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Inside Sunnyside NEWS

Village BIA now in high gear Some merchants see no need for a business group

Autism organization recieves a donation from a local charity golf tournament. – Page 3

ARTS & CULTURE

A first-time fiction author from Old Ottawa East pens a mystery novel about small-town Newfoundland. – Page 4

NEWS

Cement planters all along Rideau Street will be removed as part of the ongoing reconstruction project. – Page 9

Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - A proposed business group is needed in Old Ottawa South to attract businesses that will serve residents, advocates say, but not all merchants are convinced it’s such a good idea. If approved, the group, called a Business Improvement Area or BIA, would include the businesses along Bank Street between the two bridges and a stretch along Sunnyside Avenue from Bank Street to Seneca Street. All businesses within that area would have a fee applied to their taxes and the money collected could be used for any activity that benefits the business area as a whole, such as advertising campaigns, seasonal decorating or events and lobbying politicians and attracting potential new businesses. While a city-run survey found only 3.2 per cent of business and property owners surveyed were opposed to the idea at the end of 2011, some businesses in the area have spoken out against it. When the survey was conducted, a large segment – 30 per cent – of the business and property owners surveyed were still undecided. Sue Smith, owner of the Ottawa Antique Market, said she and many other area merchants she knows are against forming a BIA. “Most of the vendors on this street aren’t for it,” she said. Her main concern is the cost. The economy is still sluggish and it’s affecting sales for her business and other merchants. See BIA, page 12

Michelle Nash

Hitting the road for breast cancer Carlanna Cook has been riding on the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation’s Pink Tour bus across Ontario since May. Cook, along with her colleagues, stopped at the St. Laurent Shopping Centre on July 4 to offer tours of the bus and answer common breast cancer questions. The Pink Tour bus wraps up its province-wide tour in October.

Safer cycling part of mall’s expansion plans Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - After more than a year of waiting, the owners of the St. Laurent Shopping Centre will submit a site plan regarding the mall’s massive expansion to the city this summer. Morguard, owners of the city’s largest shopping centre located at Coventry Road and St. Laurent Boulevard, announced plans to expand the mall in the fall of 2010. After receiving approval from the city’s planning commit-

tee to rezone and expand the retail area by 80 per cent in November of that year, the company began working on a site plan. The initial plans involved demolishing certain buildings owned by Morguard and realigning Coventry Road. Margaret Knowles, senior vice-president of development at Morguard Investments Ltd., is overseeing the project and said the company has made some significant changes to those plans. “I am happy to say we are

working on a revised plan that has modifications to the road realignment, that takes some of the amenities, like the bicycle path off the roadway and onto our site,” she said. The new plans call for the Coventry Road bike paths to be moved from the roadway to run along the edge of the mall’s property. This plan, Knowles said, will offer a safer ride for cyclists, provide a more direct route to and from St. Laurent Boulevard and easier access to the mall.

“It works much better, is much safer and brings them to the same place, but instead of being along the roadway,” she said. The new design for the expansion still needs to be discussed with the mall’s tenants, but the goal Knowles said is to hand the revised site plan over to the city later this summer. When construction for the expansion will actually begin, however, is still uncertain.

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Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, July 12, 2012


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Autism clinic gets boost from recent donation Organization helps ensure vital early intervention Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - An organization that provides help to autistic children received a funding boost recently thanks to a charity golf tournament run by an east-end law firm. QuickStart - Early Intervention for Autism was founded in 2008 by Suzanne Jacobson to offer potentially autistic children a head start. On July 3, the law firm of Bertschi Orth Smith handed over a cheque for $14,500 to help the organization run its programs. “We are very grateful for this donation,” Jacobson said. “We are a complete volunteer organization and without this support we would not be able to do what we do.” Jacobson learned first hand about the long waits that can be involved with an autism diagnosis when her first grandson, Alexander, began

showing signs of delayed development. Inspired by her grandson and determined to not leave any child behind, Jacobson contacted the Ottawa Children’s Treatment Centre and within 13 months, QuickStart’s Getting Started Services Clinic was born. One of the law firm’s partners, David Bertschi, said it was an important cause to support. “It is a pleasure for our staff and firm and partners to raise money for a really important cause and a program with direct results,” Bertschi said. “(Hearing about) the wait times and the treatment times, it was quite obvious that there was a need to detect and treat children in the National Capital Region who have a diagnosis. These kids are getting diagnosed sooner.” When a child’s development begins to slow or change, Jacobson said, parents rightfully become concerned. The programs offered through QuickStart don’t offer a diagnosis, but begin bringing out a child’s potential. “When a child is showing signs of a developmental de-

Submitted

Suzanne Jacobson, centre, the founder of QuickStart - Early Intervention for Autism, accepts a donation of $14,500 from Debbie Orth, third from right, and David Bertschi of Bertschi Orth Smith LLP on July 3. lay, it is very important to get in the help right way. It becomes detrimental, becomes ingrained,” Jacobson said. “Because most of the children are male, doctors say, ‘Well, boys develop slower.’ You are scrambling, worrying, and your doctor says ‘Let’s wait and see.’” In four years since QuickStart began, the volunteer organization has raised more than $200,000 for the Getting

Started Services Clinic. The clinic has seen over 800 children to date, all at no cost to the families. Overall, 75 to 80 per cent of the children who attend the clinic end up being diagnosed with autism. Jacobson’s second grandson, Nathan was also diagnosed with autism, but unlike his older brother, Nathan received help right away. “There are differences, it is not fair to compare, but I

always wonder, in my heart, had we known what we knew to do for Nathan, would it have been different for Alex?” Jacobson said. “And that is hard. And I don’t want any other child to have that. And that is the essence (of QuickStart) get them in early give them the opportunities.” At age five, Nathan is no longer in therapy and just completed kindergarten. Jacobson said he is considered a

high functioning autistic boy. At the age of eight, Alexander is doing well and is definitely making great gains, she added. Bertschi said the law firm made the choice to donate to the charity because beyond the help it offers the children, the organization also offers support and programs for the parents to take advantage of. A respite program for parents of children diagnosed with autism allows parents to take a small getaway at a local hotel. “Parents are just so grateful,” Jacobson said. “The hotel just treats them so well, it gives them time for one another and as much as one could, forget about their troubles for one day, but remain close enough if they need to go home, they can.” The respite program offers daycare while the parents are away. Jacobson said donations such as the one provided by the law firm are instrumental in helping the small organization grow and build programming such as the respite program. Over the past two years, the firm has raised $24,800 for the charity through their golf tournament. A retired civil servant, Jacobson, works day and night for the organization and says she has little time to reflect about how far their charity has come. “I am always thinking about what we need to do next,” Jacobson said.

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ARTS & CULTURE

Your Community Newspaper

Novel shows mysterious side of Rock Old Ottawa East author writes about Newfoundland home Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC entertainment - A new mystery novel from an Ottawa author takes the reader to a small-town in Newfoundland where local culture and community play a signiďŹ cant role in solving the caper. Author Mike Martin grew up in St. John’s, N.L., and moved to Ottawa in 1985 to work. The Old Ottawa East resident is currently a labour relations consultant by day, but has written a number of short stories and done freelance writing over the years. Referring to writing as his escape and true passion, The Walker on the Cape is Martin’s second book and ďŹ rst novel. It pays homage to his home

province by setting the scene in the ďŹ shing community of Grand Bank. “Every year we spend a lot of time in Grand Bank and the truth is not a lot of people know anything about the town,â€? Martin said of annual trips he takes to Newfoundland with his partner. “It was an opportunity to tell a bit of the history of Grand Bank and write a good mystery.â€? The book’s main character is RCMP Sgt. Winston Windower, a Cree from northern Alberta. Windower ďŹ nds himself stationed in Grand Bank and at ďŹ rst, Martin explains, is very much out of his element. Windower is thrust into a case involving the body of a

man found on the cape, which is a trail overlooking the town. At ďŹ rst, Martin said, the townspeople believe the man had a heart attack, but it is soon discovered that the cause of death was poisoning. “The novel has other criminal activities happening and there are secrets that no one is talking about and corruption with some of the ofďŹ cials from the town,â€? Martin said. The author said he had fun playing with small-town mystery story conventions, but his familiarity with this particular town allowed Martin to add a great deal of local colour to the novel. Readers are taken through the winding, narrow streets of a town that hugs the northern coast of the Burin

Peninsula and are exposed to the town’s gossip mill situated at the local cafe and wharf-side benches full of old timers, affectionately known in the town as the “Liar’s Club.â€? “There are pieces in the book that people from Grand Bank will love,â€? Martin said. “It is a story about a crime, a mystery, but it also is about Newfoundland culture, the food and customs.â€? The idea, Martin explained was to recreate the town’s atmosphere for the reader. “It is a view from the town from a person from the outside.â€? This is the ďŹ rst in a series of stories that will feature Windower, the author said, adding that he could easily see the stories being adapted for television, an idea he is shopping around.

