every other year, for example. In its catchment area, less than 40 per cent of the English public school students, and 20 per cent of the high school aged population, are attending Rideau. Trustees asked about what other schools were considered, beyond Gloucester, Rideau and Colonel By. Lisgar Collegiate Institute was examined, but because of its physical size and enrollment level, wasn’t a suitable fit, staff said. They also thought about closing Gloucester and relocating students to Rideau, or building a new school for the two that could be built on the Rideau property, but they didn’t think the provincial education ministry would fund the school when there’s another alternative available. Both schools are diverse as well, with Rideau offering programs for new Canadians and First Na-

tions – they have a dedicated First Nations, Metis and Inuit program (FNMI) for students that include several courses. Gloucester has a diverse student body, too. Approximately 21 per cent of Gloucester students have Individual Education Plans for students that need special considerations or needs for their learning – and more than 30 per cent of students are learning English as nonnative English speakers. At the same time, the school has a French immersion program, and offers Spanish, Arabic and Japanese classes, as well as the Advanced Placement program to write special exams to gain AP status at select universities. At the same time, the school has a French immersion program, and offers Spanish, Arabic and Japanese classes, as well as the Advanced Placement program to write special exams to gain AP status at select universities. Trustee Sandra Schwartz, who represents the zone including Colonel By and Gloucester, asked how programs such as Rideau’s child care program and the FNMI pro-

TRUSTEE SANDRA SCHWARTZ

gram would be transferred over. Staff said the FNMI community will be involved and consulted with so additional credit courses can be offered at Gloucester once students move. Because the majority of families which use the child care programs live in the Donald Street area, it would make more sense to relocate the program within the neighbourhood, such as to Queen Elizabeth Public School. Staff said language programs for newcomers to Canada have been assessed “on a very preliminary basis” to move to the Ottawa Technical Secondary School. Rideau’s learning disabilities class – which currently has 22 students – would relocate to Glouces-

ter. “We did look at the vulnerable nature of the student population,” said Jennifer Adams, director of education. She said Gloucester being on the transit way is a benefit, and students who move could benefit from getting a bus pass provided that would work both in and out of school hours. The school board will continue to examine accommodations through a second phase of reviews, which will likely focus on feeder schools. Schwartz said parents at Colonel By are concerned they’ll be part of another accommodation review, but staff said it’s not on the current list of schools to be examined.

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“The preference would have been to have a larger review that included the feeder schools, but we recognize the urgent nature of the situation as it stands,” Schwartz said. “Many schools in the east are not well know, but all three (of these) are exceptional schools with exceptional staff. I think we’ll be learning a lot about the east and I’m glad that … trustee Ellis, Penny and myself will be able to share our love of the east with the rest of you.” She asked trustees to support and move forward with the recommendation, which they did. Shawn Menard voted in opposition, and Chris Ellis – who has Rideau within his zone – abstained from voting. Public meetings for the review are scheduled for November 2016 and January 2017; trustees will vote on the report in February at committee and finalize the decision in March at the board meeting. If all goes through as staff have recommended, Rideau students will consolidate with Gloucester students next September for the 2017-18 school year.

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7


OPINION

Connected to your community

We’re never too old to learn

T

he city’s public school is a democratic institution. Sort of. We have Ottawa Carleton District School Board trustees – publicly elected in a democratic system – who don’t seem keen on keeping the process so democratic. There’s evidence from current and past trustees that a clique sets the agenda and determines the proper outcome of votes before the public sits down to watch the debate. One of those former trustees has suggested students and parents would be better served by a school board made up of appointed trustees. It’s an idea worth considering. The people willing to put their name on the ballot to serve as trustee are clearly committed individuals. They must all arrive at the board table wanting children to excel. But things start to fall apart quickly when the demands of different parts of the city start pulling trustees in different directions. Trustees are elected in geographic zones, and the parents in each zone have diverse expectations. Trustees are forced into parochial decisions in order to keep local parents

happy – even when those decisions are not the best thing for students across the board. Appointed trustees could instead be specialists, without the geographic push and pull. They could be selected by the province for their experience, such as the ability to run a large committee. A financial wiz could be put in charge of understanding and explaining the budget, and members with real estate and construction experience could deal with expansion plans. As it stands today, incoming trustees have to learn these skills as they go. An appointed board would not be as democratic as a public vote every four years, but then again, in the most recent municipal election, some public board trustee zones saw turnout below 36 per cent. And even among those voters, who can say they made an informed vote? The best case scenario would see the province approve a pilot project, and try an appointed school board in one municipality for one term. It could turn out well or it could be scrapped, but it’s an idea worth trying. If the goal is to give our children the best possible education, nothing should be off the table.

Seems like no one wants to stay up late these days

A

report has come out suggesting the city’s arenas are being under-used. If you understand how the city’s thought processes work, you know that no good can come out of this. Already there is talk of streamlining and consolidating and building gleaming new structures. And if you understand how city thought processes work you know what this means: the arena near you is going to be shut down and some mega multipurpose thingy is going to be put up that you’ll have to drive halfan-hour to get to. You will be able to get a latté there, though. Before we mourn, as many will, the death of that cold, dark building that smelled of hot chocolate and the cigarettes of yesteryear, it is interesting to

CHARLES GORDON Funny Town look at the reason all this will be happening. The major factor seems to be that Canadians don’t stay up late any more. According to reports in local media, the people who rent ice time don’t like to do so before 6 p.m. and they especially don’t like to do so after 9 p.m. So there is some pretty good ice time going begging and there is a hole in the parks and recreation budget where rent the money from all those late-night beer leagues used to go. It is sad to think of us as a

people who can’t stay up late to play hockey, but the trend has been heading in this direction for some time. There was a reminder last week with the announcement of the CBC’s Peter Mansbridge’s imminent retirement. This provoked a flood of reminiscences about the CBC national news, and with it a reminder that The National, as it came to be called, was shifted to 10 p.m. from 11 p.m. in 1982. The comparison with the present day is quite startling. Before 1982 Canadians, if they wanted the CBC to tell them what was going on, had to sit up past 11 p.m., even later if they wanted the local news and weather. And they did. CBC’s ratings were pretty good in those days. Nowadays there’s no need.

DISTRIBUTION INQUIRIES Barry Davis 613-221-6213 ADMINISTRATION: Vice President & Regional Publisher Peter Bishop Donna Therien 613-221-6233 pbishop@metroland.com HOME BUILDERS ACCOUNTS SPECIALIST Geoff Hamilton - 221-6215 613-283-3182 DISPLAY ADVERTISING: Gisele Godin - Kanata - 221-6214 80 Colonnade Road, Unit 4 Director of Advertising Cheryl Hammond Randy Olmstead- Ottawa West - 221-6209 Ottawa, ON, K2E 7L2 cheryl.hammond@metroland.com Cindy Gilbert - Ottawa South - 221-6211 Carly McGhie - Ottawa East - 221-6154 Phone 613-221-6218 613-224-3330 Jill Martin - Nepean - 221-6221 Editor-in-Chief Ryland Coyne Catherine Lowthian - Barrhaven/Bells Corners Published weekly by: 221-6227 rcoyne@metroland.com Mike Stoodley - Stittsville - 221-6231 Annie Davis - Ottawa West - 221-6217 General Manager: Mike Tracy Rico Corsi - Automotive Consultant - 221-6224 mike.tracy@metroland.com Blair Kirkpatrick - Orleans - 221-6216 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SALES: Sharon Russell - 613-221-6228 Member of: Ontario Community Newspapers Association, Canadian Community, Newspapers Association, Ontario Press Council, Association of Free Community Papers 8 Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016 ottawa COMMUNITY

news .COM

Ottawa East News

OttawaCommunityNews.com

CBC news is on at 10 and you can get it at 9 if you want to go to the all-news CBC channel. For that matter, you can read it online a lot earlier than that and hit the hay around the time the sun sets. News junkies are not the only Canadians who seem to need their sleep. Earlier start times are the rule rather than the exception in many areas of life. Local concerts that used to start at 8 now start at 7 or 7:30. So do most theatre performances. Even on Broadway some shows now start at 7 p.m. and the others start at 8 p.m., a change from the celebrated 8:30 p.m. of yore. What does this mean? Are we more health conscious, more aware of the need to get more sleep with less beer preceding it? Or, more ominously, are we stayEDITORIAL: MANAGING EDITOR: Theresa Fritz, 613-221-6225 theresa.fritz@metroland.com NEWS EDITOR Brian Dryden 613-221-6162 brian.dryden@metroland.com

REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER: Michelle Nash Baker michelle.nash@metroland.com 613-221-6160

ing so late at work that it doesn’t make sense to go home and return in time for a show? Even more ominously, the only activity that takes place later these days is shopping.

