Page 1

YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

Attention Denture v•E • Wearers...

TOTAL EMC DISTRIBUTION 474,000

WE BUY GOLD!

nisuB

Are you having troubles with your dentures? We have a solution for every problem. www.sdic.ca

%,'+#G%%&&*&-*.(

Turn your unwanted Gold & Silver into instant CASH!

FOR A FREE CONSULTATION CALL

712 St. Laurent Blvd

613-216-7107 Emergency Service Available

9999

0310.339071

Sean Denture & Implant Centre

THURSDAY, AUGUST 16, 2012

AT GLOUCESTER CENTRE MALL

613-702-2090

www.YourOttawaRegion.com

Inside Closure

A Sandy Hill teen will mystify audiences at the Rideau Carleton Raceway for this year’s Midway Magic fair. – Page 4

SPECIAL REPORT

The second installment of Metroland’s Cycling the Capital series takes a look at connecting bicycle routes and the battle over bike lanes. – Page 6

NEWS

An Ottawa business man shares his own experience with dyslexia in an effort to help others realize their full potential. – Page 20

of police centre raises concerns Somerset police centre closed on Aug. 7 Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - The recent decision to close the Somerset Community Police Centre does not sit well with some area residents. The Ottawa police made the announcement that the community police centre located at 393 Somerset St. West would close for good on Aug. 7. The centre would be relocated to space at city hall in September. Robert Dekker, vice-president of the Centretown Citizens Community Association reported he has heard from many concerned residents in the area. “There is concern with the station gone, the safety the community currently feels will be gone and they are apprehensive of what could happen.” Dekker is not happy with what he called a sudden decision to close the building. “We were surprised. We received notice at 1:30 p.m. on a Friday before the long weekend? We thought we would get more notice,” Dekker said. The association, Dekker added, had heard there was potential for the centre to close, but had hoped to have taken part in a consultation process on where the new centre could be. “I think maybe I am being presumptuous, that the association was owed a phone call, but it would have been nice,” Dekker said. Cost of rent for the building is the given reason for the closure. Police chief Charles Bordeleau said that various provinces are facing sustainability issues and have to learn to re-allocate resources. See ASSOCIATION, page 9

Brier Dodge

Learning all about wildlife at Petrie Island Yip de Bruijn, 4, and his grandmother, right, join program leader Caleigh Delle Palme, left, for the weekly junior naturalist program run by the Friends of Petrie Island on Aug. 9. The Wednesday morning program runs each week in the summer.

Helping make memories last a lifetime Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - An art exhibit from local Old Ottawa South business owner and photographer Jérôme Scullino aims to help fund Alzheimer’s research at the University of Ottawa. The Art for Alzheimer’s exhibition on Aug. 19 will sup-

port the non-profit foundation You and Me for Memories, a foundation dedicated to raising money for Alzheimer’s disease research. Jérôme Scullino Photography Studio in Old Ottawa South will feature selections from Scullino’s personal work, Les Invisibles, a collection of photographs of the

elders from a small town in France. The feature photograph, one of an elderly couple embracing, highlights the impacts of a disease such as Alzheimer’s said studio manager Ashleigh Birkett. Scullino, not shy to offer his help when it comes to help fundraise for a cause, jumped at the chance to help

the organization. “It is important to the studio to give back to the community any way we can,” Birkett said. “From someone who comes to our studio or even ourselves, we have all been affected by this disease and we want to help.” See STUDIO, page 10

Open Monday to Friday, Evenings & Saturday Appointments Available - Emergencies

Get ready for school...Together! GENERAL DENTISTRY • CROWNS BRIDGES • VENEERS • TEETH WHITENING Electronic submission of dental claims

COWARDS WELCOME

Dr. Dennis Kajiura Dr. Mathieu Tremblay Service 637 Montreal Free Rd. (at Cummings) English Available in

Parking

613.746.3999

& French

R0011555084

NEWS


Three Customer Friendly Programs from Hydro Ottawa

R0011523731

NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Family fun set for Overbrook community day Event includes first outdoor movie for Overbrook Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

We all like to save time and make our lives easier. Here are three customer programs from Hydro Ottawa tailored to your needs. E-Billing from Hydro Ottawa is a convenient, environmentally-friendly and secure way to view your electricity bill online. Instead of receiving a paper bill by mail, we’ll send an email notiďŹ cation when your next bill is ready. Then you can go online and get all the information you want about your bill, electricity usage history or bill payments. You can quickly register for E-Billing if you have already enrolled in our MyHydroLink service. Just click on the E-Billing link for details. To date, more than 36,000 of our customers have taken advantage of our E-Billing service.

EMC news - Learn a few line dancing steps, take a bounce or two with the children in the bouncy castle or fill everyone’s bellies full of barbecue delights. When it comes to holding a community day in Overbrook, organizers said they want residents to see all that Overbrook has to offer. The free event begins at noon with a barbecue feast of hot dogs. Sheila Perry, president of the Overbrook Community Association, has been working with community partners, residents and the city to make this year’s community day a success. The event includes a

bouncy castle, a chance to learn how to line dance or watch a youth-police basketball game showdown. There will also be an outdoor movie playing once the sun sets. Perry said this day will give the community a chance to enjoy all the great things about their home. “It is a really, really special event,� Perry said. “This is a wonderful way to get to know your community.� This year marks the first anniversary of the Overbrook Community Centre’s re-opening and from the moment the day begins, organizers promise there will be a ton of activities for everyone who attends. With activities taking place inside and outside the community centre, Perry added people will have a hard time choosing what to do first. The community centre will be showcasing programming and there will be a chance to get crafty or watch youth

WRJHWKHUZLWK

3ULQFH(GZDUG,VODQG$XJ :RQGHUODQG0DULQHODQG 7RURQWR=RR$XJ

Your postage-free payment can then be made online through your ďŹ nancial institution, or by enrolling in our pre-authorized payment plan.

*DVSH%D\$XJ

When you set up E-Billing, another convenient choice is to register for the Auto-Pay option. You will never have to remember to make another payment again. Simply enter your banking information and we will withdraw the amount on the due date of your bill. It’s perfect if you’re going away or just busy with other things.

'LVFRYHULQJ&KLFDJR6HSW

$WODQWLF&LW\ 3KLODGHOSKLD6HSW

‡ZZZTXHHQVZD\WRXUVFD 0HULYDOH5G2WWDZD21.*-

R0011535415

)LQG2XW0RUH21/,1(

and police battle for bragging rights as the winner of a basketball game with a DJ to set the mood. Ottawa firefighters, police, paramedics, bylaw officers and city representatives have been invited to the event to promote community safety. “It is really important that you are working on a good rapport with the city when it comes to working on safety in the community,� Perry said. “And making knowledge available for what a community can do to make it safe is part of that. We have a lot to celebrate as a community, but we have a lot of work still to do and these individuals can offer support.� And the community has really come together to make this day happen, she said. The event was made possible through the help of the community’s partners. From a donated lunch through Ottawa Community Housing, a story reading organized by Ottawa Public Library and a bouncy castle provided by the community’s baseball neighbours, the Ottawa Fat Cats, Perry said she is amazed at how much work everyone has done to make the

day a possibility. “It is fabulous, it a growing progress, it takes a team to pull all this together and you can really feel everyone helping out,� Perry said. “A fair bit of work goes into this, with a lot going on behind the scenes. There is a true partnership with what is happening here, it is wonderful when you get a good group make it happen.� The other partners include the Overbrook-Forbes Community Resource Centre, the city, the East Ottawa Optimist Club and the Community Development Framework The day will also feature the unveiling of Overbrook’s first Paint It Up! mural project. More than 18 youth have participated throughout the month of August to help paint a mural that depicts life in Overbrook. The official unveiling will take place at 2 p.m. After a full day of activities, families will have a chance to go home and take a nap before the community association celebrates its first movie night with the screening of the film The Lorax at 8:30 p.m. For more information on the community day, residents are encouraged to go to www. overbrook.ca.

R0011553827

If you have not yet registered for MyHydroLink, it’s fast and easy to register before enrolling in E-Billing and Auto-Pay. Whether you are a residential or business customer, go to the www.hydroottawa.com homepage and click on MyHydroLink. More than 76,000 Hydro Ottawa customers have enrolled to take advantage of these features:

2OG)DVKLRQHG&DSH&RG$XJ

File

In 2011, the Overbrook community celebrated the re-opening of the Overbrook Community Centre during a community day event by promoting programing at the centre. This year’s event takes place on Aug. 18.

UĂŠ Â…iVÂŽĂŠÂœĂ•ĂŒĂŠĂžÂœĂ•Ă€ĂŠiÂ?iVĂŒĂ€ÂˆVÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠVÂœÂ˜ĂƒĂ•Â“ÂŤĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠ`>ĂŒ>ĂŠĂŠ by time-of-use; UĂŠ 6ˆiĂœĂŠ ĂžÂœĂ•Ă€ĂŠ VÕÀÀiÂ˜ĂŒĂŠ >VVÂœĂ•Â˜ĂŒĂŠ L>Â?>˜ViĂƒĂŠ >˜` payment history; UĂŠ ,i}ÂˆĂƒĂŒiÀÊ vÂœĂ€ĂŠ >ĂŠ ÂŤĂ€i‡>Ă•ĂŒÂ…ÂœĂ€ÂˆĂ˘i`ĂŠ ÂŤ>ޓiÂ˜ĂŒĂŠ ÂŤÂ?>˜ and E-Billing; UĂŠ -Ă•LÂ“ÂˆĂŒĂŠ >ĂŠ Â“ÂœĂ›iĂŠ Ă€i¾ÕiĂƒĂŒĂŠ œ˜Â?ˆ˜iĂŠ >˜`ĂŠ Ă€iViÂˆĂ›i immediate email conďŹ rmation of your move request details; and UĂŠĂŠ>ÂŽiĂŠ>ĂŠÂŤ>ޓiÂ˜ĂŒĂŠĂ•ĂƒÂˆÂ˜}ĂŠĂžÂœĂ•Ă€ĂŠVĂ€i`ÂˆĂŒĂŠV>Ă€`° It’s easier than ever, and more convenient for you, to get the information you need and to pay your paperless bills by using MyHydroLink, E-Billing and Auto-Pay from Hydro Ottawa. No purchase necessary. Contest open to all residents of Canada, excluding Quebec, aged 18 years of age or older. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received. One (1) grand prize will be awarded. Approximate retail value of the grand prize is $600. Entrants must correctly answer, unaided, a mathematical skill-testing question to be declared a winner. Contest closes August 31st 11:59pm EST. To enter and for complete rules visit www.save.ca

Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/savedotca 2

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

is a division of


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Annual bicycle tour promises a tasty ride Just Food event takes participants to seven community gardens in the city Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - A downtown bike tour will give participants a chance to stop and eat the cherries. The 2012 Urban Agriculture Bike Tour on Aug. 29 is organized through Just Food. The tour begins downtown and will take cyclists through Sandy Hill, the Glebe, Old Ottawa South, Old Ottawa East and over the Rideau River to Alta Vista for a total of a 12kilometre bike ride. The tour is being held to inform participants the importance of having a sustainable food system in their city. Tyler Levitan organized this year’s event and invited everyone to join the ride. “If people are interested in community gardens, and the sustainable food movement in the city, and want to meet like-minded people to learn some gardening skills and also have a really good time, they should come out,” Levitan said

“It is also just a nice time to spend the afternoon on your bike.” The ride is intended to promote community gardens, Levitan said, so individuals who wish to learn more about how a community garden is built are encouraged to come out. This is the fifth year Just Food has organized this bike tour, but it’s the first time the tour will include a stop at a home owner’s garden, too. Old Ottawa East resident Maryna Nowosielski has a garden unlike any other. A mix of fruit trees, roses, green beans and strawberries, Nowosielski has planted it all together. “You can mix and match. It is good when you grow your beans in with the flowers. It contributes to proper growing and looks really pretty too,” Nowosielski said. Nowosielski’s garden will be a stop on Levitan tour. A resident of the Glengarry Road for 35 years, Nowosielski continually changes what

her garden looks like and grows every year and she has offered the same advice to new gardeners who will stop by. “Just do what ever you like, because you will be changing it anyway. But learn what likes to grow where. After that, it doesn’t matter,” she said. Levitan said he wanted to feature Nowosielski’s garden because it truly has everything and it’ss a sight to see. Over a four-hour period, the tour will visit seven community gardens, including the stop at Nowosielski’s garden. Families are encouraged to come out, and Levitan said. No one has to cycle the entire 12 kilometres if they do not wish to. “Ask questions about anything,” Levitan said. “That is the point. Ask anything about what makes gardening unique or how to garden while on the tour.” There will be free, locally grown snacks available during the ride. The tour costs a suggested donation of $5 to participate, which will be donated to the Ottawa Food Bank. More information about the event is available at www.justfood.ca.

Submitted

Just Food bicycle tour organizer Tyler Levitan stands in the BUGS community garden, located at the Glebe Memorial Park, which is one of the gardens the tour will visit on Aug. 29

THE FAMILY THAT RIDES TOGETHER, SAVES TOGETHER

With the OC Transpo Family DayPass, up to six people (maximum of 2 age 13 years or older) can ride together all day any Saturday, Sunday or stat holiday for just $7.75! The DayPass is also good for unlimited daily rides for one person, any day of the week. PURCHASE THE DAYPASS AS YOU BOARD THE BUS!

R0011549263

Exact fare only please, the driver cannot make change.

R0011554624

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

3


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

SuperEx bringing Midway Magic to south Ottawa Sandy Hill magician will entertain audiences twice a day Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

EMC news – While the real SuperEx rides its logistical rollercoaster to secure a new home, World’s Finest Shows is bringing a little magic to the nearby Rideau Carleton Raceway this month. Beginning Thursday, Aug. 16, the raceway’s grassy grounds will be transformed into a wonderland of rides, games and shows to keep the whole family entertained over two weekends until Sunday, Aug. 26. The event is sponsored by the Central Canada Exhibition Association, which ran SuperEx at Lansdowne Park for more than 120 years until 2010, when it was cancelled due to the historic site’s redevelopment. SuperEx’s midway provider, World’s Finest Shows, created last year’s first Midway Magic event to tide families over while SuperEx is on hold. It was hosted at the Ottawa Baseball Stadium in the city’s east end. Joe Pavia, Ottawa representative for World’s Finest Shows, said this year the baseball team didn’t have its lease

finalized with the city before World’s Finest Shows needed to decide on a venue, so they went with the raceway. “When we had to make decisions it just wasn’t timely,” he said. While the Rideau Carleton Raceway is not as central as the baseball stadium, Pavia said the venue has some noticeable perks. “The raceway has something we always love to have: it has real grass. And if you’re bringing a family it’s nice to not be on pavement,” he said. He added that the raceway is better equipped with services like water and power. While World’s Finest Shows knew its event was magical last year, this year the organizers have made it more official with a roster of magicians, illusionists and hypnotists taking the stage over the two-weekend fair. Popular hypnotist Fernandez is the star, and will offer his “hypnotic comedy” at 4 and 8 p.m. each day on weekends. Ottawa magician Ian Quick will also offer two shows each day on the weekend, which are “filled with laughs, thrills and jaw-

Emma Jackson

Sandy Hill magician Gabe Roberge, 14, will mystify audiences at Midway Magic this month. dropping effects,” according to the Midway Magic press release. But it’s Quick’s understudy, 14-year-old Gabe Roberge, that visitors should watch for. The young Sandy Hill magician will perform twice a day on weekends at the biggest gig of his short career.

“I’ve never been asked to do this many shows for one person, so I’m very excited about that,” said Roberge, who will begin Canterbury High School’s drama program this September. Since he was about four years old, Roberge has lived and breathed magic. His small

bedroom is crammed with hundreds of gags, props and books that have made him the magician he is today. His decks of cards alone occupy a four-level desktop drawer set, sorted into dozens of rows of red and blue decks just waiting to fascinate his next audience.

