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ECHO

PRINCETON ARTS > CULTURE > COMMUNITY MARCH 2015

ARE PLACES THAT BAN UBER STUCK IN THE PAST?

FIGHTING THE

TASKRABBIT

AIRBNB

LYFT

COUCHSURFING

INSTACART

UBER

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FUTURE

52 page 20 CECE KING page 10 INSIDE: SEASONS How the upscale chain is capturing the hearts What led her to write, “The Broken Ones,” and tastebuds of the local dining scene

and the buzz surrounding the film


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arts and entertainment

Violist Jessica Meyers creates a tapestry of sound with her instrument and a loop machine. Story by Bill Sanservino.

20

Food and drink: Seasons 52

Seasons 52 in Princeton MarketFair is the hottest new restaurant in the area. Story by Pat Tannner.

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Power outages are becoming more frequent and longer lasting... we can insure that anytime the power goes out you will have power automatically! Make sure you have heat & lights when the power goes off. Our natural gas/propane home standby generators automatically come on when the power goes off; even if you’re not home. So you’ll be warm in the winter and cool in the summer with access to the news and no fear of freezing pipes, flooded basements, or losing perishable foods.

Food for Thought .................................................................................... 22 Dining Guide ........................................................................................... 23 Around Town .......................................................................................... 27 At Your Service ........................................................................................ 30 Classified ................................................................................................ 31 Index of Advertisers ............................................................................... 32 Sounding Off ........................................................................................... 33 Parting Shot............................................................................................. 34

Phone: (609) 396-1511 Fax: (609) 844-0180 Website: mercerspace.com SENIOR COMMUNITY EDITOR Bill Sanservino SENIOR EDITORS Rob Anthes, Lexie Yearly SPORTS EDITOR Samantha Sciarrotta CALENDAR EDITOR Lynn Miller PHOTOGRAPHERS Suzette J. Lucas, Albert Rende EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Alinza Alperin-Sheriff CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Andrew Tate, Scott Morgan, Pat Tanner, Pia de Jong MANAGING EDITOR Joe Emanski (Ext. 120) PRODUCTION MANAGER Stacey Micallef (Ext. 131) AD TRAFFIC COORDINATOR Norine Longo GRAPHIC ARTISTS Karen Bruton, Vaughan Burton SALES DIRECTOR Thomas Fritts (Ext. 110) SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Jennifer Steffen SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGERS Jennifer Schwesinger, Michael Zilembo ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Amanda Arena, Jacqueline Barrett, Michael Lovett

CO-PUBLISHERS Jamie Griswold and Tom Valeri EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Richard K. Rein ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR Brittany Bayo © 2015 by Community News Service, LLC. All rights reserved. News Events Sports

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LEADING OFF

Forbidden

FRUIT Princeton University captures the imagination with its gothic architecture and natural beauty, but few people are aware that the university’s five most iconic sites—Nassau Hall, Alexander Hall, Blair Hall arch, steps and tower, FitzRandolph Gates and Lewis Library—are what the University deems “restricted imagery.” University imagery policy stipulates that images that include all or recognizable portions of these five sites are permitted for use only on university business, and are not permitted for other use, whether the pics are supplied by the university or taken independently. The policy also covers commercial use of photography, requiring prior consent for any images used in advertising, merchandising and all other forms. Princeton University has maintained its photography policy dating back decades, to keep the university from sanctioning outside organizations or their beliefs. “We want to avoid conveying in any way Princeton University’s endorsement, approval or affiliation of any views, products or services,” said Min Pullan, media relations specialist for Princeton University. “The use of iconic images might run the risk of doing that.” One might think that the policy is not in keeping with the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. But the Founding Fathers had never heard of cameras, and photography is not expressly protected by the Bill of Rights, not for journalists or anyone else. According to the First Amendment Center, recent court cases have found for the plaintiff when the photographer was a credentialed press photographer (on an accident scene closed to the public) and even when the photographer was taking shots for personal recreational use. –Rebeccah Barger

Pictured are Nassau Hall, FitzRandolph Gates, Blair Hall, Lewis Library and Alexander Hall of Princeton University.

March 2015 | Princeton Echo3


On ly Avai l ab l e th r ou g h RW J H a m i l to n ’s Cente r fo r O r th op e d i c & S p i ne H ea l th. Choral Masterworks

A Festival of Choirs

Music by Allegri, Bach, Byrd, Pärt, Tallis, Tavener, Wadsworth

Saturday, March 14, 2015, 8:00pm Princeton University Chapel

The Princeton University Chapel is the ideal place to take in the unparalleled magnificence of choral singing. Five fabulous ensembles will fill every corner of the chapel with sonic beauty. Come experience the perfect music for this space in the perfect space for this music.

Tickets at $60, $45, and $25 www.princetonpromusica.org 20% discount available for groups of 10 or more

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Call (609) 683-5122 to inquire. Programs made possible in part by funds from the Edward T. Cone Foundation, The Scheide Fund, the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/Department of State, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New Jersey Cultural Trust. Persons requiring special assistance or accommodations are asked to contact Princeton Pro Musica two weeks in advance of an event to alert staff to any special needs. Call 609.683.5122 with any questions or requests for special assistance. Every effort will be made to accommodate special needs.

Poetry Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts Performance Central presents

PRINCETON

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Seminar and Dinner.

Orthopedic Open House: Robotic Joint Replacement March 24; 6 to 8 p.m. RWJ Fitness & Wellness Center, 3100 Quakerbridge Rd.

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For more information about Joint Replacement and Robotic-Assisted Surgery, call our orthopedic coordinator at 609.249.7879

Friday, March 13 and Saturday, March 14, 2015 A series of readings and discussions starting at 2 p.m. each day

Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University Princeton, NJ Featuring an international line-up of poets: Ellen Bryant Voigt (US) Kwame Dawes (Ghana) Paul Farley (UK) Major Jackson (US)

Kathleen Jamie (Scotland) Ada Limon (US) Maureen N. McLane (US) Valzhyna Mort (Belarus)

Michael Robbins (US) Tomasz Rozycki (Poland) Ocean Vuong (Vietnam) Ray Young Bear (Meskwaki)

The New Jersey State Finals of the national Poetry Out Loud program will open the Festival on Friday, March 13, at 10 a.m.

Tickets: $15 per day; $25 for two-day festival pass and free for students; Poetry Out Loud State Finals are free

arts.princeton.edu/poetryfestival

4Princeton Echo | March 2015

PERFORMANCE

CENTRAL


LEADING OFF Annual book sale always promises bargains The Bryn Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale is set to return to Princeton Day School for an amazing 84th year March 20 through 24. For the first time in several years, the sale will begin on a Friday, with the bulk of the sale days falling on the weekend. Scheduling conflicts necessitated mostly midweek sale dates the past few years. The book sale has an amazing history. According to the book sale website, in 1931, a group of Princeton-area Bryn Mawr College graduates looked to raise money for scholarships for new students by holding a used book sale. In 2000, with their numbers flagging, a local Wellesley alumnae group joined in the effort, and it’s been going strong ever since. The book sale is immense, almost overwhelmingly so, with volumes filling the entire gymnasium and cafeteria at PDS during the school’s spring break. The committee estimates the total count of available books at 100,000. Volunteers spend the whole year between sales receiving donations and sorting them into categories, so readers who only care for European history or social science are able to make a beeline for their

desired section. Likewise fans of mysteries or literary fiction will see their favorites staked out across rows of tables. Those who like to collect books from across the publishing spectrum, on the other hand, could easily spend the better part of an afternoon browsing. I’ve been going to the sale since 2012, and I’ve never left without a impressive stack. I’m not a rare book hunter — though rare book hunters would have a ball at the sale — but I do like to build up my home library with reading copies. I was able to assemble a pretty substantial Evelyn Waugh collection from just one year. Last year, the recent Walter Isaacson biography of Steve Jobs was just sitting there, waiting for me to take it. I did. Friday, March 20 is a Preview Day, requiring a $25 ticket to gain entry — dealers and resellers make up a substantial portion of the traffic that day. Tickets are available online. Meanwhile, Tuesday, March 24 will be box day, when bargain hunters will be able to walk out with a 16x12x12 box full of tomes for $10. Processes and procedures for Preview Day and every other day, as well as hours of operation, are online at bmandwbooks.com. –Joe Emanski

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The reporter’s haul from the 2012 Br yn Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale.

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www.princetonchamber.org March 2015 | Princeton Echo5


FIGHTING

uber FUTURE IS FIGHTING THE

By Andrew Tate It’s easy to forget in 2015 how novel the Internet was 20 years ago, or how novel smartphones were in 2007. Both altered the trajectory of the entire world economy, but they did more than that: they altered our way of life, slowly at first, then more quickly. Then, seemingly, too quickly. Too quickly for us to adapt quickly to them. Too quickly for our parents. Too quickly for our laws. New ideas didn’t always hurtle at us with such speed. Not even in the Internet era. A decade passed between the founding of Yahoo! — the first major Internet portal and search engine, which started up in 1994 — and Facebook, which went live in 2004. In all those years, we didn’t even know that online social networking was something we should be missing. YouTube, which for the millennial generation is as compelling a video medium as TV, marked 10 years in operation just last month. Lost in the fog of our memory are those years when videos were short, stuttering and blurry. It has taken a long time for programmers, thinkers and businesspeople to figure

6Princeton Echo | March 2015

out how the power of the Web could be harnessed, that long for computer technology to be able to realize their visions. Instagram, the photo-sharing social networking site that gained 200 million users between 2012 and 2014, is not yet 5 years old. Neither is Pinterest, which started up around the same time. These sites and apps have come to our lives relatively recently, but have quickly become part of the fabric of our lives. The rate of innovation continues to increase, and with it, our ability to adapt to each new thing has also been on the rise. When Apple revealed the iPhone in 2007, and competitors like Samsung drafted in with competing products, a much more mature tech sector was ready to respond. At first, few were convinced that users would walk around in zombie fashion, browsing the Internet as they walked the streets. But within a year or two, the race was on — a race that will probably never end. We’ll never wait decades for a game changer again. New websites and apps come on the market every year, every month, and many developers are setting themselves the goal not of making our life just a little better, but of chang-

ing it altogether. Thanks to the always increasing sophisitication of the pocket computers we carry around and call phones, such ambition is more realistic than ever. Uber, an app-based transportation network, is a disruptive innovation that’s been in the news a lot lately, in Princeton and around the country. Uber is a car service that matches individual drivers with people needing a ride. Using the app, which can be downloaded for free, users can call up local drivers to take them to any local destination. They can even track Uber cars on their phones. Ordinarily, if you wanted to get a cab from Princeton to Princeton Junction train station, a 12-minute ride, it would cost you $25. First you’ve got to find a cab. There is no central taxi number for the town, so you’d have to know the number for individual taxi drivers and hope someone answers, or you could chance your luck and call the Nassau Street taxi stand, and hope someone answers. Then an old sedan would pull up and take you slowly and sullenly to your destination. Hope you’ve got cash. Nobody really questioned this though, right? That was how it always worked. Until Uber.

Now, you can grab your smartphone and, in a few clicks and a few minutes, a car you have chosen based on user feedback will be at your door, ready to take you to the train station for $10. Leave your wallet at home: the money will be seamlessly taken out of your bank account. Welcome to Uber, and the start of a whole new world. Uber is as old as Instagram, although most people would be unlikely to realize it. It started out in 2010 as a San Francisco-only service, and has been expanding city by city across the country. The service is one of a new generation of companies known collectively as the ‘sharing economy’, the idea being that we can all share our own resources and make money at the same time, increasing efficiency (for all) and getting rich (for some) while doing it. Uber does it with cars (along with rival services such as Lyft and Sidecar), Airbnb does it with homes and rooms, Instacart does it with shopping, and Taskrabbit does it with anything. Anyone can sign up not only to just use these services, but be a provider as well. Drive people around, rent out your home, do someone’s shopping, or pick up their dry cleaning—be a taxi, a


hotel, a shopper, or a personal assistant. Sounds great. But not everyone is ready to usher in this brave new world. In early January, the topic of Uber was brought up at a Princeton council meeting by the owner of Amigo Taxi, a local cab service. He didn’t mention the car service company by name, but instead called on the council to take action against ‘unlicensed taxis’ in the town. Uber is seen by many as riding roughshod over local laws and regulations put in place to safeguard consumers, and taxi drivers don’t see why they have to play by the rules and Uber doesn’t. They want Princeton to follow the lead of states such as Nevada and cities such as Hoboken, where Uber can no longer operate. But here’s the thing: Princeton can’t ban Uber, because Uber is already banned. “Uber is illegal, according to borough ordinances and state laws,” says Jenny Crumiller, a Princeton councilwoman and member of the Taxi Ordinance Committee assigned to bring the borough’s licensing ordinances up-to-date after the consolidation of the borough and township. The company should not be operating a car service in the area without abiding by the local laws. So how does Uber get away with it? The answer: Because people are using it, and enjoying it, and telling their friends. Like the downloading of music that disrupted the economy in an earlier Internet era, labor sharing services are an opportunity too good to pass up for consumers, many of whom shrug off the legal implications. “If you were to poll people in Princeton, the majority of cab users who have used both Uber and the local cab would probably prefer Uber,” says Steven Strauss, a visiting professor at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs. Uber offers a much better rider experience than cabs do, for numerous reasons. Quasi-monopolies such as the local taxi system in Princeton, mean cabs and drivers no longer have an incentive to make customer experience any better. Additionally, Strauss says, “Uber takes what is normally a non-repeating transaction and turns it into a two-way rateable transaction.” If you get into a cab in New York City, or even Princeton, the likelihood of you ever seeing that driver again, is small, therefore the incentive for the driver to leave you with a good impression is small. With Uber, you rate the driver, and he/she rates you. This means that there is a real incentive for Uber drivers (and Uber passengers) to be polite and helpful. The other big thing is that Uber is cheaper. Uber’s concept of “surge-pricing,” where price goes up when demand rises, such as on holidays or during bad weather, has riled many, but for most

The entrance to Uber headquarters at 1455 Market Street in San Francisco. The ser vice is raising questions in many towns about compliance with local laws. trips, particularly in Princeton, you are going to be paying less in an Uber car than in a regular taxi.

RIDING ROUGHSHOD Uber provides a popular service, but many are still uneasy about using this service or services such as Airbnb. Their disregard for local laws, regulations and ultimately companies and councils, annoys a lot of people. The company and its proponents call this a disruption, and say it is a good way to weed out archaic and byzantine regulations that hinder the economy. It is also the reason Uber can make money: it doesn’t have to sign up to the restrictive licensing systems that taxi drivers do. The same goes for Airbnb. There are plenty of listings renting out rooms and houses in the Princeton area, directly competing with local hotels and businesses. The places listed on Airbnb do not have to submit to the same safety regulations and fire codes as regular hotels and B&Bs, so they can charge far less. Because they are not party to the archaic regulatory system, they can provide a service more in tune with what consumers want, and can adjust to demand fluctuations in the market. But those safety regulations and fire codes are there for a reason. “There are important safety issues and convenience issues with Airbnb that tend to be dismissed too quickly,” Strauss says. Yet Uber and others have chosen to flout those laws. In an article in the Huffington Post, Strauss said that while a lot of regulation can be seen as superfluous, some laws are still absolutely neccessary. Safety inspections on are as applicable to Uber

as they are to taxi companies. Most Uber cars are newer than the town cars taxi companies use, but without specific safety standards you cannot know whether an Uber car is safe to drive. Instead of providing some type of safety testing, Uber has pushed drivers to lease or buy new cars, at their own cost, and through Uber financing. Uber, et al, are gambling on the idea that with consumers on their side, states, cities and municipalities such as Princeton will choose not to fight back. They have been mostly proved right. One city that has chosen to fight back is Hoboken. A crackdown on Uber in the city (the closet thing you can get to a ban on an already illegal service) means police in Hoboken will pull over any Uber car and the passenger will not be able to go any further, and the driver will be fined for driving an unlicensed taxi. This is not something Princeton is keen to consider. Councilwoman Crumiller says that the Princeton Police are not about to start a crackdown on Uber and picking a fight with the company is a lose-lose situation for a town such as Princeton. Uber has already brought their legal heavyweights to bear on cities and towns around the country, and, as Strauss says, it is not a fight that residents really want the council to fight. For Crumiller though, she feels these companies are keeping money for themselves that should really come into the local economy. “These services are good, but they are not sharing. The corporations make money, but the town doesn’t,” she said.

THE NEW ECONOMY Importantly, Uber, Airbnb and others have just made what was already available easily accessible. Unlicensed taxis

and subletting have been around since these laws were first enacted. Ubiquitous smartphone technology and apps have just significantly lowered the transaction costs of such businesses, allowing them almost limitless access to consumers for little outlay. Rather than fight to ban companies such as Uber that are competing with them, taxi companies and other traditional providers finding themselves on the wrong end of this new economy should look at the innovations such apps have brought to the marketplace and take them on board. Easy payment systems, rating systems and even surge pricing can help older companies compete properly. They need a change in the regulations as much as Uber. Another Princeton professor, Alan Krueger, has recently published a joint paper with Uber, looking at who signs up to drive for the company, and how well they do. His findings: Uber drivers are more highly educated and younger than taxi drivers. They are also more likely to be women. He suggests that what is standing in the way of taxi drivers is also what is standing in the way of Uber. “States and municipalities can make it easier for people to become for-hire drivers. If someone with a driver’s license can drive their friend or a loved one to the airport, why can’t they drive someone who pays them for a ride to the airport?” Krueger said. He also suggests that states and cities can have ulterior motives for increasing regulation. “One problem with traditional taxi regulation is that the regulation is done to raise fees for cities and airports and prevent entry, rather than improve service and safety for passengers,” he said. Rather than running Uber out of town, as Hoboken has tried, the state and local municipalities in New Jersey would be better off looking at what they have done to tie the hands of the taxi industry and provide a level playing field for all.