Editorial Policy The Ottawa East News welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at ottawacommunitynews.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to theresa.fritz@ metroland.com, fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to the Ottawa East News, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa ON, K2E 7L2. • Advertising rates and terms and conditions are according to the rate card in effect at time advertising published. • The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount charged for the space actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of its servants or otherwise... and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount charged for such advertisement. • The advertiser agrees that the copyright of all advertisements prepared by the Publisher be vested in the Publisher and that those advertisements cannot be reproduced without the permission of the Publisher. • The Publisher reserves the right to edit, revise or reject any advertisement.

POLITICAL REPORTER: Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com, 613-221-6220 THE DEADLINE FOR DISPLAY ADVERTISING IS THURSDAY 10:00 AM

Read us online at www.ottawacommunitynews.com


OPINION

Connected to your community

Back to school means it is back to the screens

B

ack to school at our house means back to screens. I’ve been bracing

for it. When I talk to some parents, I realize my kids are among the lucky ones. Smartboards in every classroom. A unique, protected, in-board Google account associated with each student. Access to Chromebooks. All this in a public school. For the past two years, possibly more, our school has been transitioning to a paperless environment. This year, it’s for real. From kindergarten, there is to be no more pesky Duo-Tangs with songs and rhymes. For the older kids, homework is mostly accessible in Google Drive and can be completed online. There are no more letters home or sign-up sheets.

BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse Everything is to be done in the virtual world. All this has the potential to be great, for those of us who can access and use the Internet. But it also has the potential to increase the socio-economic divide that persists in our society and in our schools. Kids that have access, particularly on their own devices, will be able to complete their homework in a timely fashion and

augment their learning with math and literacy activities online. They can type their reports, conduct research, use fancy publishing programs and impress their new technology-savvy teachers. Parents who work on computers during the day, own smartphones and generally have the time and interest to access online resources will be able to fill out forms and pay with their credit cards

for school trips, milk programs and school supplies. Most families in Ottawa have Internet access at home. But there are some who don’t. Even among those with access, however, the reality of getting children online every day after school is a tricky one. It was an interesting second week of school at our house. Two kids needed to get online simultaneously during the homework hour; my daughter was chomping at the bit for me to download the songs she’s learning in junior kindergarten. We’re not device-deprived, but we have yet to become the family with two devices each. I felt like my head was spinning. How could homework get done every day with kids fighting over Internet access? And once

a device per kid. There are those who are time pressed and will leave the kindergarten rhymes and songs in Google Drive, never to look at them, let alone print them. How much harder will it be for their kids to fully participate in their school life and community? I’m happy the school board is forward-thinking and has the money to facilitate online learning. I’m very happy that I don’t have to deal with duplicate forms and masses of paper coming through the door daily. But I’m hoping they have a back-up plan that includes some alternative forms communication, provision of time on school computers and lessons for parents and kids on how to use the tech wisely.

they’re on the Internet, how do I know they’re doing their work and not messing about looking for free games or scanning the offers on Amazon? How much should I limit this interaction? I started shopping around for Chromebooks. My husband said we would be spoiling them by providing them a device. I said it was essential to their success in school to have access to a fast device that could get them logged in daily to their Google Drives. We’re still discussing who’s right. But these are middleclass problems. There are families that don’t have adequate Internet access at home. There are families who don’t have credit cards. There are families who couldn’t possibly contemplate purchasing

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MIFO nominated for provincial arts award Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

An Orléans cultural centre for arts has been nominated for the Premier’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts. MIFO, a Francophone organization in Orléans that runs programming and presents Francophone shows at the Shenkman Arts Centre, was officially announced as a nominee in the arts organization award category on Sept. 6. It’s the only Ottawa area nominee for the 2016 awards, and the only nominee of six in its category not based in Toronto. “We work hard every day, and to be recognized for that award, it made us very proud,” said Patrick Bourbonnais, MIFO's artistic director. The Premier’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts nominated 12 artists and organizations in two categories. The finalists were selected by a jury of experts based on nominations, and are administered by the Ontario Arts Council. The winning arts organization will receive $50,000, and all nominees get $2,000. Bourbonnais said Mona Fortier, a former program participant and now a parent of children in the programs offered at MIFO, put forward the organization's name

during the nomination process. He said her letter nominating the group highlighted the continual quality of MIFO programming over the years. “That made us so proud,” he said. “It’s somebody from outside witnessing the work that we do, and the impact we have on the community. And that’s what made it so special.” MIFO first opened in 1984, and has been providing programs in a variety of theatre arts ever since. It offers programs for youth, adults, and seniors and has its own building on Carrière Street in Orléans. It currently has more than 4,000 members. Bourbonnais said MIFO has been successful because it listens to what the community wants, and staff does their best to implement suggestions. “We’re a small team, but being dedicated and being close to the community, we have a direct line with our members,” he said. “They constantly feed us with ideas and propositions for programming, and we follow through. It’s our recipe for success, if you will.” MIFO is up against five Toronto arts organizations for the award, with the winner to be announced on Oct. 5 at a reception at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto.

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MIFO artistic director Patrick Bourbonnais at the season reveal announcement. Bourbonnais said staff at MIFO are excited and proud to be nominated for the premier’s award.

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$1.4M bill for taxpayers after city bus hits pedestrian Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

The city recently spent just over $1.4 million to settle a claim after an OC Transpo bus hit a pedestrian at a crosswalk, but city staff won’t tell the people footing the bill — city taxpayers — exactly where or when it happened. In an emailed response from the city’s media department, city solicitor Rick O’Connor said the city’s standard practise is to not disclose details of individual settlements. The financial details were in a report presented at a Finance and Economic Development committee meeting at city hall on Sept. 6. The $1.4 million includes settlements and all costs to the city, such as legal fees, and includes a clause that says details about payments, either claim settlements and court-ordered, are kept confidential. That includes where and when the incident happened. O’Connor said results are kept confidential to allow “for more open and fruitful negoti-

12

ations and between the parties and, in so doing, promotes the public interest of resolution of litigated matters without consuming scarce court resources.” The city did confirm the incident, which was reported as a “collision between a city vehicle and a cyclist or pedestrian”, in the report was an incident involving an OC Transpo bus and a pedestrian at a crosswalk. Troy Charter, the city’s assistant general manager of transit operations, said they investigate all collisions and ensure corrective actions are taken, in response to a question regarding any changes or safety measures that followed the collision. He said such actions include defensive driving training, accident prevention training and training to deal with interacting with pedestrians and cyclists. Mayor Jim Watson’s press secretary said that the mayor does not comment on any matter that has been settled out-ofcourt.

Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016

FILE

The city recently settled out of court after a pedestrian was struck by an OC Transpo bus. The city won’t say where or when the person was hit.