“Magic is everything,” he said. “I spend 24/7 thinking about it, working on it, practicing, trying to find new stuff to add to my show.” His Midway Magic shows will offer family-oriented magic and comedy, where he’ll invite kids on stage to participate in his tricks. He’ll make a two-litre bottle of pop appear out of nowhere and pull a roll of toilet paper out of his mouth to get people laughing. “That’s probably the hardest thing for me ... just getting people laughing, to all join in and have a good time,” he said. Nixing the traditional cape, top hat and wand for a more casually colourful attire, Roberge considers himself a “modern magician” who combines comedy with fresh magic that will leave his audience in awe. “I try to keep it away from pulling a rabbit out of a hat and pulling a quarter from a kid’s ear. I try to keep it fresh so people are always interested in what’s happening next,” he said. Roberge will perform twice every Saturday and Sunday during the fair, which runs Thursday, Aug. 16 to Sunday, Aug. 19 and Thursday, Aug. 23 to Sunday, Aug. 26. For complete details visit www.midwaymagic.ca. 0329.R0011323226

City seeks submissions for

Architectural Conservation Awards 8^inhZZ`hhjWb^hh^dch[dg6gX]^iZXijgVa 8dchZgkVi^dc6lVgYh HjWb^hh^dchVgZWZ^c\VXXZeiZY[dgi]Z 8^inÉhW^"VccjVaDiiVlV6gX]^iZXijgVa 8dchZgkVi^dc6lVgYhXdbeZi^i^dc[dg '%&&$'%&'# 6lVgYhl^aaWZegZhZciZY^cÒkZ XViZ\dg^Zh[dgegd_ZXihXdbeaZiZY WZilZZcHZeiZbWZg'%&%VcY HZeiZbWZg'%&'!Vh[daadlh/ ™ GZhidgVi^dcÄgZijgc^c\V]Zg^iV\Z gZhdjgXZid^ihdg^\^cVa[dgb!bViZg^Va VcY^ciZ\g^in ™ 6YVei^kZGZjhZÄVYVei^c\VcdaY Wj^aY^c\[dgVcZlejgedhZl]^aZ gZiV^c^c\^ih]Zg^iV\ZX]VgVXiZg ™ >cÒaaÄcZlXdchigjXi^dc^cV]^hidg^X XdciZmi ™ 6YY^i^dcÄcZlVYY^i^dchid]^hidg^X Wj^aY^c\h ™ Di]ZgÄI]^hXViZ\dgnl^aaX]Vc\Z YZeZcY^c\dci]Zegd_ZXihhjWb^iiZY ^cV\^kZcnZVg#Egd_ZXihXdjaY^cXajYZ Zc\^cZZg^c\egd_ZXih ^#Z#Wg^Y\ZgZhidgVi^dcdgaVcYhXVe^c\egd_ZXih ^#Z#gZhidgVi^dcd[]^hidg^X\VgYZchdgeVg`h 6eea^XVi^dc[dgbh!\j^YZa^cZhVcYVa^hi^c\d[egZk^djhVlVgYl^ccZghVgZVkV^aVWaZdci]Z 8^inÉhlZWh^iZVilll#diiVlV#XV$Wj^ai]Zg^iV\Z# I]ZYZVYa^cZ[dgVeea^XVi^dch^h;g^YVn!HZeiZbWZg'&!'%&'# ;dgbdgZ^c[dgbVi^dc!eaZVhZXdciVXi/ AZhaZn8daa^ch IZa/+&("*-%"')')!Zmi'&*-+ :"bV^a/AZhaZn#Xdaa^ch5diiVlV#XV





]iie/$$lll#diiVlV#XV

6Y'%&'"%-"-&'-"&+.*%G%%&&**++')"%-&+

4

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Ottawa police target distracted drivers EMC Staff

EMC news –A crackdown on cellphone use while driving has resulted in 39 tickets issued to motorists in the east end during the first week of a month-long blitz by Ottawa police. The tickets were issued over a three-hour period at various

intersections in the east end during the first week of August. Drivers were caught texting in their laps while sitting at a traffic light, and talking on the phone through the speakerphone function. Both of these offences are against the distracted driving law and cellphone laws and can cost a first-time offender

$155. The police blitz will continue to focus on cellphone use while driving and seat belt violations. Information on the distracted driving law and crime prevention safety can be found on the Ottawa Police Services website at http://www. ottawapolice.ca. R0011552820

MEC EVENTS & WORKSHOPS DATE

EVENT

TIME

COST

Thursdays

Meetup Run

6:30 PM

Free

Sundays

Meetup Ride

8:00 AM

Free

Mondays

Bike Maintenance 101

6:00 PM

Free

Wednesdays

Women Only Meetup Ride

6:00 PM

Free

Saturdays

Women Only Meetup Run

8:30 AM

Free

Tuesdays

Natural Running 101

6:00 PM

Free

Laura Mueller

Canada’s sweetheart Ottawa’s most decorated athlete, Barbara Ann Scott-King, was joined by Mayor Jim Watson and others to officially open the Barbara Ann Scott Gallery at city hall on Aug. 9. Sandy Hill native Scott-King grew up skating on Dow’s Lake and went on to become the only person to hold the European, North American, Canadian and World championship titles and the Olympic gold simultaneously in 1948. The new gallery features memorabilia from her beginnings with the Minto Figure Skating Club to her ascent to world champion.

366 Richmond Road, Ottawa 613.729.2700 | mec.ca/events

September 15 to October 15, 2012 Take part in the annual Cleaning the Capital campaign brought to you by the City of Ottawa and Tim Hortons. Be one of thousands of participants who keep Ottawa clean, green, graffiti-free and litter-free.. Join your friends and neighbours to clean up a park, schoolyard or other public area in your community. Step 1: Register Register your cleanup project by visiting ottawa.ca/clean or calling 3-1-1 before October 15. We’ll provide you with a cleanup kit with everything you need to get started. Step 2: Your cleanup project Join your friends and neighbours for a cleanup project in your neighbourhood such as a park, schoolyard, ravine or any public area that may need to be tidied up.

Vintage Motorcycle Show at Ottawa’s family-friendly historic site!

Step 3: Win prizes! Participants have a chance to win great prizes, including early bird prizes if you register before September 15.

Billings Estate National Historic Site 2100 Cabot Street, Ottawa

You can register until October 15, 2012.

2010018040

R0011552657-0816

613-247-4830 or visit ottawa.ca/museums for more information Like us on Facebook at Facebook.com/billingsestate

2012078115-03

ottawa.ca/clean

Sunday August 26 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

http://www.ottawa.ca

6Y'%&'"%+"+%'*"&+.)&G%%&&**)&*-"%-&+

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

5


FEATURE

Your Community Newspaper

Cycling the capital City looks to connect its biking routes Ottawa’s new cycling ‘links’ are making it a leader in connecting cycling facilities Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - By the end of this month, there should be a ramp allowing people to wheel their bike up beside the stairs to get up the hill to cross Hartwell Locks. It’s a small, simple addition, and although it has taken eight years to make it happen, it will allow thousands of cyclists to use the locks to cross the Rideau Canal, particularly during the National Capital Commission’s Sunday Bike Days. It’s just one of thousands of small projects completed each year to tweak conditions to make life easier for cyclists in Ottawa, says Robin Bennett, the city’s project manager of cycling programs. Ottawa’s extensive network of pathways and decent complement of painted bicycle lanes allow the city to boast that it is one of the most bikefriendly cities in the country. But if the city wants to hit its target of 12,000 trips taken by bike in 2021 (there were 4,500 in 2001), it needs to link those cycling routes together. Things like the new “bike box” at the north end of Bay Street at Wellington Street are the type of thing that re-

Laura Mueller

Innovative cycling fixes like this new ‘bike box’ at Bay Street and Wellington Street are helping put Ottawa out front of other Ontario municipalities when it comes to bicycle infrastructure. ally work to connect cycling routes, said Colin Simpson, a transportation planner at the city and project manager of the Laurier segregated bicycle lane. “It’s a great addition because it supports an important feeder line,” he said. A left turn at busy Wellington Street is the most intimidating part of cycling from Ottawa’s downtown, including the east-west Laurier segregated lane to the Ottawa River pathway and the Portage Bridge to Gatineau. Adding a bike box there to give cyclists the priority to turn left before cars is a way to make all the rest of the city

and NCC pathways and lanes more accessible and easier to use, Simpson said. Segregated lanes are the way of the future, participants heard at the Velo-City bicycle conference in Vancouver this June. They are what make the difference between improving conditions for people who already cycle, and getting new people on the roads, said Simpson, who attended the conference. “We hear from people who are taking up cycling because of this lane,” said Alex deVries, vice president of the local advocacy group, Citizens for Safe Cycling.

Unlike segregated lanes, bike boxes don’t need a trial period or “pilot project,” – they can just be done right away. That’s something Simpson wants to see more of. “We need to go further and do it faster,” he said. CYCLING LEADER

With mysterious and novel things like bike boxes popping up in Ottawa, the city is fast becoming recognized as a leader in cycling infrastructure. Buffered bike lanes on Bay Street are another Ottawa first on Simpson’s list. He wants to make the painted lines of an existing northbound bicycle

lane on Bay Street wider by painting a wider diagonal strip to the left of the bike lane, causing cars to leave more buffer room for cyclists. Another big first will be a grade-separated bicycle track along Churchill Avenue between Byron and Carling. When that road is reconstructed next year, it will have a raised track between the sidewalk and vehicle lanes that will give cyclists a feeling of safety similar to riding on the sidewalk. Being among the first in the province to construct these types of cycling facilities is giving Ottawa the edge in helping plan the provincial rules for cycling infrastructure. The upcoming bike facility guidelines, referred to as Book 18, will be completed by the end of the year, thanks in large part to the efforts of city transportation planner Robert Grimwood. “It puts us in a position to provide input on implementation … It gives us a chance to be leaders,” Grimwood said. “Ottawa has very clearly been the most engaged municipality.” There are 13 municipalities participating in drafting Book 18, which for the first time will include guidelines for how to build bicycle lanes of different styles, bike signals, “crossrides” (intersection crosswalks that cyclists are allowed to bike though) and all manner of infrastructure that could be built for bikes. Book 18 won’t provide hard and fast rules, but Grimwood said the Ontario Traffic Manual, which the document will become part of, is considered the “Bible” of infrastructure planning. “It will be used,” he said.

Battle lines drawn over Ottawa’s bicycle lanes laura mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - Not unlike neighbourhoods rallying against tall buildings, there are groups who say they like bike lanes – just not here. While cyclists can argue that small changes and a few painted lines can make all the difference in getting new cyclists on the road, some counter that maybe that’s not the best idea, and maybe the lanes aren’t making them any safer. Or, perhaps the benefits to a few cyclists don’t outweigh the frustration bicycle lanes might cause for others, such as residents, businesses or motorists. Two such groups are BBRAGFAR (Bay/Bronson

Residents Action Group for Fair Access to the Road) and the Responsible Cycling Coalition (RCC). Both make it their main business to oppose the city’s two-year pilot project testing out a curb-separated bicycle lane on Laurier Avenue West. While both groups are similar in size (around five to eight people) and in their ability to garner media attention, they oppose the bike lane for very different reasons. PARKING

For some residents of Laurier Avenue West, seeing two lines of curbs bisecting the street when they look out their windows is hard to swallow. At the west end of the

street, between Lyon and Bronson, there used to be 69 parking spaces. Now there are none. The city says that section of Centretown now has more parking than before (124 spaces replaced 122), despite the removal of spaces on Laurier, because new street parking was created on adjacent streets. But that’s no comfort for many Laurier residents, who number around 2,000 in several buildings. Their concern is represented by the cumbersomely named BBRAGFAR, a small group that says there are not enough cyclists using the bike lane in their section of the street to warrant leaving the curbs up for another year of

the pilot project. “A service for which we pay taxes was taken away from us for the sake of a few cyclists,” said Norm King, one of BBRAGFAR’s five members. They want the city to keep the segregated lane farther east, but convert it into a “sharrow,” a painted shared car and bike lane, and allow parking over the sharrow markings when it’s not rush hour (Toronto is piloting that idea on College Street). There’s less traffic and therefore less risk of injury to cyclists on those blocks, so there is no need for a segregated lane – parking would be more beneficial, King says. BBRAGFAR also bemoans the lack of consultation before

the lanes were put in. But King admits he did know about the handful of public meetings he could have attended to express his opinion – but he thinks the city had a responsibility to come meet directly with Laurier residents, and no one did. Seeing snow removed from the bike lanes at the same time as the rest of the street – often before sidewalks are cleared – only serves to add to their frustration, King says. There are many elderly or disabled folks residing in the area, and the alternate loading and drop off zones don’t serve them as well as the parking spaces they grew accustomed to enjoying. See BIKE, page 7

Cycling snafus

Cutting across 400-series highway on-ramps to continue straight on a road or bike lane is a daunting risk for cyclists.

Cycling lanes that disappear or appear out of nowhere, like this one in the middle of O’Connor Street, create collision potential.

Sharrow markings in lanes that aren’t wide enough for both bikes and cars, like at Laurier and Elgin, create risk.

Debris or crumbling asphalt in a bike lane or near the curb can force cyclists into the traffic lane For more or to report an issue: ottawabikingproblems.ca

What routes do you use for your commute? Tell us your cycling experiences at: www.yourottawaregion.com 6

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012


FEATURE

Your Community Newspaper

Bike lanes pit cyclists against cyclists ... and drivers Continued from page 6

It’s difďŹ cult for people with mobility concerns to cross over the barriers in the middle of the street, King added. “The use of bicycles isn’t the issue,â€? King said. “We just don’t want to have the front of our buildings blockaded for no reason.â€? “Our chair has a bike,â€? King adds, referring to Janine Hutt, the head of BBRAGFAR. VEHICULAR CYCLISTS

For Kanata resident Avery Burdett, there’s a big risk in encouraging inexperienced cyclists to get on the road by offering them a false sense of security in a bike lane – a mirage that’s heightened on Laurier because of the curb separating cyclists from vehicles. Burdett is a founding member of the RCC, and for him, driving (and he is careful to use that word) a bicycle is a simple and time-tested process – it’s just not one that most people bother to educate

themselves about. And it’s not a skill that most people are encouraged to learn, he says. He’s what’s referred to as a vehicular cyclist, and following the principles set out by John Forester in Effective Cycling in 1976, he treats his bike like a car on the road. It’s a theory based on research that shows being a skilled cyclist is the best way to prevent injury or death, Burdett says. He rides with conďŹ dence because he knows how to, Burdett says. He has taken the nationally-syndicated Can-Bike training course and he has spent years riding the roads with other cyclists in the Ottawa Bicycle Club. That’s what he thinks everyone else should do before hitting the road. He says the focus on building infrastructure for bicycles is purely political: “They want to get people out of cars – and it’s not going to work ‌ It has to be recognized that skills will reduce the risk of people getting injured. We’re the thorn in the side of their plans.â€?