SCARING THE HORSES

What is true, though, is that we have been here before, and we will be here again. Taxi regulations and licences have been around for almost 400 years, when the first licensing restrictions for horse-drawn carriages were introduced in London. In the industrial revolution, as mechanization changed production methods, riots occurred and machinery was smashed by workers suddenly out of a job. When cars were first seen on the streets in the 19th century, horse-drawn carriage owners and locomotive companies lobbied governments for draconian speed limits and weight restrictions to stop the car getting the upper hand. Vermont went so far as to require a man waving a red flag to precede any large

SEE UBER PAGE 8

March 2015 | Princeton Echo7


UBER CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 vehicles on the road, lest it scare the horses. Scare stories about Uber are already prevalent in the media — dangerous drivers, bad insurance, crazy fares — the 21st century equivalent of scaring the horses. But even with all the bad press, Uber is incredibly popular and continues to grow. Even those who are not happy with how Uber operates like the concept. “The Uber app is really good. But I resent them calling themselves the ‘sharing economy,’” Crumiller said. Beyond the problems with their treatment of local laws, a significant problem with the sharing economy is that it is a bit of a misnomer. “Sharing” sounds like we are all helping each other out, but the main thing that gets shared with these jobs, critics say, is risk. For example, it is entirely up to drivers, homeowners, or any other type of micro-entrepreneurs to make the money, while the parent company sits back and creams their profit off the top. There are no guarantees that work will be there to be done, no one to limit competition. The jobs come with no stability, and often require a lot of work of workers to build a portfolio and market themselves. The main bonus for individuals participating in this new economy is flexibility. Krueger’s Uber study cites the ability to smooth out income fluctuations as a reason people signed up for Uber, and flexibility is something that has been sorely missing from the U.S. job market. “The labor force participation rate of women peaked in the U.S. around 2000, in part because the workplace does not offer enough flexibility.” says Krueger. “I hope that in the future employers provide workers more flexibility to take care of their children and aging parents.”

A DRIVERLESS FUTURE One thing is for sure, Uber has the ability to dramatically change the shape of how cars and transport are used, not only in large cities, but out here in the suburbs and small towns such as Princeton. In Princeton, most people need a car. Buses run infrequently and in few places, and as we have seen, cabs are expensive. Households normally need at least one car to get around, and larger families may have two, three or four cars so everyone can get to work, school, practice, and shops. But ride-sharing could make travelling around suburban areas far more efficient. For families that run more than one car, in particular, the extra car or cars spend most of their time obsolete (this is also an issue with taxis in the area – they have significant ‘dead time’ where they are just waiting around). Choosing to use an inexpensive car-

8Princeton Echo | March 2015

sharing service such as Uber could be far more economical than paying for a car, and the requisite insurance, to sit on the driveway. Soon though, even the driver may be obsolete. Uber is already starting to look into driverless technology, following Google down the road of cars that can get from A to B without any human input. Uber drivers may replace taxi drivers, but they in turn may be replaced by lasers, GPS and machine learning algorithms. In fact, the urban landscape of an area such as Princeton may look dramatically different come 2030, as might the economy. A driverless Uber of 15 years hence may be all you need to take you to work — as long as a robot hasn’t replaced you at your job. Think: a car turns up outside your home when you request it, and take you wherever you need to go, dropping you off and picking up the next passenger, the whole ballet choreographed by algorithms that assure maximum efficiency – no ‘dead time’, no sullen drivers, no missed pick-ups. Even if that is not the exact right picture of the future, we can be sure that the future holds great uncertainty in terms of innovation. The dawn of the Internet, viewed from the future, looks now like the end of a dark age. Most of us probably don’t even remember the people we were before we had smartphones. Will we look back on each new technology and service that we came to adopt, and wonder why we ever resisted them? And will we feel, on the inevitable day down the road when Uber is made obsolete by a company with an even grander vision, that Uber should be protected from the encroachment of new competition, because by then it or something like it will be what we have come to know? The apps that change our lives these days don’t just bring us free videos and cheap tunes. They make our lives easier and more efficient. There are concerns, of course. We have yet to see what the true impact of the sharing economy will be. Could it mean the end of regular employment for all? Everyone fighting for scraps as rich corporations count their skim? Uber and the other services will surely need to be calibrated to provide the fairest opportunities for businesses and for consumers. They are flawed each in their own ways, just as the Internet was, just as early model smartphones were. But there’s little debate that the question we’re asking when it comes to each new life changer is when, not if, these new features will be absorbed into the zeitgeist. Which is why towns like Princeton, Hoboken, Austin and San Francisco are, more often than not, looking for ways to work with, and not against, the apps of the future.

WHO USES UBER?

vs After establishing itself in North Jersey locales December 2013, the app friendly car-service network Uber has become widely applauded by many Princetonians who prefer it to taxi companies for its efficiency, cost effectiveness and ease of use. Princeton University freshman Prem Nair, first acquainted with Uber in his hometown of Cupertino, began to use the service in Princeton as transport to airports and off-campus interviews. “I really like that Uber can get you where you are fast,” Nair said. “The service routes the nearest available car to your location, you know exactly where the car is and about how long it will take to get to you, and I don’t have to deal with cash or tips. I don’t have to know the phone number of a taxi company that operates in the area or anything.” For Nair, credibility of Uber is also critical. As a repeat user, Nair finds the service’s driver background checks and consistency as a single brand to be more trustworthy than taxi companies. “With Uber, I have the driver’s name, star rating and license plate,” Nair said. “They definitely have to care more about their service as you have the potential to be a repeat customer wherever you are. Ubers are proof that taxis are an industry ripe for change, and creative destruction is bound to happen if you want society to move forward.” Local employee at Carter and Cavero in Palmer Square, Chris Walton, after downloading the app, took his first free ride in a Tesla, categorized as a black car. Uber has five different services: uberX, known as the low cost Uber, uberTaxi, uberBlack, uberSUV and uberLux, the most expensive service. “You can choose how big car is and what you want to spend,” Walton said. “It customizes how you get around. It was very clean and easy to use.”

Able to choose cars in the area, the service can send a driver within minutes of selecting the car from any phone. Walton’s experience with the speed of Uber and the friendliness of his Uber driver makes him a repeat customer. “It was such a pleasant ride,” Walton said. “The guy was there really fast, and he was showing me all the features of the car because I’m interested. It felt trustworthy and like I was safer in it. It was just a really nice ride back.” Uber drivers are finding the service beneficial as well. Local Princeton Uber driver Jonathan Zissman spent five years driving a taxi both in Phoenix and with a local Princeton company before he chose to apply to Uber. After a two month background check and car inspection, Zissman began driving in late October. Zissman likes the opportunity to meet new people as a driver. He also carries courtesy items like gum, lint rollers and water in his car for customers. “I like to carry that stuff around with me because it makes a potential for using Uber higher, so the better chance I have for earning a reasonable living,” Zissman said. “That’s just sort of my mentality, being proactively thinking about what would be better for a passenger.” Uber also allows drivers to use their own car and set their own hours, and it was this increased freedom as a driver that prompted Zissman to work for Uber. “I can get up in the morning, brush my teeth and start driving,” Zissman said. “More and more people are finding out about it. I don’t see that the business is going to do anything but expand, so I should always be able to do fairly well, and it gives me a level of flexibility so I can work around my life, which to me is an advantage. I have a feeling Uber is going to keep going.” –Rebeccah Barger


Experience Trenton Country Club Amenities Include: GOLF

• Classic parkland course featuring fast greens, challenging tee shots and bunkering. Driving range, putting green and separate short game area. • Programs for the entire family: Men’s and Ladies’ leagues and Tournaments for the competitive and casual player.

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SPORTS AMENITIES

• Volleyball, platform tennis

FITNESS CENTER

Waiving the initiation fee until April 2015 No cart fees for 2015 for members coming over from other clubs

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PHS grad dons many hats in making her first feature film

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Cece King on the set of “The Broken Ones.” She is the writer, producer and star of the indie movie.

By ScoTT MorgAn How many people reading this have ever come up with an idea for a movie while they were in the Philippines? No? OK, how about this one: How many of you have ever let a real film crew from Los Angeles use your living room as a set in a movie that someone came up with while in the Philippines? You’d have to be Cece King to be the former and a member of Marti Moseley’s family to be the latter. And if you’re none of these individuals, sit back, because it’s a good story how all this came about. Let’s start in Florida, where King, 27, born and raised in Princeton, went to college at Lynn University in Boca Raton to study communications. As many a college kid finds, King’s original plans to find something in the communications field led her elsewhere. In her case, Italy, where she went at 20 to study things like set design — a field close to that of her “such a rock star” mother, Judy, who owns Judy King Interiors at 44 Spring Street. King is also the daughter of Andrew King, a bond trader who died in the 9/11 attacks in New York. Over a summer break from her Italian studies, King read a book — “Twilight: Director’s Notebook” by the film’s production designer, Catherine Hardwicke, that compelled King to move to Los Angeles and enter the world of cinema. She went to film school there and started acting in 2013 (and has had some solidly regular work since she began). One of her roles came in a film called “Treasure Hunters,” which was the movie that took King to the South Pacific. She’d been inspired by a spate of

the quadruple-threat women — writer, producer, director, actor — who are redefining the indie film world. King had been shooting for a month in the Philippines and then removed herself to an island, where a scene on a train between two characters popped into her head. And by “popped,” it was more like a champagne cork because what followed that pop was 60 pages of draft one of a feature film script called “The Broken Ones.” By the time the shooting script was ready, King was back in Los Angeles and she knew two things: She was making this movie and she was going to shoot a lot of it in Princeton. This, by the way, is a mighty ambitious idea for a small-budget indie production. And no, King won’t reveal the budget, just that it’s “in the low-to-moderate end of the indie scale.” That means less than $2 million, and King said she and her coproducers “took a tactical approach” to finding investors to finance the film. King wanted Princeton because it fits her visual style. Princeton’s architecture, its look and feel, its general vibe all found their way into the story of two “pretty broken” young people who meet and help each other overcome overwhelming personal fears. Making this film was never in doubt. “I never thought in my mind that this isn’t going to happen,” King said. “It wasn’t a matter of if.” One thing to keep in mind is that “The Broken Ones” is King’s way of creating a solid role for herself to play. Roles in films overall can be tough to get, and often, young women at the beginning of their careers in the industry are cast in roles involving short shorts and tiny tops.


Cece King with Constance Shulman, who appears in King’s indie film “The Broken Ones.” Shulman has appeared in a number of movies and television shows, including “Orange is the New Black.”

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Better roles exist, they’re just tough to find. “There’s lots of good material out there, but as an actor, it’s hard to get in on good material,” she said. So she wrote some of her own. Not all of “The Broken Ones” was shot in Princeton. Some was shot in New York, and much of it is still being worked on, and shot, in L.A., until shooting wraps up in, probably, April. “I wanted to shoot all over New Jersey,” King said. “But there’s just so much in L.A. Basically, everybody’s here (in L.A.).” The “everybody” King refers to is a rather impressive collection of actors and crew. The cast includes Margaret Colin, who has performed in large productions like “Independence Day” and “Blue Bloods;” James Russo, probably most notable of late as the slave runner left to a suddenly freed group of slaves at the beginning of “Django Unchained;” and Constance Shulman, whose resume includes “Orange Is the New Black.” These are people who have worked with some of the top directors and cinematographers around, but care about good storytelling so much that they want to help on films like King’s that have something to say, she said. King largely credits New York-based casting director Adrienne Stern, who pulled together an enviable talent pool, as she has for other indie flicks like “The Believer” and “Boy Wonder.” The crew also includes first-time director Elyse Niblett and cinematographer John Hudak Jr., who has cut his teeth on dozens of short films and the camera crews of several features. What was shot in Princeton was partially made possible by Marti Moseley, an agent at Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Real Estate on Nassau Street. Moseley, “a longtime family friend” of the Kings, said she wanted to help Cece make her film and offered a couple properties as sets. One was an unoccupied house on Cleveland Lane, which was one of Moseley’s listings. “The homeowners were incredibly gracious and

accommodating,” she said. Another was Moseley’s own living room in her Princeton home. “It was unusual,” she laughs. “They were in my home over the course of three days. I was very impressed with all that was involved — the number of people, the amount of equipment. This was the real deal.” The crew, Moseley said, made only small adjustments in the house, and put everything back in the proper place. But no one in her family made a cameo. Moseley allowed the cast and crew to shoot for free because “it was a wonderful opportunity for me to feel like I could help her,” she said. The crew also shot at the Peacock Inn on Bayard Lane and on the grounds of Educational Testing Service just outside Princeton. To say that King is grateful for the help she’s been getting in making her first screenplay into an actual movie is an understatement for the ages. Any talk of shooting quickly steers around to how blessed she feels to have so many people at so many levels doing so much to make “The Broken Ones” as good as it can be. King expects the film to be ready for release in 2016, and plans to enter it into as many festivals (yes, Sundance included) as possible. As for what making the film has taught her, well … for one thing, it’s taught her to enjoy wearing so many hats. She’s the writer, star, and producer of “The Broken Ones,” and the producer hat, she said, is a new one. Shooting has also taught her that you can’t always get what you want, but you can get damn close if you work for it. Filmmaking is a lot of compromise and sacrifice, but the end goal, if worked on hard, is worth it. “All you can do as a filmmaker is tell the best story you can,” King said. “It’s about putting yourself out there, about trying to celebrate story. It’s much bigger than you as a writer.”

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March 2015 | Princeton Echo11


Arts & Entertainment Using only a viola and loop pedal, Meyer creates layers of sound By Bill Sanservino

bsanservino@mercerspace.com

Armed with only her instrument and a loop machine — an electronic device mostly used by guitar players, accomplished violist Jessica Meyer turns her live performances into a one-woman stringed orchestra. Meyer will be the featured speaker and performer at the Princeton Public Library on March 4 as she talks about how people can tap into their own inner creativity. The talk, which starts at 7 p.m. in the Community Room, is part of the Princeton Symphony Orchestra Soundtracks series and is co-sponsored by the library. The Soundtracks Series explores music and related topics, including background on the music that the PSO performs, concert themes, and what happens behind the scenes at Princeton’s only professional orchestra, the PSO. Meyer’s presentation is a prelude to the March 15 PSO Classical Concert Series, “Soulful Reflections,” which will feature cellist Zuill Bailey performing Schumann’s Cello Concerto in A Minor and Massenet’s “Meditation” from Thais. The concert is at Richardson Auditorium. As part of her talk, Meyer will tell the story of her journey from performer to rediscovering a talent for composing that she had in her youth. “I wrote a lot as a child and I spent hours at the piano just improvising and making stuff up as a way to process my emotional life, especially as a teenager,” Meyer said. “Then I stopped for 20 years, but there was a very clear moment after becoming a parent, after having my son, when I needed a way to emotionally process what I was experiencing.” Meyer purchased a small piano for her apartment and did some work with a singer-songwriter for a while. “But it wasn’t until I found the loop machine that I really seriously got back into composition,” she said. By using an effects pedal by Boss called a Loop Station, Meyer samples segments of her music as she plays, and then uses the machine to play them back in a continuous loop. The pedal allows her to layer the looping segments on top of each other as she performs, blending them to create a onewoman orchestra. Meyer used the method on her debut album, “Sounds of Being,” which was released in November, and will demonstrate the technique during a 45-minute live performance of music from her CD as part of the library event. In addition to her solo performances, Meyer is the co-founder of the awardwinning and critically acclaimed contemporary music collective counter) induction. She has also appeared with other new music ensembles in New York City, such

Violist Jessica Meyer performs with her loop pedal and speaks at the Princeton Public Librar y on March 4. The event is a prelude to a March 15 Princeton Symphony Orchestra event, “Soulful Reflections,” at Richardson Auditorium. as Ear Heart Music, the American Modern Ensemble, the Either/Or Ensemble, and the Argento Chamber Ensemble, as well as ensembles such as the East Coast Chamber Orchestra (ECCO), and Classical Jam. Last year, her projects on baroque viola included collaborations with the Gotham Chamber Opera at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and with the Paul Taylor Dance Company. In October, she returned to the Met for the debut of her new ensemble, “The Pipeline Collective,” where fellow soloists performed music they com-

12Princeton Echo | March 2015

posed themselves. As the owner of “Chops Beyond the Practice Room,” Meyer coaches and conducts workshops that help musicians improve networking, communication and entrepreneurial skills to help them advocate for their own careers. Her workshops have been featured at The Juilliard School, the Curtis Institute of Music, for the TAs of the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Manhattan School of Music, the Longy School of Music, New York University, and the Chamber Music America Conference. Meyer said that a major inspiration for

her work is Reggie Watts, a comedian and musician whose improvised musical sets are created using only his voice, a keyboard and a loop machine. She first saw Watts perform at a club in Brooklyn, where she had gone to see her friend work as a DJ. “I didn’t know who Reggie Watts was, and he got up there (on stage) with a loop machine, and it was just him standing there turning some knobs and pressing some buttons, basically pulling off the most virtuosic vocal melodies I’ve ever seen,” Meyer said. “He was beatboxing and singing and building up all of these textures and layers and rhythms and just killing it. I remember thinking, ‘I want to do that’.” The experience made her think about approaching the viola a whole different way. “I spent many years exploring lots of different colors on my instrument, but not a lot of rhythms,” she said. “Since I’m a closet percussionist, I wanted to try a drum on my instrument and maybe sing a little bit. I thought, ‘that’s my ticket, I just have to go and get one of those things’.” After telling him she wanted one, Meyer’s husband bought her a loop machine for her birthday and she began the process of experimenting with it. “That’s how I started writing again,” she said. One representation of how this all comes together is a song on her album titled “Afflicted Mantra,” where she used the Loop Station to create myriad layers and performs vocals as well. “That piece really convinced me, not only of the importance of writing as a cathartic process and as a way to distill what’s happening, but also the importance of why I need to keep doing it,” she said. “Like many musicians, I am prone to obsessive thinking,” Meyer said of the piece. “Sometimes, this can work in one’s favor — relentless fervor supplies endless energy as tasks get done and goals are achieved. By the same token, it can easily be destructive and the root cause of anyone’s pain — mentally, emotionally, and even physically. The text of this piece originated from a series of poems I wrote in 2010 during a particularly rough patch.” Meyer said that she often turns teachings from yoga to help break her obsessive-compulsive cycles, and “Afflicted Mantra” is a manifestation of many of those concepts. “What delivers momentary feelings of euphoria or even an intense sense of connectedness in one moment can turn into the very thing that repeatedly allows one to become undone,” she said. “With the loop machine, I am able to create my own harmonium, while the Baroque bow allows me to execute certain harmonics and emote the expressive effects the piece needed.”