Submitted

Mike Martin’s first fiction novel, The Walker on the Cape takes readers on a mysterious ride through the small-town of Grand Bank, Newfoundland.

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EMC entertainment Crowds a Bluesfest this year had the chance to hear an Ottawa-based take on alternative roots music when The Flats hit the River Stage on July 7. Mixing everything from traditional folk music to alter-

native rock into their set, lead singer and guitarist Greg Brayford and bandmates Matthew Young, Robert Commins, Michel Pariseau and Steve Jugurtis were happy to play at their hometown festival. The band was established in 2007 by Brayford and has grown over the past four years

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Equestrian park future in doubt Summer after city moves to end funding

Conservation Tips!

Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - The city is banking on the National Capital Commission to find another group to run the Nepean National Equestrian Park as it prepares to shut down its equestrian operations. All programs and services at the park should cease by Aug. 26, the city’s finance committee recommended on July 3. That decision was taken with the proviso that the city will put $50,000 towards finding alternate spots for disabled and special-needs riders currently enrolled in the therapeutic riding program at the park. But the future of programs at the park is still up in the air. In addition to the therapeutic riding program, the park currently provides space to board 17 horses and also offers lessons – mainly for beginners – as well as recreational riding and facilities for horse shows. Spokesman Cedric Pelletier said the NCC would like to continue the “existing use” of the park, which the city ran by leasing NCC land for $20,200 a year. But he said the future offerings at the park will depend on what the businesses and groups that step forward suggest for the site. “I can’t tell you we will keep all the components,” Pelletier said. “At this time it’s too early to decide about this,” he said, adding the city hasn’t officially terminated its lease of the park. That wouldn’t happen until after council votes on the closure on July 11. The typical timeline for seeking a new group or business to run the park could run between three and six months, Pelletier said, but he wouldn’t confirm how long it would take to find a new operator for the equestrian park or a targeted date for the new operators to take over the facility.

The hot hazy days of summer are here, and Hydro Ottawa is sharing tips to help you conserve electricity while keeping cool.

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Laura Mueller

Milo Cruikshank, shown with Toy, the horse she leases and boards at the Nepean National Equestrian Park, was emotional at the prospect of having to leave her ‘family’ after the city indicated it wants to cease operations at the park. That worried Elaine Gagnon, whose 18-year-old son, Joey, has participated in the therapeutic riding program for five years. She spent three years looking for a local program that would accept Joey, whose pervasive developmental disorder has left him “trapped in a tense and twisted body.” “Therapeutic riding has given him an opportunity to stretch, therefore letting him stand a little taller in the world,” Gagnon said. Horse riding gives Joey, whose symptoms have autistic tendencies, something to socialize and talk about, his mother said. Milo Cruikshank, a Nepean resident for whom the park has been a “home away from home” for more than a decade, was even more uncertain about the future of her adopted “family.” “We don’t want to have to leave here. We’re going to go off in 12 directions,” she said. Cruikshank wished she and other park users had known about the impending closure earlier so they could have done more to prevent it.

The lone dissenting voice on the shutdown was Kanata North Coun. Marianne Wilkinson, who is a longtime supporter of the park for its role in providing recreational opportunities for girls, women and people with disabilities. Wilkinson presented a motion aimed at continuing operations at the park into the fall to ensure there isn’t a gap between the city’s programming and when the new operator takes over. That idea was quickly shot down by the rest of the committee. The councillor for the ward where the park is located, Bay Coun. Mark Taylor, said the gap in general programs and operations wasn’t the biggest concern for the committee. While councillors very much wanted to keep up the therapeutic riding services going, Taylor said, “No one was keen on continuing to lose money.” The park has run an average deficit of around $140,000 each year for the past six years, and it needs $1.25 million in capital upgrades, according to a report from city staff.

Use fans to supplement or replace air conditioning.

Install a programmable thermostat to manage the amount of electricity used to cool your home, especially when you are not there.

Hydro Ottawa’s peaksaver PLUS program offers customers with central air conditioning a free professionally-installed programmable thermostat and an in-home energy display to help customers track and manage their electricity use. For details, visit www.peaksaverplus.net. When cooling is needed, we recommend that thermostats be set between 25 and 26 degrees Celsius (77 and 79 degrees Fahrenheit).

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Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, July 12, 2012

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COMMUNITY

Your Community Newspaper

Michelle Nash R0011496280-0712

Stretching beyond music Sophia Santiso led a free early morning yoga session at Dominion-Chalmers United Church in Centretown on July 5. Part of the Music and Beyond festival, the 50-minute class offered seasoned and new yoga practitioners a unique chance to stretch their legs.

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    R0011292963

A Church in the Heart of Vanier 206 Montreal Rd. Sunday Communion at 9:00 am in English Also at 11:00 am (in English and Inuktitut) 613-746-8815 www.stmargaretsvanier.ca

Capital City Church 1123 Old Montreal Rd. phone: 613.833.1700 www.capitalcitychurch.ca

THIS IS MY pentecostal church

Our Service Times:

10:00 am - Morning Worship KidzChurch (ages 4-11) 7:00 pm - Young Adult Service

Sundays at 10am & Wednesdays at 7pm

Nursery care available during Sunday School and Morning Worship for infants – 3yrs.

www.billberry.org / 613-824-3131

   

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St. Margaret’s Anglican Church

613-236-0617 www.glebestjames.ca glebestjames.church@bellnet.ca

    !!

Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. Sunday School/Nursery During Worship

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Ministers: Rev. Dr. Christine Johnson Stephanie Langill - Youth and Children Rev. George Clifford - Pastoral Care Lyon Street South and First Robert Palmai - Music

1234 Prestone Dr, Orleans (1 block west of 10th Line, 1 block south of St. Joseph) 613-824-2010 www.sthelens.ca



       

Minister: Rev. Ed Gratton

Come and celebrate God’s love with us.

Elgin at Lisgar 613-238-4774 email: knoxottawa@rogers.com www.knoxottawa.ca Sunday Worship 11 AM Sunday School Serving Christ in the heart of the Nation’s Capital

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“Come Pray with Us� 320 Olmstead St. Vanier (613) 746-8503

QUEENSWOOD UNITED CHURCH

265549/0605 R0011293022

Celebrate with us Sundays @ 10am Teen programs, Sunday School & Nursery Available 1111 Orleans Boulevard 613-837-4321 Check us out at: www.orleansunitedchurch.com

Childcare available at all services

R0011291942

R0011292986

PERPETUAL HELP EVENING DEVOTION – WED 6:15 PM – 7 PM

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355 Cooper Street at O’Connor 613-235-5143 www.dc-church.org

Sunday Worship 8, 9:15, 11

KNOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Mon.-Fri. 8:00 am Sat. 4:00 pm Sun. 9:00 am & 10:30 am 12:00 pm Filipino

HjcYVnHX]dda;dg8]^aYgZc)"&'ngh# CjghZgnNdji]<gdje &'*BVX@VnHigZZi!DiiVlVÂ&#x2122;+&(,)*",-()

ST. HELENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ANGLICAN CHURCH

Generation Impact Youth Group meets every Wednesday at 7pm

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Services at 9:00 am every Sunday All are welcome to join us in faith and fellowship.

Dominion-Chalmers United Church

2476 Old Montreal Rd., Cumberland Tel: 613-859-4738

Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary Parish

613-590-0677 stmarys@rogers.com stmarysblackburn.ca

R0011493543

You are specially invited to our Sunday Worship Service

Sunday Eucharist 10:00 a.m. Sunday School

2750 Navan Rd. (2 minutes South of Innes)

1220 Old Tenth Line Rd Orleans, ON K1E3W7 Phone: 613-824-9260 www.graceorleans.ca pastordan@graceorleans.ca

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St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Church

INVITES YOU TO WORSHIP SUNDAYS AT 10:45AM

R0011292950

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GRACE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

R0011293005

R0011414050

SPECIAL INVITATION

6:00 pm (Sat) - Spanish Service 3:00 pm (Sun) - Spanish Sunday School

1825 St. Joseph Blvd, Orleans 613-837-3555

www.cpcorleans.ca

Place your Church Services Ad Here for Only $10/week. Call Sharon 613-688-1483 Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, July 12, 2012

7


OPINION

Your Community Newspaper

EDITORIAL

Bike helmet debate requires us to use our heads

R

ules, rules, rules. The government always seems to be coming up with laws telling us what to do. Have a life-jacket handy when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re travelling in a boat, buckle up when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in a car, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t drink and drive. Now, Ontarioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chief coroner is recommending the provincial government make it illegal to bike without wearing a helmet. Well, come on.

