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Abbotsford Community Protocol: A Response to Critical Incidents of Discrimination and Hate Crime March 2004

Funded by: Ministry of Community, Aboriginal and Women’s Services Settlement and Multiculturalism Branch


A Response to Critical Incidents of Discrimination and Hate Crime

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author of this document would like to acknowledge Tracy Wideman for the input and contribution that has assisted greatly with the writing of the Protocol. The document has been developed through the invaluable input and hard work of the Fraser Valley Human Dignity Coalition and its partners. Special thanks to Delaine Milette, Doug Mattka, Jen Teigen, Jason Slusarchuk and Tracy McCarthy from the working group for their dedication. Thanks also to the Coalition members and partners including Adnan Habib, Alison Wainwright, Bev Olfert, Bob Martens, Carl Vreeman, Charito Gailling, Georgina Marsom, Henry Hall, Jeven Randhawa, John Davidson, Kim Huston, Lesley Percival, Martha Dow, Nicki Gill, Sandi Tait, and Tyrone McNeil for their feedback and input on the Protocol. Acknowledgement also goes to Abbotsford Community Services Society and the Multicultural and Immigrant Integration Department for their support on this initiative. This Protocol is made possible through funding from the Ministry of Community, Aboriginal and Women’s Services and their Anti-Racism and Multiculturalism Unit.

Prepared for Diversity Education and Resource Services Program and The Fraser Valley Human Dignity Coalition, a project of Abbotsford Community Services. By Jasvinder Gill

**Note: The author of this document had the difficult task of considering several different suggestions and viewpoints on the wording of this document. The final outcome represents the authors’ own decisions for which the author takes responsibility.

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INTRODUCTION Safe and healthy communities are a concern for all community members, including service providers and governments. A significant threat to the safety of our communities is violence and crime. This document addresses a specific kind of crime. A crime targeting an individual or group from an identifiable group is a unique kind of crime. Where a perpetrator specifically targets a victim(s) with specific characteristics due to prejudice or bias, it is called a hate crime. Hate crimes or related incidents range from bigoted propaganda to violence and are different from other kinds of crimes. Hate motivated crimes or incidents impact the whole community, not just the targeted group. Hate crimes perpetuate bigotry and negatively impact the sense of safety in a community and create a climate of fear. Effectively combating the bigotry and discrimination that can disrupt the safety and health of our communities requires that the issues be addressed at several levels. Responses can include education and awareness initiatives within the community and schools, organization and institution policies, as well as human rights legislation and criminal codes. A community-based response is one strategy and a community protocol is a critical piece in addressing and preventing critical incidents of discrimination and hate motivated violence. This document outlines the Diversity Education and Resource Services Program, and its project ‘The Fraser Valley Human Dignity Coalition. It provides a background to the development of the Abbotsford Community Protocol as well as the Protocol itself. This Protocol is unique to the community of Abbotsford and is reflective of the history, challenges and strengths as well as resources and services available within Abbotsford. This Protocol is not a template for other communities, as each community would approach a Protocol or community-based response on its unique characteristics and resources. The Abbotsford Community Protocol is designed to help community members and stakeholders react promptly and effectively whenever critical incidents of discrimination, hate crime or related incidents strike with resources and a step-by-step guide to respond.

Contact Information Abbotsford Community Services Diversity Education and Resource Services Program Fraser Valley Human Dignity Coalition Project 2420 Montrose Avenue Abbotsford, BC V2S 3S9 Contact Persons: Tracy Wideman and Alison Wainwright Telephone: 604-859-7681 local 270 Fax: 604-859-6334 Email: mcaccess@paralynx.com Website: www.abbotsfordcommunityservices.com