Dawes to appear at poetry festival By Bill SAnServino

bsanservino@mercerspace.com

“I believe poetry is important. It teaches us and trains us,” said Kwame Dawes, the award-winning Ghanaianborn Jamaican poet. Dawes, who is one of 12 poets to be featured at the Lewis Center’s 2015 Princeton Poetry Festival this month, will read his works and also be part of a panel on “The Place of Poetry.” The festival, which features national and international artists, will take place March 13 and 14 in Richardson Auditorium. Dawes shared some of his thoughts on poetry in a recorded interview with Knox College posted on YouTube. “There’s a kind of muscular training of the capacity to empathize that poetry gives us,” said Dawes. “I’m unabashed about my feeling that everybody should read poetry. Everybody should attempt to write poetry, because the capacity to empathize, while it might innate, is actually a trained skill.” One way to strengthen that skill is for people to use their imaginations and try relating the lives of others to their own. “If somebody says to me, ‘I can’t imagine how you’re feeling, because I feel distant from you,’ whether it’s racially or gender-wise or geographically, my response is ‘Try’,” Dawes said. “The effort is the effort of the imagination. The effort is the effort of trying to imagine what I’m feeling. You support that effort by trying to find as much of what I have been dealing with, bringing that into the pool and then allowing what you have carried in your life to mix into that to arrive at something we call empathy.” “Look out there. Look at all of that stuff out there. Grab it,” he added. “You think that there’s nothing to write about? Look at everything that’s out there to write about and make it come alive.” Dawes is the author of 16 books of poetry and numerous books of fiction, non-fiction, criticism and drama. He is the editor of Prairie Schooner and professor of English at the University of Nebraska, and also teaches in the Pacific MFA Writing program. Dawes won an Emmy Award in 2009 for LiveHopeLove, an interactive website based on the HOPE: Living and Loving with AIDS project in Jamaica. In 2011, Dawes reported on HIV AIDS after the earthquake in Haiti and his poems, blogs, articles and documentary work were a key part of the post-earthquake Haiti reporting by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting that won the National Press Club Joan Friedenberg Award for Online Journalism. Despite his activism, Dawes said he doesn’t write his poetry with a social or political agenda in mind. “I don’t think of it in that way,” said Dawes. “I think that artwork can have that impact, but as an intention, it’s not there (for me). I do not write the poems to change anything. There’s a distinction between what I do to create in the art and what happens to the art after I’ve created it.” In fact, Dawes said there’s no way to plan the impact of his work. For example, when he writes poems about Haiti, it’s

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(609) 277-1277 Kwame Dawes is one of 12 poets to be featured at the 2015 Princeton Poetr y Festival. not with the intention of getting people to donate money. “I’m writing for the people who experience what I’m writing about. When they read the poem, I hope they will say to me, ‘That’s it. That’s what I’ve been feeling and I didn’t know how to say it’.” Organized by Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and Princeton professor Paul Muldoon, the Poetry Festival has grown since it first debuted six years ago. “The festival started off with a very strong line up — Seamus Heaney and John Ashbery in that first year — so part of the trick has been to try to maintain that standard,” said Muldoon, professor of creative writing in Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts. Muldoon is also director of the Princeton Atelier and chair of the University’s Fund for Irish Studies. As with the first three festivals, there is a strong international aspect in the selection of poets. This is by design, said the Irishborn Muldoon, to counteract a tendency toward insularity in the United States. “Princeton is truly an international venue; writers not associated with the university live in the area, and we like the idea of bringing internationally renowned writers into that mix.” Muldoon said. “We’re also committed to giving the wider community the chance to celebrate with us and our students.” International poets joining Dawes include British poet Paul Farley, Scottish poet Kathleen Jamie, Belarusian poet Valzhyna Mort, Polish poet and translator Tomasz Rózycki and Vietnamese poet Ocean Vuong. Also featured are seven poets from the United States, including Ellen Bryant Voigt, finalist for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award; Major Jackson, winner of a Whiting Writers’ Award and finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; Maureen N. McLane, winner of the National Critics Circle Award in autobiography; as well as Ada Limón, Michael Robbins and Ray Young Bear, a member of the Native American Meskwaki Nation. Tickets are $15 for each day, free for students and $25 for a two-day Festival Pass. They are available through Princeton University Ticketing at (609) 2589220, on-line, or at the Frist Campus Center Ticket Office.

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Calendar of Events Sunday March 1

sity Department of Music, Cafe Vivian, Frist Campus Center, 609-258-2800. princeton. edu/music. Free. 11 p.m.

Winter Farmers Market, Slow Food Central New Jersey, Tre Piani, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609-577-5113. www.slowfoodcentralnj.org. Locally grown cheeses, breads, baked goods, produce, jams, wine, mushrooms, and more. Live music. $2 admission. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Richardson Chamber Players, Princeton University, Richardson Auditorium, 609-2589220. puorchestra.org. “Pierrot’s Stage.” $15. 3 p.m. Family Matters, Westminster Choir College, Bristol Chapel, Princeton, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. Kenneth Ellison on clarinet, Suzanne Lehrer on piano, and Phyllis Alpert Lehrer on piano. Works by J.S. and J.C. Bach, Felix and Fanny Mendelssohn, Robert and Clara Schumann, and Lili and Nadia Boulanger. Free. 7:30 p.m.

Friday March 6

Family Furniture, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. Drama set in the early 1950s by A.R. Gurney about morals and manners. $29.50 to $31.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m. Princeton University Orchestra, Princeton University, Richardson Auditorium, 609-2589220. puorchestra.org. Respigh’s “Pines of Rome.” $15. 7:30 p.m. Folk Dance, Princeton Folk Dance, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-912-1272. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner needed. $5. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Monday March 2

Saturday March 7

Paddy Maloney and the Chieftains, McCarter Theater, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Sean Keane, fiddle, Matt Molloy, flute, and Kevin Conneff, bodhran drum. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday March 3

The City Lost and Found Film Series, Betts Auditorium, School of Architecture, Princeton, 609-258-5662. www.artmuseum.princeton.edu. Los Sures and Living Los Sures are screened. 6 p.m. Keith Franklin Jazz Quartet, Witherspoon Grill, 57 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-9246011. 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. International Folk Dance, Princeton Folk Dance, Kristina Johnson Pop-Up Studio, Princeton Shopping Center, 609-921-9340. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Ethnic dances of many countries using original music. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner needed. $5. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Princeton Sound Kitchen, Princeton University Department of Music, Taplin Auditorium, 609-258-2800. princeton.edu/music. Video works and multi-channel audio works by Princeton composers. Free. 8 p.m.

Wednesday March 4

Cornerstone Community Kitchen, Princeton United Methodist Church, Nassau at Vandeventer Street, Princeton, 609-9242613. www.princetonumc.org. Hot meals

Paddy Maloney and the Chieftains are at McCarter Theatre on March 2. served, prepared by TASK. Free. 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. National Theater Event, Garden Theater, Nassau Street, Princeton. thegardentheatre. com. Screening of “Of Mice and Men,” the Broadway revival starring James Franco and Chris O’Dowd. $18. 7:30 p.m.

Thursday March 5

Grade School Visiting Morning, Waldorf School, 1062 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, 609-466-1970. www.princetonwaldorf.org. 8:30 a.m. Tribute to Women Annual Awards Dinner, YWCA Princeton, Hyatt Regency, Carnegie Center, West Windsor, 609-497-2100. www.ywcaprinceton.org. Annual celebration for honorees who have made significant contributions in their professional fields and the community. Honorees include Nyaradzayi Gumbonzvanda, World

YWCA; Karen Andrade Mims, UIH Family Partners; Maria Evans, Arts Council of Princeton; Patricia Fernandez-Kelly, Princeton University; Robin Fogel, Robin Fogel & Associates; Mary Sue Henifin, Buchanan, Ingersoll & Rooney; Susan Hoskins, Princeton Senior Resource Center; Jayne O’Connor, Capital Health; and Elyse Pivnick, Isles. $165. 5:15 p.m. to 9 p.m. Meeting and Program, Garden State African Violet Club, Robbinsville Library, 42 Robbinsville-Allentown Road, Robbinsville, 609-2597095. www.princetonol.com/groups/gsavc. Free. E-mail gsavcmail@gmail.com for information. 7 p.m. Argentine Tango, Viva Tango, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-948-4448. vivatango.org. No partner necessary. $15. 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. University Sonny Rollins Ensemble and University Free to Be Ensemble, Princeton Univer-

Early Child Open House and Sample Class, Waldorf School, 1062 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, 609-466-1970. www.princetonwaldorf. org. Ages 2-5 with caregiver. 9 a.m. Ronald E. Hatcher Science on Saturday Lecture Series, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Forrestal Campus, Route 1 North, Plainsboro, 609-243-2121. www.pppl.gov. “Once Upon a Time in Kamchatka: The Extraordinary Search for Natural Quasicrystals” presented by Paul Steinhardt, director of Princeton Center for Theoretical Science. The program is aimed at a high school level on a wide variety of science topics. For students, parents, teachers, and community members. Photo ID required. Free. 9:30 a.m. Getting to Know Your Digital SLR Camera, Princeton Photo Workshop, Princeton Theological Seminary, 20 Library Place, Princeton, 609-921-3519. www.princetondigitalphotoworkshop.com. Basic photography techniques for ages 12 to 17. Presented by Frank Veronsky. Register. $59. 10 a.m. to noon. Less is More: Painting with a Limited Color Palette, Grounds For Sculpture, 126 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www. groundsforsculpture.org. Demonstration, personal instruction, group critique and outdoor painting exercises. Materials list provided upon registration; participants will need to bring their own. Instructor: Joe Gy-

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cheese, beef, eggs, pickles, honey, baked goods, candles, and more. 11 a.m. Baskerville: a Sherlock holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. 7:30 p.m. Argentine Tango, Viva Tango, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-948-4448. vivatango.org. No partner necessary. $15. 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.

Friday March 13

Voices Chorale features Irish Harp and Song with the Jameson Sisters at Nassau Presbyterian Church on March 14. urcsak. $180 members; $195 non-members. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Family events, Garden Theater, Nassau Street, Princeton. thegardentheatre.com. Screening of “The Lorax.” $4. 10:30 a.m. Workshop, astrological Society of Princeton, 173 South Harrison Street, Princeton, 609-924-4311. www.aspnj.org. “Follow the Ruler” presented by Janet Booth. Register. $60. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Meeting, Bhakti Vedanta Institute, 20 Nassau Street, Princeton, 732-604-4135. bviscs.org. Discussion, meditation, and Indian vegetarian luncheon. Register by E-mail to princeton@bviscs.org. 2 p.m. Family Furniture, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. Drama set in the early 1950s by A.R. Gurney about morals and manners. $29.50 to $31.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m. Latin Dance, central Jersey dance Society, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. Lesson followed by open dancing. No partner needed. $15. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Princeton university orchestra, Princeton university, Richardson Auditorium, 609-2589220. puorchestra.org. Respighi’s “Pines of Rome.” $15. 7:30 p.m.

Sunday March 8

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Family Furniture, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. Drama set in the early 1950s by A.R. Gur-

SaTurday March 14

ronald e. hatcher Science on Saturday Lecture Series, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Forrestal Campus, Route 1 North, Plainsboro, 609-243-2121. www.pppl.gov. “Scientific Opportunities and Challenges in the Upgraded National Spherical Torus Experiments” presented by Jonathan Menard, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The program is aimed at a high school level on a wide variety of science topics. Free. 9:30 a.m. Graffiti Art Class, hive 307, 40 Muirhead Avenue, Trenton. www.jerseygraf.com/graffiti/ vicious-styles-art-class-2015. This session covers history, styles and traditions. Classes are held every Saturday to March 28. $180 for three sessions. $70 for one session. $20 each class. Register. 10 a.m. Winter Farmers Market, Slow Food central new Jersey, D&R Greenway, Princeton, 609577-5113. www.slowfoodcentralnj.org. Locally grown cheeses, breads, baked goods, produce, jams, wine, mushrooms, and more. Wineries and live music. $3 admission. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

See CALENDAR, Page 16

ney about morals and manners. $29.50 to $31.50 includes dessert. 1:30 p.m. Breath of Paris, Westminster choir college, Bristol Chapel, Princeton, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. Elem Eley, baritone and J.J. Penna on piano. Works by Boyle, Faure, Milhaud, Poulenc, and Debussy. Free. 7:30 p.m.

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TueSday March 10

Baskerville: a Sherlock holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Through March 29. 7:30 p.m. International Folk Dance, Princeton Folk dance, Kristina Johnson Pop-Up Studio, Princeton Shopping Center, 609-921-9340. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Ethnic dances of many countries using original music. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner needed. $5. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

WedneSday March 11

Baskerville: a Sherlock holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. 7:30 p.m. Jazz Vespers, Princeton university chapel, Princeton campus, 609-258-3654. www. princeton.edu. A service of poetry, music, and meditation featuring members of the Chapel Choir and Jazz Vespers Ensemble. Free. 8 p.m.

ThurSday March 12

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CALENDAR continued from Page 15 Less is More: Painting with a Limited Color Palette, Grounds For Sculpture, 126 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www. groundsforsculpture.org. Demonstration, personal instruction, group critique and outdoor painting exercises. Materials list provided upon registration; participants will need to bring their own. Instructor: Joe Gyurcsak. $180 members; $195 non-members. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Meeting, Bhakti Vedanta Institute, 20 Nassau Street, Princeton, 732-604-4135. bviscs.org. Discussion, meditation, and Indian vegetarian luncheon. Register by E-mail to princeton@bviscs.org. 2 p.m. Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. Family Furniture, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. Drama set in the early 1950s by A.R. Gurney about morals and manners. $29.50 to $31.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m. Ballroom Blitz, Central Jersey Dance Society, Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 50 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, 609-945-1883.

www.centraljerseydance.org. Lesson followed by open dancing. No partner needed. $12. E-mail ballroom@centraljerseydance. org for information. 7 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Chita Rivera, McCarter Theater, 91 University Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Singer, dancer, and Tony award winner. 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Actors’ NET, 635 North Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville, PA, 215295-3694. www.actorsnetbucks.org. $20. 8 p.m. Concert, Princeton Pro Musica, University Chapel, Princeton University, 609-683-5122. www.princetonpromusica.org. “A Festival of Choirs” for three choirs and orchestra includes works by Tavener, Byrd, Tallis, and Wadsworth. $25 to $60. 8 p.m.

Sunday March 15

Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. 2 p.m. Sunday Matinee Series, Grounds For Sculpture, 126 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, 609-5860616. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Visual Acoustics: The Modernism of Julius Shulman. Post-Discussion with James Leynse, Architectural/Corporate Photographer, James

Lensye Photographer. 3 p.m. Hiromi, McCarter Theater, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Solo piano. 3 p.m. Classical Series: Soulful Reflections, Princeton Symphony Orchestra, Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University, 609-497-0020. www.princetonsymphony.org. Works by Currier, Schumann, Sibelius, and Massenet. Zuill Baley, cello. Rossen Milanov conducts. Pre-concert lecture at 3 p.m. 4 p.m.