Just think of the arguments against such an absurd suggestion. First, people would have to spend upwards of $20 to buy a helmet. Twenty dollars that would be better spent on important items such as racing stripes to decorate bicycles or a new set of iPod headphones for those long cycling trips. Another argument against forcing people to buy bike helmets is the cool factor â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or

rather lack thereof. Bike helmets put a dent in whatever type of fashion statement youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going for and prevent people from allowing their long Fabio-esque hair from flowing in the wind. And if that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough, helmets sometimes feel hot while cycling on warm summer days. OK, OK â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a bike-helmet law will save peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives. Recently, an 18-year-old who wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wearing a helmet

died after crashing into a post in Kanata. Every single one of the cycling deaths in the province between 2006 and 2010 was preventable, according to a recent report from the office of the chief coroner. According to the report, cyclists whose cause of death involved a head injury were â&#x20AC;&#x153;three times less likely to be wearing a helmet than those who died of other types of injuries.â&#x20AC;? Only four provinces in

Canada have cycling helmet safety laws for people of all ages. Ontario and Alberta require people under the age of 18 to wear helmets. When the question of a bike-helmet law hits Queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Park, MPPs will have to balance two arguments; voters distaste for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;nanny stateâ&#x20AC;? and the need to introduce legislation that could potentially save lives. If you accept the argument that helmets will save peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

lives, then maybe we should move on to the next question: how do we encourage people to obey such a law. Promotional campaigns, such as Ottawa Public Healthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Adopt a Helmet contest which offers prizes to youth ages 13 to 24 who are photographed wearing a helmet, are a good start. Education will be the cornerstone of any intelligent campaign aimed at getting people to wear bike helmets.

COLUMN

Why city beats cottage, and vice versa CHARLES GORDON Funny Town

A

side from it being too hot most of the time, we have it pretty good in the summer, not having to worry about grammar or dressing up for work. There are great things going on in the city and the usual bounty of natural wonders out by the lakes. The pressure to indulge in cottaging is intense. More and more we are hearing that the cottage is what defines us as Canadians. This makes it tough on people who worry about poison ivy, swimmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ear, raccoons and all the other side-effects of lakeside living. What people like this would really like to do is stay home in the air conditioning and let someone else worry about the mosquitos. And whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to say that they should not have the opportunity? Every Canadian has the right to a guilt-free summer of their choosing. In that spirit, here, as a public service, is a summary of the pros and cons of summer in the city and summer at the lake. Pros of staying in the city: You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to fight the traffic getting out. You have the place pretty much to yourself. There are seats on the buses and at restaurants. Except for kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; soccer night, your street is quiet. There are festivals of all sorts, which you can really enjoy as long as you are adaptable. For example, you should be adaptable enough not to expect blues at the blues festival. The city has air conditioning. The country just has air. The city has restaurants, where you can go if you feel like eating something that hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been

on a barbecue. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to drive back to the city. The Internet. Cons of staying in the city: If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t leave town, you will have to listen to friends telling you how great it was at the cottage. And look at photographs of fish. On their phones. In the city you will have newspapers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in other words, unrelenting gloom. You will have to do something about the part of the garden that hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been eaten by squirrels. All your friends are gone and the only thing on television is reruns. Work. Construction. The Internet. Pros of heading to the country: The joy of the open road. Sunset and the sound of loons. The sounds of splashing and childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s laughter. A moratorium on the need to improve yourself, the freedom to read a mystery, to take a nap and eat stuff that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t strictly healthy. Rustic bliss and losing track of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on in the world. Seeing real animals. If the roof doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t leak, a good storm. The cons of visiting the country: A truck ahead of you on the open road, passing another truck, which is behind a trailer. Construction. Sunrise and the sound of crows. The sounds of personal watercraft and somebodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sound system across the lake. Trying to smile and pretend you are not sick of corn on the cob. Things that might be bears that make a loud noise just when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to go to sleep. Where can you find a sudoku in this rustic bliss? No matter where you are, you will, unless you are a very secure sort of person, be nagged by the suspicion that others, elsewhere, are having a better time than you. Just remember that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re thinking the same thing.

Editorial Policy

Published weekly by:

:ME6C9:9B6G@:I8DK:G6<:

57 Auriga Drive, Suite 103 Ottawa, ON, K2E 8B2 613-723-5970 Vice President & Regional Publisher: Mike Mount Group Publisher: Duncan Weir Regional General Manager: Peter Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary Regional Managing Editor: Ryland Coyne Publisher: Mike Tracy mtracy@perfprint.ca

THE DEADLINE FOR DISPLAY ADVERTISING IS THURSDAY 10:00 AM 8

DISTRIBUTION INQUIRIES Steven Robinson 613-221-6213 ADMINISTRATION: Crystal Foster 613-723-5970 ADVERTISING SALES: Sales Manager: Carly McGhie 613-688-1479 cmcghie@perfprint.ca DISPLAY ADVERTISING: Caroline Grist - Kanata - 221-6215 Gisele Godin - Kanata - 221-6214

THIS WEEKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S POLL QUESTION

PREVIOUS POLL SUMMARY

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your strategy for beating the worst of summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heat?

Which acts are you most looking forward to seeing at Bluesfest this year?

A) Close the blinds and crank up the air conditioning.

A) I mostly enjoy the headliners, like Iron Maiden, John Mellencamp and City and Colour.

57%

B) Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m excited to see some of the electronic artists on the bill this year.

0%

C) Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll stick to the blues on the Black Sheep stage, thank you very much.

0%

B) Head to a shopping centre to hang out for the day â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got no AC. C) I head to the beach or local swimming pool to cool off. D) Who sayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s this is hot? I love the warm

weather and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get enough!

Ottawa East EMC welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at www.yourottawaregion.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to patricia.lonergan@metroland.com , fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to Ottawa East EMC, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa, ON, K2E 7L2.

OTTAWA EAST

Web Poll

D) I never go to Bluesfest, so I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care who will be playing. To vote in our web polls, visit us at www.yourottawaregion.com/community/cityofottawa

Dave Pennett - Ottawa West - 221-6209 Dave Badham - Orleans - 688-1652 Cindy Manor - Ottawa South - 688-1478 Geoff Hamilton - Ottawa East - 688-1488 Valerie Rochon - Barrhaven - 688-1669 Jill Martin - Nepean - 688-1665 Mike Stoodley - Stittsville - 688-1675 Emily Warren - Ottawa West - 688-1659 Stephanie Jamieson - Renfrew - 432-3655 Dave Gallagher - Renfrew - 432-3655 Leslie Osborne - Arnprior / WC - 623-6571 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SALES: Sharon Russell - 613-688-1483 Kevin Cameron - 613-221-6224 Adrienne Barr - 613-623-6571

EDITORIAL: Managing Editor: Patricia Lonergan 613-221-6261 patricia.lonergan@metroland.com NEWS EDITOR: Matthew Jay MATTHEWJAY METROLANDCOM 613-221-6175 REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER: Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com 613-221-6160 POLITICAL REPORTER: Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com 613-221-6162

Member of: Ontario Community Newspapers Association, Canadian Community, Newspapers Association, Ontario Press Council, Association of Free Community Papers

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, July 12, 2012

43%

s !DVERTISINGRATESANDTERMSANDCONDITIONSAREACCORDINGTO the rate card in effect at time advertising published. s 4HEADVERTISERAGREESTHATTHEPUBLISHERSHALLNOTBELIABLE for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount charged for the space actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of its servants or otherwise... and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount charged for such advertisement. s 4HEADVERTISERAGREESTHATTHECOPYRIGHTOFALLADVERTISEMENTS prepared by the Publisher be vested in the Publisher and that those advertisements cannot be reproduced without the permission of the Publisher. s 4HE0UBLISHERRESERVESTHERIGHTTOEDIT REVISEORREJECT any advertisement.

Read us online at www.EMConline.ca Your Community Newspaper


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Rideau Street planters to be removed Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - While a large portion of Rideau Street is getting a makeover over the next two summers, the section between Dalhousie Street and Sussex Drive will continue to look “rugged,” according to the area’s councillor. Upgrades to that section, which includes the Rideau Centre, won’t happen until construction of the downtown tunnel for Ottawa’s light-rail transit system begins in 2013, said Rideau-Vanier Coun. Mathieu Fleury. In the meantime, the city

is aiming to make that leftover section of Rideau blend in a bit better with the shiny, newer section. Large, heavy cement planters will be removed all along Rideau Street – including the portion from Sussex to Dalhousie that won’t be reconstructed. In the Sussex-toDalhousie section, pavers will be put in place to fill in the sidewalk. “The western portion will continue to look sort of rugged, so we want to create sort of a blend there,” Fleury said. There is enough money in the Rideau Street reconstruc-

tion budget to cover the cost of removing the planters. The large planters have mostly served as obstacles to pedestrians and create more clutter than an aesthetically appealing streetscape, Fleury said. When the street is rebuilt, most of the sidewalks will be in the 3.5-metre wide range, which is largely consistent with what’s there now, said Randy Dempsey, who is the transportation engineer for the project. But Fleury insisted the sidewalks, while not physically wider in many spots, will still

offer more usable space for pedestrians because of better organization of “street furniture” such as granite block benches, garbage cans and street lights. “It is (an improvement). People are looking at the width of the curbside to the wall,” Fleury said. “In spots you have wider sidewalks and in spots you don’t … But what you do is you gain because of the removal of the planters and … better organized of street furniture. It will make better, logical sense and it will be more enjoyable to walk along Rideau Street.”