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Residents wanting an expanded Rosemount library on a new site will have to be patient. Four delegates attended a recent Ottawa Public Library Board meeting on Sept. 6 to ask the board to consider reallocating money set aside for a renovation of the existing library branch be put towards a brand new library in the community in the near

future instead.Their request came at the same time the board approved a new study, identifying the need for new facilities in Barrhaven, Riverside South, Orléans and Kanata to accommodate projected growth in those areas. The report indicates a $34.6 million capital program to build new branches in Riverside South, Orléans and Barrhaven would remove a service gap to 2023. On top of ensuring equal service throughout the city,

the board continues working on finding a location for a new central library branch. It is expected to announce a preferred site in December. While Rosemount in west Ottawa is at the top of the board’s renewal list, with $1 million earmarked for a renovation in the 2017 budget, delegates at the meeting promised the board they are willing to wait for a new Rosemount facility instead. See RESIDENTS, page 14

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Unit is still looking to speak to anyone who may have witnessed or has information in relation to the collision at 613-236-1222, ext. 2481. Anonymous tips can be submitted by calling Crime Stoppers toll-free at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), or by downloading the Ottawa Police app.

Residents want library to relocate Continued from page 13

But board trustee and Kanata North Coun. Marianne Wilkinson wondered just how patient the community will be, noting the central library requires much of the board’s attention and the next priority is a facility for Riverside South, which doesn’t even have a library. “We have a lot on our plates,� she said. Kitchissippi Coun. Jeff Leiper, who spoke to the board as a delegate, promised patience and asked for the board to spend one more year preparing a business case for a new facility before spending money on a renovation – one that would be too costly for too little space. With Hintonburg continuing to grow, he added the city’s population growth figures could also use a second look. Richard Van Loon, chair of the Rosemount Expansion and Development group, said he’d like to see a new branch in the next five years and the current library site be re-purposed. Trustees wondered with all the work happening with the central branch, whether a business case for a new Rosemount library branch would even be possible. “We certainly couldn’t do many other projects and this would become one of our priorities in our facilities program,� said the board’s CEO Danielle McDonald. Since Rosemount is at the top of the renewal list, McDonald proposed that the renovation plan for Rosemount be presented during the budget process, if that isn’t desired, the board could vote on whether to proceed with a business case for a new facility.


Trustees take aim at ‘fractured’ English public board Jennifer McIntosh

jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

A block of trustees determine who gets to head up school board committees, despite a “secret” ballot held during an organizational meeting in December, say Cathy Curry and Donna Blackburn. Curry, who served as board chair of the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board before resigning in 2012, said it was common practice for a voting block of six or seven trustees to call each other to decide who gets what job – a big enough block to stop those seeking nominations that weren’t part of the clique. “A trustee might get blocked from participating in a committee where they might have expertise or interest because of a way they voted on an issue the previous year,” Curry said. Blackburn describes sitting around at a trustee’s house one year, deciding who gets to do which job. “For me, it was never about having a title,” said Blackburn, who has special interest in the special education advisory committee, but

said she was blocked from joining this year. “It doesn’t matter,” she said. “I have still been to every meeting.” There’s a myriad of committees — trustees sit on special committees much like councillors at city hall — taking their recommendations to the committee of the whole meetings. Issues of governance aren’t new. Current OCDSB chair Shirley Seward denied the practice and said it was a secret ballot, held during the organizational meeting in December. She called Curry an “interesting” trustee, but said she wouldn’t debate her concerns with governance in the media. “We are doing really important work right now that deals with student well being,” she said of the ongoing accommodation review. Seward added the board works very harmoniously. “I understand that Donna is not happy, and I am sorry for that, but there’s a more collegial way to bring up her concerns.” Blackburn and Curry’s allegations aren’t the only time the board has faced criticism over governance.

In 2007, then Minister of Education Kathleen Wynne directed a pair of consultants to report back on governance issues within the board. The report, All Students and All Communities: Report on the Feasibility of the Proposed Multi-Year Budget Management Plan and Possible Alternatives for the OttawaCarleton District School Board” by Joan Green and Brian Cain. The report says that there is little corporate solidarity in board wide decision-making, partially because of the legacy of amalgamation of the Ottawa and Carleton boards. “Some trustees described the current relations around the board table as fractured, broken or toxic,” the report reads. “…overtaken by individual zone or trustee interests or special interest group’s pressures as opposed to the best decisions for the whole jurisdiction.” Blackburn said the culture still exists, in her opinion. The dysfunction costs money, Blackburn said, adding there’s a general distrust of staff recommendations, so a lot of items end up going back for more study or consultation unnecessarily.

CATHY CURRY

DONNA BLACKBURN

“There are some good trustees on our board who have a clear understanding of what our role is,” Blackburn said. “Unfortunately it is not the majority of us. The OCDSB is an excellent school board to send your children to. However, its greatness is despite the board of trustees not because of it. We need to do better.”

ry and Blackburn said. “We overspend our special education spending envelope each year by $5 million at least,” Blackburn said. “The committee thinks they dictate board policy, but that’s not the way it’s supposed to be.” That committee, known as SEAC, is made up of members from the Learning Disability Association of Ottawa Carleton, Association for Bright Children, Down Syndrome Association, Autism Society of Ontario and others.

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NOTICE OF PASSING OF ZONING BY-LAWS BY THE CITY OF OTTAWA The Council of the City of Ottawa passed By-laws 2016-288, 2016-289 and 2016-290 on August 31, 2016, under Section 34 of The PLANNING ACT. City Council considered all submissions, including submissions received after the publication of the staff report, in addition to the planning and other considerations identified in the staff report in its decision on these matters. The staff report, and the Summary of Written and Oral Submissions can be viewed as part of the supporting materials for these matters as part of the August 31, 2016 Council Agenda available on Ottawa.ca. Any person or public body who, before the by-laws were passed, made oral submissions at a public meeting or written submissions to City Council, may appeal to the Ontario Municipal Board with respect to either of the three by-laws, by filing with the Clerk of the City of Ottawa, a notice of appeal setting out the objection to the by-law and the reasons in support of the objection. An appeal must be accompanied by the Ontario Municipal Board’s prescribed fee of $300.00, which may be made in the form of a cheque payable to the Minister of Finance. A notice of appeal can be mailed to the City Clerk at 110 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa, Ontario, K1P 1J1, or by delivering the notice in person, to Ottawa City Hall, at the Information Desk in the Rotunda on the 1st floor, 110 Laurier Avenue West. A notice of appeal must be received no later than 4:30 p.m. on October 5, 2016. Only individuals, corporations and public bodies may appeal a by-law to the Ontario Municipal Board. A notice of appeal may not be filed by an unincorporated association or group. However, a notice of appeal may be filed in the name of an individual who is a member of the association or the group on its behalf. No person or public body shall be added as a party to the hearing of the appeal unless, before the by-laws were passed, the person or public body made oral submissions at a public meeting or written submissions to the council or, in the opinion of the Ontario Municipal Board, there are reasonable grounds to add the person or public body as a party. Should the by-laws be appealed, persons or public bodies who wish to receive notice of the Ontario Municipal Board hearing can receive such notice by submitting a written request to the planner identified in the explanatory notes that accompany this Notice. An explanation of the purpose and effect of the three by-laws and a description of the lands to which each by-law applies are included. Dated at the City of Ottawa on September 15, 2016. Clerk of the City of Ottawa, City Hall 110 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa, ON K1P 1J1 EXPLANATORY NOTE TO BY-LAW 2016-288 By-law 2016-288 amends the City of Ottawa Zoning By-law 2008-250. The proposed amendment will affect the TM9 – Traditional Mainstreet Subzone 9, which applies to Stittsville Mainstreet. The affect of the amendment will be to remove the requirement for a maximum interior side yard setback of three metres. This setback is not in keeping with the recently-approved Stittsville Mainstreet Secondary Plan and Community Design Plan, and should not have been included in the zoning for this street. EXPLANATORY NOTE TO BY-LAW 2016-289 By-law 2016-289 amends the City of Ottawa Zoning By-law 2008-250. The amendment will introduce new zoning provisions for click and collect facilities and will affect properties city-wide. A click and collect facility is a delivery location where on-line purchases or other products may be picked up or returned by the consumer. Depending on where it is located, a click and collect facility will be permitted in a stand-alone, single-occupancy building or in another building with other permitted uses in the following commercial zones: Arterial Mainstreet; General Mixed-Use; Mixed-Use Centre; Rural Commercial; Traditional Mainstreet; Village Mixed-Use; Mixed-Use Downtown; Local Commercial; Transit-Oriented Development; and in a rapid transit network station. An amendment is also proposed to the MC zone provisions affecting South Keys Shopping Mall to permit a click and collect facility without lifting the holding symbol affecting the subject lands. Provisions regarding parking for click and collect facilities and minimum amounts of glazing are also proposed. For further information, please contact: Carol Ruddy, Planner Tel: 613-580-2424, ext. 28457 • Email: carol.ruddy@ottawa.ca. EXPLANATORY NOTE TO BY-LAW 2016-290 By-law 2016-290 amends the City of Ottawa Zoning By-law 2008-250. This By-law makes minor changes and corrects errors in the Zoning By-law. The amendments establish a maximum front yard setback of three metres at 628 Industrial Road; add “dwelling unit” as a permitted use in Exception [401] (Corinth Private and Edo Private); amend Exception [1629] to change the reference from minimum parking to maximum parking at 3591 Innes Road; to permit agriculture as an accessory use to a dwelling on lots with 0.8 ha or more in the AG (Agriculture) zone and AG1, AG2 and AG3 subzones; modify the definition of “recreational and athletic facility; correct an error regarding maximum floor space index provisions at part of 355 Cooper Street; correct an error regarding parking provisions to recognize the five surface parking spaces at 137 George Street; correct the zoning boundary between two zones at 100 Rossignol Crescent; and rezone part of 5660 Flewellyn Road and part of unaddressed parcel on Flewellyn Road to recognize the existing place of worship and allow agricultural use. 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Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016