Monday March 16

Princeton Chamber, Woodrow Wilson School, 609-924-1776. www.princetonchamber.org. Albert Einstein Memorial Lecture, with Nobel Prize winner Adam G. Riess. Free to attend. 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Tuesday March 17

St. Patrick’s Day Party, Alchemist & Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609924-5555. www.theaandb.com. Irish music, Guinness, Irish fare, and the annual Longbeard contest winner is revealed. Noon. Keith Franklin Jazz Quartet, Witherspoon Grill, 57 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-9246011. 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. International Folk Dance, Princeton Folk Dance, Kristina Johnson Pop-Up Studio, Princeton Shopping Center, 609-9219340. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Ethnic dances of many countries using original music. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner needed. $5. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

Thursday March 19

Westminster Conservatory at Nassau, Westminster Choir College, Niles Chapel, Nassau Presbyterian Church, Princeton, 609-9212663. www.rider.edu. Hyun Soo Lim and Dezheng Ping on violin. Free. 12:15 p.m. Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. 7:30 p.m. Argentine Tango, Viva Tango, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-948-4448. vivatango.org. No partner necessary. $15. 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.

Friday March 20

Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. 8 p.m. Folk Dance, Princeton Folk Dance, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-912-1272. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner needed. $5. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Mary Gauthier, Princeton Folk Music Society, Christ Congregation Church, 50 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-799-0944. www.princetonfolk.org. $20. 8:15 p.m.

Saturday March 21

Graffiti Art Class, Hive 307, 40 Muirhead Ave-

Soprano Robin Leigh Massie, above, Amy Zorn, contralto, and Thomas Faracco, tenor, perform at Westminster Choir College’s Bristol Chapel on March 29. nue, Trenton. www.jerseygraf.com/graffiti/ vicious-styles-art-class-2015. This session covers history, styles and traditions. Classes are held every Saturday to March 28. $180 for three sessions. $70 for one session. $20 each class. Register. 10 a.m. Meet the Music, Princeton University Concerts, Richardson Auditorium, 609-2582800. princetonuniversityconcerts.org. “Inspector Pulse Pops a String.” For children 6 to 12 and their families. 1 p.m. Meeting, Bhakti Vedanta Institute, 20 Nassau Street, Princeton, 732-604-4135. bviscs.org. Discussion, meditation, and Indian vegetarian luncheon. Register by E-mail to princeton@bviscs.org. 2 p.m. Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. California Mix, Central Jersey Dance Society, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. Lessons followed by social dance. No partner needed. Refreshments. $12. 6:30 p.m.

Sunday March 22

Westminster Conservatory Showcase, Westminster Conservatory, Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University, 609-258-9220. www.rider.edu/arts. The program features ensembles from the Westminster Conservatory of Music including the Westminster Community Orchestra, Westminster Conservatory Children’s Choir, and the Trenton Children’s Choir. $15. 3 p.m.

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TueSday March 24

International Folk Dance, Princeton Folk dance, Kristina Johnson Pop-Up Studio, Princeton Shopping Center, 609-921-9340. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Ethnic dances of many countries using original music. $5. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

WedneSday March 25

rat’s restaurant presents Gastro Pub & Belgium Beer dinner, Grounds For Sculpture, 126 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Featuring the artisanal beers of Belgium and gastro pub food. $85 plus tax and gratuity. For information and reservations call (609) 5847800. 6:30 p.m.

ThurSday March 26

Argentine Tango, Viva Tango, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-948-4448. vivatango.org. No partner necessary. $15. 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Lisa Batiashvili, Violin and Paul Lewis, Piano, Princeton university concerts, Richardson Auditorium, 609-258-2800. princetonuniversityconcerts.org. Program of works by Schubert, Bach, and Beethoven. 8 p.m.

Friday March 27

Folk dance, Princeton Folk dance, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-912-1272. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner needed. $5. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Spring concert, Westminster choir college, Bristol Chapel, Princeton, 609-921-2663. www. rider.edu. Westminster Schola Cantorum, conducted by James Jordan. $20. 8 p.m.

SaTurday March 28

Meeting, Bhakti Vedanta Institute, 20 Nassau Street, Princeton, 732-604-4135. bviscs.org. Discussion, meditation, and Indian vegetarian luncheon. Register by E-mail to prince-

ton@bviscs.org. 2 p.m. Latin Sensation, central Jersey dance Society, Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 40 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. Lessons followed by social dance. No partner needed. Refreshments. $12. 6:30 p.m.

Sunday March 29

richardson chamber Players, Princeton university concerts, Richardson Auditorium, 609-258-2800. princetonuniversityconcerts. org. “Pierrot’s Stage,” mixed chamber works by Schoenberg and Biber. 3 p.m. robin Leigh Massie and Friends, Westminster choir college, Bristol Chapel, Princeton, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. Robin Leigh Massie, soprano, Amy Zorn, contralto, and Thomas Faracco, tenor. Stephen Yarbrough’s song cycle Julian’s Showings and other works. Free. 3 p.m. Princeton cares, Princeton university Players, Frist Film and Performance Theatre, 609258-3000. www.princeton.edu/pup. 8 p.m.

Monday March 30

art exhibit, Princeton day School, The Great Road, Princeton, 609-924-6700. www.pds. org. “In Search of (Im)Possibilities” by Matthew Cordell. On view to April 23. 5 p.m.

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Keith Franklin Jazz Quartet, Witherspoon Grill, 57 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-9246011. 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. The Peking acrobats, Mccarter Theater, 91 University Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Gymnasts, cylclists, jugglers, acrobats, and tumblers. 7:30 p.m. International Folk Dance, Princeton Folk dance, Kristina Johnson Pop-Up Studio, Princeton Shopping Center, 609-921-9340. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Ethnic dances of many countries using original music. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner needed. $5. 7:30 p.m.

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March 2015 | Princeton Echo17


From the Princeton Merchants Association

Put your best beard forward By Arthur Kukoda St. Patrick’s Day at the Alchemist & Barrister is where the wearin’ o’ the green meets the wearin’ o’ the Longbeard. This year marks the 35th anniversary of A&B’s Longbeard Contest, where Princeton-area fellows sport their best face moss for fun and to help raise money for a great local cause. This year is our first animal charity. Funds raised from the 2015 Longbeard Contest will benefit SAVE Animal Rescue (www.save-animal.org), which is hoping to complete a new shelter for homeless pets in Montgomery Township. The site was chosen as a nod to one of our employees, who recently rescued a pet from an abusive trainer. The Longbeard Contest runs from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Alchemist & Barrister on Witherspoon Street, when a local barber will cut beard hairs from entrants to see how they measure up. And if you think you have the stuff to grow a beard but not an epic beard, no worries. You can come in first in one of the other categories we make up as we go — shortest beard, ugliest beard, whitest beard, handsomest beard, most creative beard … we’ll find something for you. This year, some 18 fellows signed up, paying their $25 entry fees for the bragging rights to Princeton’s most righteous facial hair, and a plaque to make sure everyone knows he has it. All entry fees go straight to the charity of choice. Other prizes than bragging rights come through the generosity of our great business community. After all, the Longbeard Contest isn’t just an A&B thing, it’s a community event supported by lots of local businesses that donate prizes — good prizes, too, we’ve given away bikes, TVs, MP3 players — and gift certificates. Everyone does something to pitch in, to help keep the contest fun, and to make sure a great time happens for a great cause. The contest started back in 1980 as a nod to Leon Uris’ novel, Trinity, in which the hero escapes a Northern Ireland prison by growing a great beard and walking right out the front door, under the guards’ noses. That’s a great enough story for us to celebrate anyway, but the Alchemist & Barrister formally got whiskers growing when then-owner Tom Schmierer challenged this brother, Jake, to a beard-off. The public liked the idea so much that area fellows joined in, all in the spirit of raising funds for a local charity and putting a positive spin on St. Paddy’s Day. Thirty-five years later, here we are, still growing out our whiskers for charity and fun. Beard-growing season for this year’s contestants kicked off between Feb. 1 and 5, when entrants came in baby-faced, signed up, and then set out for six weeks of growing. By the way, there’s no need to be

18Princeton Echo | March 2015

Irish to enter. Our contestants come from all walks of life. We get Princeton University grad students, 20-somethings, 30-somethings, seniors, married guys, single guys, Irish guys and Irishfor-a-Day guys. We’ve even had a couple Princeton mayors enter the contest over the years — Marvin Reed came pretty close not long ago. And Howard Levy, the basketball coach at Princeton University almost won himself some bragging rights a few years back as well. And yes, I always enter the contest myself, though I never win. I’ve come close a few times, but I still don’t get the bragging rights. Though I do keep the beard until the beginning of the next contest the following year. One thing — you can only win three times. After that, we retire you with a nice plaque in the hall, because, well, we like new faces in the contest, and what fun would it be if one beard always won? So why still do we do this after all these years? Because it’s so much fun and because it brings so much of the community together. As a business owner, you have to be civic-minded. There’s no way around it. The great thing is, none of us in the Princeton Merchants Association have to force it. Bringing the community together and giving back to it just come naturally to us. The Longbeard Contest is our personal favorite way of giving back, here at the A&B. And over the years we’ve raised many thousands of dollars for so many worthy organizations. Typically, we raise anywhere from $3,000 to $10,000 per contest, depending on the organization. We’ve raised money for HiTOPS youth health center, Princeton Nursery School, the William E. Baker Trust, which helps raise awareness of spinal cord injuries, and our most successful campaign so far, the Wounded Warrior Project. The contest is free to watch, but there’s a $2 cover because we have a band, Langaroo, who play the great old Irish ballads and standards. If you can’t grow a beard — or if you’ve grown a few so well that we’ve retired you — come out and watch and have a great St. Paddy’s Day for a great local cause. Arthur Kukoda is a co-owner of Alchemist and Barrister and a member of the Princeton Merchants Association. The Hometown Princeton column is provided monthly by the PMA. On the web: princetonmerchants.org


March 2015 | Princeton Echo19


FOOD AND DRINK

PHOTO BY SUZETTE J. LUCAS

' T I S

T H E

by pat tanner Rarely has a restaurant debuted in the Princeton area that has been so swiftly and thoroughly embraced by the dining-out public as has Seasons 52, which opened in MarketFair in late 2014. In no time flat, snagging a Friday or Saturday dinner reservation for any of its 284 seats became impossible unless you booked a week in advance or were willing to dine before 5 or after 8:45 p.m. (Reservations for Valentine’s weekend were snatched up two weeks ahead of the holiday.) One local restaurant critic even booked a table for her family’s Thanksgiving meal. Not bad for a chain restaurant inside a mall — albeit an upscale chain restaurant inside an upscale mall. “Guests keep telling me there’s nothing like this in the area, that we are filling a niche,” says Kerry Hennessy McNulty, the restaurant’s general manager. “We resonate with the young, the old, those who like to eat well, those who demand atmosphere.” The MarketFair restaurant — in the space that had been Barnes & Noble, which relocated to the other end of the mall — is the 42nd Seasons 52 to open around the country since 2003. Its parent company is Darden, whose other brands include Olive Garden and Longhorn Steakhouse. But Seasons 52 has less in common with those and more in common with Darden’s other fine-

dining property: the Capital Grille group of steakhouses. It resembles that wellregarded brand in its clubby, gleaming, wood-toned ambiance, but instead of steaks, Seasons 52 promises a globetrotting menu that changes with the seasons and features fresh ingredients combined into well-balanced dishes that never exceed 475 calories. If this sounds like a recipe for tiny portions of bland diet food, Seasons 52’s satisfied clientele begs to differ. In fact, recipes are cannily crafted to deliver maximum satisfaction within

the size of a double shot glass and costing a mere $2.75. Winter flavors include mocha macchiato with caramel, lemon curd with blueberries, key lime pie, pecan pie, carrot cake, chocolate and peanut butter, double fudge brownie, and cannoli with raspberry sauce. Lunch has a particularly international flair — Vietnamese banh mi sandwiches, Korean lettuce wraps, black bean tacos, shrimp scampi, hummus (two kinds: minted edamame and roasted red pepper) — but also all-American favorites like burgers with housemade pickles

“Guests keep telling me there’s nothing like this in the area, that we are filling a niche.” -Kerry Hennessy McNulty, Seasons 52 general manager that limitation. Flatbreads, for example, have a crisp, cracker-like base more like lavash, the Middle Eastern bread, rather than, say, soft, caloriedense focaccia. (A typical selection of five to seven flatbreads is offered, and includes blackened steak and blue cheese, artichoke and goat cheese, and lobster and fresh mozzarella.) In keeping within the calorie limit, dessert has been finessed into “signature mini indulgences.” Guests choose from among seven varieties of parfait, each

20Princeton Echo | March 2015

and barbecued chicken salad. The dinner menu, while still eclectic, is a virtual hit parade of everyone’s favorite proteins paired with interesting sides. With an average dinner entrée price of $21.50, selections include, for example, six big, fat caramelized grilled sea scallops atop a bed of butternut squash and leek risotto with sautéed broccolini ($21.50 at lunch; $1 more at dinner) and grilled flatiron steak with “harvest” mushrooms, roasted tomato, broccolini, mashed potatoes and red wine sauce ($15.95).

Seasons 52 sports a full bar that includes signature seasonal cocktails and craft beers, as well as 52 wines by the glass (which change seasonally, like the menu), plus a list of 100 wines by the bottle. All are selected by George Miliotes, who is one of fewer than 250 souls worldwide to hold the title Master Sommelier. “I knew there was a demand for this in the area,” says McNulty, who in addition to her role as general manager is also in charge of booking the restaurant’s two private dining rooms. “There are so many corporate headquarters and pharmaceutical companies.” McNulty, 38, joined the company early in 2010. “Seasons 52 had just opened in Cherry Hill [mall], and I was hired as assistant managing partner.” (“Managing partner” is the company term for general manager, because a portion of the employee’s compensation is tied to performance.) “But then the GM left and I was promoted,” she says. McNulty was born and raised in Haddonfield. After graduating with a BA in French from Drew University in 1999, she went on to the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park, NY, where she worked front-of-the-house positions while earning her culinary degree. “I stumbled headfirst into frontof-the-house,” she says, and never looked back. From there she worked for two high-profile Philadelphia restaurateurs, Jose Garces and Stephen Starr. McNulty recently received an MBA from RutgersCamden and lives in Barrington (Camden County) with her husband Thomas and their three-year-old child. Thomas McNulty works right up the road from his wife: he is the general manager of P.F. Chang’s in West Windsor. That P.F. Chang’s also happens to be where Seasons 52’s executive chef/partner James Petersen last worked. Like McNulty, Petersen joined Seasons 52 in early 2010. He was based in the King of Prussia mall location in Pennsylvania, but was also called upon to open several other locations around the country. The chain seeks out mall locations in particular. In New Jersey, besides the Cherry Hill and Market Fair restaurants, there’s also one in Menlo Park mall and another is coming soon to Bridgewater Commons. The company is headquartered in Orlando, where it originated, and underwent what Petersen calls a “huge expansion” between 2010 and 2014, a pace that will now be slowing down. “The plan never was to be huge,” Petersen says. “Seasons 52 is still a close-knit company. For example, I have the corporate executive chef on speed dial, and he’ll call me to consult on developing new recipes.” A key component of his professional satisfaction, says this chef, is that while the chain’s core menu changes four times a year, dishes that appear in the “Chef’s Selections” column on the righthand side of the menu change weekly. “This allows us to stay current and bring in new things as they become available,” he says. Individual restaurant chefs also have latitude to offer what are normally dinner-only dishes at lunch. Recently, for example, this included an entrée of New Zealand venison chop and venison ragout with sweet potato mash and roasted peppers ($26.95). Chefs also can


Seasons 52 Executive Chef James Petersen ensures the restaurant’s menu focuses on only the freshest seasonal ingredients. (Photo by Suzette J. Lucas.)

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swap individual ingredients in and out, so instead of broccolini with the venison, as the company website lists, Petersen recently substituted asparagus. “And we source locally when we can,” he says. “There’s a whole corporate department that’s been able to source organic, freerange chickens from Pennsylvania’s Amish country for us, for example.” The 32-year-old Petersen oversees a kitchen staff of 38, all of whom have been with him since opening day (Nov. 1). “I’m proud to report that none have them have left!” he says of this rare phenomenon. As is company policy, he got to hire his own workers, and reports being shocked when he found “a line out the door” the day he arrived to begin interviewing candidates. Petersen lives in Chalfont, Pennsylvania, with his wife of two years. But he’s a local boy: he grew up and went to high school in Hillsborough, where his family still lives. He ventured out to Arizona for

college, earning a business degree from Arizona State University in 2005. During college he got on-the-job training while working at a local restaurant as manager and, eventually, sous chef. After college he stayed in Arizona, establishing a restaurant with two partners in Chandler, a suburb of Phoenix. “By then I had worked with executive chefs who had been certified by the American Culinar y Federation and I had also gained experience working front-of-house. You could say I basically got old-fashioned apprenticeship training,” he says. When the restaurant folded in 2007, Petersen returned home to central New Jersey and for the next two years managed the P.F. Chang’s on Rt. 1 in West Windsor, before joining Seasons 52. He takes pride in knowing that the single most frequent comment on Yelp! about any Seasons 52 restaurant is: “It doesn’t feel like a chain.”