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TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS .................................................................................... 2 INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................. 3 Contact Information .............................................................................................. 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS....................................................................................... 4 DIVERSITY EDUCATION AND RESOURCE SERVICES PROGRAM................ 5 Background Information ....................................................................................... 5 Fraser Valley Human Dignity Coalition ................................................................. 5 Coalition Goals................................................................................................ 5 Coalition Mandate ........................................................................................... 6 Coalition Membership Policy........................................................................... 6 Coalition Membership and Partners ................................................................ 6 ABBOTSFORD PROTOCOL AND THE CRITICAL INCIDENT RESPONSE MODEL ........................................................................................... 7 Background .......................................................................................................... 7 Intent and Purpose of Protocol ............................................................................. 7 Mechanisms of Protocol ....................................................................................... 8 Victim Support................................................................................................. 8 Referral ........................................................................................................... 9 Victim/Community Outreach................................................................................. 9 Outcomes for the Community............................................................................... 8 ABBOTSFORD COMMUNITY PROTOCOL: A RESPONSE TO CRITICAL INCIDENTS OF DISCRIMINATION AND HATE CRIME ................................... 10 Protocol Mechanisms ......................................................................................... 10 Victim Support............................................................................................... 10 Referral ......................................................................................................... 10 Protocol Roles and Expectations........................................................................ 11 Role of Abbotsford Community Services (ACS)............................................ 11 Role of Diversity Education and Resource Services (DEARS) ..................... 11 Role of Coalition............................................................................................ 11 Role of Protocol Signers ............................................................................... 12 Definitions........................................................................................................... 12 Education and Resource List.............................................................................. 15 Continuum of Intolerance ................................................................................... 16 APPENDIX 1 ...................................................................................................... 17 A) Protocol Resource Guide and Partner List.................................................... 17

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DIVERSITY EDUCATION AND RESOURCE SERVICES PROGRAM Background Information The Diversity Education and Resource Services Program (DEARS) at Abbotsford Community Services has a long history of cross-cultural, diversity and human rights education and awareness initiatives in the community. Over the years, Abbotsford has seen rapid growth and has continued to grow diverse and enjoy the benefits of diversity. However it is also faced with the reality of intolerance, exclusion, discrimination and bigotry that often accompany rapid and diverse growth. Unfortunately, incidents of overt and covert discrimination as well as hate crime have been documented in the Fraser Valley and Abbotsford over the years. In 1999 the DEARS program received funding through National Crime Prevention to establish a community response team against hate and racism. The team, comprised of community members and key stakeholders, took on the name Fraser Valley Human Dignity Coalition (FVHDC). In the pursuit of social justice and equity, the Coalition began to promote the values of human rights and dignities and a safe and healthy community for all of Abbotsford citizens.

Fraser Valley Human Dignity Coalition A community-based coalition is an effective means of responding to discrimination and hate motivated crime and incidents. An essential ingredient in addressing discrimination and bigotry in any community is getting citizens in collaboration with service providers and government agencies involved in discussing and tackling the issue, the main premise of a community-based coalition being that the grassroots of a community has a significant role in addressing the harassment and intimidation experienced or witnessed by community members – essentially giving the community a voice and opportunity to deal with its own issues. A community coalition can make a difference by forging strong community based partnerships and encouraging collective opposition to discriminatory and hate motivated behavior. Resources and education opportunities as well as broad community mobilization are significant in the success of a community-based coalition. To this end, the Fraser Valley Human Dignity Coalition has established a mandate and goals. In pursuit of the mandate and goals the Coalition and its partners have offered numerous awareness and education initiatives for the community and youth. These have included workshops on hate crimes, diversity, racism, human rights, and the organization of a human rights conference, an anti-bullying forum and study circles on various issues.

Coalition Goals ƒ ƒ ƒ

Promote the awareness of the value of human rights and dignities Respond to the issues and concerns in the community as needed Support victims whose human rights and dignities have been violated

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Coalition Mandate The Fraser Valley Human Dignity Coalition’s (FVHDC) mandate is to promote the rights and dignities of all people. As a Coalition of community partners, we believe every person has the right to be treated with dignity, respect, fairness and compassion. The Coalition’s underlying premise is that all members of the human family live without fear of discrimination, intimidation and violence due to race, ethnicity, class, gender, family status, sexual orientation, religion, mental and physical ability, age or political beliefs.

Coalition Membership Policy Coalition membership is open to all citizens and organizations in the Fraser Valley. All new Coalition members are required to agree to and sign a Code of Ethics Form to insure a confidential and safe forum for community dialogue and action.