LOOK FOR YOUR FLYER IN THE

Ottawa’s #1 Soccer Club

MANCHESTER UNITED ACADEMY COACH NEIL RYAN TO VISIT THE OSU On Thursday July 12-14, 2012, Ottawa South United coaches and players will benefit from the incredible opportunity to learn from Neil Ryan, one of the top coaches in Manchester United’s Academy. During his visit Ryan will spend his time at OSU holding training sessions for our players as well as, in conjunction with OSU’s newly appointed Head Coach of Player Development from Everton FC Paul Harris, giving a seminar to our coaches. OSU players and coaches will benefit greatly from this unique opportunity to learn from the philosophy and player development program of one of the top clubs in the world. “ Manchester United is globaly renowned over the years for producing “in-house” soccer talent that graduates (Beckham, Giggs, Scholes, Welbeck, etc) to play with the famed Manchester United FC team. This is a unique opportunity for the OSU coaches to learn directly from the people that operate this Academy. We are also pleased to hear that other non-OSU coaches from other soccer clubs in Ottawa will be participating in this exclusive seminar with Neil Ryan” said OSU President, Bill Michalopulos.

R0011497344

Neil Ryan played professionally in England and the United States, before joining the Manchester United Academy as a coach. Ryan’s visit is one of the benefits of OSU’s unique affiliation with Dallas Texans and Nike.

R0011496340/0712

*Delivered to selected areas

www.osu.ca Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, July 12, 2012

9


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10

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Yasir Naqvi, MPP

Students top priority for new trustee Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - A longtime community and school board volunteer, Joanne MacEwan is looking forward to helping students in her new role as Catholic School Board trustee. Currently the co-chairwoman of the Catholic School Parents Association and chairwoman of the board’s parent involvement committee, MacEwan was named trustee for Beacon Hill-Cyrville/Innes at a Catholic board meeting on June 27, replacing

Katalin Sheskay, who died suddenly on May 17. MacEwan has experience fighting for student success in her former roles within the Catholic board, a role she intends to continue as a trustee. “There are a number of areas that I am interested in, but particularly, I will focus on ways students can improve their success in the school system,” she said. The mother of two said she applied for the position because she felt the timing was right with her youngest child graduating from high school

this year. MacEwan was one of eight people who applied for the position after Sheskay’s death. Each candidate was asked three main questions from the board as part of the application process: what are the challenges in the zone, what are the challenges for the board and why they wanted to be a trustee. “The main reason that I wanted to be a trustee was to continue working with the school board, because the board is such a good board,”

MacEwan said. “You feel like you are part of a team.” The eager new trustee said she can not wait to learn all about the schools in her zone in the fall. “I hope to work hard and am looking forward to getting into the schools next fall,” MacEwan said. “Each school is their own community and they each have their own issues and challenges.” MacEwan was sworn in at the June 27 meeting by justice of the peace Paulina Brecher. She will begin her official role as trustee in the fall.

LOOK FOR YOUR

Ottawa Centre

Green Energy in Ontario With summer upon us, many of us will be thinking about the energy and electricity that will be used to keep cool when the temperature starts to rise. I encourage everyone to consider how we can conserve energy – small changes, like keeping your curtains drawn during the day and washing your laundry in cold water, can make a big difference! Our government is also committed to developing clean, renewable sources of energy that will provide Ontario with a reliable and sustainable supply of electricity. Ontario is the largest province in Canada, with the biggest industrial and manufacturing base and we need a modern stable and clean energy system that supports our growing economy. Since 2003, we have invested $3.7 billion in the upgrading and diversification of our energy system, bringing over 8,000 new MW online – that is more than 20 per cent of our current energy capacity, and is enough electricity to power cities the size of Ottawa and Toronto for a year. It also includes 1,400 MW of renewable energy, enough to power more than 400,000 homes. We recently completed the first bi-annual review of the Feed-In-Tariff (FIT) Program, during which we consulted with families, businesses, First Nations, municipalities and industry. We are now taking immediate steps to ensure the long-term sustainability of renewable energy while creating more jobs, lowering prices and giving communities a greater say in the process. We are acting quickly to implement all of the recommendations highlighted in the review, which include: s

FLYER IN THE

s

s

2EDUCINGPRICESTOBALANCETHEINTERESTSOFALL Ontarians, while continuing to encourage investment – FIT prices will be reduced by more than 20 per cent for solar and approximately 15 per cent for wind, while prices for water, biogas, biomass and landfill gas will remain at current levels; %NCOURAGINGGREATERCOMMUNITYAND Aboriginal participation through a new priority point system, which will also prioritize projects with municipal support; 2ESERVINGPERCENTOFREMAININGCAPACITY for projects with significant participation from local or Aboriginal communities; and

I am proud that our province’s clean energy sector continues to evolve; we are now positioned to become a global leader in clean energy knowledge and products. I am also pleased to see the success of solar microFIT projects right here in Ottawa Centre – we see solar panels on homes, church roofs and businesses. Building a clean energy system is part of the our government’s plan to create and support jobs for Ontario families while ensuring we have the electricity we need to power our homes, schools and hospitals. For more information about green energy in Ontario, please visit www.ontario.ca/greenenergy or www.yasirnaqvimpp.ca, or call me at my Community Office at 613-722-6414. Yasir Naqvi, MPP Ottawa Centre http:// www.yasirnaqvimpp.ca

R0011472537/0628

*Delivered to selected areas

R0011497278

Community Office: 411 Roosevelt Avenue, Suite 204 Ottawa, ON K2A 3X9 T: 613-722-6414 F: 613-722-6703 ynaqvi.mpp.co@liberal.ola.org www.yasirnaqvimpp.ca Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, July 12, 2012

11


SENIORS

Your Community Newspaper

Everything tastes better at a parade

I

t didn’t matter a whit that our family were Lutherans and that Mother still thought of herself as a Catholic – when the 12th of July rolled around, we practically closed down the farm and headed into Renfrew to celebrate with the hundreds of Orangemen who met once a year to observe the Glorious Twelfth. We would get up earlier than usual that day, so that we could finish the chores and be in town before the parade started. But long before we left the farm, there were preparations to make at home. We wouldn’t be back until late in the day, so the chores had to be done and the livestock tended to. We children would have a morning bath and then dressed in the clothes we would wear to church on Sundays.

MARY COOK Mary Cook’s Memories My sister Audrey and Mother would start to pack the lunch early. Sandwiches of roast beef and sliced chicken, hard-boiled eggs and raisin cookies were all packed in 11-quart baskets lined with clean white flour-bag tea towels. Honey pails would be filled with big chunks of ice from the ice house and tea, made the night before and left sitting on the back of the stove, poured in. The parade always started at the fair grounds, so that was where we headed with

the old Model T. We always tried to park close to the gate, so we would have no trouble getting out when it was time to head home. We looked for a grassy spot which we would claim for the day. Mother would have taken one or two quilts, and these would be spread out on the grass, our lunch on top and another quilt wrapped around the lunch and tea to keep everything as cold as possible. For reasons which escape me today, we never got sick from food poisoning

from a spoiled lunch. Back then, you could go off and leave your belongings on your chosen spot without fear of it being stolen. Often there would be a midway and we would wander through the fair grounds, knowing we could never take advantage of the rides or candy floss - there would be no money for such frivolities and we considered ourselves lucky just to be in Renfrew for the parade. It seemed to take forever for the bands to get lined up in proper order and as soon as they started to play and march out of the fair grounds, every eye would be turned towards the place where King Billy would be in the lineup. He always rode a white horse and its tail would have been braided for the day with yellow and blue ribbons flying out behind. Everyone

roared and clapped, even those who had absolutely no connection with the Orangemen. We usually knew who King Billy was because often he turned out to be a neighbour, but for that day he was someone very special and our hands ached from clapping when he passed by us on his white horse. Hundreds of people, not even part of the parade, dressed for the occasion. White suits, white dresses, white shoes and stockings and brilliant orange and blue sashes swathed across their chests. For years I begged Mother to let me go as an Orangeman, but to no avail - she told me to be satisfied to be at the parade. Back then, the true significance of the day meant little to us children. We had Catholic neighbours who

BIA could push for new shops to serve residents, supporter says Continued from page 1

Furthermore, she said, she simply can’t see any benefit from such an organization. “I just don’t see how a street party is really going to do much,” she said. Anthony Power, owner of New Morning Futon and Furniture, has also expressed

concerns about the proposal, but was out of town and unavailable for comment last week. UNIFIED VOICE

The need for a unified business voice became apparent during the consultations on the

Lansdowne Park redevelopment project, said Arthur McGregor, owner of the Folklore Centre and one of the merchants pushing for the BIA. But he sees more benefits for both businesses and local residents. A BIA could lead the charge to promote intensified development along Bank

Street in the same style as a mixed-use commercial and residential building at Grove Avenue that contains a coffee shop and stores at the ground level and residential units on the upper floors. More residents will encourage more merchants to open businesses that cater to the local population, such as food stores and merchants that offer items and services for everyday needs, in addition to some of the specialty shops, gift stores and antique dealers that feature prominently along the street now.