Still, Burdett wouldn’t be upset to see more cyclists on the road – as long as they are trained to the exacting standards he holds himself to. “No one who is a committed cyclist would want to discourage people from getting on a bike,â€? he said. He says improvements to roads and intersections could make it easier for people to cycle – but those improvements would also beneďŹ t all road users and motorists, he added. ADVOCACY

Cycling advocacy in Ottawa seemed to go through a shift starting about four years ago. That’s when Hans Moor took over as president of Citizens for Safe Cycling (CfSC), and it’s also around the time when the group handed over Can-Bike training courses to be run by the city. “It’s not the same group as it was,� said Burdett, who was once involved with CfSC. “It’s basically an environmen-

tal group now.â€? Moor, who moved to Ottawa from Holland in 1998, says his ďŹ rst decade or so in Ottawa gave him the impression that the people who cycle here are mainly focused on an athletic pursuit. But after he took over the advocacy group, he noticed that there were many cyclists in Ottawa who shared his mindset: that riding a bike is simply an efďŹ cient, healthy and safe way to get around. “Our message is a bit more moderate than in the past – it appeals to more people,â€? Moor said. Moor likens the range of cycling groups to the different types of motorists. That includes everyone from regular commuters to Formula One racecar drivers, he says. “Eliteâ€? cycling groups like RCC represent the cycling equivalent of Formula One drivers. CfSC leans more to the average commuter. CfSC doesn’t disagree with everything other groups are saying (Moor also thinks that more money could be spent

Laura Mueller

Cyclists should learn how to ‘drive’ their bicycles before hitting the road, according to Avery Burdett, a founding member of the Responsible Cycling Coalition. on cycling education), but he’s reluctant to get into debates with groups that hold an opposing view. In the end, Moor says his impression is that not many

decision makers listen to the anti-bike lane or elite vehicular cycling groups. “It doesn’t have much of an impact on where cycling is going in Ottawa.�

R0011555030-0816

Sunday Services Worship Service10:30am Sundays Prayer Circle Tuesday at 11:30 10:30 a.m. Rev. James Murray

R0011292993

-/&*Vb&%/(%Vb

QUEENSWOOD UNITED CHURCH

Celebrate with us Sundays @ 10am Teen programs, Sunday School & Nursery Available 1111 Orleans Boulevard 613-837-4321 Check us out at: www.orleansunitedchurch.com

Ministers: Rev. Dr. Christine Johnson Stephanie Langill - Youth and Children Rev. George Clifford - Pastoral Care Lyon Street South and First Robert Palmai - Music 

Bilberry Creek Baptist 480 Charlemagne Blvd., Orleans

Worship Time: 11:00

Worship 10:30 am R0011292984

613-236-0617 www.glebestjames.ca glebestjames.church@bellnet.ca

Our Service Times: Sundays at 10am & Wednesdays at 7pm R0011545745

360 Kennedy Lane E., Orleans

613-837-6784 www.queenswoodunited.org

Childcare available at all services

R0011293010

R0011292981

St. Margaret’s Anglican Church

A Church in the Heart of Vanier 206 Montreal Rd. Sunday Communion at 9:00 am in English Also at 11:00 am (in English and Inuktitut) 613-746-8815 www.stmargaretsvanier.ca

THIS IS MY pentecostal church

10:00 am - Morning Worship KidzChurch (ages 4-11) 7:00 pm Young Adult Service Nursery care available during Sunday School and Morning Worship for infants – 3yrs.

www.billberry.org / 613-824-3131

Minister: Rev. Ed Gratton

Come and celebrate God’s love with us.

1234 Prestone Dr, Orleans (1 block west of 10th Line, 1 block south of St. Joseph) 613-824-2010 www.sthelens.ca

Capital City Church 1123 Old Montreal Rd. phone: 613.833.1700 www.capitalcitychurch.ca

Vacation Bible Adventure Aug. 13-17 & Aug. 20-24

G%%&&'.'.(,

Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. Sunday School/Nursery During Worship

R0011359314-0419

265549/0605 R0011293022

Elgin at Lisgar 613-238-4774 email: knoxottawa@rogers.com www.knoxottawa.ca Sunday Worship 11 AM Sunday School Serving Christ in the heart of the Nation’s Capital

R0011458919

St Bartholomewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church HjcYVnHX]dda;dg8]^aYgZc)"&'ngh# CjghZgnNdji]<gdje &'*BVX@VnHigZZi!DiiVlVÂ&#x2122;+&(,)*",-()

Sunday Worship 8, 9:15, 11

R0011354346

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come Pray with Usâ&#x20AC;? 320 Olmstead St. Vanier (613) 746-8503

Info: 613-216-2200 or www.bvnanglican.ca

R0011291942

R0011292986

PERPETUAL HELP EVENING DEVOTION â&#x20AC;&#x201C; WED 6:15 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7 PM

lll#hiWVgihdiiVlV#XV

355 Cooper Street at Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor 613-235-5143 www.dc-church.org

8:30 a.m. 10:00 a.m. 9:45am 11:30 a.m.

ST. HELENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ANGLICAN CHURCH

KNOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Mon.-Fri. 8:00 am Sat. 4:00 pm Sun. 9:00 am & 10:30 am 12:00 pm Filipino

Sunday Worship Trinity (8785 Russell Rd., Bearbrook) St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (3480 Trim Rd., Navan) Navan Community Sunday School St. Andrewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (1900 Devine Rd., Vars)

R0011292944

G%%&&'.((,*

MASSES: M

Services at 9:00 am every Sunday All are welcome to join us in faith and fellowship.

Reverend Canon John Wilker-Blakley

Dominion-Chalmers United Church

2476 Old Montreal Rd., Cumberland Tel: 613-859-4738

Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary Parish

613-590-0677 stmarys@rogers.com stmarysblackburn.ca

Anglican Parish of Bearbrook, Navan & Vars

R0011555953

You are specially invited to our Sunday Worship Service

Sunday Eucharist 10:00 a.m. Sunday School

2750 Navan Rd. (2 minutes South of Innes)

1220 Old Tenth Line Rd Orleans, ON K1E3W7 Phone: 613-824-9260 www.graceorleans.ca pastordan@graceorleans.ca

:kZgnHjcYVn.Vbid&&Vb EVhidgH^bZdc

    

St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Church

INVITES YOU TO WORSHIP SUNDAYS AT 10:45AM

R0011292950

&&)'8Vga^c\6kZHj^iZ&"( DiiVlV!DciVg^d@&O,@* IZa/+&(#+-%#).*,$+&(#+&)#'''-

GRACE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

R0011293005

R0011414050

SPECIAL INVITATION

Generation Impact Youth Group meets every Wednesday at 7pm

6:00 pm (Sat) - Spanish Service 3:00 pm (Sun) - Spanish Sunday School

1825 St. Joseph Blvd, Orleans 613-837-3555

www.cpcorleans.ca

Place your Church Services Call Sharon 613-688-1483 Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

7


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

EDITORIAL

Drought comes with a price for everyone

Y

ear after year we are seeing less predictable weather. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s costing the farmers dearly this year and the dry times will cost us all over the coming months and years. Adapting our actions to deal with climate change is a simpler task than adapting our lives to deal with weather that can damage our economy. The price we pay for fruits and vegetables will be the

first effect felt by consumers. If dry weather becomes the new normal, some produce may not be available at all or the season will be shorter. Because local corn and hay feeds cows but is in short supply, farmers across much of Canada and the central United States will likely be forced to sell off beef cattle. There could be a glut and prices might drop in the short term which could be followed by a spike.

Unpredictable weather may mean unpredictable beef prices. Beyond the food on our tables, there will be other, less obvious effects if dry, hot weather becomes the norm. At Pinto Valley Ranch in Fitzroy Harbour, the owners plan to sell nearly half their horses because feeding them hay at current prices isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t possible. That will mean reduced opportunities for Ottawa kids to try riding,

which in turn will almost certainly mean fewer riders for the equestrian industry in the future. If watering bans become the new normal, backyard gardens and community allotment gardens wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be able to provide as much food for city folk. That in turn increases demand for imported foods. If weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re forced to stop watering lawns, they will die and homeowners will have to invest in drought resistant

plants or pave the front yard. Golf courses are suffering and the cost of installing irrigation systems could be the difference between staying in business or shutting down for some course owners. The sports fields used by children and adults are in rough shape because of the dry weather. When the quality of play drops far enough, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to add the cost of resodding fields to the property tax bill. All those costs for con-

sumers pale in comparison with the trouble ahead for farmers. Some plants do well in wet weather while others can survive dry times, but what can farmers plant when the weather is completely unpredictable? If our summers are going to be extreme â&#x20AC;&#x201C; dry, wet, hot or cold â&#x20AC;&#x201C; we will all pay dearly. It makes investment in climate science seem like a good deal.

COLUMN

Protecting our most precious commodity â&#x20AC;&#x201C; sleep BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse We recently had one of those Sunday afternoons where our newborn screamed as only a colicky baby can for 15 minutes. In the same quarter of an hour, my six and seven-year-old boys started wrestling to the death on their bedroom floor, the cat vomited at my feet from the humidity, just as Ottawa received its first significant rainfall in over a month and water started pouring through the living room ceiling. The aftermath was not pretty. No resilience, no problem-solving, no understanding or empathy for the poor cat. To put it simply, we all freaked out. Much of this â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or at least our reactions to it â&#x20AC;&#x201C; could have been prevented by a good nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sleep the night before. Unfortunately, with a two-week-old baby on hand, my husband and I had spent the better part of midnight to 5 a.m. rocking or feeding or singing to our crying baby. We were exhausted. I decided that day that I had to take matters in hand. There would be no more five- hour overnight stretches of screaming baby. I vowed that

from 10 p.m. until 6 a.m., I would not leave my bed, and the baby would be by my side, and she would learn to respect the precious commodity of sleep in our household. Who says you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sleep train a newborn? At the risk of jinxing a good thing, my method has worked. Little Darling seems to sense that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for bed as soon as the TV goes off, the lullabies go on, the lights go down and we put our jammies on before the last feed of the day. Granted she tends to fall asleep in my arms, me propped upright for most of the night on a collection of cushions and pillows. But you know what? Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re sleeping. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re sleeping so well, in fact, that I often wake up in a panic because five or six hours have gone by without interruption. I check to make sure Little Darling is still breathing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; she is â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and then proceed to wake her for a feed. At 6 a.m. I get up, make coffee and open the curtains before waking Little Darling for the day. She doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have an opportunity to cry. She wakes up slowly as I talk to her, change her, tickle her toes and take her to the daytime feeding station in the living room. The boys generally help out with the final part of the daytime announcement by banging out the White Stripes on piano or guitar and then wrestling to the death on the living room floor. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only been a week. And you know babies have a tendency to alter their routines just as you get used to things. At the same time, a week is a third of Little Darlingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. And frankly, at this stage of the game, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll celebrate whatever sleep I can get.

Catch up on the latest

Web Poll THIS WEEKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S POLL QUESTION

How should the city deal with the emerald ash borer infestation?

A) Treat the trees even if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an expensive option. B) Cut down affected trees and hope the bugs donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t spread further.

Community News

C) Wait until the damage is done and replant trees other than ash.

with your local EMC.

D) What are ash borers?

Editorial Policy The Ottawa East EMC welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at www.yourottawaregion.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to patricia.lonergan@metroland.com , fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to the Ottawa East EMC, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa, ON, K2E 7L2.

OTTAWA EAST

Published weekly by:

:ME6C9:9B6G@:I8DK:G6<:

57 Auriga Drive, Suite 103 Ottawa, ON, K2E 8B2 613-723-5970 Vice President & Regional Publisher: Mike Mount Group Publisher: Duncan Weir Regional General Manager: Peter Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary Regional Managing Editor: Ryland Coyne Publisher: Mike Tracy mtracy@perfprint.ca

THE DEADLINE FOR DISPLAY ADVERTISING IS THURSDAY 10:00 AM 8

DISTRIBUTION INQUIRIES Steven Robinson 613-221-6213 ADMINISTRATION: Crystal Foster 613-723-5970 ADVERTISING SALES: Sales Manager: Carly McGhie 613-688-1479 cmcghie@perfprint.ca DISPLAY ADVERTISING: Caroline Grist - Kanata - 221-6215 Gisele Godin - Kanata - 221-6214

PREVIOUS POLL SUMMARY

Due to a technical problem, last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poll question did not appear on our website. Last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s question: How often do you use your bicycle to get around town?

A) Every day. My bicycle is my primary mode of transportation. B) Often. I cycle to work every once in a while or recreationally. C) Occasionally. I ride my bike a few times each year, but not frequently. D) Never â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even own a bicycle.

To vote in our web polls, visit us at www.yourottawaregion.com/community/cityofottawa

Dave Pennett - Ottawa West - 221-6209 Dave Badham - Orleans - 688-1652 Cindy Manor - Ottawa South - 688-1478 Geoff Hamilton - Ottawa East - 688-1488 Valerie Rochon - Barrhaven - 688-1669 Jill Martin - Nepean - 688-1665 Mike Stoodley - Stittsville - 688-1675 Emily Warren - Ottawa West - 688-1659 Stephanie Jamieson - Renfrew - 432-3655 Dave Gallagher - Renfrew - 432-3655 Leslie Osborne - Arnprior / WC - 623-6571 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SALES: Sharon Russell - 613-688-1483 Kevin Cameron - 613-221-6224 Adrienne Barr - 613-623-6571

EDITORIAL: Managing Editor: Patricia Lonergan 613-221-6261 patricia.lonergan@metroland.com NEWS EDITOR: Matthew Jay MATTHEWJAY METROLANDCOM 613-221-6175 REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER: Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com 613-221-6160 POLITICAL REPORTER: Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com 613-221-6162

Member of: Ontario Community Newspapers Association, Canadian Community, Newspapers Association, Ontario Press Council, Association of Free Community Papers

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

s !DVERTISINGRATESANDTERMSANDCONDITIONSAREACCORDINGTO the rate card in effect at time advertising published. s 4HEADVERTISERAGREESTHATTHEPUBLISHERSHALLNOTBELIABLE for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount charged for the space actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of its servants or otherwise... and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount charged for such advertisement. s 4HEADVERTISERAGREESTHATTHECOPYRIGHTOFALLADVERTISEMENTS prepared by the Publisher be vested in the Publisher and that those advertisements cannot be reproduced without the permission of the Publisher. s 4HE0UBLISHERRESERVESTHERIGHTTOEDIT REVISEORREJECT any advertisement.