Coalition Membership and Partners The Coalition is comprised of a broad range of community services providers, organizations and citizens. Coalition initiatives and events are also regularly supported by community groups and organizations who are referred to as Coalition community partners. The Coalition 2003-2004 members and partners include the following stakeholders and organizations: Abbotsford City Councillor Abbotsford Community Services Abbotsford Police Department Victim Services Abbotsford Police Department - Community Policing Branch Abbotsford Youth Commission Aboriginal Resource Centre, University College of the Fraser Valley Amnesty International Baha’i Faith community BC Muslim Association Community member/Douglas College Student Consortium on Diversity Education (CODE) Provincial Representative Criminology Department, University College of the Fraser Valley Fraser Valley Chinese Canadian Association Fraser Valley Metis Association Matsqui Institution Mennonite Central Committee BC PRIDE, University College of the Fraser Valley School District #34 Social Work Department, University College of the Fraser Valley Soka Gakkai International/Buddhist Faith Sto:lo Nation Women’s Resource Society Fraser Valley Youthquest!

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ABBOTSFORD PROTOCOL AND THE CRITICAL INCIDENT RESPONSE MODEL Background Recently the Ministry of Community, Aboriginal and Women’s Services and Settlement and Multiculturalism Branch embarked on a new model to address the issues of hate and racism. The Critical Incident Response Model is an approach offered by the Ministry’s Anti-Racism and Multiculturalism Unit to assist communities in addressing and responding to issues of racism, discrimination and hate crime. The work of the DEARS program and the Fraser Valley Human Dignity Coalition in addressing discrimination and bigotry was a natural fit with this Model. The Ministry welcomed DEARS into their provincial Critical Incident Response Model as a step three community (see below). The provincial model is based on three levels of community participation. In the first level or step the Ministry provides leadership and resources to communities for public education and cross-cultural dialogue. The second step involves Ministry support of community-led initiatives that assist in the development of partnerships between community stakeholders. The third step, where Abbotsford enters, is where partnerships that have been established will work together to create a response protocol to critical incidents of racism and hate. The DEARS program and Coalition members and partners have together worked on the framework for the Protocol document that is intended for the use of the community of Abbotsford as a whole.

Intent and Purpose of Protocol We need only look at current events in our own and neighboring communities to see how discrimination or hate crimes cause pain and disruption in a community. A hateful act can be destructive to the point of paralyzing a community and isolating groups and service providers. Thus, just as communities have in place mechanisms to respond to disasters, traumas and crisis situations, a protocol intends that a community be prepared in the event of a critical hate motivated incident. A protocol agreed to by relevant service providers can act as a community-based mechanism for the quick assessment and decisive action towards critical incidents of discrimination and hate motivated incidents. Coalition members and partners agreed that a community Protocol should be brief, clear and concise. It should provide a basic understanding of hate crimes, discrimination and bigotry with a clear understanding of available resources and responses. It is intended to provide a means for the community to support victims and respond as a community to incidents or issues. It is important to note that the Protocol does not intend to have all stakeholders become expert practitioners of victim support or in the enforcement of human rights legislation or the criminal code. Nor is it the intention to have every stakeholder Abbotsford Community Protocol 11/25/2004

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understand the complexities of hate crime and related activities. The protocol aims to assist and support existing service providers who have the expertise in enforcement, investigation and victim support, such as the Abbotsford Police, Hate Crimes Team, Human Rights Tribunal and victim support services. This Protocol will produce a document of understanding and outline procedures to address and respond to incidents of discrimination, hate crime or activity stemming from prejudice, stereotypes and xenophobia. It provides a step-bystep, easy to use guide designed to help community members and stakeholders react promptly and effectively whenever discrimination or a hate motivated incident occurs. The Protocol is a tool that highlights safe places for victims of critical incidents of discrimination and hate crime and offers access to relevant resources. It also provides a list of key terms and their definitions. The Abbotsford Community Protocol acts as a unique and innovative public policy initiative that holds accountable community service providers, leaders and community members. Providing strategies, concrete recommendations and a referral system are key in prevention and finding solutions to underlying tensions or issues. Such a means to respond as a community strengthens community ties and ensures the safety and healthy involvement of all Abbotsford’s citizens. It should be further noted that this Protocol is the first step towards creating an integrated referral system, and incident and victim documentation and tracking mechanism. The Protocol should be revisited regularly to identify strengths and weaknesses and further develop the mechanisms required. The Protocol is also a document that can be used by businesses and organizations in Abbotsford to enhance and supplement their existing Employee Policies and Practices materials concerning harassment and discrimination.