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March 2015 | Princeton Echo21


Food for Thought Anderson, Beard Award nominee, looks to May Elements re-opening By Pat Tanner

ples, which will ring a bell with Agricola regulars, include Flatiron Steak with Green Garlic Gremolata, Spicy Mushroom Flatbread with Fried Egg, and Warm Granny Smith Apple Bread Pudding. The book can be preordered on Amazon, but for those who like to support local booksellers, farms, and at least one restaurant, or who might want to snag an autograph, events featuring Thomsen and Great Road Farm farmer Steve Tomlinson may be on the horizon.

dinewithpat.com

Whither the re-opening of Elements? “Late, late May” is the new target date for the debut of the relocated Elements, says Scott Anderson, executive chef and co-owner, whose Princeton restaurant has been among the highest rated in the state since it opened in 2008. In the interim, Anderson has been named a semifinalist for a 2015 James Beard Award in the category of Best Chef: MidAtlantic. Finalists will be announced on March 24, and the winner on May 4. Last June, when Anderson vacated the space on Bayard Lane/Route 206 that had housed his flagship property, he projected a January opening. Meanwhile, a brand new space is under construction on the second floor of the building at the corner of Hulfish and Witherspoon Street that houses Anderson’s second restaurant, Mistral. (The scaffolding is hard to miss.) He and partner Steve Distler own the entire two-story building. Anderson says typical construction and engineering issues have delayed progress, and is hoping that winter’s frigid temperatures won’t extend into early spring. “Once it’s warm enough to lay concrete, we could be open within five or six weeks,” he projects.

Gennaro’s Market celebrates grand opening

Scott Anderson, executive chef and co-owner of Elements, has been named a semifinalist for a 2015 James Beard Award. In the first months of Elements’ hiatus, Anderson traveled around the country doing guest-chef appearances at friends’ high-profile restaurants. These days, he and Mike Ryan, his chef and right-hand-man at Elements, are developing dishes for the opening menu. “Other than that,” Anderson admits,

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©2012 Firehouse Subs. This offer valid with coupon at participating restaurants. Prices and participation may vary, see restaurant for details. Limit one per customer, per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Exp. 3/31/15 SUB$SUBCOMBO

“we are bored out of our minds.” When asked if he is tempted to relieve the boredom by stepping into the kitchen at Mistral, which is run by chef Ben Nerenhausen, Anderson says he chooses not to interfere with a good thing. Several months ago Elements’ liquor license was transferred to Mistral, which had been BYOB, but which established a no-corkage-fee policy to accommodate patrons who still want to bring their own beer and wine. The same license will serve not only Mistral and Elements, but also an artisanal bar coming into the first level, which will be under the direction of Elements’ popular bar manager, Jamie Dodge. “It will be an extension of Mistral,” Anderson says. “People can enjoy a drink downstairs before heading up to Elements, or come straight up to the restaurant. Elements will have a full fine-wine list, our own signature cocktails, and premium liquors.” A key feature of the building’s design is an exterior elevator that will carry guests up to the new space. The dining room will sport a view of the open kitchen and only 30 seats, down from the original restaurant’s 80. Plans call for a private dining room as well.

Agricola cookbook to debut this Spring It seems fitting that a Jersey-born chef who put in serious time on the Northern California restaurant scene — ­ including at the French Laundry — then came back home to head up a farm-to-table restaurant in Princeton would produce a cookbook with stylish, hyper-seasonal recipes. The Agricola Cookbook, written by that Witherspoon Street restaurant’s executive chef Josh Thomsen, is due out in late May. It promises 100 recipes inspired by produce from the restaurant’s own Great Road Farm in Skillman, as well as by the Garden State foragers, specialty growers, and other farms that supply the restaurant. Thomsen promises recipes that are “accessible and totally appealing.” Exam-

Over the last decade, Gennaro Costabile has quietly built a large and loyal following for his eponymous Italian restaurant on Route 206, including for private parties and off-premise catering. It was the success and growth of the catering operation, he says, that motivated him to open Gennaro’s Italian Market & Catering on Main Street in Kingston. I caught up with Costabile at the grand opening on Feb. 8, where he welcomed everyone to what he terms his “little neighborhood market.” Pride of place in the 2,000-square-foot space goes to two large cases that showcase a rotating selection of gourmet sandwiches and grab-n-go prepared foods, including Gennaro’s signature eggplant rolatini and fresh mozzarella. Elsewhere are breads (some made in-house, as is the mozz); cheeses; salumi; frozen store-made pasta and ravioli; refrigerated Gennaro sauces, soups, and desserts; and shelves laden with premium Italian olive oils, dried pastas, and other pantry items. The market is situated in a space that has seen a parade of gift shops come and go over the years. Costabile says that one day almost two years ago he drove by and saw a “For Sale” sign out front. “I had a vision,” he says, “I needed a bigger kitchen and I live only two blocks away!” Fast forward 18 months, and the space he now owns has not only seen a complete renovation, but has a 900-foot expansion on the back that houses a gleaming new commercial kitchen. The kitchen will also serve as the site for Costabile’s community service project, Caring Cooks Academy, which combines corporate team-building with good works. Teams of volunteer coworkers participate in a hands-on cooking lesson that ends with the delivery of complete, catered meals to the charity of their choice. “Last year we donated 1,200 meals,” Costabile says with pride. Costabile, 54, tapped Kendall Parkbased architect Jeffrey Kusmick for the market’s design. “We liked the historical feel of the place,” Kusmick told me during the open house, “but wanted to refresh and open it up.” He did that with a soaring cathedral, plenty of pot lights, and a color scheme of terra cotta and cream. Gennaro’s Italian Market & Catering, 4587 Route 27, Kingston. (609) 683-1212, gennarositalianmarket.com


ECHO

DINING Powered by

Guide

Soup’s On! Winter may be waning but we’ll all want to warm up after a frigid February like we’ve just withstood. So we’ve put together a short list of restaurants in the Princeton area that take the time to make broths and bisques are their specialty. Bon appétit!

WHOLE EARTH CENTER

F E AT U R E D

PRINCETON SOUP & SANDWICH a a a a a 49 Reviews

F E AT U R E D

MAIN STREET a a a a a 55 Reviews

$$ • Bars, American

301 N Harrison St Princeton (609) 921-2779 mainstreetprinceton.com “Main Street is a great, no-nonsense neighborhood dining establishment. I like to think of it as Princeton’s “Cheers.” The food is reliably good and reasonably priced. It’s my “go-to.” –Eileen R., Princeton “The bar is really nice ..looks like you are at a beach !..so enjoy the outdoors. Some nice cocktails on the menu. The lamb kebab inside the pita bread was heavenly.” –Nikhil M., Plainsboro Township “Love it love I love it. Doesn’t get much better than this! Gnocchi is best in the world. Baked Alaska is creative and yum. Ravioli stupendous and love the outdoor seating. Food is A plus for years. Would love them in my home.” –B. S., Clinton See our ad on page 23

$ • Soup, Sandwiches, American

30 Palmer Sq E Princeton (609) 497-0008 princetonsoupandsandwich.com “Great soups & sandwiches with several choices always on display. They’ll let you taste anything, and for those of us who must be gluten free, they have GF baguettes, and bagels too!” –Jeff B., Princeton See our ad on page 23

BLUE POINT GRILL

a a a a a 52 Reviews

a a a a a 309 Reviews

$$ • Grocery, Health Mkts, Delis

$$$ • Seafood

360 Nassau St. Princeton (609) 924-7429

258 Nassau St Princeton (609) 921-1211

wholeearthcenter.com

bluepointgrill.com

“ I love the soups and sandwiches as well as the salads, Mac n cheese, seitan entrees and of course the famous rice nut loaf! You cannot go wrong!” –Nicole W., Neptune

PRINCETON

“Absolutely loved the fresh seafood here! The crab and chowders soup was delicious, highly recommended. It was like a Manhattan crab chowder mixed with a new England clam chowder. !” –Annie H., New York

F E AT U R E D

TRIUMPH BREWING COMPANY a a a a a 380 Reviews

$$ • Breweries

138 Nassau Street Princeton (609) 924-7855 triumphbrew.com “Triumph Brewing Company is pretty much the epicenter of Princeton. Not only because of its location, but also because of its welcoming atmosphere. As you walk down the long hallway entrance, you feel like you are diving into the depths of a secret underground city.” –Chris B., Princeton, NJ “I started coming here as a youngster around 1995, which was an 8 mile bike ride from West Windsor. Fast forward 19 years and I am still coming here. It was the best back then, and even with 200+ meals under my increasingly larger belt, it is still the best.” –Chad N., Princeton, NJ “Hoagie Haven is always my go-to when I want to indulge. Get an extra dirty Sanchez. You won’t regret it.” –Julia N., Princeton, NJ See our ad on page 23

TIGER NOODLES

THE PEASANT GRILL

AGRICOLA EATERY

a a a a a 85 Reviews

a a a a a 33 Reviews

$ • Chinese

$$ • Cafes

a a a a a 213 Reviews

260 Nassau St Princeton (609) 252-0663

21 E. Broad St. Hopewell (609) 466-7500

princetontigernoodles.com

thepeasantgrill.com

“My favorites are the Taiwanese Beef Noodle soup - I think the menu calls it Little Bit of Everything -- not a bad description, family style noodles with pork, and ma po tofu. They also do greens well in season, stuff like yu choi, dow mieu, baby bok choi!” –Julian S., Princeton

“There is no better place for a salad, a delicious cup of soup or a hearty sandwich, not to mention the mac and cheese and lasagna.” –Tara M., Skillman

$$$ • American (New) 11 Witherspoon St., Princeton (609) 921-2798 • agricolaeatery.com “Their kale salad is a must. My boyfriend who had never had kale salad before raved about it. Their vinaigrette dressing softens the tough texture of the green, which is a nice treat when consuming kale. Lovely service, atmosphere and quality food! We had the Eggs Benedict and Farm Burger for our brunch and both were excellent. Will definitely visit again in the future.” –J. Y., Santa Clarita, California

March 2015 | Princeton Echo23


AJIHEI

HOAGIE HAVEN

TORTUGA’S MEXICAN VILLAGE

a a a a a 114 Reviews

a a a a a 352 Reviews

a a a a a 162 Reviews

$$ • Japanese 11 Chambers St., Princeton (609) 252-1158

$ • Sandwiches 242 Nassau St, Princeton (609) 921-7723 • hoagiehaven.com

$$ (cash only) • Mexican 41 Leigh Ave., Princeton (609) 924-5143 • tortugasmv.com

“Sushi freshest fish in the area, the hamachi and eel especially are moist and delicious.” –David D., New York

“The Sanchez is delicious, and a heart attack waiting to happen (mozzarella sticks, French fries, and chicken cutlet all in a hoagie with ‘Sanchez sauce’). It’s so good I never order anything else.” –Ravi P., Manhattan

“Fantastic! One of my favorite Mexican places in NJ. I recommend the California Burrito. It is a BYOB place so make sure to bring something with you. The chips and salsa are great. The staff are friendly and the place is always packed!” –Meg P., Corpus Christi, Texas

MEDITERRA a a a a a 194 Reviews

$$$ • Mediterranean 29 Hulfish St., Princeton (609) 252-9680 • mediterrarestaurant.com “The setting is really nice and it has a warm and inviting interior. I was really pleased with the service as it was attentive but not overbearing or condescending. “ –Amanda G., Somerset

ALCHEMIST & BARRISTER a a a a a 163 Reviews

MAMOUN’S FALAFEL a a a a a 34 Reviews

$ • Middle Eastern 20 Witherspoon St., Princeton (609) 454-5936 • mamouns.com ‘The falafel is very good, and the lamb shawarma even better. –Davey H., Princeton

METRO NORTH a a a a a 64 Reviews

$$ • Pubs, American, Sports Bars 28 Witherspoon St., Princeton (609) 924-5555 • alchemistandbarrister.com

$$$ • American 378 Alexander Road, Princeton (609) 454-3121 • metrogrills.net/index.html

“I always go back for the cheesesteak salad. Crispy romaine topped with roasted red peppers, grilled pickled onions, provolone, sirloin, topped with a mound of potato hay all dressed in a creamy vinaigrette.” –Diane B., Jersey City

“Our meal started with fried calamari—it was fresh, crispy, hot and delicious ... for dinner I ordered the butterfish with lump crabmeat, artichokes, and sundried tomatoes. It was phenomenal.” –Katy M., Old Bridge

CONTE’S PIZZA a a a a a 131 Reviews

$$ • Pizza, Italian 339 Witherspoon St., Princeton (609) 921-8041 • contespizzaandbar.com “Recommend getting the pepperoni and garlic pie with a pitcher of Peroni.” –Vinayak B., Trenton

GENNARO’S RESTAURANT a a a a a 29 Reviews

$$ • Italian 47B State Road (Route 206), Princeton (609) 497-2774 • gennaros-princeton.com “We each enjoyed our selections: lobster ravioli, pappardelle bolognese, filetto gorgonzola and a special with escarole and artichokes. Everything was decadent.” –Shirah M., Princeton

JAMMIN’ CREPES a a a a a 34 Reviews

$ • Creperies, Farmers Market, Cafes 20 Nassau St., Princeton (609) 924-5387 • jammincrepes.com “Good selection of breakfast, lunch and dessert crepes. Perfectly prepared with good service.” –Ron M., Edison

OLIVES DELI AND BAKERY a a a a a 139 Reviews

$$ • Bakeries, Desserts 22 Witherspoon St., Princeton (609) 921-1569 • olivesprinceton.com “Excellent spot. Deli-style takeout (with a couple seats in the back) with pretty consistently good food. Great chicken salad, amazing quiche...definitely recommend. –Julia N., Princeton, NJ

24Princeton Echo | March 2015

MISTRAL a a a a a 148 Reviews

THE PEACOCK INN a a a a a 85 Reviews

$$$ • Hotels 20 Bayard Lane, Princeton (609) 924-1707 • ascendcollection.com “Highly recommend the tuna tartar and gnocchi appetizers. The toffee cake for dessert was excellent. The ambiance from the interior was simple but still elegant.” –Subiya K., Jersey City

WINBERIE’S RESTAURANT AND BAR a a a a a 163 Reviews

$$ • Pubs, American 1 Palmer Square E., Princeton (609) 921-0700 • princeton.winberies.com “First time going there and was very impressed. I had the Cajun Mac and Cheese which was excellent. My GF had the hickory burger which was as tasty and juicy as it was large. Excellent wait staff and management. The environment and ambience also added to the experience.” –Jose C., Perth Amboy

$$$ • Tapas/Small Plates 66 Witherspoon St., Princeton (609) 688-8808 • mistralprinceton.com

WITHERSPOON GRILL

“Some highlights are the roasted sunchokes, the foie gras ... pork ear and tomatillo salad, cured trout, poached fluke.” –Alex S., Chesterfield Township

$$$ • Steakhouses 57 Witherspoon St., Princeton (609) 924-6011 • witherspoongrill.com

PJ’S PANCAKE HOUSE a a a a a 225 Reviews

$$ • Diners, American, Breakfast and Brunch 154 Nassau St., Princeton (609) 924-1353 • pancakes.com “Their pancakes are amazingly fluffy, buttery, and filling. They have a variety of different types of pancakes, but my favorite would be the chocolate chip ... their hashed potatoes are also my favorite, mixed with peppers and onions.” –Cynthia T., Atlantic City

SMALL WORLD COFFEE a a a a a 230 Reviews

$ • Coffee & Tea 14 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ 08542 (609) 924-4377 • smallworldcoffee.com “Their coffee is always robust, flavorful, and tastes of higher quality than a similar blend at Starbucks.” –Jake E., Princeton, NJ

TERESA’S CAFFE a a a a a 301 Reviews

$$ • Italian, Wine Bars 29 Palmer Square E., Princeton (609) 921-1974 • terramomo.com “I’d have to say go with a pizza—they often even have an uovo pizza with an egg on top, and that’s always delicious.” –Garner S., Princeton

a a a a a 196 Reviews

“An institution for the older crowd, serves up classically decadent dishes ... lobster risotto, braised short ribs, pecan crusted salmon and seared sea scallops in a creamy bacon vinaigrette rounding out the show.” –Ali M., New York

HOPEWELL BLUE BOTTLE CAFÉ a a a a a 74 Reviews

$$$ • American, French 101 E. Broad St., Hopewell (609) 333-1710 • thebluebottlecafe.com “Its BYOB too which is rare to find for a place with this level of food. We love the blue bottle salad and get that everytime. They rotate the menu pretty frequently but last time I had an really tasty, lean venison dish for my main course. The fish is always good too. Service is also fantastic.” –Greg W., Austin, Texas

BRICK FARM MARKET a a a a a 59 Reviews

$$ • Cafés, Bakeries 65 E. Broad St., Hopewell (609) 466-6500 • brickfarmmarket.com “The juice bar is fantastic, and they even have a happy hour! The staff is friendly and the prices are reasonable. The outside patio is a great place to enjoy the weather.” –J M., Jersey City


THE BROTHERS MOON

PALACE OF ASIA

a a a a a 40 Reviews

a a a a a 131 Reviews

a a a a a 51 Reviews

$$$• Bakeries, American, Salad 7 W. Broad St., Hopewell (609) 333-1330 • brothersmoon.com

$$ • Indian 540 Lawrence Square Blvd., Lawrence (609) 689-1500 • palace-of-asia.com

$$ • American, Gastropubs 137 Washington St., Rocky Hill (609) 683-8930 • rockyhilltavern.com

“I love their winter menu, the mushroom risotto, also always the house burger, a burger with a twist. I order it without brie- its delicious with lots of sweet sauteed onions and their special herb mayo.” –Cathy M., Hopewell

“We had the chicken tikka masala and the chana masala (chickpeas & tomato). Very well cooked with delicious rice.” –D K., Chicago