Read us online at www.EMConline.ca Your Community Newspaper


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Park expo aims to teach residents about green living Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - An eco-friendly organization wants people in Ottawa to learn all about where used tires go. The group plans to create a mini-park in two spaces of a parking lot in the Byward Market near the intersection of Dalhousie and George streets on Aug. 19, with a bench sitting on a path surrounded by flowers and mulch – all made out of recycled rubber. Ontario Tire Stewardship Andrew Horsman said this park is his organization’s chance to showcase what happens to a recycled tire. The executive director said he wants the city of Ottawa to learn about the products which will be featured at the park, aiming to have the municipality begin to use eco-friendly products such as used rubber when building parks, curbs or play areas in the city. “The Pop-up Park gives people the idea of what real world use can be of their old tires,” Horsman said. “What we are trying to do with this space is to inform people of where their scrap tires go, they don’t get burned – they

get turned into sustainable products.” The Ontario Tire Stewardship is a non-profit organization responsible for developing and applying the use of Ontario’s used tire program and is funded by industry organizations. Horsman said the goal of the event in Ottawa is to educate people on how rubber can be used as an alternative building material for construction of city parks or roads. A recent survey conducted by Ontario Tire Stewardship found 89 per cent of Ontarians felt their communities would benefit from the use of recycled tire products in community projects. The event highlights sustainable living and maximizing recycled rubber products, turning them into everyday items including rubberized tiles, sidewalks, mulch and roof shingles, Horsman added. “It is taking place in a parking lot, taking up parking spaces, to also highlight the need to use other modes of transportation,” Horsman said. The eco-friendly mini-park will be open to the public from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Association will keep watch: Dekker Continued from page 1

“Managing within that envelope is a challenge we’re facing,” he said. “We looked at that we’re paying rent, $60,000 a year. How can we partner up with the city to save money?” By changing the location of the Centretown station, the department will drastically reduce rent costs to run the station. Dekker is not convinced. “I understand social responsibility, but at what point do we worry about the safety of the residents?” Dekker said. The building was closed over several months in 2011 for renovations, re-opening in April. At the time, the community police officer in charge of the centre Const. Khoa Hoang said the interim period had been extremely difficult for staff, the community, and business partners. Upon re-opening, the centre was flooded with residents, happy to have the centre back. Now, Dekker said, it will be gone for good. “One email from a resident asked, ‘how many (officers) boots will it take to replace a sign?’ And that is the question, isn’t it?” Dekker said. Dekker is referring to the element of safety the community police centre has offered,

simply by being in the neighbourhood. The centre will move from directly beside a methadone clinic to an office in city hall. Somerset West has not had too much criminal activity, and Dekker and area residents have credited that to the centre’s presence. Residents are worried that criminal activity in the area will increase after the centre moves to a new location, he said. The new location also poses some concerns. The move, Dekker said takes the centre away from residential homes. “Are people going to go to the new centre? They might call 911 instead,” Dekker said. Dekker suggested a space, such as a community centre could have also been used to house the community police centre. “A location like the Jack Purcell Recreation Association could have worked and people may have been more receptive to the move,” he said. But according to Sgt. Stephane Tracy, the move will not cause disruptions or affect programs and services offered by the downtown community police centre. Dekker said he hopes this is the case. “I know the officers out of

File

Residents have raised some concern over the closure of the downtown community police centre located at 393 Somerset St. West. The centre will be relocated to city hall in September. that building were fabulous and we are anticipating that the level of interaction will not change,” he said. Tracy said the number of officers for the area and the centre itself won’t change, adding that the level of service will remain the same. “Moving will not affect what the community police centre does,” Tracy said. Dekker said in light of the removal of the centre, the community association’s safety committee will be watching for any increase in criminal activity in the area. Dekker encourages residents who live in the area to

contact the committee if there are any concerns. “The committee will gauge how this new change will go,” Dekker said. “We may not know until September what the impact is of the centre moving but we will be keeping an eye on it.” The centre will relocate to city hall on September. Crime prevention information can be picked up at any of the other community police centres in the city. For urgent police matters, police have requested residents go to the Ottawa Police Station at 474 Elgin St. or call 613-236-1222 ext. 5766.

0719.R0011511084

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

9


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Studio holds exhibit to raise money for Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research Continued from page 1

Birkett added it is also important to the studio to give back to the community. You and Me for Memories is a volunteer group that raises money for Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research done by Dr. Richard Bergeron, a physician with the University of Ottawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faculty of medicine. The foundation was created in 2008 by St-Jeanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brother, David, and his friend, Bruce Levis, who both had mothers who suffered from the disease. At one time, the group raised all its money through one annual fall gala, but now holds several small fundraising events throughout the year at local long term care homes. This will be the first businessorganized fundraiser for the foundation. Over the past four years the organization has raised more than $175,000. St-Jean said the goal this year will be to sell more than 1,000 tickets, which are on sale for $80 each. AN EVENING TO REMEMBER

Karen St-Jean, the founda-

tionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s director of media relations and events sponsorships, said the idea for the fundraiser arose when she approached the photography studio for a donation for their annual fall gala, An Evening to Remember. Scullino, who also had a family member suffering from Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, showed St-Jean his photographs taken of an elderly couple embracing from the Les Invisibles series. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I started to cry, it reminded me of the way my father was with my mother,â&#x20AC;? St-Jean said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was when I saw the photograph that a conversation started about the possibility of holding an event at the studio.â&#x20AC;? Briket agreed that it was through the emotional conversation of what it is like to have a family member live with the disease which led the studio to offer to hold the one day fundraising event. This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the first time that the photographs of Les Invisibles have been on display, Brikett added, but it is the first time the photos will be displayed the way Scullino wants them to be. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The studio felt being able

JĂŠrĂ´me Scullino

An intimate moment showing an elderly couple embracing is but one of a series of photographs by Old Ottawa South photographer JĂŠrĂ´me Scullino. Part of a series called Les Invisibles, this and the other photographs will be on display during a fundraising event at Scullinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s studio at 1171 Bank St. on Aug. 19. The exhibition aims to raise money for Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease research. to exhibit the photos would bring awareness to the disease and to the studio. It is a project of JĂŠrĂ´meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (Scullinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) that is very dear to him, they have never been shown the way he wanted it to be, and this is his chance,â&#x20AC;? Brikett said. The staff of three began canvassing the area, from lo-

cal businesses to residents to inform them about the upcoming fundraiser as well as gather more gifts for the final draw. All the proceeds from the draw will go to the foundation and Scullino will donate half of the proceeds from any photograph prints sold to the

foundation. The exhibition will also feature a draw, where the chance to win one of Scullinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s print, along with other prizes will be handed out. Tickets to enter the draw are $20. The event is scheduled to run from 1 to 5 p.m. at 1171

Bank St. St-Jean said people can also donate to the foundation online at www.youandme formemories.ca or attend the fifth-annual You and Me for Memories gala, An Evening to Remember at the Ottawa Convention Centre on Sept. 29.

 

 " $ 

                              

ymcaywca.ca 10

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

YMCA-YWCA of the National Capital Region

YMCA-YWCA de la rĂŠgion de la capitale nationale

R0011553941

R0011534663

 +2*!+0., &' .,   #, +1 #,.+ 0+-%122%/**+0+-%022%,+/*


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Place dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;OrlĂŠans leads the way for e-car owners Electric car charging station installed at mall

Supporting the Next Generation of Sports: A Collective Responsibility Do you remember how proud you felt when Denis Potvin won the Stanley Cup for the first time in 1980? Or the chill you felt when Elizabeth Manley reached the second step of the podium at the Calgary Winter Olympic Games in 1988? Or the emotion you felt when Kristina Groves won a silver medal in the 1500m and a bronze medal in the 3000m speed skating event at the Vancouver Winter Olympic Games in 2010?

Brier Dodge brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - Ottawa drivers who use electric cars to get around have got their ďŹ rst free spot to charge up while they run errands. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s believed to be the ďŹ rst public electric car charger in Ottawa was installed at the Place dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;OrlĂŠans Shopping Mall on July 16. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s being used and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re receiving compliments from customers,â&#x20AC;? said Place dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;OrlĂŠans general manager Chris St. Amand. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sort of a growing community of electric car drivers.â&#x20AC;? The project started because Myers OrlĂŠans Chevrolet Buick GMC was looking for an OrlĂŠans location to install an electric car charging station. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know there are going to be more electric vehicles in the future,â&#x20AC;? said general sales manager Andrew McAlear. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to establish a location where our clients could charge up.â&#x20AC;? They considered several locations but they needed to ďŹ nd a location where the parking lot was owned by the retailer. Place dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;OrlĂŠans ended up ďŹ tting the bill best for the universal charging station, which charges any electric car. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We ďŹ gured that would be the number one location,â&#x20AC;? McAlear said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of people walk through Place dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;OrlĂŠans from January to December and there is a clear location underground.â&#x20AC;? Neither McAlear or St. Amand were aware of any other free public charging stations currently in Ottawa. The spot is marked in the underground parking, in the ďŹ rst row to the left upon entering underground parking from the north side of the mall. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s close to the carwash station that is also underground. The signs indicate that it is a spot for electric car charging and ask users to respect a two-hour parking limit. St. Amand said that there are some early issues with customers who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t drive electric cars parking in the spot. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re now putting up additional signage to say that that space is intended for electric cars only,â&#x20AC;? he said. He added that there are adjacent spaces that the chargerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cords can reach. For the electric vehicle McAlear is used to selling, the Chevrolet Volt, it takes about four hours for a full charge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meant for a top-up or replenishment,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re asking that they be considerate; donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t leave your vehicle there charging all day.â&#x20AC;? This is an early experiment for the shopping mall, but

Brier Dodge

The electric car charger in the underground parking area at the Place dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;OrlĂŠans Shopping Mall. management likes the idea so far and are open to expanding the program to include additional chargers in the future. The electric car community in Ottawa is small â&#x20AC;&#x201C; McAlear says he sells about 10 to 12 Volts a year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but owners

are connected, using message boards and mobile apps to share charging stations. While there are other charging stations in the city, they require a credit card to pay for usage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were unsure about

how much electricity it actually consumes but the information that we have is itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very nominal,â&#x20AC;? St. Amand said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to encourage customers to have green practices, so if we can support that, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re happy.â&#x20AC;?

FINALLY AN AFFORDABLE PERMANENT ROOF SOLUTION Asphalt roofs have an average life expectancy of only 9-14 years! WakeďŹ eld Bridge steel shingles are designed as an alternative to common asphalt shingles, but with the toughness and long-lasting qualities of highstrength steel. With our 50-year warranty, these new steel shingles may very well be the last roof you install on your house for as long as you live. s 2%$5#% 2%$5 %.%2 %.%2'9#/343 ss).#2%!3% ).#2 2%3!,%6!,5% 2%3! ss-!).4%.!.#% -!). &2%%

100% -!$%). /.4!2)/

Dynamic RooďŹ ng Systems Inc. Your Ideal RooďŹ ng Partner

Steel Shingles

Any athlete can tell you that you need talent and a lot of hard work to compete with the best in the world. But athletes will also say that a strong support team is important to their success. This means involved parents, devoted coaches, and committed volunteers. When an athlete steps onto the podium and reaches the pinnacle of his or her sport, it reflects the culmination of their effort and countless hours of training. But this achievement is also the success of a greater team, and even the community as a whole. This team is made of those people that have encouraged them since the beginning, watched their every step and followed them throughout their career. After all, these athletes are part of our family, our friends and are our neighbours. As members of our community, it is important that we support our athletic leaders of tomorrow. Of course, only a handful of athletes will ever reach the professional level in their respective sport or discipline. It is the same for the Olympics. Many aspire, but few manage to make it to the Games. However, the Olympic dream is still alive in young athletes today and it is for this reason that we must encourage their dreams and aspirations. By supporting young athletes of today, we are contributing to the professional athletes of tomorrow. In short, we must appreciate and develop amateur sports in Ottawa. It is up to us to get involved â&#x20AC;&#x201C; whether it is on the local, regional or provincial level â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with the goal of fostering our athletes. The 2014 Winter Olympic Games will take place in Sochi, Russia, more than 7000km from Canada. In 2016, it will be Rio de Janeiroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turn to host the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest athletes. But for many of these participants, their Olympic dreams start right here in Ottawa. Take part and get involved in our sports community.

Mathieu Fleury City Councillor for Rideau-Vanier Ward

#ALLUSTODAYFORANO obligation appointment

1-855-858-2939 .OFANCYSALESGIMMICKS, no tricks, JUSTANHONESTPRICEFROM#ANADASPREMIER manufacturer and supplier of steel rooďŹ ng.

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy a new roo f before talking to us.

-ENTIONTHISADWHENYOUCALL ANDWEWILLCOVERTHE(34 R0011555149-0816

 

    613-580-2482 R0011555102

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

11


C8JK  :?8E : KF<E < K<I

<ek\ikf[Xp]fi =I<<Xk

Zc`ZbĂ&#x2C6;9lp]fi'%''Ă&#x2030;

<ek\i]fipfli Z_XeZ\kf

N@E899H

R0011554145

"('' NX^AX^>ifZ\ip Zi\[`k

No purchase necessary. Contest open to residents of Ottawa, St. Lawrence, Belleville and Kingston, Ontario 19 years of age or older. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received. One (1) grand prize of a Napoleon P500 Prestige barbeque and a $100 promotional code for WagJag Grocery is available to be won (ARV of $999.00 CAD). Selected entrants must correctly answer, unaided, a mathematical skill-testing question to be declared a winner. Contest closes August 20th, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. ET. To enter and for complete contest rules visit https://www.wagjag.com/?w=amAZU.

12

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012


SENIORS

Your Community Newspaper

R0011555359

Ice box brought wonders EMC lifestyle - If it hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been for the ice house, and the Barnett ice box grandfather bought, we would not have had a way to keep food from spoiling. But the ice house served another purpose as well, even though we kids were forbidden to use it for anything other than to store ice from the Bonnechere River. It was a retreat on a hot day, but we had to sneak in and sneak out. When the winter was at its coldest, and the river had frozen solid, father would cut huge blocks of ice, pile them on the flat bottom sleigh, and haul the load to the ice house. He would be at the job for days: drilling, sawing, and stacking the blocks in the ice house in neat rows. Once he had enough that he thought we could survive until the next year, he made many trips to the saw mill for sawdust. Every square inch of ice was covered with the sawdust to protect it from the little bit of summer warmth that penetrated the wood walls. It was usually Audrey or Everett who were sent for a new block of ice. The ice house was pitchblack inside, and so they worked by feel rather than by seeing what they were doing. When the house was built, a big wood slip lock was made to keep the door secure, and which could be used to open and close the door from either inside or out. That was a great comfort to me, as I was always terrified of being locked inside some place and not being able to get out. That door was supposed to

MARY COOK Mary Cookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Memories be opened only when a block of ice was being taken out. But that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean that was always the case. Although I was much too timid to do this on my own, I knew that my brothers would often slip into the ice house and spread out on the top blocks to cool off on a blistering hot summer day. They would wait until father was in a field, and mother was busy in the kitchen, and then they would sneak open the big wood slip lock and put as much flesh as they could. They had to be very careful to rid themselves of any sawdust when they emerged, however. Mother made big jugs of iced tea, and Audrey would be sent for shards of ice, which would be washed thoroughly in a clean bowl, and then dropped into the tea. For reasons which escaped me at the time, ice for the cold drink was never taken from the ice box. But when grandfather saw the many hardships mother had to endure when she married a back-woods farmer after living so long in a big city, he bought a brand new wood ice box in Renfrew, and as well as keeping our food fresh, it served as a nice piece of furniture for the kitchen. It sat kitty-corner and moth-

er always had a potted plant on the top of it, which at the time, I thought brought a touch of elegance to the kitchen. Since I was the youngest of five, I was given jobs mother thought I was capable of doing. One was emptying the melted ice water from under the ice box. It dripped into a large white porcelain basin and I was always checking it because it was sure to spill it on the kitchen floor. So several times a day, I got down on my belly, and stuck my hand in the basin to see if it was ready to be emptied. In the winter time, the water was poured into the reservoir on the end of the Findlay Oval. Anything we could do to cut down on dragging water from the pump out in the yard when the snow was knee deep, we did it. But in the summer, the water was poured on the garden, or on motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flower beds. It was no small blessing that I never really appreciated back then; but we had the river, and so we had ice. We had an ice house to store it in, and so were always able to keep our perishables fresh, we had a grandfather who had enough money to buy us an ice box. We were poor, but in many ways we were blessed.

$# $  $   $  %! ! $ ! $$ $   $ 

$ $

$ !$$  $&  $! !$ $ ! $ %   $  $$! $!  #$$$  $ !  $$ $ $ " !   $  $ ! 