Mechanisms of Protocol There are primarily two key mechanisms involved in the Protocol and they are very much interconnected. The first is victim support and the second is referral.

Victim Support In the event of a critical or traumatic hate motivated incident, the victim requires support from the community. Support can take on various forms. The primary form of support that may be required is trauma and crisis counseling provided by professionals. Community members or organizations can support victims by listening to and validating the victims’ experience. They can also support targeted groups by coming together and organizing an event to show community solidarity and unity. Another form of victim support would be the documentation of the incident by the Fraser Valley Human Dignity Coalition. Documentation assists in efforts to monitor and track tensions and issues in the community and highlights areas of prevention and education by the DEARS program and the Coalition and its partners. Abbotsford Community Protocol 11/25/2004

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Referral Service providers, stakeholders, and community members can not be expected to meet all the needs of an individual or group after an incident. Included in the Protocol is a list of local, regional and provincial organizations that can assist victims through legal remedies and victim services. Protocol members and community members are asked to refer victims to the services listed in the accompanying reference guide.

Victim/Community Outreach The effectiveness of the Protocol rests with the awareness and utilization of the document by service providers and victims of discrimination or hate motivated incidents. Thus, a significant piece involved in supporting the Protocol is victim outreach. This would take the shape of, or at least be addressed by, the promotion of the Protocol within the community. In part this would take place through the activities of the DEARS program and the Coalition. Through awareness initiatives, information sessions and media relations the Protocol’s intent and resources will be promoted within the community. The Protocol will also be available at all partnering organizations as listed in the Partner List (see page 18) and the pullout Reference Guide will be distributed and be made available more broadly. The Reference Guide and the promotion of the Protocol will make information accessible regarding the services and resources available to victims and potential victims. This form of victim outreach addresses prevention before a critical incident occurs. The resources and services of DEARS, the Coalition and Protocol mechanisms address victim outreach during the event of any critical incident. As a next step or phase, protocol partners can further examine victim support and outreach. They can choose to develop in more detail the specific procedures, and mechanisms (i.e. victim report forms) and a follow-up or tracking system.

Outcomes for the Community Establishing a community protocol is only one piece in the response and prevention of discrimination and hate motivated incidents against targeted individuals or groups. But it is likely one of the most significant pieces in uniting against hateful and bigoted acts and ensuring a safe and healthy community for all. Some of the key outcomes of this Abbotsford Community Protocol include: • creating an unwelcome environment to hate motivated incidents through a collaborative community approach • creating an environment for community involvement in finding solutions to underlying tensions or issues • establishing ongoing relationships between stakeholders and service providers

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ABBOTSFORD COMMUNITY PROTOCOL: A RESPONSE TO CRITICAL INCIDENTS OF DISCRIMINATION AND HATE CRIME The Abbotsford Community Protocol is designed to help community members and stakeholders react promptly and effectively whenever critical incidents of discrimination, hate crime or related incidents strike with resources and a step-bystep guide to respond. Relevant service providers who will take part in this initiative will provide a clear statement of what services or resources are available in the wake of a critical incident. Service providers will aim to provide swift services, resources as needed and a safe environment for targeted individuals or groups. For this protocol to be most effective service providers should be familiar with the manifestations of discrimination, hate and bigotry and be able to proceed and address the situation appropriately. In doing so, service providers are encouraged to establish organizational/institutional policies that promote equity and respect. The Protocol is also a document that can be used by businesses and organizations in Abbotsford to enhance and supplement their existing Employee Policies and Practices materials concerning harassment and discrimination. Service providers are also encouraged to make efforts in staff development and education to facilitate awareness and understanding of the issues. Service providers are strongly encouraged to utilize the resources and services outlined in the Resource Guide and Partner List. The Protocol is a statement agreed to by community organizations and service providers to help respond to and prevent critical incidents of discrimination and hate against targeted individuals or groups.