“Love this place! Food is consistently well prepared. The Lamb Burger is delicious. Pork Belly Fries, Pork Belly BLT, Devils on Horseback all wonderful elevated pub food.” –Lauren M., Franklin Park

NOMAD PIZZA COMPANY a a a a a 157 Reviews

$$ • Pizza 10 E. Broad St., Hopewell (609) 466-6623 • nomadpizzaco.com “The food was delicious. My husband and I got the arugula salad, margherita pizza, and the arugula prosciutto pizza. Everything tasted fresh and delicious. It reminded us of our trip to Italy. We also loved that it is BYOB and that the ingredients used are local and organic. .” –Kimberly R., Flemington

VIDALIA RESTAURANT $$$ • Italian 21 Phillips Ave., Lawrenceville (609) 896-4444 • eatvidalia.com

a a a a a 160 Reviews

$$$ • Italian 4484 Route 27, Kingston (609) 497-1777 • enoterra.com “Order the arancini and any of their pastas, especially the ricotta gnocchi.” –Isa D., Plainsboro Center

a a a a a 210 Reviews

PENNINGTON F E AT U R E D

PICCOLO TRATTORIA a a a a a

380 Reviews

$$ • Italian

“We had crab cakes, braised short rib, and the shrimp & grits... everything was excellent ... they make the corn bread themselves. I’ve also tried their pulled pork sandwich & fried chicken at lunch... both excellent.” –Original 6., Lawrence Township

ENO TERRA

AMERICANA DINER

“If you are looking for amazing home made Italian food from a top chief then Vidalia’s is the place. I first ate here over a year ago and keep coming back for three reasons: awesome menu that keeps you guessing, great decor, amazing service.” –Brian W., Newark

a a a a a 10 Reviews

KINGSTON

...AND BEYOND

a a a a a 60 Reviews

SWEETGRASS RESTAURANT $$ • Southern, American (New), Comfort Food 9B E. Broad St., Hopewell (609) 333-8912 • sweetgrassrestaurant.com

ROCKY HILL INN EATERY & TAVERN

800 Denow Road Pennington (609) 737-9050 piccolotrattoria.com “I don’t know what’s about it, but, the pizza has me always coming back here when I am in the Princeton area.” –Wilbur V., Nutley “I ordered a Veal dish served over gnocchi—amazing! The gnocchi are homemade and soft. The sauce had such good flavor ... BYOB and there is conveniently a liquor store in the same complex. –Katie B., Brighton, Michigan “I drive past 4 pizza places to go here. Best Brooklyn pie hands down, great chicken Caesar salad and my son can’t live without their vodka rigatoni pizza.” –Alyssa B., Pennington See our ad on page 23

OSTERIA PROCACCINI a a a a a 144 Reviews

$$ • Italian, Pizza 4428 Route 27, Kingston (609) 688-0007 • osteriaprocaccini.com “I had the Pizzo Doro (sausage, pepperoni, and fresh mozzarella). The ingredients tasted very fresh ... The BF had the Ruchetta E Proscutto (a white pizza with prosciutto, arugula, parmigiano, and balsamic dressing) ... absolutely incredible!” –Liz A., Princeton

AVANTI RISTORANTE ITALIANO a a a a a 31 Reviews

$$ • American, Vegetarian, Wine Bars 23 W. Delaware Ave., Pennington (609) 737-7174 • avantipennington.com “ Their vodka sauce is some of the best, and the Chicken All ‘Arabiata is delicious. Soups are usually always amazing too.” –Scott S., Princeton

LAWRENCE CHAMBERS WALK CAFÉ & CATERING a a a a a 30 Reviews

$$ • American 2667 Main St., Lawrenceville (609) 896-5995 • chamberswalk.com “Their soups are delicious, their salads taste as if they were just picked from the garden. The flavors of their entrees are distinctive yet not overpowering.” –A L., Lawrence Township

ROCKY HILL

$$ • Diners, American 359 U.S. 130, East Windsor (609) 448-4477 • americanadiner.com “Not typical diner food ... Had the paella, bruschetta sampler, and flourless cake.” –S L., Fairfield

ASIAN BISTRO a a a a a 140 Reviews

$$ • Asian Fusion, Sushi Bars, Korean 31 Station Drive, Princeton Junction (609) 378-5412 • asianbistronj.com “The veggie bibimbap in the stone bowl is my favorite meal here. The veggies are always crisp and fresh ... I’ve always had a great experience here. The menu is a mixture of Japanese, Chinese and Korean dishes.” –Lele E., Princeton

BARBARA’S HUNGARIAN RESTAURANT a a a a a 40 Reviews

$$ • Hungarian 1400 Parkway Ave., Ewing (609) 882-5500 “Had the stuffed cabbage one time and the goulash another. Loved both would go back.” –Carla C., Montclair

BLEND BAR & BISTRO a a a a a 22 Reviews

$$ • Bars, American 911 Route 33, Hamilton (609) 245-8887 • blendbarandbistro.com “I would break down the ratings into 5 stars for beer selection, 3.5 for cocktails, and 3 for food. The bar has over 200 types of beer, so it obviously had a huge selection.” –Fiona L., New Brunswick

CAFE 72 BY CUGINO’S a a a a a 59 Reviews

$$ • Breakfast & Brunch, Italian 72 W. Upper Ferry Road, Ewing (609) 882-0087 • cafe72.net “Cafe 72 is one of the best breakfast spots in the area. It gets crowded, so come early!” –Samantha D., Lawrence Twp.

ONE 53

CRISPANINO

a a a a a 99 Reviews

a a a a a 24 Reviews

$$$ • American 153 Washington St., Rocky Hill (609) 921-0153 • one53nj.com

$ • Tapas/Small Plates, Sandwiches 1507 Parkway Ave., Ewing (609) 771-1414 • crispanino.com

“Their mussels are out of this world. Their grilled squid with ink aioli is off the hook good.” –Marc P., Plainsboro Township

“Empanadas were the highlight of the dinner, freshly made crisp on the outside and literally melts in your mouth.” –Raj B., Philadelphia

March 2015 | Princeton Echo25


D’FLORET

OLIVER, A BISTRO

a a a a a 46 Reviews

a a a a a 66 Reviews

$$$ • American 18 S. Main St., Lambertville (609) 397-7400 • dfloretrestaurant.com

$$$ • American 222 Farnsworth Ave., Bordentown (609) 298-7177 • oliverabistro.com

It’s a small place in an unassuming building ... the goat cheese over the roasted tomato was surprisingly delicious appetizer. My wife had the rack of lamb special and loved it ... I had the Wyoming Elk special and was very impressed.” –Eric W., Matawan

“A cozy and intimate setting decorated nicely ... I ordered the crispy chicken entree which was fantastic! Cooked to perfection and paired well with the risotto and vegetables ... We shared the short rib Mac and cheese; outstanding!” –Amy c., Princeton

DE LORENZO’S TOMATO PIES

RAT’S RESTAURANT

a a a a a 173 Reviews

a a a a a 187 Reviews

$$ • Pizza 2350 Route 33, Robbinsville (609) 341-8480 • delorenzostomatopies.com

$$$ • French 16 Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton (609) 584-7800 • ratsrestaurant.org

“Very thin crust and just the right amount of cheese. There will probably be a wait if you go during peak hours.” -Dan R., Manhattan

“The food is top notch and the decor is so fun and classy. The service was very, very leisurely.” –Robert S., Southampton, Pennsylvania

DESTINATION DOGS a a a a a 210 Reviews

$$ • Hot Dogs, American, Sandwiches 101 Paterson St., New Brunswick (732) 993-1016 • destinationdogs.com “Great hotdogs, definitely a must try if you’re within distance. Service was very prompt and attentive to our needs. The Colombian dog was the best in my opinion, and the chili and cheese dog was awesome.” –Billy K., East Rutherford

EL TULE MEXICAN & PERUVIAN RESTAURANT a a a a a 188 Reviews

$$ • Mexican, Peruvian 49 N. Main St., Lambertville (609) 773-0007 • eltulerestaurant.com “Everyone loved their dishes, from ceviche and guacamole to tacu tacu. Even the quinoa flan was fantastic!” –Colin M., Flemington

$$ • Polish 925 N. Olden Ave., Trenton (609) 656-1600 • rozmarynrestaurant.com “Excellent food and the hostess couldn’t be nicer. We had the gypsy special and stuffed cabbage.” –Kenneth M., Philadelphia

SEASONS 52 a a a a a 33 Reviews

$$ • American, Vegetarian, Wine Bars 3535 U. S. 1, West Windsor (609) 799-2152 • seasons52.com “Great seasonal food and wine at a good price. It’s a little loud but very lively. Fun place to go for a night out. Will definitely keep coming back.” –Stella H., Newtown Pennsylvania

STUFF YER FACE

a a a a a 13 Reviews

$$ • Pubs, American, Pizza 49 Easton Ave., New Brunswick (732) 247-1727 • stuffyerface.com

JAFFRON a a a a a 82 Reviews

$$ • Indian 11 W. Bridge St., New Hope, Pennsylvania (215) 862-1677 • jaffronindianrestaurant.com “Had chicken saag, baingan Bharta (spicy). We also had Kashmiri Veg Birayani and garlic naan . Perfection. Birayani was the best I have EVER had outside of Delhi, India.” –Dee S., Annandale

MARSHA BROWN a a a a a 223 Reviews

$$$ • Steakhouses, Cajun/Creole, American 15 S. Main St., New Hope, Pennsylvania (215) 862-7044 • marshabrownrestaurant.com “Good food, good drinks in a really cool old church. Staff was attentive ... call outs, onion rings and the salmon. –Howie G., Closter

26Princeton Echo | March 2015

Top o’the morning to ya! It’s almost St. Paddy’s Day, and you know what that means? (No, not our 32-minute uilleann bagpipe solo of Danny Boy, although we can whip that bad boy out if you’d like.) It’s time for a pint and plenty of craic! Here’s all you need to bring out your inner-Irish in celebration. Slàinte!

a a a a a 40 Reviews

a a a a a 315 Reviews

“The food is so delicious! I had the duck breast and the hot chocolate mousse. Great presentation too.” –Katie S., Princeton

ST. PATRICK’S DAY PICKS

ROZMARYN RESTAURANT

IL FORNO CAFÉ & TRATTORIA $$$ • Pizza, Italian 358 Princeton-Hightstown Road, West Windsor (609) 799-8822 • ilfornowestwindsor.com

The Monthly

“Amazing strombolis and really good appetizer food ... can get super crowded especially on Friday and Saturday nights.” –Jill W., New York

Corned Beef from Teddy’s Luncheonette Photo by Lisa Z., Long Beach, CA

1. Killarney’s Publick House, Hamilton, NJ

“This place has a genuine pub atmosphere and a large menu that I would imagine caters to most diners... From hearty shepherd’s pie to healthy deli sandwiches, the food is delicious at a good value.”

-Jacqueline P., New Hope, PA

2. Tir Na Nog, Trenton, NJ

“This place could not be more authentic Irish pub, right down to the barkeep with the accent! Total dive, but great atmosphere.”

-Nicole I., Lakehurst, NJ

3. North End Bistro, Princeton, NJ

“I had the fish and chips. The batter was spot on. Perfectly crispy, not greasy. I had the fish and chips. The batter was spot on. Perfectly crispy, not greasy.”

THE TIGER’S TALE

-Scott B., Monmouth Jct, NJ

a a a a a 92 Reviews

4. Winberie’s,

$$ • Bars, American 1290 Route 206, Skillman (609) 924-0262 • tigerstalenj.com “A great place to bring friends and they have a large bar that usually had a seat or two available. –Joe W., Oaklyn

VAULT BREWING CO. a a a a a 126 Reviews

$$ • American, Pubs 10 S. Main St., Yardley, Pennyslvania (267) 573-4291 • vaultbrewing.com “They brew their own beer and even offer them in tasting flights ... My favorite is the Buffalo pizza with brown sugar and prosciutto ... try the pad thai popcorn for a start and finish the night off with a s’more! It does get really crowded though.” –Nicholas V., Elmer

Princeton, NJ

“My two favorite items are the Hickory Burger; which is a burger with cheddar, bacon, BBQ sauce and chili fried onions. And of course their Irish Nachos smothered in cheese and bacon and deliciousness. Try not to have them on the same day, but if you do, call me to share.”

-Marlyn V., Trenton, NJ

5. Teddy’s Luncheonette, Cranbury, NJ

“Best Corned Beef Hash. Period... Teddy’s version is mostly corned beef, shredded, with just enough potatoes, seasoned beautifully and served in healthy portions. I usually get a double order with a couple of poached eggs on top.”

-Jason E., Princeton, NJ


AROUND TOWN African Soiree to raise riverblindness funds The sixth annual African Soiree to benefit UFAR (United Front Against Riverblindness) is set for March 21 from 5 to 9 p.m. in the Mackay Center at Princeton Theological Seminary. The evening includes an African market (opening at 4:30 p.m.) followed by a showing of African fashions from FEBA (Woman Cradle of Abundance), a buffet of international and African food and a live auction. The auction will feature Congolese works of art. Traditional Congolese art was affected by influence from abroad that came during the era of colonization, but the individuality and variety of tribal customs has been preser ved. Kuba art includes masks, woven textiles, potter y, beading, figurines and statuettes. UFAR is an African-inspired, Lawrenceville-based nonprofit that aims to eradicate onchocerciasis, a major public health problem in the Kasongo region of the Democratic Republic of Congo. More than one-third of the 60 million people in the DRC are at risk for getting riverblindness, which caused by a parasite and transmitted by black flies that live near the river. Medicine is provided free by Merck & Co., but distributing it poses a challenge. UFAR uses a community-directed

approach to treat more than two million people each year. Annual treatment for each person is required for ten years to eliminate the disease. Tickets are $70. The Mackay Center is located at 64 Mercer Street in Princeton. More information is online at riverblindness.org.

Variety Theater to present modernized Cinderella Princeton Variety Theater, sponsored by the Arts Council of Princeton, is set to present “Cinderella, the UGGly Version: A Panto In The British Style” on Saturday March 7 at 2 and 7 p.m. and Sunday, March 8 at 4 p.m. at the Stuart Little Theater at Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart. The show involves more than 50 community members both on stage and back stage, including singers, dancers, acrobats and musicians. The plot follows self-obsessed and whiny Cinderella (Victoria Wayland) who can’t get her act together, owing to poor self-esteem. She is held back by her scheming stepmother (Beth Harrison) and two overbearing stepsisters (Alastair Binnie and Robert Hebditch). When Hulit the shoe boy (Winston Peloso) makes a delivery, Cinderella falls for him, but only magical intervention from the Fairy Guidance Counselor (Gretchen Zimmer) can

make her venture outside. The script, written by Zoë Brookes, Todd Reichart and Per Kreipke, features local businesses and local stories. Brookes, Reichart and Plainsboro music teacher Michael Jacobsen have created original music for the show. Tickets are $15 for adults and $12 for Arts Council members, children and seniors. More information is online at artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Communiversity 2015 applications due March 2

YingHua International School: The Area’s Only YingHua International School: Mandarin Immersion The School Area’s Only

International School

The Arts Council of Princeton It’s Time to Enroll for announced that applications are avail- Small classes. School Year Cam able for Communiversity ArtsFest 2015. Great 2015-2016 teachers. 2015 Summer Communiversity is a celebration of Extended day options. & 2015 Summer Camp th music, dance and arts and crafts that attracts more than 40,00 people to PrincFull NJ Curriculum. eton every spring. 609.375.8015 www.yhis.org info@yhis.or This year’s event will take place on Chinese math. Apr. 26, from 1 to 6 p.m. rain or shine. to achie Small classes. All interested participants including fluency in Chinese a artists, crafters, merchandise and Great teachers. food vendors, non-profit organizations Englis Extended day options. and performers should visit artscouncilofprinceton.org to download and 2 ½ years through 8th grade print an applications. All potential participants must submit their applications by Mar. 2. Because 609.375.8015 Communiversity is a juried event, appliwww.YhIS.org info@yhis.org cations postmarked after the deadlines will not be considered.