The BIA would formalize a loose association of businesses that has existed in the area for a dozen years, McGregor said. Capital Coun. David Chernushenko, who is also a resident of the area, is in support of the BIA. “For many reasons, the time has come for a BIA in Old Ottawa South,” he wrote in a city report. “I believe that the future strength and prosperity of this main street and the quality of life of Old Ottawa South would benefit greatly from a ... business association.”

took the day off from farming just as we did. On that day, it was the parade that mattered, not which church you belonged to. We children thought we were pretty lucky to be able to go into Renfrew for the day, and leave the day chores behind us. We would wait until the entire parade passed the spot we had chosen to sit, which often took more than an hour. And then Mother would take the quilts off the basket of lunch and we would eat like we hadn’t had a meal in days. It always tasted better coming out of the basket than it did when it was just eaten around the old pine table in the kitchen back on the farm in Northcote. I could never figure that out and once I asked my older and much wiser sister Audrey, how that could be. Her answer made perfect sense to me. “Everything always tastes better when you are at a parade,” she’d say.

While the official legal name of the group would be the Old Ottawa South Sunnyside Village Business Improvement Area, McGregor is pushing to have the business district known as “Sunnyside Village.” While he doesn’t want to see the name of the neighbourhood itself changed, McGregor said a more geographically distinctive name for the business area that surrounds Sunnyside Avenue along Bank Street would be a benefit. “We need a promotional, identifiable point of view,” McGregor said. “The name (Old Ottawa South) is meaningless to people who don’t live here,” he said.

24 hours 12 games 1 amazing cause Savouring Sunday Maybe Grandma had it right all along! Learn to preserve food and get a primer on how to make beer at home. Sunday, July 15 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Billings Estate National Historic Site

Love hockey? Up for a challenge? Want to make a child’s dreams and wishes come true? Join us on July 28th for 24 Hours of Hockey! It’s a non-contact, non-competitive adult co-ed hockey marathon. All in support of Make-A-Wish Eastern Ontario.

2100 Cabot Street, Ottawa 613-247-4830 or visit ottawa.ca/museums for more information Like us on Facebook at Facebook.com/billingsestate 6Y'%&'"%+"+%'*"&+*%&G%%&&).*+(("%,&'

12

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, July 12, 2012

Visit hockey4wishes.ca today to sign up or donate. R0011495644-0712


FOOD

Your Community Newspaper

Four easy ways to give fresh fruit flavour appeal

W

e all enjoy one of the biggest benefits of summer – the availability of a wide variety of seasonal fresh fruit. Fruit can be served as a snack, an appetizer, a salad or a dessert. It’s generally quick and easy to prepare and can be served at any time of the day. While we often eat fresh fruit just as is, sometimes a few extras can give it a whole new flavour. Here are some suggestions to try. With some, I’ve given only approximate amounts so vary them to your taste. WATERMELON WITH FRESH MINT & FETA

• 1/4 red seedless watermelon, cubed • 3-4 fresh mint leaves, minced • 2-3 tbsp. crumbled feta cheese This has to be tasted to believe, the flavour is amazing. In a serving bowl, gently toss the watermelon cubes with the mint. Top with the feta cheese. Serve as an appetizer or salad. Serves two to four. HONEYED CANTALOUPE WITH BLUEBERRIES

PAT TREW Food ‘n’ Stuff • 1 tbsp. fresh lemon juice • 2 tbsp. liquid honey • a pinch of cinnamon • 1 cup fresh blueberries • 3 cups cantaloupe melon, cubed in bite-sized pieces, then measured In a small bowl, whisk the lemon juice, honey and cinnamon together. Place the blueberries and cantaloupe cubes in a serving bowl, and toss gently with the dressing. Serve as a dessert. Serves four. You can substitute fresh raspberries for the blueberries for variety. BLUEBERRIES WITH ORANGE SHERBET

• 1 litre orange sherbet • 1-2 cups fresh blueberries This is quick and easy to prepare and makes a refreshing dessert on a hot summer

night. When you’re ready to serve dessert, scoop the sherbet into individual serving bowls. Scatter fresh blueberries over the sherbet. Serves four. STRAWBERRIES WITH SOUR CREAM & BROWN SUGAR

• 3 cups fresh strawberries • 1/2 cup sour cream (reduced fat) or plain yogurt • 4 tbsp. brown sugar For this recipe, you can use either light sour cream or plain yogurt. Wash and pit the berries. If they are small, leave them whole. If they are large, slice them. Divide the prepared berries among individual serving bowls. Top each serving with some of the sour cream or yogurt. Sprinkle a tablespoon of brown sugar on top. Serves four.

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Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, July 12, 2012

13


OPINION

Your Community Newspaper

Mind your manners

W

ith all the hustle and bustle of daily life, parents seem to have forgotten how to instil good manners in their children. It’s a rare occasion that a child speaks to me without prompting from his mother. At the innumerable play dates I’ve hosted without parents, I often find myself shaking my head at kids chewing with their mouths open, grabbing their crotches and failing to listen to the

BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse basic rules of the house. And I’ve yet to hear a kid say please or thank you. I recall several years ago, my aunt offering my own dear son a cookie. Before handing it over, she asked

that age-old question “what’s the magic word?” To which my son embarrassingly replied, “umm, abracadabra?” From that moment, I deemed it necessary to discipline my children. (Having a

mother like me is no picnic some days). Don’t get me wrong. Like most parents, I had spent years prompting my children to say hello to the neighbours, to speak up when elders asked them questions, to say thank you when appropriate. It was a constant narrative of mom saying, “Say thank you. Say hello to Mrs. Smith. Granny’s asking about your soccer game. Tell her about playing goalie.” While this is probably not a bad start for instilling

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discipline in pre-schoolers, it loses its lustre once the kids are school-age. And the problem with the prompting method, as I discovered at that abracadabra moment, is that it doesn’t stick. Kids don’t necessarily carry those good manners with them when mom and dad are not around. I recall reading a teacher’s memoir in which he advocated a more action-oriented method; one that would force children to experience the natural consequences of their ill manners. If a child asked for something without tacking the word “please” on the end, the teacher would withhold the item until he or she remembered. If the child took the item without saying thank you, the teacher would take it away. While the rules of the game were explained up front, there was no verbal exchange during the transaction. He found that kids were much quicker to pick up on the concept once they understood the stakes. I’ve employed this method, myself. While I have no idea what my children do when I’m not present, I’ve seen them at family visits thanking hosts for the meals and asking with an appropriate s’il vous plait, when they want the potatoes passed along at Thanksgiving, without a word from mom. Stepping it up a notch, I have explained to my offspring – one of which happens to be rather shy – the importance of acknowledging adults, whether that means saying a simple hello or engaging in conversation with grown-ups before

running off to play. As they continued to ignore the grown-ups in their midst, I was pretty convinced I was just blowing hot air, until a few months ago. We went for dinner at the house of some retired neighbours. In the past, my children had been known to bury their heads in their arms when asked “How are you?” or to simply ignore the question altogether and run off in search of toys. On this particular occasion, my eldest son was asked “How are you?” by the female host. It was one of the proudest moments of my life when he responded, “I’m well, thank you. And how are you going?” (His anglicized version of the question in French). From that point, they exchanged pleasantries, until my son – in six-yearold fashion – finished the conversation by saying, “Could we please play with your toys now?” Thoroughly charmed, my neighbour was more than happy to lead them to the ’70s Playmobil she’d dug out of the basement storage in honour of their visit. For all I know, my kids are crotch-grabbing, openmouth-chewing, no-pleasesaying little monsters when they go over to play with the neighbour kids. But I don’t think so. I’ve often had people – teachers, other parents and my childless friends – make purposeful comment on their manners. As one friend said to me recently, “people only make comments if they’re good; if they were bad, people would choose to say nothing at all.” I hope that’s true.