Protocol Mechanisms There are two key mechanisms involved in this Protocol. The first is victim support and the second is referral.

Victim Support In the event of a critical or traumatic incident of discrimination or hate crime the community service provider agrees to: • Provide prompt service and liaise accordingly with other relevant service providers. • Recognize and acknowledge the victim’s experience. • Document the incident and contact the Fraser Valley Human Dignity Coalition (FVHDC). • Participate in a community response.

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Referral As a community service provider that can provide relevant services to victims of a critical or traumatic incident of discrimination or hate crime, the service provider will: • Provide the relevant service to the victim(s). • Refer the victim(s) to another agency when unable to provide the required service or when the victims’ needs are beyond the scope of the mandate, or when needs exceed capacity. • Make available referral using accompanying Resource Guide and Partner List to the appropriate agency.

Protocol Roles and Expectations For a Protocol to be effective it is important to have clearly defined roles and expectations of those involved. The following is a breakdown of the expectations prior to implementation and on an ongoing basis from participating organizations and service providers.

Role of Abbotsford Community Services (ACS) As the organization housing the DEARS program and the FVHDC, ACS will: Pre-Implementation • Provide leadership on the implementation of the community protocol. Ongoing • Provide support and services from relevant programs such as Victim Services, Translation and Interpretation Services and Immigrant Settlement and Multicultural Services.

Role of Diversity Education and Resource Services (DEARS) As a program of Abbotsford Community Services DEARS will: Pre-Implementation • Provide staff support for the FVHDC and support the development of the protocol. Ongoing • Encourage and support education and awareness opportunities for community members, students, professionals and employers. • In partnership with protocol signers research ongoing funding for initiatives to support and enhance the protocol objectives. • Maintain an updated list of relevant service providers, victim support and ethno-cultural organizations that can be accessed for referral.

Role of Coalition As a community based coalition of concerned citizens and service providers the Coalition will: Pre-implementation • Lead the development of a community protocol in response to critical incidents of discrimination and hate crime. Abbotsford Community Protocol 11/25/2004

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• Promote the protocol to other stakeholders and solicit buy-in. Ongoing • Support victim(s) by listening to account, documenting account, referring to appropriate service or organization. • Make available educational resources and services on human rights, discrimination and hate crime. • Purpose activities in pursuit of Coalition goals which promote the awareness of the value of human rights and dignities; respond to the issues and concerns in the community as needed; support victims whose human rights and dignities have been violated. • Promote resources and protocol within community and respond to critical incidents as needed in a prompt manner.

Role of Protocol Signers Pre-implementation • Provide statement of what service/resources are available in wake of critical incident. Ongoing • Provide swift services and resources as needed to critical incidents in a safe environment. • Make efforts in organization staff development, education and awareness of issues and establish policies that promote equity and respect. • Make efforts to document incidents and contact FVHDC.

Definitions To assist in the reading of the Protocol and the understanding of the issues surrounding discrimination and hate crime, a list of key terms is provided. 1 The list of terms is not comprehensive and in some cases definitions vary according to the source. For more information or education opportunities and materials refer to the Education and Resource List (see page 15). Ableism is discrimination in favour of able-bodied people. Ageism is discrimination on grounds of age. Bias is an inclination, opinion or preference formed without any reasonable justification. Bias is reflected in a person’s prejudices or attitudes towards a different race, class, gender, cultural background etc. and can often result in unfair treatment of individuals or groups. Bigotry refers to the character or conduct of intolerance towards another’s beliefs, religion, race, sex, mental or physical ability or sexual orientation. 1

Definitions have been compiled from several sources including the following: Responding to Incidents of Racism and Hate: A Handbook for Service Providers, BC Human Rights Coalition 2003; Anti-Racism: Terminology, Concepts and Training, Ministry Responsible for Multiculturalism and Immigration 1994; BC Hate Crimes Team.