$"  $ $ $! $ $  $ $$  $ $ 

 & &RQWDFWH[W # & (YHU\:HGQHVGD\IRUZNVVWDUWLQJ6HSW ! & SPÂąSP #  & :RRGZDUG'ULYH2WWDZD  5HJLVWUDWLRQUHTXLUHG

0816.R0011551406

       

   

    Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

13


2 194

PAIRS OF GLASSES STARTING AT

99

$

includes PROGRESSIVE scratch-resistant plastic lenses with select frames*

50

NOW! $

OFF

**

lenses that adapt as light conditions change

Visit Sears Optical today! St. Laurent Shopping Centre 613.746.4311

searsoptical.ca

*2 complete pairs of prescription eyeglasses (frame and lenses) for $194.99 with scratch-resistant bifocal or progressive plastic lenses and $99.99 frames - same prescription. Taxes extra. Other specialty lenses and lens enhancements are extra. Valid prescription required. Cannot be combined with other offers, discounts, previous purchases or prior orders. Discount off tag prices. Some restrictions may apply. See optical associate for details. Not valid in the province of Quebec. Registered trademark of Sears, licensed for use in Canada. eyeNET: 572032. **TransitionsŽ poly lenses available at $50 off. Transitions and the swirl are registered trademarks of Transitions Optical, Inc. Š2012 Transitions Optical, Inc. Valid until October 2, 2012. R0011554580-0816

14

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012


FOOD

Your Community Newspaper

Making Greek bread is easy with a breadmaker

O

ne of Jeff’s aunts gave me this recipe for Greekstyle bread made in the bread machine. I tried it one day when we were having a light summer supper, and we thoroughly enjoyed the flavour combination of feta cheese, black olives and oregano. The bread is moist and keeps well for a couple of days. We didn’t quite finish the first loaf however before the last couple of slices were starting to get a bit dry. I had cooked a turkey a couple of days before and was making hot turkey sandwiches for supper. I decided to use the last of the Greek bread as the bottom layer for the sandwich since the turkey gravy would help to moisten it. The distinctive flavour of the bread transformed the hot turkey sandwiches into an entirely new and tasty dish. It was so good that I expect I’ll be making this recipe whenever I have left-

PAT TREW Food ‘n’ Stuff over turkey. This bread is also great for sandwiches. I used it one day for tuna sandwiches, and, like the turkey sandwich, they had an entirely different flavour. The amount given here makes a small loaf, about one pound. The amounts shown in brackets make a larger loaf. Jeff’s aunt recommended using a sweet bread setting on the breadmaker. I’ve also baked this using the dry milk setting when I substituted skim milk powder and water for the milk. The bread turned out fine both ways. You can leave out the black olives, but the bread will be just a bit drier.

GREEK BREAD

• 2/3 cup milk (1 cup) •1 Tbsp. olive oil or vegetable oil (2 Tbsp.) •1/2 tsp. salt (1 tsp. salt) •2 cups flour (3 cups) •1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese (2/3 cup) • 3 Tbsp. black olives, pitted and sliced (1/4 cup) • 2 tsp. sugar (2 tsp.) • 1 tsp. oregano (1 1/2 tsp.) • 1 1/2 tsp. bread machine yeast (1 1/2 tsp.) Place all ingredients in the bread machine in the order given and follow your machine’s directions. As soon as the bread is done, turn out on a rack to cool before cutting.

Have you read your yourottawaregion.com newspaper today? connecting your communities

authentic Lebanese

HUMMUS

answe the call JOIN OUR

100 KM ROAD BIKE TOUR

TO SUPPORT WORLD-CLASS CANCER RESEARCH

8 SEPTEMBER 2012 TH

Our authentic Lebanese style hummus is made fresh in our kitchen with plump chickpeas, tahini, lemon juice, garlic, a touch of salt – and nothing else, no artificial flavours or colours. Enjoy the light and airy texture you can only get from freshly prepared in delicious flavours like Caramelized Onion, Roasted Red Pepper, Roasted Pine Nut, and Roasted Garlic.

RIDETHERIDEAU.CA

Farm Boy™ Hummus $3.99 -4.99 ea, 300-350 g

CHECK OUT OUR RIDE EVENT SPONSORS

R0011378260/0503

FUELLED BY

farmboy.ca R0011554932

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

15


It’s Free!

SAVE UP TO 90% Your Local EMC Community Newspaper

$29 $29 FOR A 1-HOUR QUANTUM TOUCH - PRANIC HEALING SESSION OR A 1-HOUR REIKI SESSION AT AHAU CONNECTIONS (AN $80 VALUE) 2 LOCATIONS Regular Price: $80.00 $279 FOR A RIO LASER X60 HAIR REMOVER FROM DGA NORTH AMERICAN (A $620 VALUE)

You Save: $51 Discount:

64%

$279

$9 $9 FOR $20 TOWARDS A DIY CARD-MAKING CLASS AT STAMPING WITH MONICA

Regular Price: $20 You Save: $11 $15 FOR $30 TOWARDS BOOKS AND MORE FROM BOOKCLOSEOUTS.CA

55%

$49 FOR A 2-WEEK SUCCESS SYSTEM INCLUDING A $49 NUTRITIONAL ANALYSIS, MENU PLAN, PERSONAL COACHING, RODUCT AND A PROGRAM SAVINGS COUPON FROM HERBAL MAGIC (A $409.75 VALUE) - CHOOSE FROM OVER 270 LOCATIONS ACROSS CANADA

Get deals on your phone: 16

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

$26 $26 FOR 5 KG OF BANANA BERRY COMBO FROZEN FRUIT MIX (A $58 VALUE)

$15

$22 $22 FOR 5 KG OF STRAWBERRY MANGO FROZEN FRUIT BLEND (A $58 VALUE)

Do business with WagJag! Email ottawa@wagjag.com

R0011553799

Discount:


GARAGE SALE

CLASSIFIED

HELP WANTED

Multi-home Garage Sale at 1390 Duford Drive on Saturday, August 18th. In case of rain, will be held the 19th.

FOR SALE Disability Products. Buy and Sell stair lifts, scooters, bath lifts, patient lifts, hospital beds, etc. Call Silver Cross Ottawa (613)231-3549. *HOT TUB (SPA) Covers-Best Price. Best quality. All shapes and colours. Call 1-866-652-6837. www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper

HELP WANTED

Go Get Holdings Inc. has openings for: Assistant Manager for its Thai Garden Buffet Restaurant at 201 Queen Street, Ottawa and Thai Cuisine cooks for its Green Papaya Restaurant at 246 Queen Street, Ottawa, Ontario. Must have at least three years experience and credible credentials related to the above positions. Demonstrable ability to communicate in Thai preferred. Salaries starting at $17.50 and $15.50, respectively. Send resumes to vagobuyan@gmail.com Home Builder Requires construction Labourers & carpenters. Must have own transportation, please fax resume to (613)523-3547. Looking for persons willing to speak to small groups, 1 on 1 presentations. A car and internet necessary. Diana (866)306-5858.

News EMC Classifieds Get Results!

AUCTIONS

AUCTIONS

TRAVEL WORK OPPORTUNITIES Plus Travel, hotel jobs in England, Childcare positions in United States, China, New Zealand, Australia, Spain and Holland plus more. Teach in South Korea. Accommodations & Salary provided. Various benefits. Apply 902-422-1455 email scotiap@ns.sympatico.ca

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

MUSIC

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Learn to Stepdance with “Pauline” at the Ottawa Bronson Centre. 613-858-0039 or visit www.stepdancewithpauline.ca

Plan to Change the World?

Oliver Smith Music- Musical instruction with piano, guitar, bass and theory. 613-233-3458. Located downtown Ottawa off Main and Lees.

If you have a passion for work that can make a meaningful, long-term impact around the world, join us as: DONORWORX AMBASSADORS For PLAN CANADA • Part-Time •

LEGAL CRIMINAL RECORD? You can be arrested, jailed or deported if you enter the United States with a criminal record. A waiver clears you for entry. Call now, toll free: 1-8-NOW PARDON) 1-866-972-7366 www.removeyourrecord.com In business since 1989

Selected candidates will promote the Child Sponsorship Program in Bayshore, Carlingwood, and St. Laurent Mall, starting in Sept. Complete training & flex schedules. Ideal for students, business-minded individuals & mothers w/ kids in school. Must be articulate & outgoing, w/strong resilience & commitment to the cause. $17.00/hour to start w/ rapid promotion oppty’s & regular incentives. Apply at: donorworx.com • EOE

MORTGAGES $$MONEY$$ Consolidate Debts Mortgages to 90% No income, Bad credit OK! Better Option Mortgage #10969 1-800-282-1169 www.mortgageontario.com

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

i>Ê>ÀŽiÌ

UÊ /+1 -Ê UÊ " /  -Ê UÊ/""-Ê UÊ-*",/-Ê ", Ê UÊ** -Ê UÊ/  Ê7, Ê UÊ1, /1, Ê UÊEÊ1 Ê1 Ê", t

AUCTIONS

Huge Indoooorm! Showr

UPCOMING AUCTIONS “Call or email to Book Your Auction Today”

"*

Friday August 17 & Saturday August 18, 2012 - Real Estate OPEN HOUSE

TRAILERS / RV’S

LARGE SELECTION OF QUALITY FURNITURE

and Ou Building! tdoor

7i`‡-՘ʙ>“Ê̜Ê{«“ÊUÊ613-284-2000ÊUÊÃÌÀiiÌyi>“>ÀŽiÌJ…œÌ“>ˆ°Vœ“ xÊ -Ê-"1/Ê"Ê-/-Ê-ÊUÊ ", ,Ê"Ê79Ê£xÊEÊ 9Ê,"

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Weddings, Baptisms & Funerals, location of your choice. Also available small weddings, my home, weekdays. The Rev. Alan Gallichan. 613-726-0400.

White Cedars Tourist Park Constant Lake/Eganville 2013 Seasonal Sites Available Now Big Lots, 3 Services Great Rate for balance of 2012 Season By Appointment Only 613-649-2255 www.whitecedars.com

100-$400 CASH daily for landscaping work!

VACATION/COTTAGES Christie Lake Cottages, cottages still available for August. 613-267-3470. www.christie lakecottages.com

Competitive, Energetic, Honestly a MUST!

FOR SALE

CARP GUN & HUNTING SHOW SEPTEMBER 1st & 2nd Sat. 9 am-4 pm Sun. 9 am-3 pm

CL403732/0816

CL366242

You can also pre-apply online at www.firststudentcanada.com

$

FOR SALE

If you hold a full driver’s licence with a clean record and would enjoy driving and working with children, and/or the general public call 613-688-0653 or e-mail ottawa.recruiting@firstgroup.com Free training classes are filling up right now. Special consideration given to those who already have a school bus licence. Ask about special hiring incentives, especially in West Carleton, Kanata, Stittsville and Richmond. We are an equal opportunity employer.

HELP WANTED

PropertyStarsJobs.com

****** Saturday August 18 & Sunday August 19 2012 - Real Estate OPEN HOUSE

Admission $7 VENDORS WELCOME

www.valleysportsmanshow.com HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Youths! 181 Robert Run, Perth - From Perth Take Rideau Ferry Rd. Turn Right On Clifford Cres., & Left on Robert Run, for Don & Trudy Switzer - Auctioneer will be onsite Saturday 4 PM - 8 PM as well as Sunday August 19 Noon - 4 Pm To show this Unique Spacious 3+2 Bedroom Split Level Home - This home has been completely Renovated and is ready to move in. Included with the sale of this real estate are all Appliances, 7 Person Spa located on the back large deck with deeded access to Jebbs Creek which leads to Otty Lake. 2012 Taxes $2798.28 ****** Sunday August 19, 2012 - Consignment Hall Auction. Auction Starts at NOON (Preview from 11am) at our Hall 182 Glenview Road, Smiths Falls (Drummond North Elmsley Twp). Local Estates, Consignments & More! See Web for more info. ****** Tuesday August 28, 2012 - Real Estate Auction. Real Estate sells at 6 p.m. SHARP. 181 Robert Run, Perth (Drummond North Elmsley Twp). Unique Spacious 3+2 Bedroom Split Level Home - This home has been completely Renovated and is ready to move in. Included with the sale of this real estate are all Appliances, 7 Person Spa located on the back large deck with deeded access to Jebbs Creek which leads to Otty Lake. 2012 Taxes $2798.28. ****** Wednesday August 29, 2012 - On Site Auction For Howard & Rosemary Pratt. 345 Glen Tay Side Road, From Perth Turn Right on South Street (turns into Scotch Line Road) and turn Right on Glen Tay Side Road. Auction Starts at 6 PM (Preview from 5 PM). The Pratts have sold their home and are downsizing. Join us in this Clean Short Auction Sale & Expect Surprises the day of the Auction as items are still being sorted in preparation for this sale! Lawn Tractor, Lawn Roller, Garage Related Items, Household Furniture, patio Furniture & Much More!

CL390585_0816

***** Thursday August 30, 2012 - Real Esate Auction. Real Estate sells at 6 p.m. SHARP. 4 Jessie St., Perth. Spacious Executive Style Home. 4 + Bedrooms, Attached 2 Car Garage, Rear enclosed Patio, Owner is Extremely motivated. This Property MUST BE SEEN!

DAN PETERS AUCTION

WEDDING

White Cedars Tourist Park Constant Lake/Eganville Fully Outfitted Waterfront 2 and 3 bedrooms Cottages. Until Thanksgiving weekend. 613-649-2255 www.whitecedars.com

STEADY PART-TIME STARTING IN SEPTEMBER

Dan Peters CPPA Auctioneer & Certified Appraiser Amanda Todd CPPA Auctioneer & Certified Appraiser (613) 284-8281 or Auction Hall (613) 284-1234 email: info@danpetersauction.com Website: www.danpetersauction.com

2009 Grand Caravan. Sto-ingo. Certified, e-tested. Red. 113,000 kms. $12,900; 1992 Road Trek motorhome. Good condition. Certified, e-tested. $9,500. 613-542-0683.

COTTAGES FOR RENT

DRIVE A SCHOOL BUS

4 Jessie Street, Perth - Auctioneer will be onsite Friday 4-8 PM as well as Saturday From NOON - 3 PM to show this Spacious Executive Style Home. 4 + Bedrooms, Attached 2 Car Garage, Rear enclosed Patio, Owner is Extremely motivated. This Property MUST BE SEEN!

VEHICLES

Seasonal Camping

CL389624_TF

Attention: Do you have 5-15 hours/week? Turn it into $5000/month on your computer. Online training, flexible hours. www.debsminioffice.com

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

CL369551

Garage Sale Sat. Aug.18 @ 50 Dallaire Crescent, Richmond, 8 am to noon. Downsizing....so many things have to go!

HELP WANTED

www.emcclassified.ca

CL363274

Your Community Newspaper

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

HELP WANTED

Adults!

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Seniors!

Earn Extra Money! Keep Your Weekends Free!

Routes Available! We’re looking for Carriers to deliver our newspaper!

• • • • •

Deliver Right In Your Own Neighbourhood Papers Are Dropped Off At Your Door Great Family Activity No Collections Thursday Deliveries

Call Today 613.221.6247 613 .221.6247 Or apply on-line at YourOttawaRegion.com 308527

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

17


Your Community Newspaper

Network

CLASSIFIED

For more information contact your local newspaper.

STEEL BUILDINGS

HEALTH

BUSINESS OPPS.

PERSONALS

!+ $D * 1.   :         6 #   8  H          2   *  ,  +  <  , *5..* 540*4736

"(& (, '  F % +9" . + %  ! I " " D                13.I? R       + ?  $  $ 6 K G  + 2 K""     >II$ #  6<!  6 ?

)&K"' !F+&:  -0I76 H   8  6 (       H    6  '     P - - 0 0    <       V1-64I?W *..*75*3- V1-6I?W6 !   ?   8886  ? ?65X

ANNOUNCEMENTS

P+&)+!""'&("("1-564I <    6                       6 %?  ' 8  6 %   4< ' 8     5..D %  6  ' "    ' F    88866 ## ##*K""> *533*-5*456

EMPLOYMENT OPPS. 1 1   " (  & (   +  #  " 1 1          2                 ? ?  , , ,  !                  ?    ?  <         1 1 1  @ % &  D #F6 6 6 # & < &  " ' !"! : 6 *5..*5*45 8886   G 6 ? "/"&"("' ! "! (    &:         H            :     I                6  +              8      :    8 2         !              ? :     8 6  -32...-            - 6 4       ( 6 " 6   " ?  2 6!   ??*   ##$   6 ?6 !    ?   > !   2 $ G .32 # # $ 2 $2 . -.6 "?> J 6 6  <<"&# $""D""&()  *          ? 6  )     K    :  8 ?6"G :    * 2 H   2      *  6   8   G   6   *   *?    6 ! L 72 -.6  #6 *75.*54* 33.M888666I: 86

www.emcclassiямБed.ca

ADVERTISE ACROSS ONTARIO OR ACROSS THE COUNTRY!