2 ½ years through 8 grad No prior Chines required

WANTED • Quality Fine Jewelry • Timepieces • Engagement & Wedding Rings • Designer Jewelry • Vintage & Estate

BUYING ALL GOLD JEWELRY 10-K...................................COME IN 14-K.............................FOR LATEST 18-K.........................................OFFER

BRING IN FOR OUR OFFER ALSO BUYING DENTAL GOLD

New, Used, Old, Broken, Damaged

Rings, Necklaces, Bracelets, Watches, Earrings, etc... License # 24809

COLAVITA JEWELERS 209 Scotch Road • Ewing 609-883-1090 March 2015 | Princeton Echo27


congratulations 2 Anna Shulkina, SA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe PLATiNuM Re/MAx of Princeton

Joseph R. DeLorenzo, BO 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe GOLD Re/MAx Platinum Club Re/MAx iN TOWN

Joan eisenberg, SA/O 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe GOLD Re/MAx Platinum Club Re/MAx Greater Princeton

Bob Weber, SA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe SiLveR Re/MAx 100% Club Re/MAx Tri County

Pamela Bless, BA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe BRONZe Re/MAx 100% Club Re/MAx Tri County

Mark A. Brower, SA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe BRONZe Re/MAx 100% Club Re/MAx Tri County

Joan Martinez, SA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe BRONZe Re/MAx executive Club Re/MAx Tri County

Gina Marie Mazur, SA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe BRONZe Re/MAx executive Club Re/MAx Tri County

Neil Paul, SA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe BRONZe Re/MAx 100% Club Re/MAx Tri County

Smita Shah, BA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe GOLD Re/MAx Platinum Club Re/MAx Greater Princeton

Christine Barrett, SA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe SiLveR Re/MAx Platinum Club Re/MAx Tri County

Jane Belger, BA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe SiLveR Re/MAx 100% Club Re/MAx Tri County

Jennifer L. D’Alesio, SA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe SiLveR Re/MAx Platinum Club Re/MAx Tri County

Sabrina e. Chell, SA Carla Z. Campanella, SA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe BRONZe exCeLLeNCe BRONZe Re/MAx executive Club Re/MAx executive Club Re/MAx Tri County Re/MAx Tri County

Martyn Daetwyler, BA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe BRONZe Re/MAx 100% Club Re/MAx of Princeton

Martha Dee, BA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe BRONZe Re/MAx executive Club Re/MAx of Princeton

Desiree Daniels, SA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe BRONZe Re/MAx 100% Club Re/MAx Tri County

Maria A. Remboski, SA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe BRONZe Re/MAx executive Club Re/MAx Tri County

Rebecca Rogers, SA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe BRONZe Re/MAx executive Club Re/MAx of Princeton

fred Sarstedt JR., SA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe BRONZe Re/MAx 100% Club Re/MAx of Princeton

John Sullivan, SA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe BRONZe Re/MAx 100% Club Re/MAx of Princeton

Karma estaphanous , SA 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe GOLD Re/MAx Platinum Club Re/MAx of Princeton

Dawn Petrozzini, BO 2014 NJAR CiRCLe Of exCeLLeNCe BRONZe Re/MAx 100% Club Re/MAx Greater Princeton

•BA-Broker Associate •SA-Sales Associate

28Princeton Echo | March 2015

KELLER WILLIAMS

BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOME SERVICES

SOTHEBY’S

NEW JERSEY STATEWIDE MARKET SHARE TOP BRAND RANKING YEAR TO DATE: 1/1/2014 12/31/2014 29,645 - 22,358 21,775

CENTURY 21

COLDWELL BANKER

This chart combines “total units sold” and “total volume sold” for residential listings for all office locations of each organization identified from 1/1/14 – 12/31/14. It includes which listings were sold by such organization itself, or with the aid of a cooperating broker for the state of NJ and time period indicated, according to the data by the following Multiple Listings Services in NJ: Trend MLS, Garden State MLS, Monmouth County MLS, Middlesex MLS, South Jersey Shore MLS, New Jersey MLS, Hudson MLS, Ocean MLS, and Cape May County MLS. This representation is based in whole or in part on data supplied by each MLS listed. Each MLS does not guarantee or is in any way responsible for its accuracy. Data Maintained by each MLS may not reflect all real estate activity in the market. This chart lists up to the top 7 competitors in the market indicated. Each RE/MAX office is independently owned and operated. Equal opportunity employer.

WEICHERT

ELITE

NEW JERSEY STATEWIDE MARKET SHARE TOP BRAND RANKING YEAR TO DATE: 1/1/2014 - 12/31/2014

14,928

13,461

8,889

5,461


S 2014 AWARD WINNERS! Diane DeLorenzo, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Sue Fowler, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX of Princeton

Joan C. George, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Joseph Lombardo, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Maria Picardi Kenyon, SA Linda S. November, SA/O 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton RE/MAX Tri County

John Ratico, JR., SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Vanessa A. Stefanics, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Heather F. Davidson, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Thomas R. Elliott, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE The NJAR Distinguished Sales Club Award RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Arlene Feinstein, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Joseph Giancarli, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Laura Hall, SA Yolanda Gulley, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County RE/MAX Tri County

T. Christopher Hill, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Leonard Kirkuff, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Paula S. Wirth, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Marna Brown-Krausz, SA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Karen Evertsen, SA RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Bruce Evertsen, SA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Elliott Eisenburg, RA RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Douglas Gibbons, BA Cyril (CY) Gaydos, SA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton RE/MAX of Princeton

Judy Peraino, SA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Anna Marie Pratico-Radice, SA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Edmund “ED” Schoen, SA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Cynthia (Cindy) Schwartz, SA RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Jame (Jim) Simmons, BA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Hong Xiao, SA Barbara A. Wirth, BA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton RE/MAX Tri County

OUTSTANDING AGENTS. OUTSTANDING RESULTS. RE/MAX Tri County 2275 Route 33 Suite 308 Hamilton, NJ (609) 587-9300

RE/MAX Greater Princeton 112 Village Blvd. Princeton, NJ (609) 951-8600

WWW.REMAX-NJ.COM

RE/MAX IN TOWN 181 Franklin Corner Rd. Lawrenceville, NJ (609) 895-0500

RE/MAX of Princeton 343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ (609) 921-9202 March 2015 | Princeton Echo29


AT YOUR SERVICE Advertise for $49 a month. For more information, call 609-396-1511 ext.110

Gutter Services of NJ Gutter Cleaning F R E Et e s Seamless Gutters a Estim Gutter Covers

Julius Gross PaintinG

Fully Insured EPA Certified Co.

Certified EPA Lead paint renovation contractor.

Offices located in Lawrenceville & Bordentown

609-924-1474

609-947-4667 • www.gutterservicesofnj.com

R.J. Frederick Plumbing LLC Good Materials Good Craftsmanship Honest Prices Specializing in Renovations & Repair

Mention this ad. Cannot be combined with other offers.

We Fix Your Roof The Way We Would Our Own - Rooong - Masonry -Heating -Cooling - Siding - Doors -Decks lso A - Gutters -General Remodel - Windows -Kitchens -Bathrooms -Additions

609-731-8982

www.MercerRooongAndSiding.com

10% OFF LABOR

Dan 609-414-6369

Insured

Residential Professional Painting

30 Years in Business

Interior & Exterior Power Washing • Wall Paper Removal Deck & Fence Staining Aluminum Siding/Stucco Painting

Family Owned & Operated Matthew & Luke Curran Fully Insured

Free Estimates • Owner Operated

NJ REG# 13VH00425100

Roofing •Siding •Windows Doors •Alterations •Additions •Decks Kitchens •Baths •Insect/Rot Repair

Office: 215-736-2398 Be Amazed with our Craftsmanship, Price & Dependable Service!

S. Giordano’S ConStruCtion Fully Insured

Family owned & operated

est.1995

Licensed

(609) 771-3761

Now it’s time for iNterior paiNtiNg at the lowest cost home improvemeNt www.juliushgrosspainting.com juliushgross@comcast.net

All Work Performed by Owner/Master Plumber FREE Estimates • Reasonable Rates Early Evening Hours Available-Call for Details! Licensed Bonded & Insured • Lic # 12840

Curran Home Improvements, LLC

Free Estimates

Custom Homes remodeling additions Bathrooms

Kitchens roofing Windows doors

Large or Small Jobs | References Available Carpentry • Tile • Painting • Maintenance Bathroom/Kitchen/Basement Renovation Electric • Masonry • Hot Water Heaters • Power Washing

Siding • Sun Rooms • Custom Decks Sam Giordano

Lic#13VH02075700

609-893-3724

www.giordanosconstruction.com

and the list goes on!

609-743-1482 or Emartin1@comcast.net

GRAND OPENING

Flower Bar & New Gift Shop March 14 th !

12 MONTHS FINANCING DEFERRED INTEREST WITH PAYMENT* *For Qualified Customers

$5.00 OFF $20.00 OR MORE VALID UNTIL MARCH 14TH

$100 OFF Customers or Repair *For Qualified ANY PURCHASE OF plus parts

$95 Service or Repair

ON ANY GARAGE DOOR ON YOUR HOME

Offering unique, high quality, items to make everyday a little brighter. Distinctive Gifts • Stunning Home Decor Charming Seasonal Accessories Clocks • Lamps & lanterns • Mirrors Pillows • Ceramics • & much more!

FOR INFORMATION ON THIS AND OTHER GREAT EVENTS AT DRAGONFLY FARMS TEXT “ DRAGONFLYFARMS ” TO 71441

30Princeton Echo | March 2015

$200 OFF

$95 Service 12 Months Financing DeFerreD interest with payMent*

ly Jewer Bags es Scarv

966 Kuser Road • Hamilton, NJ 08619 609.588.0013 • DragonflyFarmsNJ.com

Jammer Quality & Commitment for 94 Years

like us on Facebook!

ON

Must present coupon at time of purchase. *Additional parts & labor in excess of 1 hour will be billed at our scheduled rates. One plusper parts coupon customer/household. Expires 2-28-15. ANY GARAGE DOOR

Jammer Quality &

ANY PURCHASE OF Commitment for 95 Years $2500 OR MORE

$100 off $200 off $1000 OR MORE

Must present coupon at time of purchase. Not accepted at time of installation. Not valid with any other discounts, repairs or prior purchases. One coupon per customer/household. Coupon has no cash value. Expires 2-28-15.

ANY pURcHAsE Of $1000 OR MORE

Must present coupon at time of purchase. Not accepted at time of installation. Not valid with any other discounts, repairs or prior purchases. One coupon per customer/household. Coupon has no cash value. Expires 2-28-15.

ANY pURcHAsE Of $2500 OR MORE

ON YOUR HOME

Must present coupon at time of

Must present coupon at time of

Must present coupon at time of purchase. *Additional parts & labor in excess of 1 hour will be billed at our scheduled rates. One coupon per customer/household. Expires Expires3-31-15. 9-30-14.

of installation. Not valid with any other discounts, repairs or prior purchases. One coupon per customer/household. Coupon has no cash value. Expires Expires 3-31-15. 9-30-14.

of installation. Not valid with any other discounts, repairs or prior purchases. One coupon per customer/household. Coupon has no cash value. Expires Expires 3-31-15. 9-30-14.

Garage Doors • Operators • Gate Openerspurchase. • Entry Doors Patio Doorsat• time Storm Doors • Windows • Retractable Awnings Not• accepted purchase. Not accepted at time

VISIT OUR SHOWROOMS TODAY

Garage Doors • Operators • Gate Openers • Entry Doors • Patio Doors • Storm Doors • Windows • Retractable Awnings

ourSHOWROOMS showrooMsTODAY toDay VISIT OUR

10 Main Street (At The Gristmill) Yardley, PA 19067 215-493-7709

2850 Brunswick Pike (Business Rt. 1) Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 609-883-0900


CLASSIFIEDS LOCAL CLASSIFIED

PAYROLL & BOOKKEEPING

IN-HOME DOG BOARDING

PAYROLL & BOOKKEEPING *Small Business Rates on a budget. 609.249.4390.

HOMEBODIES IN-HOME DOG BOARDING-Avoid the stress, expense and inconvenience of a kennel. We provide comfort, safety, attention and no disruption in your animal companion’s routine. CCBC Vet Tech certified. Call Sharon: 609-730-0600.

CAREGIVING CAREGIVER-I provide compassionate services for the elderly. I have 30+ years experience with references and own transportation provided. Live-in preferred. Call 609-882-1292. CARING IN SO MANY WAYS-Affordable caregiving. $10-$12 an hour for full-time work. 28 years experience. References available. Call 609-3945128.

FOR SALE CEMETERY PLOT IN PRINCETON MEMORIAL PARK FOR SALEDD Lawn Crypt. Moving out of area. Must sell. Price very negotiable. Call 609-414-3335 for more information. FIRE WOOD-Seasoned hardwood. $180 per chord for local delivery. 609731-2822. FOR SALE-Ice cream equipment & freezer for sale. Call 609-712-1688.

FOR RENT FOR RENT-Hamilton Twp.-Store for Rent 800+ sq. ft w/parking. Call 609712-1688.

WANTED WANTED-BETTER QUALITY CAMERAS AND PHOTO EQUIPMENT, FOUNTAIN PENS AND OLDER WATCHES FAIR PRICES PAID CALL HAL609-689-9651.

CHILD CARE CHILD CARE-Safe and loving environment for your child in my home. Reasonable rates. References. 10+ years experience. Patty 609273-3790.

TEA LEAF READINGS HOST A GROUP TEA LEAF READING OR HAVE AN INDIVIDUAL HERBAL READING. 609-455-3743. www. sacredtealeafreadings. com.

JOB TRAINING Mercer Med Tech offers philabotomy, CNA, CMA, EKG Certification with internship. We are looking for energetic people to work in Labs, Nursing Homes. Flexible schedule with affordable payments plan. Call 609-712-5499. www. hshnj.org.

HELP WANTED EXPERIENCED PAINTERS AND CARPENTERS WANTED-Must have driver’s license and own transportation. Top pay. Call 609-540-9400. AREA PROPERTY INSPECTORS-Supplement Your Income-Perfect for Part-Time. Earn up to 30KNo Experience Needed/ We Train. 609-213-9823/ newcareerkim@aol.com. COMPASSIONATE SENIOR CARE NEEDED IN THE PRINCETON AREA; major home healthcare service is seeking Certified Aides (CHHAs) for flexible hourly and live-in schedules. Call 732-3298954x112. TRANSPORTATION COMPANY SEEKS EXPERIENCED LOCAL/ OTR BUS/MOTORCOACH DRIVERS. FT/PT. Experience preferred but will train right person. Competitive benefits package. Driver Rewards Program. Apply: Stout’s Transportation. 20 Irven St. Trenton, M-F 8-5pm, S-S 8-11am. Fax or email resume 883-6682 hr@ stoutstransportation.com. HAIR STYLIST-Full or part-time position available. Following required. Right in the heart of Hamilton Square. Ryanns Hair Salon. 609-890-9008. Hamilton pet bakery and retail store is currently seeking a PART-TIME STORE CLERK. Must be willing to bake and lift 40lb+ on a daily basis. Flexible schedule with ability to work nights and weekends is required. Send resume and cover letter to Gregg or Melissa at barkeryjobs@gmail. com. RETIRED TEACHER NEEDED-If you are a Mercer area retired teacher and could work 2 to 8 hours per week, we have a teaching position for you. Please email your resume to qlc4044@quaker-bridge. com or call 609-933-8806 to make an appointment. Exciting Opportunity/ New Career Professional Wanted/Take control of your future. We provide all necessary training. 609213-9823/newcareerkim@ aol.com. STANDARDBRED RETIREMENT ASSOCIATION SEEKS ADDITIONAL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT-Experienced Administrative Asst, who can wear a variety of hats is needed to assist w/ ongoing projects related to fund raising, general office responsibilities, managing your own projects, creative writing, website updating & other responsibilities. Small pleasant office.

Must be available for an occasional weekend event. Please respond only if you have a minimum of 4 years of an administrative background, and are highly proficient on the computer. Email resume to Judejude2000@aol.com PART-TIME/FULL-TIME CASHIERS NEEDED. Dolce and Clemente. 609259-0072. Inquire within. PROPERTY INSPECTORS NEEDED-PT to 20K/FT to 80K. No experience needed, we provide all training! 609-213-9823/ newcareerkim@aol.com. SEEKING SCHEDULING COORDINATOR FOR HIGH QUALITY ORTHODONTIC OFFICE. Must be friendly w/ excellent customer service/ phone skills. Hard-working, dependable, responsible. Organized & detail oriented. Computer literacy required. Dental office experience preferred. Approx. 30 hrs/ week. Competitive pay & benefits. Email info@ BordentownBraces.com. IHOP COOKS/SERVERS NEEDED, Ewing IHOP is in need of line cooks, and servers, for more information please call Ana @ 609-403-8174. BAGEL SHOP-Must be available for early morning/ afternoon shifts. Open 7 days/week & holidays. Must be able to work in fast-pace work environment. Food background preferred but training available. 18 & older. Starting rate: $9/hour, raises based on performance. Email slillis14@hotmail.com for more information or to apply. HELP WANTED-Commercial dry cleaning plant looking for experienced pressers. Call Mike at (609) 468-7195. LINE COOK POSITION AVAILABLE, experience required, Part time. Bar Back position available for weekends will train. call Mary @ 609-291-7020. NOW GROWING! VCSALON, a Top 10 salon in NJ is hiring nail therapists, massage therapists, guest service pro’s, hair/nail/spa apprentice programs available. If you’re just starting out & need a safe place to grow & succeed Vc could be right for you! Company-sponsored health care plans, 401k, profit sharing, paid vacation time, in-house education, 3 or 4 day FT work schedule, product & lifestyle shop discounts, Career Pathing – growth opportunities, Community/ Fashion & Editorial Events. If you believe in our mission to create a transformative, “wow” experience, & inspire people to look & feel beautiful everyday & you “Run With Scissors,” apply online @ vcsalon.com and click on the CAREERS tab, or stop in to fill out application. APPOINTMENT SETTING/LEAD GENERATION IN LAWRENEVILLE, CASUAL ENVIRONMENT. Needed Skills: Well-spoken, upbeat, good

50 cents a word $10 minimum. For more information call 609-396-1511 typing, to call businesses for outbound phone work. Previous sales exp. a plus but not required. 7 hrs each day during business hrs. Hourly + commission = $11-$15 hr. + bonuses. Opportunity to grow within the company-looking to promote to Campaign Manager or Business Developer. Apply at www.MarketReach.biz.