Former chair says province should do away with elected school board trustees Continued from page 15

“We’d get a report telling us that its better to place kids in their community schools, in regular classrooms, with support and we’d have a recommendation coming out of SEAC with a motion attached to add three new learning disability classes in Orléans,” Curry said. “A trustee would add that item to a motion at like 10:50 p.m. and it would cost hundreds of thousands of dollars.” The Green and Cain report from 2007 also talks about special education, and said the management plan for the ministry has a firm commitment to community schools. It says it makes the best use of board resources in the long term and reduces transportation costs. The report notes that the district overspent it’s envelope in that department by $10.3 million for special education. “…and yet trustees seem to be divided between those who feel special education is still grossly under funded and those who believe current spending levels are a significant concern but cannot find their way to a solution,” the report reads. In a 2013 interview with Metroland, SEAC chair Rob Kirwan said. with the growing number of recognized learning disabilities and dwindling funding, resources are tough to get. “It becomes a case of pit-

“People want to know how the public board is providing service to their children. I just think of the huge range of things we’ve made decisions about, there’s a lot of good work going on.” OCDSB CHAIR SHIRLEY SEWARD

ting kids with ADD (attention deficit disorder) against kids with autism as they compete for dollars,” he said. RECOMMENDATIONS

That’s why the trustees should be appointed, argues Curry. When Curry resigned, she sent a series of recommendations to the deputy minister to help deal with the governance issues. Like hospital boards, Curry said trustees should be appointed for their expertise, ensuring that they’re there to serve the interests of the whole jurisdiction, rather than special interest groups. “Take the finances,” she said. “I have no background in finances, and yet I was being asked to make decisions with a budget of nearly $1 billion.” Curry said that some trustees, for example, run on a platform of never voting to close a school – something that becomes necessary from time to time.

Another option would be to give the director or chief financial officer voting power, Curry said, recalling several times where an issue was gridlocked over a tied vote. “Then we’d go back to the drawing board,” she said. Seward said governance has been looked at during her six-year tenure on the board, which included a shift in how the committee of the whole meetings are done. “That work (on governance) is being continuously done,” she said. And that’s not what we should be worrying about, Seward said, adding that parents are much more interested in the work the board is doing to make things more equitable for students across the city, than the internal workings. “People want to know how the public board is providing service to their children,” she said. “I just think of the huge range of things we’ve made decisions about, there’s a lot of good work going on.”


Crowdfunding campaign launched for revitalization of Prince of Wales Bridge Melissa Murray

mmurray@metroland.com

Police presence didn’t derail a picnic on the Prince of Wales Bridge, organized by those opposing a proposal to build gates to barricade it from the public. In overwhelming humidity and with candles lighting up the rail line, about 30 people came out to eat, talk and listen to a gypsy jazz band on the edge of the bridge, located west of LeBreton Flats, on Sept. 7. The former rail bridge is unused today, but some argue it could be renovated to become a valuable pedestrian and cycling link between Ottawa and Gatineau. According to the city, it would cost $10.5 million to make it a formal pedestrian and cycling route and

the cost to convert the bridge for rail transit is between $20 million and $40 million. “It’s a beautiful space and I think it could be made so much better,” said Aileen Duncan, one of the organizers of the event and founders of the Ottawa Rail Bridge project. The bridge project is a group that aims to work with residents, community associations, and governments to determine what can be done with the bridge. It also hopes to recommend policy options and facilitate discussions between interested parties. The same day as the sit-in, the Ottawa Rail Bridge project set up a crowdfunding page dedicated to raising funds for the bridge’s revitalization. So far, about $300 has been raised through the website. Duncan

is hoping the page can raise about $10,000. Duncan previously organized a petition against gates for the bridge, which has more than 1,700 signatures. Gates could cost up to $250,000 and would be paid for with city tax dollars. “We have the same goals to keep people safe – they think the way to do that is not to let people on and I think the way to keep people safe on the bridge is to improve the bridge.” Duncan previously suggested the rail ties be repaired and lighting be added to make the bridge safe, but her thinking on the bridge’s potential has evolved. She’s now looking to other cities for ideas on how to use the bridge and takes inspiration from New York’s High

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Line park, which sits on an unused elevated railway line, she said. “It’s not enough for this space to just be safe and OK or not a liability anymore. Let’s dream big here,” Duncan said. Her ultimate goal is to help develop a co-financing agreement with the cities of Ottawa and Gatineau, the National Capital Commission and Infrastructure Canada to revitalize the bridge. Alex Millaire, a member of band Moonfruits, which played at the picnic, said people have a lot of ideas for the bridge. He added that the $250,000 the city has proposed for gates would go a long way toward the bridge’s revitalization, which could include guardrails along each side. To donate to the crowdfunding campaign, visit www. generosity.com/communityfundraising/revitalization-ofprince-of-wales-bridge.

MELISSA MURRAY/METROLAND

A jazz ensemble plays some tunes on the edge of the Prince of Wales Bridge while community members who oppose a plan to build $250,000 gates blocking access to the bridge picnicked on Sept. 7.

NOTICE OF OPEN HOUSE

in accordance with Section 17(16) of the Planning Act.

Employment Land Policies and Growth Projections

www.campuspharmacy.com OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

This Open House is an opportunity to find out more information concerning the Final Report for the City’s Employment Land Review and to view the draft results of the 2036 Population and Household Projection Review. Thursday, September 29, 2016 City Hall, Festival Board Room 110 Laurier Ave West • 6:30 to 8 p.m. Presentations by staff at 7 p.m.