!""# $%&#'&() * +%)" #"*  (  "  !  # " ,  - . / - 0  1 0 2 3 4 5 6 - 4 / - 5  1 4 2 -  4 6   . / 0 .  1 7 2 7  . 6 -/40 1.23..6 0./45 102546 07/75 12556     8  * 6    !  *5..*335*40--6 8886   66

MEDICAL MARIJUANA EDUCATIONAL SEMINAR 9 %: *%:      September 8 & 9  2'  ) 8 ;     "  6)    ) 8<=  6 & > www.greenlineacademy.com

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

FOR SALE

! <&##!  ?  17 * <D" < ( " F  ;  ! 9 "  < ( " F  8      8  ? *  ?       ?     6  &                6  K  " "  &    ;  ' 9 ' > 8886( 8 !8?6 ?I0..  *5..*433*35"G>0.. 6

FINANCIAL SERVICES 111 < ("F 111 K  (F %*  !",,, " ( +"# * '    ?   74Q, 2 -  ;   <   ;    6 $   2 G  ?     D 6  *   K  6 V#&P .7W2  *K  *555*.7*772 8886  *8 6 ?6 <   : 6 ?6 14.. #    X6 (      6 K2 "2 ..Q!  6*577*773*33.6

CAREER OPPS.

MORTGAGES 111  ; -  ;    < *  2 #    666 4*..Q K6 $"#  $(D "!,     ;    D 6 (     ?  :                6 ! :" ;(    6  L?   2 + ?   K  # 6  *K  *533*0.*332 ?> =?  JH?  H  62 8886H?  H  62 #& P.0.6 ! !""( ( 9 * 2 - 2 + ?  "H # 2 $   2 ! * "?  2 $ 2 K    2  8   !        * K R#      S T       ,U ##              !           (   *K  *577*7*00-0 V-0 + W    8886<<?  6 ? V#P--3W6 111 2 - 2   < ))"! * '      2  2   :      2   G        2    <+  6 14.D    1-.56I ?  V W6 (   ? 2    2  8       ,, $""   & (  <   )  ) " ! 2    # #  'F  *K  *5..*-5-*32 8 8 86 ?           6  ?  V # &  P .3W6

DRIVERS WANTED

&<&(# " 'R !   8  " ' !%!"(!& ( V' (W, (        %6!6R )   4   &9",         6  *  *555**' (  .4* 04*336 %##F " '  +9" )" " #"        : ,       ;        2     ;    8   T        * ?  ??* ? R <&!F &9" &( '%* & (! ?          :         8                7 2##V3W-47* 42 8886?:  6 ?6 (   ?  H 6 '&() !"9&"6 # * ?I *  ?   2     , *577* -7*556 8   6 P7575  *555*40*3506    8, *533**30.  P4.46 <       6*577*5.0*456V5XW

Build Your Career With us L  ?<8 <  8# 2! 6 YK  !   ? Y& #  &    <  Y ? :  ?      Y! $   Y  : ": ?  '  :  ?    : ? 8       8   :  ? R         8, www.tolko.com <"'&# (!&& ( "' P -  K   * + < "  L $ ! 6  !                6  )              ?   ,  "       86     :    8 ?  ? 6 *5..*033*446 8886 6 ?6  ? J 6 ?6

%"'9&", , * , *577*0-*.3  *..*4-5* 3-45  ?   P00536 V5XW 16I ? M8886 66

AUTOMOTIVE 9     (#F    <9&    ?   *   8 8      ?  *     6  T         :      ?*  :?    6   : 

      8  ?>8886 ?:6 6 *5..* 0*3..-6

ADVERTISING "+<&##& (! K%! <"! &( (   &  &  +  ( "  "  ! F ##, F       '   8             8    8  8   *  2  6 K  ?    ?      *K  *555*-*-43.2 "?>

6 ?      J   ?      6      :     > 8886    6 ?6

IS HIRING PROFESSIONAL TRUCK DRIVERS  " ?  IID? I# *

? I!    <  L8 Apply Now! F ?: - T : G   V8Z  W $*  G       6    * ? ? ? * 2   ?      6  :  ? :  8 2:  I ?8  2     6APPLY ONLINE AT: www.westcanbulk.ca Join Our Team2 KG>75.607-63.6 K    ## ##*K"">1.888.WBT.HIRE. "<'&9"!;#9"<'&9* "!  ?  2 (6 (!* K"&)+ KK"!*     !  2 ? :   ;"G *   $  2 (     2   6 "@%&"<"(! * 9 *     4  F          *       " G      2       < 9                6         >      544* D0K V37*405W6 !    ?    8  0J 6 ?6 9>8886 6 ?6 #&'#  &"! 9( '&9&!& (  H  G   Z    :*       %6!6  ?? ?    6 + ?  8 6 ( 8 H? 6    8    6 *5..* -3*5-37

WANTED K&"<! ("' K  %)%! -4+ %& (>  2 ! 2 + 6  "  !  " ?         I  *     ?6   2 !8* [ T  >  *K  *5..*30* -3.2  J8[  6 ?  88868[  6 ?6

Connect with Ontarians тАУ extend your business reach! www.networkclassified.org

FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHU H RE ES CA ATA ALO L GU UES CONTEST STS S PRODUCT CTS STOR O ES FL LYERS RS DEA ALS COU UPO PONS BROCHURES CATALOG OGUE U S CO CONT NTES E TS PROD PR ODUC UC CTS S S STO TOR TO RES ES FL FLYE YERS YE ERS S DEA E LS S COU COUPO PONS NS BR BROCH OCH HUR URES ES CAT CATA ALOG LOGUE GUE UES S CO CONT NTES ESTS TS PRO RODU DUCT CTS S ST STOR ORES OR ES FL FLYE YERS YE RS DEA DEALS ALS COUP CO UP PONS ONS ST STOR STOR ORES FL ORES LY YE ERS DEA ERS DEA AL LS SC COU OUPO OU PONS PO NS B BRO RO OCH CHUR HUR URE RES ES C CAT ATA AT ALOG LOG OGUE UES UE S CO CONT NTES NT ESTS ES TS S P PRO RODU RO DUCT DU UCTS TS ST STOR OR RES ES F FL LYE LYE YERS RS D DEA EALS EA LS

 SAVE TIME. SAVE MONEY.

rough ursday th effect Th w ямВyer will be Flyer in e n A ay. . Wednesd ble August 16th availa

is now available on Flyerland.ca!

SAVE TIME. SAVE MONEY.

your source for FREE coupons

R0011553837

18

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012


BUSINESS DIRECTORY

BOOKING: FRIDAY 9:30AM FINAL APPROVAL: FRIDAY NOON

CLEANING

SINCE 1976

R E NOVATION CE NTR E INC.

FOUNDATION CRACKS WINDOW WELL DRAINAGE WEEPING TILE

Call Ardel Concrete Services

613-761-8919

&REE%STIMATESs!LL7ORK'UARANTEED

BATHROOM SPECIALISTS sFIXTURES sCUSTOMCABINETRY sCUSTOMCOUNTERTOPS sCUSTOMSHOWERS sGRANITE 613-868-6523 sQUARTZ RENOS YOUVILLEBATHROOMCOM

WWW.YOUVILLEBATHROOM.COM

LET IT SHINE CLEANING SERVICES

Call for FREE Estimate

for only 00 $165000 $1690

DRYWALL

EAVESTROUGHS

GLAVINA DRYWALL

<8M<JKIFL>?:C<8E@E> N@E;FN:C<8E@E> D@EFII<G8@IJ

Cell: 613.852.1672 newedgeconstruction@bell.net Licensed Tradesman | Fully Insured With Over 25 Years Experience! | Free Estimates! s7INDOW$OORS s$ECKS&ENCING s'AZEBOS0ORCHES s-ETAL2OOlNG

8ccNfib >lXiXek\\[

-(* /,)$'+),

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Est. Since 1980

INSULATION

UĂ&#x160;/Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;>Â?Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x20AC; UĂ&#x160; VÂ&#x153; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;

PHC

Toll Free 1-855-843-1592 www.insultech.ca

A+ Accredited

613-723-5021

Fully Insured â&#x20AC;˘ Independently Owned and Operated in Ottawa since 1998 * Electrical work performed by ECRA contractors

10% Summer Discount Free Estimates, Guaranteed Workmanship

613-733-6336 KITCHENS

JUNK REMOVAL

Interlock Fencing Design/Install/Repair

613-282-4141 Serving Ottawa Since 1989

Finish Basements, Bathrooms, Kitchens, Drywall, Painting, all Types of Flooring, Additions, Repairs, Doors & Windows, Decks, All Types of RooďŹ ng â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Build Houses

ottawa.handymanconnection.com

FREE ESTIMATES ~ ALL WORK FULLY GUARANTEED SENIORS DISCOUNT

Custom Home Specialists

613-843-1592

Brennan Brothers Ltd.

R0011395690

R0011291745

UĂ&#x160;-ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;>Â&#x201C; UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;1ÂŤ}Ă&#x20AC;>`iĂ&#x192;

>Ă&#x20AC;ÂŤiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; Â?iVĂ&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;V>Â?IĂ&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*Â?Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;LÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;} UĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;VÂ&#x2026;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;,iÂ&#x201C;Â&#x153;`iÂ?Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160;*>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;iÂ&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;>Â?Ă&#x160;,iÂŤ>Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192; Ă&#x160;*>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;

"Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160; >Â?Â?Ă&#x160;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; /Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;9Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160;7>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;

Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i°°°Ă&#x160; " t

INTERLOCK

613-688-1988 or call Brian 613-857-2976 LIC#ECRA1ESA7007076

HOME IMPROVEMENT

PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL BASEMENTS ALL TYPES OF FLOORING REPAIRS ADDITIONS

613â&#x20AC;&#x201C;601â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9559

Residential & Commercial Home Rewire & Upgrades Repairs, Renovations & Tenant Fit-up Preventative Maintenance Hot Tubs & Pools

HOME IMPROVEMENT

BILINGUAL SERVICE R0011294029

Call Maurice, Owner/Operator 613-978-9752 therightwayinc@hotmail.com

DYNAMIC HOME RENOVATIONS BATHROOMS KITCHENS PAINTING DRYWALL INSTALLATIONS

Kitchens-Bathrooms-Basements Ceramic Tile and much more

R0011369064

Serving Ottawa and Area!

Complete Home Renovations Restorations and Repair after Disaster Strikes

The first place to Call For All your Electrical needs

=i\\<jk`dXk\j

CALL SIMON 613-715-2398 glavinadrywall@gmail.com

THE RIGHT WAY INC.

ELECTRICAL

R0011509821

s2ENOVATIONS!DDITIONS s+ITCHEN"ATHROOM s&INISHED"ASEMENT s#ERAMIC4ILEs(ARDWOOD&LOORS

G%%&&((&)+&

R0011368359

Scott Pickard

613-422-4510

G%%&&(%',+'"%(%-

General Carpentry

FRAMING DRYWALL INSTALLATION & FINISHING EVERYTHING FROM NEW BUILDS TO SMALL REPAIRS

$ 00 Only $9900 Only 9999.00 *Does not include pad.

JUNK REMOVAL Bin Rentals Available

We Remove Almost Anything from Anywhere!

613-825-0707

R0011291637/0301

0331.359184

R0011378804

CONSTRUCTION

Single Car 12 x 20 H^c\aZ8Vg&%m'% ALL SIZES AND STYLES AVAILABLE

613-220-2316

  

CONSTRUCTION LTD.

We can tear down and rebuild.

Garages Built & Installed

0324.359174

0315.R0011315133

0524.R0011407074

all sizes & styles available 8x10 delivered & installed

s#ONCRETEWORKs'ARAGEmOORS s&LOORlNISHINGs7ALKWAYS$RIVEWAYS s2EPAIRS2ESTORATIONSs0ARGINGEPOXY COATINGs#ONCRETECRACKINJECTION

WWWLETITSHINECLEANINGCA

EDG E

SUMMER SPECIAL SAVE 10% ON DECKS 613-830-9493 613-795-3048

SPRING SALE

SPECIALS

#ALL4/$!9  

Cabinets Decks Drop Ceilings Basements OfďŹ ce Designs RooďŹ ng Bathrooms Drywall FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED Serving OrlĂŠans Since 1985

GARAGE BUILDERS

GARDEN SHEDS SPRING

2%3)$%.4)!, #/--%2#)!,#,%!.).' &ULLYLICENSED INSUREDANDBONDED

&

COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL Additions RENOVATIONS Tenant Fit Ups

CUSTOM BUILDS

CONCRETE

7EEKLYs"I WEEKLYs-ONTHLY /NE4IME#LEANING3ERVICES

S.M. Carpentry

YOUV ILLE BATHR OOM

LEAKING BASEMENTS!!

R0011472578

* Solar Pannels Wind Gen/Inverters Equipment * Geothermal Systems Commercial & Residential * Air ďŹ lters Commercial & Residential * Electric Motors * Variable Frequency Drives * Air source Heat Pumps (House & Pool) * Commercial Refrigeration AC & Chillers * Custom Built Electrical Panels * Steam HumidiďŹ ers * Motor Soft starts * Thermography * Air Balancing * Motor Controllers & PLC * Geothermal Supplies G%%&&)+%.'(

CARPENTRY

BATHROOMS

R0011291433

WWW.KINGSCROSS.NET (613-271-0988 ex 3) denis.laframboise@gmail.com Sales & Service

613-688-1483

R0011399413

BASEMENTS

AIR CONDITIONING

R0011291791

Your Community Newspaper G%%&&***%,."%-&+

NEW

DEADLINES:

:fdgc\k\B`kZ_\e;\j`^e @ejkXccXk`fe :XY`e\kI\]XZ`e^:flek\ikfgj

JXm\,':Xj_:Xiip -(*$/*+$(--( fi -(*$-)'$)//0 G%%&&'.&(-*

;Xe`\cCXm\i^e\

B`kZ_\e :fejlckXek N`k_fm\i),pij%\og\i`\eZ\

REACH UP TO 91,000 HOMES EVERY WEEK CALL SHARON AT 613-688-1483 or email srussell@thenewsemc.ca Fax: 613-723-1862

Read us online at www.emconline.ca

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

19


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Ottawa businessman helping others overcome dyslexia Jessica Cunha jessica.cunha@metroland.com

Your Community Newspaper G%%&&***%.)"%-&+

Jessica Cunha

Carl Nigi runs Kanata-based business Overcoming Dyslexia. After getting help himself at age 39, Nigi is working to help others realize their full potential. by Ron Davis – a severely dyslexic adult – to correct reading learning disabilities. Now Nigi is a facilitator. The program offers help for people diagnosed with a number of learning disabilities, including learning math and writing, attention deficit disorder (ADD) and attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD). “It gets to the root cause of dyslexia, ADD, ADHD, non verbal learning disabilities,” he said. “We use (the word) dyslexia because it was the first name ever given to what people now call language-based learning disabilities.” The program boasts a 97 per cent success rate, said the 44year-old, who runs Overcom-

ing Dyslexia in Kanata. ‘BRILLIANT’

Leah Edwards knew her sons were struggling with traditional learning. Both Blair, 16, and Kyle, 18, had learned their alphabet and knew their colours before starting school. But once they entered the classroom, they started to fall behind. “As soon as they started school, they forgot all of that,” she said, adding they were diagnosed with ADD and put on what she called a “huge amount of medication.” “It was a band-aid,” Edwards said. “My children weren’t wild…just a lot of trouble and difficulties at school.”