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ARTS & CULTURE

Your Community Newspaper

Become the Sun continue evolution on Bluesfest stage Kristy Strauss kristy.strauss@metroland.com

EMC entertainment - Theepan Vijay said Become the Sun is not just the name of a band he plays in â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it also describes the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s evolution. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Become the Sun to me means striving for something in terms of growth and I feel weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve achieved that as a band, in our evolution and our writing,â&#x20AC;? said Vijay, singer and guitarist with the band. Become the Sun has mem-

bers from Westboro and the Little Italy area and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be performing at Bluesfest July 13 at 7:30 p.m. on the Black Sheep Stage. Vijay has only one word to describe how he feels about playing at the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s massive annual music festival. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stoked,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So stoked.â&#x20AC;? Vijay, originally from North Carolina, said Become the Sun started about three or four years ago when he moved

to Ottawa and started jamming with fellow bandmates bassist Matt Stobo, drummer Evan Camm, and guitarist Pat Kehoe. Become the Sun has since recorded a four-EP collection, with each EP named after the four elements: Fire, Water, Earth and Air. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each one has a distinct sound, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re approaching it this way because it gives the band a chance to expand and build a repertoire of music,â&#x20AC;?

TD office building wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be demolished Continued from page 1

Beyond the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lengthy approval process, the company will also be ensuring they have met pre-leasing requirements, in other words, securing tenancy for the expansion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is still a lot of work to be done,â&#x20AC;? Knowles said â&#x20AC;&#x153;But we are hopeful that given the great location, we will be successful.â&#x20AC;? The other part of the construction, the re-alignment of Coventry Road remains on hold, Knowles said, as Morguard is waiting on final decisions to be made regarding the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Orleans water main project. The reconstruction of the road will be done in tandem with the water main project. The road already curves around the mall, but the expansion would require the road to be extended further west towards Vanier Parkway. There are no conceptual designs yet, but other revised portions of the new plan, Knowles

Sean Sisk / Submitted

Become the Sun will be performing at Bluesfest on July 13 at 7:30 p.m. at the Black Sheep stage. Vijay said. He said the band has been influenced most recently by another band also playing at Bluesfest this year, Winter-

sleep. But he said members have also been influenced by bands they listened to growing up including Soundgarden, Rage

Against The Machine, Alice in Chains, and The Smashing Pumpkins. While theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at Bluesfest, Vijay said he and the members are looking forward to checking out other performers like The Sheepdogs. The band wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just be stopping at Bluesfest. Vijay said they will also be doing their first cross-Canada tour from Ottawa to Vancouver and back at the end of the summer. The tour will start at the Rainbow Bistro on Aug. 17, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll hit the road for the next two and a half weeks. For more information on Become the Sun, visit the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at: www.becomethesun.com or check out their page on Facebook.

LOOK FOR YOUR FLYER IN THE

said, include changes to the demolition of certain properties. Morguard purchased properties adjacent to the mall to be used for the expansion: the site of the former Coca Cola building (500 Coventry Rd.), which was demolished several years ago and is now used for overflow parking; the TD Waterhouse office building (525 Coventry Rd.); and the EMCO distribution facility (535 Coventry Rd.). The plans initially called for the demolition of the EMCO facility and TD building. Morguard has decided to not demolish the TD Waterhouse office building, but instead, to make a minor adjustment to the current building. The exact adjustment is not settled quite yet, Knowles said, as they are waiting for approval of the plans from TD. Reports have pegged the cost of the expansion at over $200 million. With files from Laura Mueller



        

     

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Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, July 12, 2012

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CLASSIFIED HELP WANTED

FOR SALE

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Summer Weekly Rental Waterfront cottage on the Mississippi River, near Carleton Place. This 3 bedroom + 2 bathroom house is the perfect place for your family to get away to. Clean, safe, shallow water is ideal for swimming, canoeing and kayaking.

HELP WANTED

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FOOT

2002 Prowler sleeps 4, full stand up shower A/C. Specially built trailer, call for details, with decks, shed . Must see in person. $12,900 or best offer. includes lots fess for 2012 Can be seen at Camel Chute Campground check it out at www.camelchutecampround.ca 613-851-2865

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DAN PETERS AUCTION Dan Peters CPPA Auctioneer & Certified Appraiser Amanda Todd CPPA Auctioneer & Certified Appraiser (613) 284-8281 or Auction Hall (613) 284-1234 email: info@danpetersauction.com Website: www.danpetersauction.com

42 acres, Hwy. 43, 5 kms. east of Perth. Most wooded. Secure. Accessible. Development potential. Excellent building sites. Priced to sell. 613-267-6709.

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NOW BOOKING ON SITE SUMMER AUCTIONS – BOOK YOUR DATE NOW! Sunday July 15, 2012 - On Site Outdoor Auction. Auction Starts at Noon (Preview from 11 am). For Jack & Beverly Paterson, 21 Fowler Street, Richmond, Ont. From Smiths Falls take Hwy 15, turn right on Richmond Road (Cnty Rd. 10) to Richmond, turn right on Fowler Street. 1981 Chev Silverado 454 - One Owner, Original Paint, Factory Bucket Seats, Factory Air, Daily Driver. 1950 Plymouth Special Deluxe 6 Cyl, Rebuilt (1000 Miles on Engine) - Current Owner has had this Vehicle since 1980. Turn Key Driver. 1985 Honda “Big Red” ATV 250 cc (In AS NEW Condition). Lewis 16’ cedar canoe. Garage items and tools. Many more items, see website for full listing. Wednesday July 18, 2012 - REAL ESTATE AUCTION - Real Estate will sell by Live Public Auction at 6 PM SHARP! 358 Bathurst Line E, Rural Perth. 3 + Bedroom Unique Family Home with 12.84 Acres of Mature Hardwood. Country Living at its Best! Thursday July 19, 2012 - REAL ESTATE AUCTION. Real Estate will sell by Live Public Auction at 6 PM SHARP! 4 Jessie Street, Perth. 4 + Bedroom, 6 Bath, Executive Style Home. Attached 2 Car Garage, located in the Historic Town of Perth. Saturday July 21, 2012 - Outdoor Auction. 22 Johnston Street, Carleton Place. Auction Starts at 10 am (Preview from 9 am). 1973 3/4 Ton GMC Vandura- Approx. 64,000 Miles, One Owner, V8 Auto, 3 Speed Standard, JFK memorabilia, Swords, WW2 Hand Guns (Disarmed), M2 (Disarmed), Large Selection of Tools, AS NEW Household Furniture, LCD & PLASMA TV’s, Sports Collectibles & More! Sunday July 22, 2012 - Estate & Consignment Auction at our Auction Hall. 182 Glenview Rd., Smiths Falls. Auction Starts at NOON (Preview from 11 am). Furniture, Appliances, Antiques, Collectibles, & More! Sunday July 29, 2012 - One Consignor Liquidation. Name With-held At Our Auction Hall. 182 Glenview Rd., Smiths Falls. Auction Starts at NOON (Preview from 11 am). Furniture, Appliances, Antiques, Collectibles, & More!

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ANY LUCK FINDING A LIFE PARTNER? Maybe you’re looking in the wrong places. Maybe your’re choosing the wrong people. Maybe you could use some advice & help.MISTY RIVER INTRODUCTIONS is personalized & confidential. See current photos-great success rate. CALL (613)257-3531, www.mistyriverintros.com.

STEEL BUILDING - HUGE CLEARANCE SALE! 20X24 $4,658. 25X28 $5,295. 30X40 $7,790. 32X54 $10,600. 40X58 $14,895. 47X78 $19,838. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca.

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AUTOMOTIVE Vehicle buyers are ONLY protected by OMVIC and Ontario consumer protection laws when they buy from registered dealers. There’s no protection if you buy privately and you risk becoming victim of a curbsider. To verify dealer registration or seek help with a complaint: www.omvic.on.ca or 1-800943-6002.

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Rod Beauprie / Submitted

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Lake Ontario. Her sister, Natalie, will also take part. Natalie became the youngest female to swim Lake Ontario at age 14 and is the ďŹ rst person to swim butterďŹ&#x201A;y stroke across Lake Erie. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a former Easter Seals child and a passionate swimmer, the Busktukah Bring on the Bay Swim is an event I have been looking forward to all year,â&#x20AC;? Jenna said in a press release. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am so proud to champion an event that gives back to the community in a healthy way for a cause so close to my heart.â&#x20AC;? Walters said the goal this year is to raise $33,000 and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a cap of 475 swimmers, so she encourages potential participants to register online at www.bringonthebay.com.