Brief Background As part of the review of the City’s Official Plan in 2013, Council undertook to further review the Employment Land polices and Employment Land supply. The consultants hired to undertake that review have finalised their report and have made recommendations for changes to the City’s Official Plan. Information on this project is also available on the city website at ottawa.ca/publicconsultations. At the request of the Ontario Municipal Board the City is also reviewing the population and housing projections to the year 2036. Population and housing projections form the basis for the timeframe of the Official Plan and the assessment of land needs for housing and employment. The Official Plan may be updated to incorporate the final projections and a 2036 planning horizon. This Open House provides an opportunity for the public to view the possible changes recommended for the Employment Lands and the proposed projections and to ask questions of City staff before these matters are considered by the Council.

Direct your written submissions and/or questions to:

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Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016

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Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016


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Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016


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Big Brother isn’t watching homes, LRT officials insist Erin McCracken

erin.mccracken@metroland.com

Eastway Gardens residents have been assured cameras at the Belfast light-rail yards behind their homes are not invading their privacy. M.J. Beauchamp and her neighbours learned at a Sept. 7 public meeting at the Overbrook Community Centre the devices are “construction cameras” angled toward the maintenance and storage facility and don’t offer a 360-degree view that includes nearby homes. “But there’s no construction there now,” Beauchamp said. “All the construction is done, so I don’t know what they are talking about.” Her daughter, Emilie Beauchamp, said she can understand the need for safety cameras to monitor spaces that employees use and to guard against theft or vandalism. But her bedroom

is at the back of her Eastway Gardens home, and the cameras and stadium-bright lights they are mounted on have had an impact. “I have to keep my blinds closed because of the lights and we don’t know what the cameras do,” Emilie said. LRT officials have said lights were turned off at the west end following complaints earlier this year, but that the issue will again be reviewed. The primary role of the cameras is theft prevention, said Kathryn Keyes, communications director at OLRT Constructors, which is building the Confederation Line of the LRT project. These will be replaced with closed-captioned television cameras, similar to those at OC Transpo stations, and would be in use when the line opens in 2018, she said, but did not elaborate on the technical difference between the two types.

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“During the construction, the cameras are on and pointed at the building,” said Damon Berlin, who gave the evening’s presentation on behalf of LRT officials. “They’re monitored by security personnel and construction personnel. They’re kept – as per protocol – 30 days. They’re not shared.” A new policy that will be presented to the city’s transit committee this fall will govern “who has access to (the cameras), how long the (footage) will be kept, what they will be looking for,” said Alta Vista Coun. Jean Cloutier. But it doesn’t make sense to the Beauchamps if the cameras will be swapped out for a different system in the future. “Why have temporary safety cameras if you’re putting in CCTV footage afterwards?” Emilie said. “They look pretty permanent to me,” said Beauchamp. Residents were also told 50 trees and shrubs will planted among the 15 trees that were put in this July at an earthen berm that separates the Belfast Yards and Eastway Gardens. “That landscaping will help with that reflection of the sound off the berm,” Cloutier said, referring to the sound of Via trains that that chug between the berm and homes. The greenery will begin to go in within the next few weeks depending on the

ERIN MCCRACKEN/METROLAND

Emilie Beauchamp (second from right) raises concerns about safety, lighting, cameras and landscaping at the Belfast Yards in back of her home during a public meeting at the Overbrook Community Centre on Sept. 7. weather, but the bulk of it will be planted next spring, according to rail officials. “They have not turned their back on you,” Berlin said. “They continue to monitor and they will make adjustments and update the area through the fall of this year.” TESTING TRAINS

If you live or work along the light-rail route between the Blair and Cyrville stations, as well as the Belfast Yards, you may soon find yourself doing a double take. Light-rail trains currently being assembled at the Belfast maintenance and storage facility will soon go for test runs, beginning in late September or early October when the line is electrified.

“As soon as we produce a vehicle we begin to test them,” said Roger Schmidt, technical director of OLRT Constructors. Six out of the 34 Confederation trains will be the first to be put through their paces. Not all will be ready for practice runs at the same time, said Keyes. “It’s ongoing.” Expect to hear some noise during the day – the preferred schedule for rail officials – but not a lot. “They’ll be going fairly low speed,” said Schmidt, but added that one of the vehicles will undergo a single high-speed test. “Most of the testing is if the controls are working, if the brakes are working.” “They emanate much less noise than the Via,” Keyes added.

The public can expect some advance warning before the overhead catenary system, which is made up of an overhead network of wires that send electricity to the trains, goes live and trains skim down the track. Notification will be shared via area councillors, on social media and with schools located within two kilometres of the test-alignment areas, Berlin said. “It’s important that kids aren’t finding an opportunity like, ‘This is an exciting fence to climb,’ and ‘This is where I want to fly my kite,’” he said. “That’s not what we want have happen.” People may also see unfinished trains whirring down the track during the test period. “We don’t want people to be alarmed,” Keyes said of when that starts.

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Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016

Ottawa child picks name for RCMP foal Megan DeLaire mdelaire@metroland.com

And Nordic was his name. A seven-year-old Nepean child named Rory was one of six Canadian kids to choose winning names for the RCMP’s newest batch of foals, submitting the name Nordic. Each spring, the RCMP foal naming contest invites young Canadians to submit original names for six of the foals born at the RCMP breeding farm in Pakenham,

Ont. This year, contestants had to submit names beginning with the letter N, and Nordic joins Nacho, Nanook, Nemo, Nickle and Noble as the RCMP’s newest Nnamed recruits. The other winners were Calleigh, 7, from Chilliwack, B.C. for the name Nacho; Ariya, 3, from Brampton, Ont. for the name Nanook; Alexis, 10, from Port Coquitlam, B.C. for the name Nemo; Drew, 9, from Quis-

pamsis, N.B. for the name Nickel; and Kolton, 4, from Estevan, Sask. for the name Noble. All winners will receive a signed RCMP Stetson hat worn by a musical ride member, a set of the 2016 musical ride trading cards, a horse and rider leaf pin, a framed photo of the foal they named and a certificate signed by the commissioner of the RCMP. More information about the contest can be found at rcmp-grc.gc.ca/en.


36 Ottawa research projects get funding Melissa Murray

mmurray@metroland.com

Ottawa research is getting a boost with almost $7 million in funding from the provincial government. The money will be a boost for 36 different projects, including five at Carleton University, one at CHEO’s Research Institute, two at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and 28 at the University of Ottawa. The announcement was made at the University of Ottawa on Sept. 7. According to a press release, the projects were evaluated through a peer review process that involved Canadian and international academic and industry experts. One of the projects funded in part by the provincial government is the University of Ottawa Refugee Assistance Project, led by researcher and professor Jennifer Bond. The five-year project is getting $100,000 from the provincial government’s Early Researcher Awards program and $50,000 in matching funds from the university. Bond said the money will help extend and deepen her research, which looks at access to justice issues that exist for refugees. The project looks at real refugee cases, including audio recordings of court proceedings, and the issues around evidence. By looking at trends in evidence, the project can find where there are deficits in the refugee system. “Then our goal is to identify those problem areas and contribute to improving or fixing the system,” Bond said. The findings are used to cre-

PUBLIC MEETINGS

ate policy documents, as well as to train support workers to help prepare refugees for their hearings. So far, 300 support workers in Canada have been trained through the program. Bond’s research began five years ago at the University of Ottawa with two part-time students. Since then, more than 75 students have been involved. “They frequently tell us how meaningful this work is for them because they are doing this research-based work and community-based work and can see how their work can impact communities in a direct and meaningful way,” Bond said.

All public meetings will be held at Ottawa City Hall, 110 Laurier Avenue West, unless otherwise noted. For a complete agenda and updates, please sign up for email alerts or visit ottawa.ca/agendas, or call 3-1-1. Wednesday, September 21 Transit Commission 9:30 a.m., Champlain Room Did you know you can receive e-mail alerts regarding upcoming meetings? Sign up today at ottawa.ca/subscriptions.