Nigi said dyslexia is often misunderstood in the traditional education system. Students may be labelled as inattentive, lazy, or a problem. “These kids are being marginalized, (they’re) not given enough help in school,” he said. “A non dyslexic telling a dyslexic what their experience is going to be is a little like a man telling a woman what her experience in pregnancy is going to be,” said Nigi. “I can’t give her the benefit of my wisdom because I don’t have any.” The Davis program offers insight from the point of view of a dyslexic. “What the program says is this isn’t a disability. It’s actually a talent – a perceptual talent. If we do some very simple things and practice some very simple things we can actually overcome it,” said Nigi of dyslexics of all ages. “The disability part becomes a thing of the past.” For more information, visit www.overcomingdyslexia.ca. DEADLINES:

613-688-1483

PLUMBING

PAINTING

R0011498090

All types of plastering painting interior exterior residential & commercial

West: ROB 613-762-5577 East: CHRIS 613-276-2848

2 year warranty on workmanship

613-733-6336 R0011300899

Email at plumbing@landriault.org, www.landriault.org Please Call GILLES 613-978-7524 or 613-841-2656

BH ROOFING Residential Shingle Specialist

on Menti d d an this A he Save t x a T !

30 YEARS EXPERIENCE

613-277-9713

R0011324197-0322

Quality Workmanship Fully Insured • Free Estimates Written Guarantee on 15 Years of Labour

ROOFING

ROOFING

ROOFING

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

Over 27 years experience. Free esmate, licensed and insured

www.axcellpainting.com

ROOFING

Roof Top Snow Removal

Plumbing done right the 1st me - residenal or commercial -

s&REE7RITTEN%STIMATES s.O#HARGEFOR-INOR0REPARATION s&REE5PGRADETO@,IFEMASTER4OP ,INE0AINT R0011291147

free estimates

Plumbing & Heang

 / ,",ÊEÊ 8/ ,",ÊUÊ£nÊ9ÀÃ°Ê 8* , ÊUÊ+1/9Ê7", -*Ê ÓÊ9,Ê1, / ÊUÊ" Ê/ tÊ" Ê 1  /tÊUÊ-/** Ê, *,-ÊUÊ, --Ê-*,9 

15% Summer Discount

R0011472680

MISUNDERSTOOD

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Painting

20

Nigi treated a 14-year-old male who was reading at a Grade 2 level. He had been diagnosed with ADD and put on medications. “I had him reading at a good Grade 7, soft Grade 8, and that’s just in one week,” he said, adding the teen was able to go off his medications. He said the boy’s mother was thrilled, and called to let Nigi know that, “His worst days after the program are like his best days on medication.”

BOOKING: FRIDAY 9:30AM FINAL APPROVAL: FRIDAY NOON

PAINTING 20 years experience

Edwards found out about Nigi’s program about a year ago. Before starting the program, “Blair was (reading) at a soft Grade 2 (level),” said Edwards. “By the end of his first day he was at a mid-Grade 7 level. Not only had he learned the alphabet, he’d mastered the alphabet.” When the family went out to celebrate Kyle’s 18th birthday this year, Blair read the menu for the first time, said Edwards, adding it was a big accomplishment. As for Kyle, he is heading to college for underwater commercial skills this fall. “If someone had ever told me that Kyle would be med free, I would have told you, you were on crack,” said Ed-

BRENNAN BROS. ROOFING 15 years warranty on workmanship Lifetime manufacturer shingle warranty

Fully Insured-Free Estimates ~ Senior’s Discount ~

5%

GDD;>C<:ME:GI>H:NDJ86C8DJCIDC

Summer Discount Over 30 years experience

;G:::HI>B6I:H ;JAAN>CHJG:9 R0011514557

EMC news – A Kanata businessman is using his experience with dyslexia to help others realize their potential. Carl Nigi, originally from England, left school at the age of 16 to begin working. “I was reading at about a seven-year-old level,” he said. “I was basically a functioning illiterate.” He knew by age 10 that he had a problem. “I remember I had conversations about it,” he said. “I tried everything that educators and specialists offered, and I mean everything. I spent thousands of dollars doing it.” Nigi said specialists were able to diagnose the symptoms but offered little in the way of support. “They were never able to give me anything helpful to actually overcome it,” he said. “It was only after joining the workforce that I realized I wasn’t stupid.” He went back to college in his 20s to learn fine-furniture making. One day, a teacher put a name to his problem. “My teacher said, ‘Look, Carl, you are dyslexic,’” Nigi said, adding an official diagnosis was the only thing that saved him from failing the course. At age 21, Nigi was officially diagnosed as severely dyslexic, but he didn’t find the help he needed for 18 years. Nigi was 39 years old when he found help with the Davis Dyslexia Correction program. The program was developed

wards, adding both sons are off medications. She added the program is not an instant fix and those taking the program have to want to be there. “It’s not a cake walk,” Edwards said, adding the family generally works on four to five words a session, twice a week. In his first year as a facilitator, Nigi said he came across a 12-year-old boy who was about three years behind his grade level. “When I asked about problems in schools, he said, ‘Well, I don’t know. I think I’ve got brain damage or something,’” said Nigi, adding the boy’s admission hurt. By the end of the one-week program, Nigi had the boy reading at his grade level. “It gives them tools that they can basically understand and overcome the problems of their dyslexia, or ADD, or ADHD and give them understanding and success. And that’s far bigger than a cure,” said Nigi. Dyslexics are usually visual, multi-dimensional thinkers, who are highly creative, said Nigi, adding that’s why the Davis program calls dyslexics gifted. “If someone is highly skilled and creative we call them gifted,” he said. “If we try to cure dyslexia, really cure it, it would be like trying to cure somebody of their sense of humour.” However, Nigi said he finds he is often contacted as a last resort. “That’s usually what I find, people come try me after they’ve tried everything else.”

86AA+&(-(+",)*) lll#gZhidgZ"Vaa#Xdb

R0011472600

613-733- 6336

HZgk^c\DiiVlVVcYhjggdjcY^c\VgZVh[dgdkZg'%NZVgh


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Submitted

Ottawa-Orléans MPP Phil McNeely making the funding announced at the Montfort Hospital on Aug. 8.

Ontario annouces more nursing hours for Ottawa Hours to help with ambulance offload Brier Dodge brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - Ottawa-Orléans MPP Phil McNeely was at the Montfort Hospital on Aug. 8 to announce additional nursing hours in Ottawa. Ottawa will receive up to

26,807 nursing hours in 201213 dedicated to patients arriving by ambulance. Allocating more nursing hours to patients arriving in the emergency room via ambulance prevents a backlog of ambulances and paramedics. The nurses will be working with patients who do not have life-threatening conditions. “We’re providing better emergency care by funding new nurses who are dedicated to

helping patients arriving by ambulance,” said McNeely, who is also the parliamentary secretary to the minister of health and long term care. “This means patients will get the care they need while allowing paramedics and ambulances to respond to other emergency calls.” There were 18 different communities that received funding for the additional hours, with Ottawa receiving $1.5 million.

Pet Adoptions PET OF THE WEEK COCOTTE

BLOSSOM

ID#A145792

ID#A141758

Cocotte is a spayed female, calico Domestic Shorthair who is just over two years old. This tri-coloured feline loves to wake up early in the morning and has an attentive and affectionate disposition. She loves to play with toys and be near her human companions. She loves to use a scratching post! Cocotte loves attention and would like to be in a home where she can have company for most of the day.

Blossom is a spayed female, orange tabby Domestic Shorthair cat who is about three years old. She loves to cuddle with grown-up friends for attention and affection. Blossom has a very friendly disposition with humans but likes all of the attention to herself so needs to be the only feline in your home. She needs lots of interesting toys to keep her entertained. An owner who will keep her active to help her shed a few pounds will help her live a long and healthy life! For more information about these or other animals available for adoption, please call the Adoption Centre at 613-725-3166 ext. 258 or visit www.ottawahumane.ca.

DON’T KEEP SCRATCHING YOUR HEAD; USE THESE TIPS TO RID YOUR FURRY FRIENDS OF FLEAS!

These wingless insects are capable of jumping long distances. While cat and dog fleas prefer to feast on animal blood, they will turn to a human host if needed. The life-cycle of a flea has four stages: Eggs, which fall from the host into the environment Larvae, which live off of the fallen fecal matter of adult fleas found in carpets and in lawns. Pupae, which is the cocoon. They do not emerge until a host is detected (via warmth /vibration)

Adults, which feast on blood. If you do have a flea-infestation, it is important to treat the pet’s environment as well, to eliminate flea eggs and larvae.

lice and mite infestation prevention. Because of their ease of use, their safety, and their effectiveness, they are highly recommended.

There are many over-the-counter products that help solve flea problems such as flea sprays (both for the pet and environment), shampoos, or collars. While the costs may be lower for over-the-counter products ($5 to $30), they often need to be reapplied to solve a flea infestation.

It is important to read all of the instructions carefully before using any flea-control product. Follow all the instructions. Never use flea productions designed for dogs on cats, and vice versa. When in doubt, contact your veterinarian.

Prescription-only solutions such as topical treatments (Advantage, Revolution) or pills (Program, Sentinel) are more expensive and require a vet visit for a prescription. They are usually dispensed in a six-month package, to be applied monthly for the flea season.

Use a flea comb several times a week on all pets.

They are safer, easier and more effective than over-the-counter products. These products often have additional benefits, such as heart-worm protection and tick,

Wash pet bedding weekly.

Vacuum frequently, disposing of bags immediately after use.

Hi, our names are Jaga and Azlan, we are two young Highland Lynx kittens that come from Québec. We look very different although we are brothers, and also bestfriends! Our mission - protect the house from any small intruders! And in the meantime practice on everything, like shadows and small rolling objects. We also have a big brother golden Retriever named Charlie, we all love to play and sleep together, he still doesn’t like to cuddle as much as we do, but it’s a work in progress!

Long grass can host fleas: keep lawns mowed.

9dndji]^c`ndjgeZi^hXjiZZcdj\]idWZÆI=:E:ID;I=:L::@Ç4HjWb^iVe^XijgZVcYh]dgi W^d\gVe]nd[ndjgeZiidÒcYdjiH^beanZbV^aid/X[dhiZg5i]ZcZlhZbX#XVViiZci^dcÆEZid[i]ZLZZ`Ç

Alternatives:

To protect cats from fleas and ticks, as well as a host of other outdoor hazards, cats should be kept indoors at all times.

Time to make a grooming appointment R0011554611

Please note: The Ottawa Humane Society has many other companion animals available for adoption. Featured animals are adopted quickly! To learn more about adopting an animal from the Ottawa Humane Society please contact us: Website: www.ottawahumane.ca Email: Adoptions@ottawahumane.ca Telephone: (613) 725-3166 x258

Jaga and Azlan

0816

Fleas, an annual external parasite, are mostly harmless. The biggest problem caused by fleas is itching. However, some pets or people may be allergic to flea saliva, which causes flea allergy dermatitis (super-itchy spots with hair-loss); young, sick or elderly pets can become anemic from too much blood loss.

12-5303 Canotek Rd.(613) 745-5808 WWW.TLC4DOGS.COM Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

21


Local events and happenings over the coming weeks — free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: patricia.lonergan@metroland.com

Aug. 15 & 29

Sept. 5 and 12

A crime has been committed at the Cumberland Heritage Village Museum! Young detectives, ages six to 14, will use their super sleuthing skills to solve the mystery. Cost is regular admission plus a $10 workshop fee. Runs Wednesdays from 1 to 4:30 p.m.

The Village Squares, a traditional couples square dancing club, is offering two free open house evenings of instruction for beginner couples at 7:30 p.m. in the Roy G. Hobbs Community Centre, 109 Larch Ave. No experience necessary. Caller Paul Adams and club members will give a warm welcome. Complimentary refreshments will be provided at the end of the evening. The dance season

Aug. 18 Come out to the Overbrook Community Day on Aug. 18. The day begins at noon and goes until 4 p.m. There will be a free barbecue provided and lots of family activities and information tents. For more information please visit www.overbrook.ca Community corn boil at the Cumberland Farmers’ Market. Every week at the market you will find a wide variety of local goods such as seasonal produce, meats, breads, pastries, specialty foods, skin care products and artisans goods. It is located at the RJ Kennedy Community Centre at 1115 Dunning Rd. Visit www.cumberlandfarmersmarket.ca or call 613.833.2635.

Aug. 25 Friends of the Farm are hosting Art on the Farm, with a rain date of Aug. 26. Spaces are still available, and all medium are welcome. The event will take place at the west exit of the Prince of Wales roundabout at the corner of the National Capital Comission Driveway and Maple Drive. For more information, please go to the website at friendsofthefarm.ca, email info@friendsofthefarm.ca or call 613-230-3276.

Sept.15 Join Ottawa’s hilarious and sensational Afro-Caribbean Group, ‘Ni Wewe Tu’ on Saturday, Sept. 15, for an evening of entertainment in celebration of Jamaica’s 50th Year of Independence. Jamaica Mi Soon Come is a skit about an unruly group of people travelling to Jamaica on “Soon Come Airlines” to celebrate Jamaica’s 50th. They get increasingly frustrated with the flight delays and heated arguments, Jamaican style, ensue. When they finally arrive, their friends and relatives welcome them back to Jamaica. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children age’s six to 12. To purchase tickets and for more information, please call 613-8341718 or visit the web site, niwewetuchoralgroup.org.

homes and build hope across the region. For more information, call Gail at 613-749-9950 ext. 223, send an email to fundraising@ habitatncr.com or go to www.habitatncr.com

Sept. 22-23, 29-30 The artists of the 17th annual West End Studio Tour invite you to visit their studios in the Westboro/West Wellington neighbourhoods on the weekends of Sept. 22-23 and September 29-30. Spend an autumn weekend wandering one of the city’s most vibrant and eclectic areas as you visit the 14 artists of the tour. Enjoy works from painting to fabric art and from etching to photography. The West End Studio Tour offers a multitude of styles and mediums that will engage and entertain.

Tuesdays The Hogs Back 50+ Club meets every Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the front room of the Boys and Girls Club, 1463 Prince of Wales Dr. at Meadowlands and Hogs Back. Bring a bag lunch or come for cards, crafts, friendly chatter and camaraderie. Drop in and check it out. For more information call Shirley at 613-225-8089.

Sept. 17

Wednesdays

Calling all golfers for Habitat for Humanity National Capital Region’s Annual Chipping In Golf Tournament for on Monday, September 17 at Cedarhill Golf and Country Club. Come out for a fun day of networking, prizes and friendly competition while raising much-needed funds for Habitat NCR to build

Buns in the Oven, a free program for pregnant moms led by a nurse and a parent educator at South Nepean Community Health Centre, 4100 Strandherd Dr., suite 201, runs on Wednesdays from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. in May. For more information or to register, please call Susan 613-288-2825, ext. 2134.

Fridays Five-pin bowling league is encouraging senior citizens over the age of 50 to participate in an activity that provides regular moderate exercise. Members range in age from 50 to 90. There is no registration fee. Bowling takes place each Friday afternoon between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. at Walkley Bowling Centre, 2092 Walkley Rd. Participants are placed on mixed four-person teams. To register, please call Roy or Jean Hoban at 613-731-6526.

Saturdays The Elmdale Lawn Bowling Club is open from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturdays in June at 1 MacFarlane Ave. Bring the family and let members introduce you to this fun and active sport. For more information call 613-248-0632 or www.leaguelineup.com/ elmdalelawnbowlingclub.