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Discrimination is when prejudice and bias move from a state of opinion or mind to action. Discrimination means to treat a person or group differently or negatively because of prejudice and bias. This can take on many different forms such as harassment, unequal pay or benefits, unequal conditions or service provisions, to hate propaganda. Harassment can take the form of physical, visual or verbal conduct that is unwelcome, discriminatory, has negative effect on the work environment, involves intimidation or an abuse of power and denies the respect and dignity of an individual. Hate/Bias Crime is a criminal offence committed against a person or property which is motivated by the suspect’s hate, prejudice or bias against an identifiable group based on race, religion, sex, gender, age, mental or physical ability, sexual orientation or any other similar factor (as defined in section 718.2 of the Criminal Code of Canada). Hate/Bias Incidents are those actions that are not criminal in nature and may be covered by the Human Rights Code of Canada. Heterosexism is discrimination by heterosexuals against homosexuals. Homophobia is a fear or hatred of homosexuals or homosexuality. Intolerance is not allowing, or enduring differences in opinions, teaching, worship, lifestyle etc. Prejudice (Bias) means to ‘pre-judge’ and is an attitude towards a person or group. When applied to racism, prejudice refers to beliefs or attitudes about an individual or group based on negative or positive stereotyping. Internalizing prejudice leads to bias, which is a predisposition to build on stereotypes. Together prejudice and bias form the motivation for discrimination. Prejudice and bias are a state of mind and there are no laws to prohibit them. Privilege is a special advantage, immunity, permission, right, or benefit granted to or enjoyed by an individual, class, or caste. Propaganda is the systematic propagation of a doctrine or cause or information reflecting the views and interests of those advocating such a doctrine or cause. Race is a pseudo-scientific ideology of inferiority or superiority based on either biological or cultural stereotypes of group difference. Racism refers to a set of beliefs that asserts the superiority of one ‘racial’ group over another (at the individual as well as institutional level), and through which

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individuals or groups of people exercise power that abuse or disadvantage others on the basis of skin colour and racial or ethnic heritage. Individual Racism is any action or practice which denies equality to any person because of their race, religion, ethnicity or culture. Systemic Racism refers to the social and organizational structures, including policy and practices, which whether intentionally or unintentionally exclude, limit and discriminate against individuals not part of the traditional dominant group. Systemic Racism is most often an unconscious by-product of ethnocentrism and unexamined privilege. Racialization is to differentiate or categorize according to race and to impose a racial character or context on. Relevant Service Providers are service providers that offer services and resources that are directly related or useful in the event of a hate crime or critical incident involving discrimination. Sexism is discrimination on the grounds of sex. Stakeholders in context of the Abbotsford Protocol refer to the service providers, organizations and institutions within Abbotsford who have invested interest in the health, safety and vitality of the community. Stereotype is a false or generalized conception of a group of people which results in the unconscious or conscious categorization of each member of the group, without regard for individual differences. Stereotyping may relate to race, age; ethnicity, linguistics, religious, geographical or national groups; social, marital or family status; physical, developmental or mental attributes; and or gender. Xenophobia is fear of other people, groups, or cultures that are different from one’s own. The term is usually used to describe the phenomena where the dominant group of a country feel fear of ‘foreigners’, their customs and culture.