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The money will help dozens more students have similar experiences, as Bond and other researchers mentor them and collaborate with them to achieve more results for refugees. Ontario’s Early Researcher Awards Program is providing $11 million to support 79 research projects at 22 different research institutions in Ontario. “Supporting these very bright researchers, we are giving them the opportunity to develop these ideas and concepts into a practical reality that could potentially change lives,” Ottawa Centre MPP Yasir Naqvi said following the press conference. He added the research could later be commercialized, leading to the creation of new jobs. Ottawa South MPP John Fraser said health care and research in his riding is akin to what the automotive industry is to Oshawa. He said the

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MELISSA MURRAY/METROLAND

One of the projects receiving funds from the provincial government through the Early Researcher Awards program is the University of Ottawa Refugee Assistance Project, led by researcher and professor Jennifer Bond. Bond attended the provincial funding announcement Sept. 7 at the University of Ottawa. research projects receiving money from the province include advancing online security, preventing Type 2 diabetes and heart disease and more. “You’re finding innovative solutions to help improve people’s lives by making new discoveries, finding new treatments and creating new technologies,” Fraser said.

Ottawa research projects include: • Five projects at Carleton University – $486,276 • One project at CHEO’s Research Institute – $140,000 • Two projects at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute – $280,000 • Twenty-eight projects at the University of Ottawa – $6,085,149

DEVELOPMENT APPLICATIONS NOTICE OF PLANNING COMMITTEE MEETING Tuesday, September 27 – 9:30 a.m. The items listed below, in addition to any other items previously scheduled, will be considered at this meeting which will be held in the Champlain Room, City Hall, 110 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa. To see any change to this meeting agenda, please go to Ottawa.ca. Zoning – 306 Livery Street 613-580-2424, ext. 27629 – Jean-Charles.Renaud@ottawa.ca Zoning – 112 Montreal Road and 314 Gardner Street 613-580-2424, ext. 27591 – Steve.Belan@ottawa.ca Comprehensive Zoning By-law 2008-250: Anomalies Q4 2016 613-580-2424, ext. 13944 – Tim.Moerman@ottawa.ca Ad # 2016-508-S_Dev Apps_15092016

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25


PHOTOS BY NEVIL HUNT/METROLAND

Volunteers’ generosity recognized Gov. Gen. David Johnston hands out the Sovereign’s Medal for Volunteers during a Sept. 7 ceremony at Rideau Hall. Above, Bruce Poulin of Vanier was recognized for his push for gender equality, youth development and volunteers with organizations like the Knights of Columbus, St. John Ambulance and Scouts Canada. Above right, Bob Rainboth has been volunteering in his community for 20 years, devoting countless hours to the Eastern Ottawa Resource Centre. At right, Joffre Bélanger spearheaded the project to change the name of the town of Eastview to Vanier in honour of former governor general Georges P. Vanier. Now, at 100 years of age, he volunteers his time in his parish.

Pet Adoptions

DUSTY

Dusty, a Bengal/ Tabby mix, was three years young on June 5. Dusty is a little rascal who lights up the lives of anyone he meets. He loves to play with his toy mice and fuzzy balls. He has a very loud meow and he lets you know when his favourite ball is trapped under the couch. You can’t leave anything small on the table because Dusty will steal it. When he isn’t playing with (or annoying) his fur siblings, Dusty can be found happily sleeping in the sunshine waiting for his fancy feast.

Do you think your pet is cute enough to be “THE PET OF THE WEEK”? Submit a picture and short biography of your pet to find out! Simply email to: dtherien@metroland.com – attention Pet of the Week 26

Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016

TESLA (ID# A194098)

Ottawa Humane Society is Changing Future for Cats With Launch of City’s First Ever Spay/Neuter Clinic on Wheels On Sept. 8 the Ottawa Humane Society launched the city’s first ever mobile spay/neuter clinic in an effort to stop the suffering of countless generations of homeless cats. “This is one of the first mobile clinics in Canada so we’re really excited to put Ottawa on the map in animal welfare.

We’ll finally be able to tackle the problem of homeless cats at its root in our city,” said Bruce Roney, OHS executive director. “This will change the future for Ottawa’s cats for the better.” The new Ottawa Humane Society Mobile/Spay Neuter Clinic will be providing subsidized sterilizations to pet owners in low-income neighbourhoods of Ottawa, with owners paying a nominal fee. Studies show that 6,000 surgeries a year will lead to a sharp decline in the population; the OHS expects to hit that number by the second year of the program, Roney said. The capital to purchase the clinic was provided by PetSmart Charities of Canada. The mobile clinic will receive no government funding and will operate solely through donations. Learn more at www.ottawahumane.ca/mobile. Pet of the Week: Tesla (ID# A194098) Meet Tesla, big guy with an even bigger heart who is looking for his new best friend. Tesla is a playful and energetic boy who loves to go on long walks and play with his favourite toys. He is a friendly dog who gets along well with other canines. Tesla is an intelligent dog who is both house trained and crate trained. Are you the one Tesla has been waiting for? For more information on Tesla and all the adoptable animals, stop by the OHS at 245 West Hunt Club Rd Check out our website at www.ottawahumane.ca to see photos and descriptions of the animals available for adoption.

Please note: The Ottawa Humane Society has many other companion animals available for adoption. Featured animals are adopted quickly! To learn more about adopting an animal from the Ottawa Humane Society please contact us:

Website: www.ottawahumane.ca Email: Adoptions@ottawahumane.ca Telephone: (613) 725-3166 x258


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Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016

27


Terry Fox Run going strong in east end of city Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

On April 12, 1980, Terry Fox set off to run across Canada. On Sept. 1, 1980, he had to stop his run in Thunder Bay for health reasons, after running 5,373 kilometres. On Sept. 18, 2016, thousands of adults and children across Canada will run, walk, rollerblade and bike in Fox’s memory to continue chasing his goal to raise money for cancer research. One of those more than 800 local runs across Canada will be held in Orléans, taking place at Sir Wilfrid Laurier Secondary School on Tenth Line Road. “Kids amazingly are still engaged in the Terry Fox story through their schools, even though they weren’t born when Terry Fox did his run,” said Ottawa East Terry Fox Run organizer Jahn Fawcett. “They know his story.” To involve more youth and children, this year’s event in Orléans will include a kids run. “That way you can bring the whole family,” Fawcett said. Families with children will be able to choose how far they want to travel, and adults or children looking for a challenge can do the regular 5 km route once or twice. This year’s event will also include local staple Nelson Waddell, 74, who will take part in his 36th Terry Fox Run. He’s done the run every year, and isn’t slowing down.

Waddell started participating in Terry Fox Runs in 1981, shortly after his then 9-year-old daughter was diagnosed with cancer. She survived, and he kept participating. Now, it wouldn’t be a Terry Fox Run in Orléans without Waddell. “Nelson, he’s kind of the Terry Fox Run in Orléans, I just organize it,” Fawcett said. He said people take interest in seeing all of Waddell’s stickers from every year he’s participated. “It’s really nice, and it inspires people,” Fawcett said. Waddell said he accomplished a major milestone last year, when his total raised reached $100,000. He’ll raise money this year, but isn’t as firm on his fundraising goals. He hopes to run the 10 km loop in under an hour. He’s built up a crew of regulars that have also been participating for the past 18 to 20 years, he estimates. “Make a commitment with someone else that you’re going then you’re committed,” Waddell said his advice would be to anyone who wanted to become a run regular. “Get a friend or a neighbour. Just get people to go with you.” This year’s run will kick off at 7 a.m. with registration; with the actual run starting at 8 a.m. at 1515 Tenth Line Rd. Participants are able to register ahead of time to collect sponsorships at terryfox. org.

FILE

In 2015, Nelson Waddell was preparing for his 35th Terry Fox Run — meaning he’s never missed one. This year, Waddell will participate in his 36th run, having raised over $100,000.