Ongoing As part of efforts to transform Dundonald Park to a vibrant place, the Centretown Community Health Centre is collaborating with a variety of community groups and organizations. They hope to increase park use by the local community with activities taking place throughout the summer. Monthly calendars will be available for pick up at Centretown Community Health Centre, 420 Cooper St. You can also visit the Centretown Community Health Centre website at www. centretownchc.org for more information. Too late for university? Think again! Carleton University Bridging Program offers mature students a way to qualify for university ad-

Pinhey’s Point Historic Site, 270 Pinhey’s Point Road Saturday, August 18, 2012 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Bring a blanket or a lawn chair and settle in for an evening of traditional folk tales. Enjoy the smell of the bonfire and the taste of roasted marshmallows while taking in the history of the Ottawa Valley! 613-832-4347

Friday and Saturday evenings the Chinese Alliance Friendship Club hosts Line and Folk Dancing in the Park at Dundonald Park from 4:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. For more information, please contact Mrs. Jiang at 613-6808863 (Chinese) or Sally at 613-580-2424 ext. 26144 (English). Enjoy unique and captivating activities all summer long at the Canada Agriculture Museum. From donkey care and bread making to afternoon milking and ice cream making, there is a daily demonstration sure to please everyone. Visit agriculture.technomuses.ca or 613-991-3044 for info. The Overbrook Community Association is currently looking for volunteers to deliver their community newsletter. Right now zone co-ordinators are needed for deliveries in sections east of Lola Street. Bundles of newsletters are available at Reception at the Overbrook Community Centre, 33 Quill St., for volunteers to deliver over the next week or please contact info@overbrook. ca for more information on how to volunteer.

comers@hotmail.ca. The Eastern Ontario Umpires Association (EOUA) is looking for individuals, male and female 18 years of age and over, who are interested in officiating fast pitch and slo-pitch softball. The EOUA is affiliated with Softball Canada, Softball Ontario and Slo-Pitch Ontario. Ontario is proud to boast one of the best umpire programs in the country. If you are interested in learning a new avenue of the game of softball, we are always looking for individuals like you. Training and clinics are provided. Please call George at 613-722-2620 for more information. Teen Book Club takes place at Ottawa Public Library’s Carlingwood branch. Chat about books and share your favourites with other teens. The club is for ages 12 and up and takes place the last Tuesday of the month (Aug. 28) at 7 p.m. A campaign to establish a Department of Peace in Canada is undertaking its first membership drive. For $10 people can support a national effort to bring the political peace agenda to the federal government. For more information and to join as a voting member of CPI, visit departmentofpeace.ca or email Ottawa East’s Iman Ibrahim at imanibrahim@ rogers.com. This summer’s Torchlight Shakespeare production of Henry V tours parks across the region starting in July and runs until August 18. Directed by Geoff McBride and starring Margo MacDonald as Henry, the production promises blood and battle, bravery and romance, all with the Fool-ish twists audiences have come to know and love. For more information please go to www.fools. ca. Old Time Music and Country Dance takes place on the first Friday of every month at the Greely Community Centre, 1448 Meadow Dr. from 7:30 to 11:30 p.m. The cost is $5 per person. Yearly memberships available. Free for musicians and singers. Come have a good time with us.

Volunteer in your Community

June 1st to October 31st.

R0011554986

22

Free Yoga at Dundonald Park Wednesday evenings starting at 5:30 p.m. and Sunday mornings at 8:30 a.m. Akhanda style Hatha Yoga led by Manohar. Bring a blanket, towel or mat, or make friends with the grass. Weather permitting. Sessions are 1.5 hours on average; past sessions have generally range between one to two hours in length.

Ottawa Newcomers’ Club invites women new to Ottawa to join our activities and meet some new friends. Activities include: bridge, Scrabble, walks, luncheons and dinners, book club, Ottawa sights/events, travel cafe and craft and chat. Please check out our website at: www.ottawanewcomersclub. ca. For more information call 613-860-0548 or ottawanew-

Stories of the Ottawa River Valley

Ottawamuseumnetwork.ca

mission, improve academic skills, and build confidence. Only $200 for a 12-week, part-time course. Register now for September. Call 613520-2600 ext. 1024 or visit www.carleton.ca/cie.

R001148094

http://www.raysreptiles.com

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

R0011558956


6G>:H"BVg'&$6eg'%

A>7G6"HZei'($DXi'(

HdbZX]Vc\Z^h^cdgYZg!6g^Zh#Ndj]VkZgZVa^oZY^i[dg hdbZi^bZcdl!Wjii]^hlZZ`^ibjhiXdbZid[gj^i^dc# I]^c`VWdjii]ZlVnndjlVciidVeegdVX]i]^h#

I]^h^hi]ZlZZ`idh]de[dghdbZi]^c\cZl!A^WgV#>ibVn WZVcZllVgYgdWZ!hdbZcZl[jgc^h]^c\h!dgZkZcVcZl XVg#NdjgejgX]Vh^c\edlZg^h]^\]g^\]icdl#

I6JGJH"6eg'&$BVn'&

H8DGE>D"DXi')$Cdk''

IVjgjh!ndjVgZdcVcZbdi^dcVagdaaZgXdVhiZgVcYYdcÉi `cdl]dlndjl^aa[ZZa[gdbdcZhZXdcYidi]ZcZmi#;^\jgZ djindjg\dVa[dgZVX]YVnVcYi]Zc\dVadc\[dgi]Zg^YZ#

NdjgVXVYZb^X]^hidgnVcYldg`adVYYdcÉiaZVkZ bjX]gddb[dgXgZVi^k^in#7ji^[ndjlVciid\d djiVcYYdhdbZi]^c\!i]Zch^beanYd^i#Ndjl^aaÒcYV ldg`"VgdjcY#

<Zb^c^!ndj[ZZaa^`ZhiVn^c\^cVYgZVbldgaYhjggdjcYZY WnV[ZcXZd[ndjgdlcbV`^c\#7jii]ZgZVa^ind[ldg`VcY [Vb^ana^[Z]VhidhZi^cVihdbZed^ci#

86C8:G"?jc''$?ja''

CLUES ACROSS 1. Pesetas (abbr.) 5. Mutual savings bank 8. Supplementing with difficulty 9. Dancer Twyla 12. 100 = 1 kwanza 13. Sleep gear 16. Travel a route regularly 17. Sever the edges 18. A people of Myanmar 19. Titan mother of Helios 23. 2 syllable metrical foot 24. Rapid bustling movement 25. Makes more precise 28. Brittle bone disease 30. Don’t know when yet

31. Graphical user interface 33. Make the connection 41. Uncaptured prisoners 42. No (Scottish) 43. Oh, God! 46. Counting of votes 47. A cgs unit of work 48. Actress Basinger 49. Foot digit 50. Banded metamorphic rock 54. South American nation 56. Dwarf juniper 58. Sunfishes 59. Exclamation: yuck! 60. Inner surface of the hand

CLUES DOWN 1. Landscaped road (abbr.) 2. Fasten with a cord 3. Black tropical American cuckoo 4. Specific gravity 5. Metric ton 6. Shaft horsepower (abbr.) 7. The cry made by sheep 8. Actor Gould 10. Actor Wagner’s initials 11. Native to Latin America 14. Silent 15. All the best (texting) 16. Protective cushions 18. Path (Chinese) 19. Thrust horse power, abbr. 20. 10 = 1 dong 21. Stray 22. Military mailbox 23. Copy of a periodical 25. Glides high

26. Spanish “be” 27. Draws near in time 29. In a way, receded 32. Rocks formed from magma 34. Integrated circuit 35. Skip across a surface 36. Central mail bureau 37. Snakelike fish 38. __ Aviv, Israel 39. Swiss river 40. Nickname for Margaret 43. Electrocardiogram 44. Cotton seeding machine 45. 50010 IA 49. Electric rail car 51. 29th state 52. “Law & Order: ___” 53. Special interest group 54. Blue grass genus 55. Rt. angle building extension 57. New Hampshire 58. Military policeman

H6<>II6G>JH"Cdk'($9ZX'& HV\^iiVg^jh!hdbZi]^c\^bedgiVci]VheVhhZYWjindjVgZ hi^aagZVe^c\i]ZWZcZÒih#7Vh`^ci]ZV[iZg\adlVhbjX]Vh ndjXVcWZXVjhZ^iXVcÉiaVhi[dgZkZg#

I]ZgZ^hhdbZi]^c\^ci]ZhiVghi]^hlZZ`ejh]^c\ndjid bV`ZVX]Vc\Z!8VcXZg#I]ZX]Vc\ZbVnWZVhh^beaZVh lZVg^c\ndjg]V^gVcZllVndgVhh^\c^ÒXVciVhX]Vc\^c\ XVgZZgh#

86EG>8DGC"9ZX''$?Vc'%

A:D"?ja'($6j\'(

6FJ6G>JH"?Vc'&$;ZW&-

I]^c\hVgZd[[idVgdj\]hiVgii]^hlZZ`!WjiWZiiZgYVnh VgZg^\]iVgdjcYi]ZXdgcZg#@ZZei]^c`^c\VWdjii]Z\ddY i^bZhV]ZVY#I]Znl^aaWZ]ZgZWZ[dgZndj`cdl^i#

6fjVg^jh!bV^ciV^cVedh^i^kZVii^ijYZi]^hlZZ`VcY ndjÉaaWZcZÒi\gZVian[gdb]Vk^c\YdcZhd# DcXZndj\Zi^ig^\]i!ZkZgni]^c\l^aaXa^X`#

K>G<D"6j\')$HZei''

E>H8:H";ZW&.$BVg'%

K^g\d!^iÉhi^bZidgZXdch^YZgVY^[ÒXjaih^ijVi^dc#>[ndj hi^aa]daYidVeVgi^XjaVgWZa^Z[!ndjXdjaYWZa^b^i^c\ndjg edhh^W^a^i^Zh#6YdeiVcZled^cid[k^Zlid\V^cVY^[[ZgZci eZgheZXi^kZ#

E^hXZh![dgdcZgZVhdcdgVcdi]Zg!hdbZ^hhjZhl^aa\d jcgZhdakZYi]^hlZZ`#I]ZnXVclV^i!hdYdcÉildggn#

AVhilZZ`Éh VchlZgh

8Veg^Xdgc!ndjbVnÒcYndjÉgZhigj\\a^c\Va^iiaZidYZÒcZ ndjg^YZci^in!Wjii]^c\hl^aa[Vaa^cideaVXZhddc#NdjÉgZVc ZXXaZXi^Xb^md[Viig^WjiZh!VcnlVn#

I]^hlZZ`h ejooaZVchlZgh^c cZmilZZ`h^hhjZ

;jc7nI]ZCjbWZgh A^`ZejooaZh4I]ZcndjÉaaadkZ hjYd`j#I]^hb^cY"WZcY^c\ ejooaZl^aa]VkZndj]dd`ZY [gdbi]ZbdbZcindjhfjVgZ d[[!hdh]VgeZcndjgeZcX^a VcYejindjghjYd`jhVkknid i]ZiZhi =ZgZÉh=dl>iLdg`h/ HjYd`jejooaZhVgZ [dgbViiZYVhV.m.\g^Y! Wgd`ZcYdlc^cidc^cZ(m( WdmZh#IdhdakZVhjYd`j! i]ZcjbWZgh&i]gdj\]. bjhiÒaaZVX]gdl!Xdajbc VcYWdm#:VX]cjbWZgXVc VeeZVgdcandcXZ^cZVX] gdl!XdajbcVcYWdm#Ndj XVcÒ\jgZdjii]ZdgYZg ^cl]^X]i]ZcjbWZghl^aa VeeZVgWnjh^c\i]ZcjbZg^X XajZhVagZVYnegdk^YZY^ci]Z WdmZh#I]ZbdgZcjbWZgh ndjcVbZ!i]ZZVh^Zg^i\Zih idhdakZi]ZejooaZ

0816

<:B>C>"BVn''$?jc'&

R0011492744

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

23


Solutions to relieve constipation WEEKLY STAR PRODUCTS D E L A SE M A I N S E T T E D E V E OS PUREX

Liquid laundry detergent Détersif liquide 1,89 L

3

PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

ea. ch.

VICHY Normaderm Selected skin care Soins sélectionnés

3

PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

for pour

3$

VACHON Selected cakes Gâteaux sélectionnés

6

for pour

UNITS PER CUSTOMER UNITÉS PAR CLIENT

t1-":#0: t"%*%"4

t Antibacterial mouthwash Rince-bouche antibactérien, 1 L tDenture cleanser tablets Nettoyant pour prothèses dentaires Comprimés 108

3

3

PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

99

PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

Saturday and Sunday, AUGUST 18 and 19 Samedi et dimanche 18 et 19 AOÛT

Eau de toilette Spray / vapo. 50 ml

99

with the purchase of

products

à l’achat de produits de Details / détails p. 4

If you suffer from constipation, don’t suffer in silence, your pharmacist is there to help and ensures complete confidentiality.

Personalized self-adhesive labels for your school items Étiquettes autocollantes personnalisées pour vos

Discount of Rabais de

articles scolaires

Sheet protectors Protège-feuilles Pack of /emballage de 10

4

UNITS PER CUSTOMER UNITÉS PAR CLIENT

60 %

Discount of Rabais de

APP

16

3-subject coil book Cahier à spirale 3 sujets 300 pages

2$

for pour

UNITS PER CUSTOMER UNITÉS PAR CLIENT

50 % for pour

Washable ink Encre lavable

53

3$

STAEDTLER

Discount of Rabais de

50 %

2 99

PLAYSKOOL Markers / marqueurs Pack of / emballage de 8 PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

PRISMACOLOR

Rasoplast White eraser / gomme à effacer blanche 526B20

Scholar Quality colouring pencils Crayons couleur de qualité 92808HT Box of / boîte de 60

3 Discount of Rabais de

Ask now to any Jean Coutu employee Demandez-les dès maintenant à un employé Jean Coutu

6

60

UNITS PER CUSTOMER UNITÉS PAR CLIENT

%

1

for pour

50 %

PER CUSTOMER PAR CLIENT

T

60 different files and more of the same size 60 fichiers différents ou plus de même format.

LE

photo jeancoutu.com/photo 4x6* *Excluding instant prints from the digital printing kiosk. Details in stores. / Excluant les impressions instantanées au kiosque d’impression numérique. Détails en succursale.

FRI./VEN.

SAT./SAM.

SUN./DIM.

MON./LUN.

TUE./MAR.

WED./MER.

THU./JEU.

17

18

19

20

21

22

23 ONT.

24

w

w

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, August 16, 2012

.

j

e

CIRCULAIRES COMPLÈTES TOUJOURS DISPONIBLES EN SUCCURSALES

DIGITAL PRINTS ONLY IMPRESSIONS NUMÉRIQUES SEULEMENT

EVENT

Valid from AUGUST 17 to 23, 2012 En vigueur du 17 au 23 AOÛT 2012

COMPLETE FLYER ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN STORE

19 99

Discount of Rabais de

3$

L'ÉVÉNEMEN

w

When constipation occurs, it is most important to try to identify the cause of the problem and the ways of relieving it. It is better to use non pharmacological methods first, such as staying well hydrated, doing physical exercise, increasing fiber intake by eating foods that are high in fiber, etc. However, in some cases, these measures are insufficient. At this point, you may consider using a laxative which is most often available without a prescription. Each situation has a solution, but it can sometimes be difficult to choose among a large range of products, supplements to be mixed in a liquid (fibers, polyethylene glycol 3350, etc.), senna tablets or syrup, glycerine suppositories, etc. Always ask the advice of a health professional to help you choose the product that best suits your needs.

a

n

c

o

u

t

Luc Chainé Pharmacist Owner 262 ch. Montreal, Vanier, Ontario 613-741-5050 u . c o m

0816.R0011553549

N

For some, constipation may be an embarrassing problem to talk about with a health professional. Yet, bloating, abdominal pain, and the discomfort that accompanies constipation can affect the quality of life of those who suffer from it. Its causes are numerous and can result from such things as disease, certain medications, pregnancy, a sedentary lifestyle or immobility. Whether the problem is acute (short term) or chronic (long term), there are solutions available and talking privately with your pharmacist can be of great help.

Ottawa East EMC  

August 19, 2012

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you