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Education and Resource List Abbotsford Community Services Society Diversity Education and Resource Services (DEARS) 2420 Montrose Ave, Abbotsford, BC V2S 3S9 Tel: 604-859-7681 local 270 Email: mcaccess@paralynx.com BC Hate Crimes Team C/o Major Crimes Section - CIU E Division HG- Surrey Satellite Complex 12992 – 76th Avenue Surrey BC V3W 2V6 Tel: 604-660-2659 Toll Free: 1-800-563-0808 BC Human Rights Coalition #1202- 510 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 1L8 Tel: 604-689-8474 Fax: 604-689-7511 Toll Free: 1-877-689-8474 Email: info@bchrcoalition.org Website: www.human-rights-coalition.bc.ca Canadian Anti-Racism and Research Society (CAERS) PO Box 2783 Vancouver, BC Tel: 604-687-7350 Website: www.antiracist.com Email: caers@telus.net Canadian Race Relation Foundation Toll free: 1-888-240-4936 Email: info@crr.ca Website: www.crr.ca Ministry of Community, Aboriginal and Women’s Services Settlement and Multiculturalism Branch 2nd Floor – 1125 Howe Street Vancouver, BC V6Z 2K8 Tel: 604-660-2203 Fax: 604-775-0670 Website: www.gov.bc.ca/mcaws/

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Continuum of Intolerance The following illustration depicts a continuum of intolerance. The continuum summarizes situations and events that range from the covert and subtle to the overt and violent. This Protocol is a response to address incidents that fall on the right side of the continuum - incidents of discrimination and bias that are overt and violent. The examples below may be familiar, as some are adapted from actual events in the Fraser Valley and Lower Mainland.

Intolerance

Prejudice

There is a resistance in parts of the community to acknowledge or allow different opinions in teaching or lifestyle.

A lobby group delivers several presentations in the area on the negative effects of immigration from non-white, non-English speaking countries.

Discrimination

Hate Crime

When crossing the local border crossing, people who are or look to be of Middle Eastern descent are subjected to racial profiling.

An elderly Sikh man is beaten to death by a group of youth connected to a white supremacist group.

VIOLENT

SUBTLE

Stereotype

Bias

Hate Activity

People of a certain ethnic descent are perceived to be prone to drug related gang violence and criminal behaviour.

A local technology company prefers to hire those less than 30 years old feeling they are more knowledgeable of cutting edge technology.

A local church is defaced with racist and bigoted graffiti.

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APPENDIX 1 A) Protocol Resource Guide and Partner List The Resource Guide and Partner List are designed as a back-to-back laminated pull-out sheet for easy use and display.

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ABBOTSFORD COMMUNITY PROTOCOL PARTNER LIST 2004 The Protocol is designed to help community members and stakeholders react promptly and effectively whenever critical incidents of discrimination or hate crime strike with resources and a step-by-step guide to respond. The Abbotsford Community Protocol: A Response to Critical Incidents of Discrimination and Hate Crime can be found at all partnering organizations listed below.

Abbotsford Community Services 2420 Montrose Ave., Abbotsford, BC V2S 3S9

Tel: 604-859-7681 Fax: 604-859-6334

The Diversity Education and Resources Services (DEARS) program provides workshops, resources and education on human rights issues. The Fraser Valley Human Dignity Coalition (FVHDC) provides advocacy and awareness opportunities on human dignity matters. Other relevant programs include the Translation and Interpretive Services, Victim Services and Immigrant and Multicultural Services.

Abbotsford Police Department 2838 Justice Way, Abbotsford, BC V2T 3P5

Emergency - Call 911 Non-Emergency: 604-859-5225

Abbotsford Police are first responders to Criminal Code offences involving hate, racism or harassment. They will liaise with and forward information to the BC Hate Crimes Team. They are able to provide proactive intervention and education through the community outreach programs of the Community Policing Branch. The Graffiti Task Force is also available to assist.

Abbotsford Youth Commission #101-32383 South Fraser Way Abbotsford, BC V2T 1W6

Tel: 604-854-8785 Fax: 604-854-8092 www.abbyyouth.com

The Abbotsford Youth Commission exists to identify, promote, improve and increase services for youth in Abbotsford. The AYC will refer people to the appropriate resources identified in the protocol. The AYC would be willing to work in partnership with other community agencies to offer forums, education, or workshops in response to an identified need.

Abbotsford Police Victim Services 2838 Justice Way, Abbotsford, BC V2T 3P5

Tel: 604-864-4757 After Hours/ Crisis: 604-859-5225

Victim Services provides information on victim's rights, criminal justice system and what to expect if the crime is reported to the police. They provide emotional support, crisis visits, phone follow-ups and meetings as well as and information and referrals in regards to financial assistance, shelter, safety planning, counselling, child trauma, critical incident stress, immigration issues, legal and civil matters, grief, mental and physical health concerns.