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Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016

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Ottawa EastNews News--Thursday, Thursday,September September 15, 31 Orléans 15, 2016 2016 23


FOOD

Connected to your community

Pork tenderloin with fresh salsa Want to impress guests? Try these elegant and lean pork tenderloins that you can simmer to juicy perfection in pure apple juice that is jazzed up with hot peppers. Serve the tenderloins with a fresh crunchy autumn apple salsa, which you can make up to two hours ahead if desired. Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 15 minutes Serves: 4 to 6

• Pinch of salt The pork: • 1-1/2 tsp (7 mL) vegetable oil • ¼ tsp (1 mL) coarsely ground black pepper • 2 pork tenderloins, about ¾ lb (375 g) each • 3 tbsp (45 mL) finely chopped hot green peppers • 2 cups (500 mL) apple juice • 2 tsp (10 mL) Dijon mustard

INGREDIENTS

PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS

The salsa: • 2 Cortland apples, unpeeled • 1 pear, unpeeled • 2 tbsp (25 mL) fresh lime juice • 2 large cloves garlic, crushed or 1 tsp (5 mL) bottled minced garlic • 4 green onions, thinly sliced • ½ cup (125 mL) coarsely chopped fresh coriander

Finely chop unpeeled apples and pear; place in a bowl. Stir in lime juice, 1 tbsp (15 mL) chopped peppers, garlic, green onions, coriander and salt. Set aside. In large non-stick skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Sprinkle pork with black pepper; press into meat. Add to skillet and cook until lightly and evenly brown,

turning often, about four minutes. Add remaining two tbsp (25 mL) chopped pepper to skillet along with apple juice; partially cover and bring to boil. Cook over medium heat, turning meat occasionally, 10 to 12 minutes or until springy to the touch and meat thermometer registers 160°F (70°C). Remove tenderloins to cutting board and cover to keep warm. Turn heat to high and whisk mustard into apple juice mixture. Boil, uncovered and stirring often, until sauce is reduced to about 1 cup (250 mL), about eight minutes. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. Thickly slice tenderloins and arrange on platter; spoon a little sauce over top. Pour remaining sauce into gravy boat to serve along with salsa. Foodland Ontario

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Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016


SENIORS

Connected to your community

Fireflies became a cruel game for the brothers

T

hey were everywhere. Glowing in the dark of the night. I wasn’t frightened of them. I was frightened for them. They were the many fireflies that came out in the heat of the summer and once darkness had settled in, they flitted around, not that far from the ground ... many little glowing lights, no doubt unaware of the danger awaiting them. I was once frightened by the fireflies, but then my sister Audrey said they were simply tiny pieces of stars broken off by unseen angels and sent down to bring light in the darkness. That made perfect sense to me, and certainly eliminated any fear I had. What didn’t make sense to me and filled my veins with ice water, was how my three brothers could murder those harmless little

MARY COOK Memories flies. They were easy to catch, because they seemed to land on an arm, unaware of what lay in store for them. And this is when my three brothers would commit their murderous act, so that the poor creatures could no longer fly. They actually ripped the little bodies apart and put the small pieces of glowing light up and down their arms, until they looked like they were carrying many tiny little flashlights.

Then the brothers would tear around the yard like people possessed! They would yell and laugh, enjoying their murderous acts. I covered my ears with my hands, so I couldn’t hear them and pleaded with Mother to stop their cruel acts, but that got me nowhere. I would stay in the house, praying for Mother to say it was time to get ready for bed, and avoided even looking out the

kitchen window, just in case I saw what was going on in the backyard. Finally, it was bedtime. Mother went to the door, hit the wooden spoon against the tin disc that hung on a nail that was used to call everyone in for meals, and one by one the brothers headed into the house, leaving the evidence of what they had been up to outside. They were still talking about what a great night it had been when they had their glass of milk and cookie, and again, I put my hands over my ears to shut out what they were saying. Being the youngest, I was always ushered upstairs before anyone else, and Audrey was right behind me that night. She knew how upset I was, and tried to steer the conversation to something more

pleasant. But nothing could erase what I had seen in the backyard. UPSTAIRS

Finally, the brothers came upstairs, and they had to pass through our bedroom, which was really a big hall, leading to their beds in the back room. Emerson, whose mission in life seemed to be making my life miserable, came right over to where I was sitting on the side of the bed waiting for Mother to come and hear our prayers. He thrust out his arm and there were the remains of one of the murdered fireflies! Of course, it had lost its glow. Audrey gave him a poke that sent him flying and told him to get ready for bed or he would be sorry! And right then I knew what I was going to pray for. I was going

to pray that the next time the brothers went out at night to catch fireflies, they would be attacked by a batch of wasps instead and, just maybe, their arms would fall off! It took me a long time to fall asleep and when I did, I dreamed of angels breaking off little pieces of stars and sending them down to our farm in Northcote where they became fireflies. And I could see my brothers trying to catch them. But they soared way above the ground, and I dreamed I could hear the fireflies laughing. Interested in an electronic version of Mary’s books? Go to https://www. smashwords.com and type MaryRCook for e-book purchase details, or if you would like a hard copy, please contact Mary at wick2@sympatico.ca.

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Local events and happenings over the coming weeks — free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-723-1862, E-mail: ottawaeast@metroland.com

Sept. 17

The Epiphany Anglican Church will hold a not-forprofit Outdoor Good Food Market and Community Yard Sale from 9 a.m. to noon on September 17 at 1200 Ogilvie Rd. Free refreshments will be offered. For more information, please contact Cindy at 613-746-9278. www.redgreen.com

TUES., OCTOBER 18, 2016 – 7 PM ALGONQUIN COMMONS THEATRE - OTTAWA 1-888-732-1682 or in person at the Algonquin Commons Theatre Box Office.

WED., OCTOBER 19, 2016 - 7 PM GRAND THEATRE - KINGSTON

613-530-2050 or www.kingstongrand.ca

Come celebrate the Autumnal Equinox on Sept. 17 at Ottawa’s second annual Wine and Bread Tasting Event led again by sommelier Asha Hingorani at St. John the Evangelist Anglican Church at the corner of Elgin and Somerset streets in Centretown. From 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., we invite the public to sample red wines and indulge in gourmet breads, olive oil and balsamic vinegar to cleanse palates between tastings. Tickets for a commemorative glass and two initial tastings are $10 in advance from the office at 154 Somerset Street West (weekday mornings) or $15 at the door. More information is available 613-232-4500 or office@stjohnsottawa.ca.

Sept. 19

Know Your Roots with Robert Glendenning, Sept. 19 7:30 p.m. at Top Generation Hall, 4373 Generation Court. The presentation will deal with recognizing different types of perennial roots, their functions, and how to divide them. Admission is free. Space is limited. Pre-registration is required at 613-749-8897. For more information visit gardenontario.org/site.php/glouster/ about/meetings.

Sept. 21 – Oct. 2

Ottawa Peace Festival 2016 with 25 “admissions-free” events takes place in 18 locations. The program comprises peace walk, film festival, peace arts night, exhibition of paintings, and panels on peace and justice themes to celebrate volunteerism in peace building. For full program, visit ottawapeacefestival.blogspot.com, or call Bill at 613-244-1979 or Peter at 613-852- 4527. 34

Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016

September 24

The Lupus Walk to raise funds for patient support, research and awareness will take place Sept. 24. No fee registration at 10 a.m. at Confederation Park, with to Parliament Hill beginning at 11 a.m. More information at lupusottawa@rogers.com. The Ottawa Humane Society Auxiliary will be selling homemade baked goods, original crafts, jewellery, books and other treasures at its Fall Bazaar on Sept. 24 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the animal shelter 245 West Hunt Club Rd behind Hunt Club Nissan. Admission and parking are free. For more info call 613-823-6770 or go to facebook.com/OttawaHumaneSocietyAuxiliary.