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tannia Yacht Club â&#x20AC;&#x201C; are unbelievably accommodating. And, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for a great cause.â&#x20AC;?

or yellow heads bobbing in the water, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the ďŹ rst thing in the morning, and they just kind of take off,â&#x20AC;? Walters said. The water is usually much warmer than participants think, she said. For ďŹ rst-time participants who might be nervous about the distance or swimming conditions, Walters said it is important to be conďŹ dent. She said the event is open to swimmers of all levels and that support is provided on the water if people need breaks along the way. The swim will also showcase former Easter Seals ambassador Jenna Lambert, a full-time member of Team Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Para Swim and the youngest female with a physical disability to swim across

R0011472680

EMC community - What started as a challenge between friends six years ago has grown into one of Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest open swims which raises money for children with physical disabilities. On July 14, more than 450 swimmers of all ages and abilities will take part in the Busktukah Bring on the Bay Swim, where participants will swim three kilometers from the Nepean Sailing Club to the Britannia Yacht Club on Britannia Bay to raise money for Easter Seals Ontario. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grown in popularity because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a really great event,â&#x20AC;? said Krystal Walters, the development manager of the Easter Seals Ontario, On-

The annual fundraiser is now in its sixth year and has since raised more than $60,000 for Easter Seals. Last year alone, Walters said the event raised more than $30,000. She said money raised from the event goes to help Easter Seals assist families of children with physical disabilities with the cost of mobility equipment and communications devices. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The cool thing is not only are (participants) supporting a great cause, they also get to swim three kilometers,â&#x20AC;? said Walters. The event is a â&#x20AC;&#x153;really amazing sight,â&#x20AC;? she said, with hundreds of swimmers wearing neon coloured swim caps. All participants also get a medal at the end. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone has neon green

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SPORTS

Your Community Newspaper

Ottawa’s Oluseyi Smith earns Olympic relay berth Eddie Rwema eddie.rwema@metroland.com

EMC sports - Ottawa’s Oluseyi Smith has won a spot on Canada’s men’s 4x100-metre relay team heading to the 2012 London Olympics this summer. The Ottawa Lions Track and Field Club member won a bronze medal at the track and field trials held in Calgary on July 1, running the 100-metre dash with a career-best time of 10:22 seconds. It was the fastest 100 metres of Smith’s career. The 25-year-old former student at Fielding Drive Public School and Brookfield High School in south Ottawa considers qualifying for London as his greatest achievement. “Canada has a lot of good sprinters – young ones and even older ones that are still competing today,” said Smith. “For me to finish third at a national championship, is a good achievement because I was ahead of a lot of good sprinters. Smith’s running career began while in Grade 5 at Fielding Drive where he was actively involved in track and field. “I was doing track and field in elementary school, but while in Grade 5, one of my teachers told me to join the Ottawa Li-

ons Track and Field Club, one of the largest and the most successful athletics club in Canada,” said Smith. “Ever since then I have been a member of the club and doing track and field outside of school.” Smith has previously represented Canada at two world championships in South Korea and Germany. He has also competed for Canada at the Commonwealth Games in India in 2010. Now that he has qualified, Smith’s next mission is to help Canada win a medal in London, and he’s hopefully they can make it to the medals po-

MAKE IT HAPPEN Finished high school and don’t know what career path to choose? Explore your options with one of the General Arts & Science programs still accepting applications for Fall 2012.

Community Studies prepares students for success in a variety of programs, including Child and Youth Worker, Developmental Services Worker, Early Childhood Education, and Social Service Worker. Design Studies is intended for students who wish to explore a career and further studies in design through the preparation of a competitive portfolio.

Environmental Studies helps students to develop their awareness of the environment and the world around them.

Media and Communication Studies is designed for students who are interested in media, communications, film studies, and photography. Pre-Animation and Illustration is designed for students who are interested in art, drawing, animation, life drawing, illustration, comic books, and photography. Pre-Technology is designed for students who are interested in pursuing further studies in a technical field.

To learn more, contact Darlene at:

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Pet Adoptions PET OF THE WEEK RAPHAEL

ID#A142556

ID#A142138

Max is a neutered male, black and white Domestic Shorthair cat who is about seven years old. Max came to the shelter on April 23 but is now available for adoption. This beautiful boy is declawed on his front paws and he loves to roll around on the floor while you pet him. He has a patient and easy going disposition: he gets along well with other cats and he has lived with rabbits previously. Max would rather not live with really young children as he prefers a quieter environment with a family who can respect when he needs “alone time.”

Hello, my name is Shadow. I am a 2 year old Poodle-Terrier mix who loves running in the backyard, going camping, playing with my master Ariane and stealing her toys. My pet-parents take good care of me; I was pretty shy at first when they got me but, after taking some training classes, I listen well and am now a good dog.

Meet Raphael, an unaltered male, orange and white American Shorthair guinea pig. He is about nine months old and was surrendered to the shelter by his owner on April 11. Raphael loves to speak and squeak his mind! Pay him a visit and he will charm you with his conversation skills. He’s a social butterfly who solicits attention from anyone willing to listen and give him some affection. Guinea pigs are talkative and entertaining creatures that enjoy a lot of fresh fruit and vegetables as treats. They love to be where the action is and become part of a routine in the home where they can join in the conversation and sing you a song or two. To find out more about owning a guinea pig, contact the Adoption Centre at 613-725-3166 ext. 258 or visit www.ottawahumane.ca

OPERATION: FOREVER HOME The Ottawa Humane Society (OHS) is urging people to consider adding to their family because the Adoption Centre is full of furry and feathered friends needing homes. With more animals than ever before in the shelter, and more arriving each day, there is no room in the Adoption Centre for new adoptable dogs and cats. Animals in the holding area can’t be moved into the more spacious Adoption Centre for the public to see until some of the current adoptables move out. The dog pods in the Adoption Centre are all occupied with dogs of all sizes, shapes and ages – with one thing in common – they’re all looking for a forever home! “The summer is a great time to

welcome a dog into the family,” said Bruce Roney, OHS Executive Director. “Everyone is outdoors biking, riding, hiking: all activities you can enjoy with your dog. The family is together and can take the time to welcome and bond with their new pet.” There are nearly 100 cats available for adoption at the West Hunt Club Facility as well as throughout the city at PAL (Pet store Adoption Location) partners. Through July, the OHS is actively promoting cat adoption. During this period, for people who adopt one adult cat (six months or older) from its 245 West Hunt Club Road location, the adoption fee will be waived on a second adult cat adopted. The OHS has cats available at several of its Pet store Adoption

Anyone interested in adopting a cat can visit the OHS Adoption Centre, weekdays 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Pictures and profiles of adoptable cats are also featured online at www.ottawahumane.ca. The OHS currently has about 40 small animals and birds looking for new homes. There is a pet for everyone at the OHS – large, small, furry or feathered. Please spread the word and tell your friends to take visit our Adoption Centre. You might meet your new best friend!

Shadow 9dndji]^c`ndjgeZi^hXjiZZcdj\]idWZÆI=:E:ID;I=:L::@Ç4HjWb^iVe^XijgZVcYh]dgi W^d\gVe]nd[ndjgeZiidÒcYdjiH^beanZbV^aid/X[dhiZg5i]ZcZlhZbX#XVViiZci^dcÆEZid[i]ZLZZ`Ç

Time to make a grooming appointment

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Please note: The Ottawa Humane Society has many other companion animals available for adoption. Featured animals are adopted quickly! To learn more about adopting an animal from the Ottawa Humane Society please contact us: Website: www.ottawahumane.ca Email: Adoptions@ottawahumane.ca Telephone: (613) 725-3166 x258

Location (PAL) pet store partners throughout the city, although the special promotion does not apply to cats adopted from those locations.

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Oluseyi Smith has been named to Canada’s 4x100 men’s relay team after posting a career-best time running the 100-metre dash of 10:22 seconds during Olympic trials held in Calgary.

dium. “I think we have got a legitimate chance to surprise a few people when we get there, as long as we keep our heads cool and perform like we know we can,” said Smith. “We have a chance of being at the medal podium. I don’t think that is an unattainable goal.” Smith was one of the 40 athletes who have been put forth to the Canadian Olympic Committee for nomination to the 2012 Canadian Olympic team by Athletics Canada. Smith hopes Canadians will turn up in big numbers to cheer on their teams. “I hope when it is time for us to race at the Olympics, many people in Canada will be tuning in to watch us,” he said. As an athlete, Smith has always dreamed of competing in the Olympics. “For me it is a dream come true but also an opportunity for me to evaluate how good of an athlete I am compared to other athletes from the world,” he said. Most of all, Smith said he is proud to represent his country. “It feels good to represent Canada and I just hope I can represent to the best of my ability and make every one proud at home.”

ALGONQUIN COLLEGE

12-5303 Canotek Rd.(613) 745-5808 WWW.TLC4DOGS.COM Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, July 12, 2012

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Local events and happenings over the coming weeks — free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: patricia.lonergan@metroland.com

• July 13 Watson’s Mill Annual Beer Tasting Event is here once again. Come on out on Friday, July 13 for a great evening of beer tasting, delicious appetizers, and upbeat tunes provided by the Swamp Water Jazz Band. Enjoy samples from a variety of different breweries and make sure to buy your raffle tickets for our exciting prizes! The event will be held from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Admission is $30; ticket holders must be 19 years or older. Tickets are available both at the door and in advance at the Mill or Office Pro. Tickets are limited, however, so get them early! Admission includes six beer samples with extra samples available at the door for $2 each.