Women's Resource Society of the FV Box 3044, Mission, BC V2V 4J3

Tel: 604-820-8455

Youthquest! Provincial Office

Tel: 604-523-9115 Fax: 604-523-9116 Toll Free: 1-866-NOT-ALONE www.youthquest.bc.ca

Community Dev. Program: 604-855-3361 An agency that responds to violence against women by providing safe refuge, group and individual counseling, community outreach and public education.

88 7th Street, Rm. 100B, c/o DSU Box 2503

New Westminster, BC V3L 5B2

Youthquest! provides a range of services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and questioning youth. Youthquest! also operates a peer-answered crisis line that offers peer support services for youth (604-3089572) and works toward the reduction and elimination of bigotry and homophobia in schools and society and provides workshops as requested. If you have questions or require more information regarding the Abbotsford Community Protocol: A Response to Critical Incidents of Discrimination and Hate Crime please call DEARS at 604-859-7681 x 270. Abbotsford Community Protocol: A Response to Critical Incidents of Discrimination and Hate Crime

March 2004


ABBOTSFORD COMMUNITY PROTOCOL RESOURCE GUIDE 2004 If you have experienced or witnessed a critical incident of discrimination or hate crime and do not know what your options are contact the Diversity Education and Resources Services Program (DEARS) for information, referrals and confidential support services. DEARS can also provide access to education and training on a range of human rights and diversity topics (604-859-7681).

IMPORTANT CONTACT NUMBERS Abbotsford Police Department Abbotsford Police Victim Services BC Hate Crimes Team BC Human Rights Coalition BC Human Rights Tribunal Canadian Human Rights Commission Diversity Education and Resource Services

911 or non-emergency 604-859-5225 604-864-4757 1-800-563-0808 1-877-689-8474 1-888-440-8844 1-800-999-6899 604-859-7681 Local 270

STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO RESPOND If you are a victim of a critical incident of discrimination or hate crime or a witness to an incident here are some suggested steps to follow. Other options to respond or report can be accessed by contacting the organizations listed above under Important Contacts.

Violence 1. If you are a victim or witness to a criminal act involving violence call the police immediately at 911 and give full details of the incident. Please note that crimes of violence are a high priority to the police, and though they may not respond to less serious calls right away, they will attend the scene as soon as they are able to. 2. Assist who is injured and restore order. (For example, if incident occurs at school have students return to their classes. Be careful not to disturb the scene or any evidence).

3. Be prepared to recount the details of the incident and events to authorities. 4. Make referrals to local, provincial and federal bodies listed above that could assist in enforcement and legal remedies. 5. Refer to and access the network of safe sites listed on reverse side of this Guide for counseling and or support for victims. 6. Support the victim or targets of the violence. (This may include organizing a gathering to celebrate community unity and diversity).

Graffiti and Vandalism 1. In the case of major property crime contact the police at 911 immediately. With minor

property crimes (e.g. defacement of textbooks or library materials) inform the appropriate authorities such as School Administration or Library Staff. 2. Document any high-profile property crime by taking photographs or videotape of the offence. Make note of details such as location and time of incident and have details ready for authorities. 3. The Graffiti Task Force is available to assist. Contact the Community Police Office at 604864-4814 for details. 4. While waiting for authorities to arrive cover offence without disturbing it if possible. After authorities have attended, remove offense as soon as possible. (Some may choose to have colleagues or community members join in the removal of the offence as a sign of support and unity). 5. Support the target or targets of the graffiti. (This may include organizing an event or gathering to celebrate community unity and diversity). 6. Refer to and access the network of safe sites listed on reverse side of this Guide for

counseling and or support for victims. The local police and Hate Crimes Team should be contacted if you come upon propaganda or materials that advocate genocide or communicate hatred of any identifiable group. Abbotsford Community Protocol: A Response to Critical Incidents of Discrimination and Hate Crime

March 2004


Critical Incident Protocol: Abbotsford