Sept. 25

The Lily of the Valley Community Church and the Ottawa Adventist Health Network will present the Lifestart Health Expo on Sept. 25 at the St. Laurent Complex, Aubry Room from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Get wellness tips and free screening for health age, body-fat per centages, natural remedies, diabetes screening, healthy food tasting and a lot more. For more information about the event, call 613-6277599.

Oct. 7

Join the Redblacks for an evening of fun and football on Oct. 7 at 7 p.m. in support of Ottawa First Responders. A portion of the proceeds from ticket sales will be donated to The Salvation Army for a new Emergency Response Vehicle. For tickets capitaltickets.com/ TDPlacePromo use promo code SALVARMYRB.

Oct. 11

Are you a parent looking for home daycare? A caregiver with space in your daycare? Come to a Child Care Connection meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 11 or Nov. 8 at the Ottawa Public Library North Gloucester Branch (2036 Ogilvie Rd) from 7 to 8 p.m. For more information regarding

this meeting or other meetings around the City please go to www.ccprn.com or call 613-749-5211 Ext. 24. Child Care Providers Network is a non-profit, charitable organization that provides information, training, resources and support to home child care providers.

Ongoing

Muséoparc Vanier is looking to fill an on-going volunteer reception position. Interested applicants must be bilingual (spoken and written), good interpersonal skills and has a good sense of responsibility. Duties and responsibilities include, serve as host for guests of the museum, assuring a presence at reception, conduct all functions related to visitors’ admission, inform visitors/respond to question related to our exhibits and programs, perform a range of administrative tasks such as answering the phone, photocopying, filing and other tasks as occasionally required and keep statistics related to admissions/attendance. Hours can vary based on availability. Please contact Nancy Penkala 613-8429871 or email benevoles@ museoparc.ca for more information or to apply. Calling all Pineview residents. We want to know what matters most to you! Over the next few months, the Pineview Community Association (PCA) will undertake a community consultation to identify issues that matter most to residents, and we want to hear from you. Take advantage of our online survey (www. pineviewottawa.com), send us an email (pineviewottawa@gmail.com) or connect via Facebook or Twitter (Pineview Ottawa) to share your views on how we can make Pineview a better place. We also look forward to hearing from you in person at our community events and as part of our door-to-door summer outreach campaign. Together, we can build a strong and vibrant community.


CLUES ACROSS 1. Employee stock ownership plan 5. Teaspoon 8. Type of IRA 11. Restore courage 13. Pet Detective Ventura 14. Discount 15. Where rockers play 16. Light Armored Reconnaissance (abbr.) 17. Computer manufacturer 18. Nomadic people 20. Liquefied natural gas 21. Steps leading to a river 22. Benign tumors 25. In an early way 30. Type of wall 31. Pop folk singer Williams 32. Greek Titaness 33. Expresses purpose 38. Type of school 41. Least true 43. Delighted 45. Church building 47. Replacement worker

49. A sign of assent 23. Disappointment 50. Semitic gods 24. Evergreen shrub 55. Ancient kingdom near Dead Sea 25. Parts per thousand (abbr.) 56. Partly digested food 26. Young snob (Brit.) 57. Fevers 27. Midway between northeast and east 59. Genus of trees 28. Chinese surname 60. Midway between east and southeast 29. Poplar trees (Spanish) 61. Jewish spiritual leader 34. Electron scanning microscope 62. Gallivant 35. Actor DiCaprio 63. Hideaway 36. Equal (prefix) 64. Source 37. Cartoon Network CLUES DOWN 39. Revealed 1. Major division of time 40. Remove lice 2. Withered 41. Supervises interstate commerce 3. Portends good or evil 42. Whale ship captain 4. Single sheet of glass 44. Baited 5. More long-legged 45. Bleated 6. Scrutinized 46. Swedish rock group 7. Archway in a park 47. Air pollution 8. Oliver __, author 48. Carbonated drink 9. Ancient Greek City 51. Swiss river 10. Type of shampoo 52. Ottoman military commanders 12. __ King Cole 53. Type of job 14. Adventure story 54. One point east of southeast 19. Satisfy 58. Sex Pistols bassist Vicious

This week’s puzzle answers in next week’s issue

ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Any obstacle can be overcome if you set your mind to it, Aries. Your combination of intellect and work ethic will serve you well in the coming weeks. TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Others are paying attention to you this week, Aquarius. Bounce your ideas off of other people and don’t be surprised by the positive feedback you receive. GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, your energy and attentiveness are in abundance this week. Use this combination to tackle tasks you have been putting off. Offer others help if they need a hand. CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 You have an uncanny ability to tune into the way people think, Cancer. You can put this skill to work at the office or use it to network and explore new business ventures for yourself. LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, a family member needs help getting through a tough time. You could be the first person they call on to lend a helping hand. Offer your Here’s How It Works: unconditional support. Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each Put your creative energy to good use this week, Virgo. Think about row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric renovating a portion of your home or discovering a new hobby to keep you clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle! busy when things slow down.

LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, use this week to tackle a financial project this that has been on your mind for some time. Completing this project will provide some relief. SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, you have a lot of energy and a desire to do everything to the best of your abilities. This week that approach will serve you well in your professional life. SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, a request of you may require some help to be fulfilled. Trust your instincts and don’t be afraid to seek assistance if you think this requires a team effort. CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, make the most of a sudden burst of energy. Apply this to both your personal and professional lives. Bring new people together in your social circle. AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 A new friend is keeping you on your toes, Aquarius. Embrace this person’s joie de vivre and go with the flow. You will be glad you let your hair down. PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, keep trying to win over someone whose opinion on a particular matter contradicts your own. It just may take a little more persuasion. 0915

YOUR CAREER

STARTS HERE

SEARCH

Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016

35


2016-17 Season

All Games

On Sale

NOW!

Visit ottawasenators.com/tickets or Call 1-877-788-FANS Follow us on Facebook www.facebook.com/ottawasenators and on Twitter: @Senators

®Trade-mark of Capital Sports & Entertainment. *The following tickets are only available in 5 Game Pick’em Packs: October 12, 2016 vs. Toronto Maple Leafs, † Applies to full and half season-seat members. *Visit ottawasenators.com for full details. Certain conditions apply. ®Trade-mark of Capital Sports & Entertainment. October 15, 2016 vs. Montreal Canadians, December 29, 2016 vs. Detroit Red Wings January 12, 2017 vs. Pittsburgh Penguins, January 14, 2017 vs. NHL and the NHL Shield are registered trademarks of the National Hockey League. NHL and NHL team marks are the property of the NHL and its teams. © NHL 2015. All Rights Reserved. Toronto Maple Leafs and March 18, 2017 vs. Montreal Canadians. Visit ottawasenators.com for more details. ®/™ Trade-mark of Capital Sports & Entertainment.

36

Ottawa East News - Thursday, September 15, 2016


Sunday, Sept. 25 Get your tickets now!

in Advance *includes taxes but excludes CRF and convenience charges

Be one of the first 7,500 to purchase your ticket and receive a Craig Anderson Bobblehead at Fan Fest. Senators practice and intrasquad game Autograph sessions • Fan press conferences Interactive games • Free parking and Half-price Concessions! Schedule of Events

9 am 10 am 11:45 am 12:40 am 1:30 pm 2:45 pm 5 pm

Doors open - Welcome Ceremony (Gate 1) Ottawa Senators practice - Team Red Intrasquad Game - Team Red vs Team White Ottawa Senators practice - Team White Autographs/Photos - Team Red Fan Press Conferences Autographs/Photos - Team White Fan Press Conferences Closing

Visit ottawasenators.com/tickets or Call 1-877-788-FANS * First 7,500 fans purchasing a Fan Fest ticket will receive a voucher for a bobblehead at time of ticket purchase, to be redeemed at Fan Fest on September 25, 2016. ® Registered trade-mark of Capital Sports & Entertainment Inc.


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Ottawa East News September 15, 2016

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