1127 Mill Street in Dickinson Square, Manotick. We hope to see you there.

court, Rosalind seeks safety and her love in the Forest of Arden.

• July 15 - 18

• July 18

The Friends of the Farm is organizing a four-day bus tour that features a visit to Grand-Metis (Reford Gardens) which will be celebrating 50 years. The bus stops in Rimouski, Rivière du Loup, St. Siméon, La Malbaie, Baie St. Paul, St. Anne de Beaupré and Hudson. The cost for members is $499, and others is $525. For a single supplement, add $205. The package includes bus and ferry transportation, hotels, entrance fees, tips, and some meals. For more information call 613-230-3276, email: info@ friendsofthefarm.ca, or visit: www.friendsofthefarm.ca.

Join the Friends of the Farm and the Run Ottawa Club for a runners’ challenge during the Cowpattie Relay - 10 Mile Run at 6:30 p.m. To register, visit: www.runottawa.ca or call 613-234-2221. The event will take place at Morningside Lane, C.E.F. For more information and registration, visit: www. runottawaclub.com

• July 14 - 15

• July 16 - Aug. 3

Come join us July 14 and 15 for Heritage Gardening at Dickinson House. Members of the Manotick Horticultural Society have put together a genuine pioneer herb garden and will be available to talk about and explain the uses of herbs - culinary, medicinal & aesthetic from the 19th century to the present day on both Saturday and Sunday. Dickinson House is located at

Académie de la Capitale, located 1010 Morrison Dr., is holding a program for students in grades seven to 12 interested in space colonization and exploration. As part of the program, participants will build a moon base, Martian base and Earth Ocean base. For more information visit: ACADECAPCISS.com

• July 17 Manotick’s “Grass Roots Theatre” returns for another summer, offering outdoor entertainment for all ages. All shows start at 7pm on the green across from Watson’s Mill on Dickinson Street. Bring your blanket or lawn chair and a donation for the hardworking actors. On Tuesday, July 17 enjoy As You Like It by the Bear and Company, which brings one of Shakespeare’s most enduring comedies to Manotick. Banished from her uncle’s

“A Walk With Mr McGee” presented by Obviously, A Theatre Company

Bytown Museum July 12th - 14th 8:00 p.m. nightly

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Ottawamuseumnetwork.ca

•Aug. 11 Learn about the journey from cow to cone at the Ice Cream Festival. Practice your milking technique on the Museum’s wooden cow and get the scoop on how dairying technology now includes milking machines, and even robotic milkers. Fore more information visit agriculture.technomuses.ca or 613-991-3044

• Aug. 15 Come to the 1st Annual Live & Learn Resource Centre Golf Tournament! On behalf of Councillor Doug Thompson and Rural Family Connections, we are very pleased

Yasir Naqvi, MPP Ottawa Centre

Here to help you! Community Office 411 Roosevelt Avenue, Suite 204 Ottawa, ON K2A 3X9 T: 613-722-6414 | F: 613-722-6703 ynaqvi.mpp.co@liberal.ola.org www.yasirnaqvimpp.ca fb facebook.com/yasirnaqvimpp | tw @yasir_naqvi

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Come and celebrate the 180th Anniversary of the Rideau Canal from August 3 to 6! From boating and outdoor leisure enthusiasts to heritage buffs and art lovers, the fourday celebration offers fun, interactive entertainment for the whole family. The party runs for the entire Civic Holiday weekend – don’t miss out! For a complete list of activities, visit rideaucanalfestival.ca.

Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, July 12, 2012

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Experience a play in the unique surroundings of the Bytown Museum! A Walk With Mr. McGee stages the tragic story of our prophetic founding father Thomas D’Arcy McGee. 613-234-4570

• Aug. 3 - 6

to announce our 1st Annual Live & Learn Resource Centre Golf Tournament on Wednesday, Aug. 15 at the Metcalfe Golf Course. The $100 entry fee includes 18 holes, power cart and dinner. It is a 1 p.m. shotgun start and the event includes a silent auction, 50/50 draw, and door prizes. For tickets and information, please contact Marlene Shepheard at 613821-2899.

• Aug. 25 Friends of the Farm are hosting Art on the Farm, with a rain date of Aug. 26. Spaces are still available, and all medium are welcome. For more information, please go to the website: www.friendsofthefarm.ca, email: info@ friendsofthefarm.ca, or call 613-230-3276.

• Ongoing The Overbrook Community Association is currently looking for volunteers to deliver their community newsletter. Right now zone coordinators are needed for deliveries in sections east of Lola Street. Bundles of newsletters are available at Reception at the Overbrook Community Centre, 33 Quill St., for volunteers to deliver over the next week or please contact info@overbrook.ca for more information on how to volunteer. A campaign to establish a Department of Peace in Canada is undertaking its first membership drive. For $10 people can support a national effort to bring the political peace agenda to the federal government. For more information and to join as a voting member of CPI, visit departmentofpeace.ca or email Ottawa East’s Iman Ibrahim at imanibrahim@ rogers.com. Ottawa Newcomers’ Club invites women new to Ottawa to join and make new friends. Activities include: bridge, scrabble, walks, luncheons and dinners, book club, sightseeing and events, travel cafe and craft and chat. Check out the website at ottawanewcomersclub.ca. For info call 613-860-0548 or ottawanew-

comers@hotmail.ca. Watson’s Mill is proud to team up with local growers and producers to host a Farmers Market in Historic Dickinson Square. Starting Saturday, June 23, the Farmers Market is scheduled to run on Saturdays, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., through Aug. 25 at the Carriage Shed, across the street from Watson’s Mill. Attention high school students! The Osgoode Township Museum in Vernon is offering community service hours to any high school student interested in helping us out with the museum’s exciting summer events including our annual Pioneer Day and Strawberry Social taking place on Saturday, July 21, as well as our children’s summer drama camp which will be preparing a production of Peter Pan. We are seeking volunteers in the afternoons from Tuesday through Friday, starting on Aug. 14 until Friday, Aug. 24 from noon until 4 p.m. If you are interested, please call the museum at 613-8214062 or send us an email at osgoode-museum@hotmail. com. We look forward to hearing from you! Is your daughter looking for a place to do fun things with her friends? Make new friends in the community? Try new things? Check out Girl Guides. Every week, girls ages five through 17, meet to learn everything from camping to acting, all in the company of friends they can trust, and women they can look up to. Visit https://register.girlguides.ca/WCM/OnlineReg to find a unit near you and to register for the next Guiding year (2012-2013).

• Mondays GET W.I.T.H It Walking Program takes place at Hillcrest High School, 1900 Dauphin Road on Mondays from 6 to 8 p.m., Drop in anytime. Get the benefits of walking indoors during the cold, dark months. The cost is free. Run in partnership with the Heart Institute & Healthy Lifestyle and Diabetes Program. Wheelchair and stroller friendly. Please bring a water bottle and comfortable

walking clothing. For more information contact Shannon Merizzi at 613-798-5555 ext. 81806.

• Tuesdays The Hogs Back 50+ Club meets every Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the front room of the Boys and Girls Club, 1463 Prince of Wales Dr. at Meadowlands and Hogsback. Bring a bag lunch or come for cards, crafts, friendly chatter and camaraderie. We welcome all new Canadians with new ideas and hope that we can add to yours. Drop in and check us out. For more information, call Shirley at 613-225-8089.

• Wednesdays Are you looking for a fun way to spend an afternoon while meeting new people? Then join us for an afternoon of bridge. Takes place at St. Aidan’s church located at 955 Wingate Dr., a temporary location while Emmanuel United Church undergoes reconstruction, from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Call 613-733- 0437 for more info.

• Fridays Five pin bowling league is encouraging senior citizens over the age of 50 to participate in an activity that provides regular moderate exercise. Members range in age from 50 to 90. There is no registration fee. Bowling takes place each Friday afternoon between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. at Walkley Bowling Centre, 2092 Walkley Rd. Ottawa. Participants are placed on mixed four person teams. To register, please call Roy or Jean Hoban at 613-73l-6526.

• Saturdays The Cumberland Farmers’ Market 2012 season is open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., rain or shine, until Oct. 13. Seasonal produce, meats, breads, pastries, specialty foods, skin care products, artisans goods and more at the RJ Kennedy Community Centre (Cumberland arena), 1115 Dunning Rd. For information visit www.cumberlandfarmersmarket.ca or call 613.833.2635.


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Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, July 12, 2012

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Ottawa-East EMC - Thursday, July 12, 2012


Ottawa East EMC