MUSIC LESSONS MUSIC LESSONS: Piano, guitar, drum, sax, clarinet, F. horn, oboe, t-bone, voice, flute, trumpet, violin, cello, banjo, mandolin, harmonica, uke, and more. $32 half hour. Summer Music Camp. Call today! Montgomery 609924-8282. West Windsor 609-897-0032. Hightstown 609-448-7170. www. farringtonsmusic.com.

at Traditions 55+ community! Lrgst 2 BR model. Move in condition! Optional sunrm, 2 car grg, Upgraded EIK, hrdwd flrs, LG master suite w/full BA & huge walk in. Huge LR/DR, sep study & 2nd BR, rear patio w/view. $305,000 RE/MAX IN TOWN Joe DeLorenzo 609-895-0500x107 www. joedhomes.com/6483496 HAMILTON-Completely remodeled 3BR, 2 full BA, huge yrd. Move-in ready! EIK w/new ss applncs, tiled back splash, cherry cabs, gorgeous granite, 2 main flr BRs, upper lvl MSTR suite w/remodeled full BA, walk-in closet! Brand new roof, new siding, freshly painted. $175,000 RE/MAX IN TOWN Joe DeLorenzo 609-895-0500x107 www. joedhomes.com/6465216 EWING-Completely redone 4 yrs ago, like new 3 BR, 2 full BA ranch. A lovely deck off the DR overlooks fully

fenced rear yrd. Full BSMT w/walk out stairs, 4 yr old kitch, BA, wndws, heater & A/C. Close to Shopping & park. $192,900 RE/MAX IN TOWN Lorraine McCormick 609-895-0500x125 www. mercercountyhouses. net/6521795

Upgraded BAs & ceiling fans in all rms. Well-maintained. Nicely lndscpd w/private fenced in patio. Convenient access to major highways. $245,000 RE/MAX IN TOWN Joe DeLorenzo 609-895-0500 ext 107 www.joedhomes. com/6521472

LAWRENCEVILLE-Lovely Nassau 1 community, bi-lvl, 3 lrg BRs w/hrdwd & 2 full updated BAs. Main lvl has good size EIK, LR & formal DR w/hrdwd. Lower lvl has lrg FR. Nice size yrd w/beautiful deck. Conveniently located. $299,999 RE/MAX IN TOWN Joe DeLorenzo 609-8950500x107 www.joedhomes. com/6520488

LAWRENCEVILLE - Spacious 4 BR Ranch w/2.5 BA. Updated kitch Lrg, bright living w/wood burning FP, Formal DR & sunrm. MSTR BR located in separate wing, w/private BA, generous sized BRs. Fin BSMT w/FR, play rm. 1 car grg, laundry rm, large fenced in rear yrd. Convenient location! $349,900 RE/MAX IN TOWN Joe DeLorenzo 609-8950500x107 www.joedhomes. com/6544567

LAWRENCEVILLE-Beautiful 3-BR, 2.5-BA, 2-Story home in 55+ Community. Open flr plan, cathedral ceilings, Nice sized kitch w/corian, ceramic tile floor, pantry, 42” oak cabs. DR w/chair rail molding.

STATELY FARMSTEADSpringfield Twp $450,000. 4BR, 2.5BA Farmhouse LR, DR, EIK, FR, Lndry, Loft, Foyer

& Library. Renovated Circa 1697. New well & septic, htr, electric, winds, siding & roof. MLS# 6459138 / 21438035 ERA Central Realty 609.298.4800 / 609.259.0200 ERACentral.com. COLONIAL-Ewing Twp $208,000. 4 BR 2.5 BA One of kind on over-sized lot. Looking for ample space, then look no further. Large attic & full basement w/walkout for additional space. MLS# 6495720. ERA Central Realty 609.298.4800 / 609.259.0200 ERACentral.com. UPPER FREEHOLD TWP $110,000. Beautiful 1.84 acre lot in desirable Cream Ridge. Located on the corner of Burlington Path & Route 539. Endless possibilities! Come take a look today. MLS# 6500659 / 21500037COMPANY INFOERA Central Realty 609.298.4800 / 609.259.0200 ERACentral.com.

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SOUNDING OFF Walking bad in Princeton By Richard K. Rein Princeton being Princeton and having a small but charming downtown attractive to shoppers, diners, sightseers, and office workers, you can always count on problems with traffic, parking, and — now more than ever, I predict — pedestrians. Pedestrians didn’t use to be much of a problem. When I first moved to town, it was simple. When pedestrians wanted to cross a street, they stopped, looked, and listened and made sure no car was coming fast enough in either direction to hit them. Then they crossed. But New Jersey eventually became more like California — motorists had to yield to pedestrians in crosswalks and at intersections. As Princeton has become more congested, regulating the flow of vehicles and people has become a challenge. And the matter is likely to get heated now that the town is advocating that the state making one downtown intersection — Nassau Street at Vandeventer and Washington Road — an “all-way walk” intersection. That means that for some precious seconds in every traffic light cycle, motorists coming from all four directions will have to sit (and stew) while pedestrians freely traverse the intersection every which way. Of course in a town like Princeton pedestrians are the true kings of the road. They are the lifeblood of the walkable Princeton that we all cherish. And if you think about a pedestrian confronting a motor vehicle it’s difficult not to be sympathetic to the former. To take the side of the motorist against the pedestrian feels wrong, like pulling for the big box store on Route 1 to put the mom and pop shop on Nassau Street out of business. But since I do a lot of walking myself in downtown Princeton, I feel entitled to offer some constructive criticism of our precious pedestrians. Entitled is an appropriate word because entitled is how all too many Princeton pedestrians seem to feel. Yes, pedestrians, you have the right of way in crosswalks but please make sure that the oncoming motorists see you (particularly at dusk) and have a reasonable time to stop for you. When the motorist does come to that grinding stop, please don’t stroll as slowly as a Parisian flaneur as you cross. And while it’s not necessary, it sure doesn’t hurt to acknowledge the motorist with a wave or a nod. Also, if you are seeking protection in a crosswalk as a pedestrian, then be a pedestrian. Don’t linger on the curb in front of the crosswalk, gabbing with a friend. Don’t be engrossed in a cell phone conversation that puts you in different place and mindset from the busy street you are attempting to cross. And

do pay attention to the signals. At intersections with “walk” and “don’t walk” signs, it ought to be easier for motorists and pedestrians to exist in relative harmony. But that depends on pedestrians obeying the signals. At Nassau and Witherspoon that’s often not the case. Here motorists on Nassau Street heading east (toward Kingston) get a small break: a green arrow that permits them to turn left onto Witherspoon Street before the traffic from the other direction gets under way and blocks that turn. It’s a small amount of time — around 10 seconds — that improves traffic flow on Nassau Street a lot. But it only works if pedestrians obey the “don’t walk” instruction. All too often they don’t and then the first car in the queue trying to turn left from Nassau onto Witherspoon is blocked. The cars behind have to hope to make it through later in the cycle. One light further east, at Nassau and Vandeventer, the intersection is slightly more complicated because there are two delayed green traffic signals for motorists making left hand turns, and two delayed “walk” signals to permit motorists to make right hand turns before the pedestrians clog the crosswalk. Some pedestrians, however, jump the gun and block the motorists’ path, making that intersection less efficient and more dangerous. So now the state, which has jurisdiction because Nassau is a state highway, is considering making the intersection an “all-way walk” crossing. Word on the street (what better source?) has it that the intersection signals could be changed by the fall. Princeton already has one all-way walk at the other end of Nassau, where it meets Bayard Lane and Stockton Street. But that intersection is lightly used by pedestrians. Nassau and Vandeventer can be pedestrian central. Will motorists sit patiently while walkers criss cross in front of them? Motorists, of course, need to respect the community through which they drive. If they want to have the roads and intersections all to themselves, they should drive around the state offices in Trenton at night. But pedestrians need to cooperate. If they don’t, they should take a hike. Richard K. Rein, editorial director of Community New Service, has lived and walked in downtown Princeton since 1972. The Princeton Echo welcomes opinions from people on issues of concern impacting the community. If you would like to have your opinion or views printed in Sounding Off, send an email to bsanservino@mercerspace.com. All commentary might be edited for clarity or space reasons.

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Participants may be liable for the payment of unauthorized or out-of-network services. 34Princeton Echo | March 2015

A farewell to Scheide’s Bach By Pia de Jong

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PArting Shot My friend’s husband recently died, so on a foggy February morning, I ask her over for a cup of tea. “Oh, no, please come to my house instead,” she says, “and you can still see Bach’s portrait before it goes forever to Leipzig.” Bach’s portrait in her house? Bach sat for only two portraits in his lifetime. One is in poor condition. The other, painted by Elias Gottlob Haussmann in 1746, is in excellent condition just a few blocks away from me in Princeton. An elderly gentleman who introduces himself as the “house manager” lets me into my friend’s house. “Madame is still getting ready,” he says. “Make yourself at home.” Curious, I look around the crowded living room, which is a cross between a church and a library. Half of the room is occupied by a gleaming Holtkamp organ. Under a glass plate is a handwritten musical score with the name: Johann Sebastian Bach, signed with a flourish. On a lectern is an open Gutenberg Bible. Suddenly, I am standing face-to-face with perhaps the greatest composer who ever lived. I know the famous portrait from the jackets of the old record albums my father used while preparing music for his church, and then later on from CD covers and busts sitting on pianos around the world. Bach was 61 when his portrait was done. He is a stout man with a double chin and an unhealthily ruddy skin. He wears a white blouse with sleeves puffed at the wrists; over it is a black jacket with hard buttons. On his head, like a weird hat, is a white wig. In his right hand he holds a tiny piece of sheet music. On it is written, “Canon triplex á 6 Voc.” Then Judith enters, the widow of musicologist and philanthropist Bill Scheide, who died in November at the age of 100. She is momentarily distracted, shuffling around the room, but when she sees me in front of the painting, she brightens. “Ah,” she says, “you’ve already met him.” The house manager brings in a tray of tea, and Judith takes a sip. “Bill bought this painting 62 years ago,” she says. “It was his most prized possession. Our mornings always started here, in this room, with the music of Schubert. Bill said that listening to Schubert first gave him permission to listen the rest of the day to Bach.” I had heard about the wave of emotion in church during Bill Scheide’s funeral when Schubert’s String Quintet in C Major was played. Arthur Rubinstein called this composition “the gateway to heaven” and wished to have it played at his own funeral. “He looks very serious, huh?” Judith says, with a glance at Bach, “but he was a gentle man.” She then sits at a Bösen-

dorfer piano which I had completely overlooked. “Whoever makes music, makes something of love,” she says as she opens the Notebook for Anna Magdelena Bach. As we listen to Bach’s Bist du bei mir (“Be thou with me”) playing in the background, Judith seems to turn into a girl. Bach, who watches from the wall, is suddenly no longer the pompous man with the quizzical look that Haussmann gave him but a distant third husband watching his much younger wife. I listen to the song’s words and think of my father, who died three years ago today: “Be thou with me, and I will go gladly to my death and my rest.” “It is time that the cantor of St. Thomas Church return to Leipzig,” Judith says, looking softly at the painting. “But how I will miss him.” Editor’s note: William Scheide was well known in music circles as the owner of the Haussmann painting, which they called the “Scheide Bach portrait.” Upon Scheide’s death it was bequeathed to the Bach-Archiv in Leipzig, Germany, of which Scheide was founding curator and later director emeritus. In February, Princeton University announced that Scheide had left the school his collection of rare books valued at nearly $300 million, including a Gutenberg Bible, an original printing of the Declaration of Independence, all four of Shakespeare’s Folios and musical manuscripts written by Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Schubert and Wagner. Pia de Jong is a Dutch novelist who moved from Amsterdam to Princeton in the summer of 2012 with her husband, Robbert Dijkgraaf, after he was named the director of the Institute for Advanced Study. She currently writes a weekly column for the Dutch newspaper NRC, called Flessenpost (Notes in a Bottle) about her life in the USA. Her columns are also featured on the Huffington Post. De Jong will speak on March 2, from 7 to 9 p.m., at the Princeton Public Library. She will speak about her adjustment to writing in English and what it has taught her about the immigrant experience.


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LEADING OFF

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FRUIT Princeton University captures the imagination with its gothic architecture and natural beauty, but few people are aware that the university’s five most iconic sites—Nassau Hall, Alexander Hall, Blair Hall arch, steps and tower, FitzRandolph Gates and Lewis Library—are what the University deems “restricted imagery.” University imagery policy stipulates that images that include all or recognizable portions of these five sites are permitted for use only on university business, and are not permitted for other use, whether the pics are supplied by the university or taken independently. The policy also covers commercial use of photography, requiring prior consent for any images used in advertising, merchandising and all other forms. Princeton University has maintained its photography policy dating back decades, to keep the university from sanctioning outside organizations or their beliefs. “We want to avoid conveying in any way Princeton University’s endorsement, approval or affiliation of any views, products or services,” said Min Pullan, media relations specialist for Princeton University. “The use of iconic images might run the risk of doing that.” One might think that the policy is not in keeping with the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. But the Founding Fathers had never heard of cameras, and photography is not expressly protected by the Bill of Rights, not for journalists or anyone else. According to the First Amendment Center, recent court cases have found for the plaintiff when the photographer was a credentialed press photographer (on an accident scene closed to the public) and even when the photographer was taking shots for personal recreational use. –Rebeccah Barger

Pictured are Nassau Hall, FitzRandolph Gates, Blair Hall, Lewis Library and Alexander Hall of Princeton University.

March 2015 | Princeton Echo3


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Friday, March 13 and Saturday, March 14, 2015 A series of readings and discussions starting at 2 p.m. each day

Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University Princeton, NJ Featuring an international line-up of poets: Ellen Bryant Voigt (US) Kwame Dawes (Ghana) Paul Farley (UK) Major Jackson (US)

Kathleen Jamie (Scotland) Ada Limon (US) Maureen N. McLane (US) Valzhyna Mort (Belarus)

Michael Robbins (US) Tomasz Rozycki (Poland) Ocean Vuong (Vietnam) Ray Young Bear (Meskwaki)

The New Jersey State Finals of the national Poetry Out Loud program will open the Festival on Friday, March 13, at 10 a.m.

Tickets: $15 per day; $25 for two-day festival pass and free for students; Poetry Out Loud State Finals are free

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4Princeton Echo | March 2015

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LEADING OFF Annual book sale always promises bargains The Bryn Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale is set to return to Princeton Day School for an amazing 84th year March 20 through 24. For the first time in several years, the sale will begin on a Friday, with the bulk of the sale days falling on the weekend. Scheduling conflicts necessitated mostly midweek sale dates the past few years. The book sale has an amazing history. According to the book sale website, in 1931, a group of Princeton-area Bryn Mawr College graduates looked to raise money for scholarships for new students by holding a used book sale. In 2000, with their numbers flagging, a local Wellesley alumnae group joined in the effort, and it’s been going strong ever since. The book sale is immense, almost overwhelmingly so, with volumes filling the entire gymnasium and cafeteria at PDS during the school’s spring break. The committee estimates the total count of available books at 100,000. Volunteers spend the whole year between sales receiving donations and sorting them into categories, so readers who only care for European history or social science are able to make a beeline for their

desired section. Likewise fans of mysteries or literary fiction will see their favorites staked out across rows of tables. Those who like to collect books from across the publishing spectrum, on the other hand, could easily spend the better part of an afternoon browsing. I’ve been going to the sale since 2012, and I’ve never left without a impressive stack. I’m not a rare book hunter — though rare book hunters would have a ball at the sale — but I do like to build up my home library with reading copies. I was able to assemble a pretty substantial Evelyn Waugh collection from just one year. Last year, the recent Walter Isaacson biography of Steve Jobs was just sitting there, waiting for me to take it. I did. Friday, March 20 is a Preview Day, requiring a $25 ticket to gain entry — dealers and resellers make up a substantial portion of the traffic that day. Tickets are available online. Meanwhile, Tuesday, March 24 will be box day, when bargain hunters will be able to walk out with a 16x12x12 box full of tomes for $10. Processes and procedures for Preview Day and every other day, as well as hours of operation, are online at bmandwbooks.com. –Joe Emanski

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www.princetonchamber.org March 2015 | Princeton Echo5


FIGHTING

uber FUTURE IS FIGHTING THE

BY ANDREW TATE It’s easy to forget in 2015 how novel the Internet was 20 years ago, or how novel smartphones were in 2007. Both altered the trajectory of the entire world economy, but they did more than that: they altered our way of life, slowly at first, then more quickly. Then, seemingly, too quickly. Too quickly for us to adapt quickly to them. Too quickly for our parents. Too quickly for our laws. New ideas didn’t always hurtle at us with such speed. Not even in the Internet era. A decade passed between the founding of Yahoo! — the first major Internet portal and search engine, which started up in 1994 — and Facebook, which went live in 2004. In all those years, we didn’t even know that online social networking was something we should be missing. YouTube, which for the millennial generation is as compelling a video medium as TV, marked 10 years in operation just last month. Lost in the fog of our memory are those years when videos were short, stuttering and blurry. It has taken a long time for programmers, thinkers and businesspeople to figure

6Princeton Echo | March 2015

out how the power of the Web could be harnessed, that long for computer technology to be able to realize their visions. Instagram, the photo-sharing social networking site that gained 200 million users between 2012 and 2014, is not yet 5 years old. Neither is Pinterest, which started up around the same time. These sites and apps have come to our lives relatively recently, but have quickly become part of the fabric of our lives. The rate of innovation continues to increase, and with it, our ability to adapt to each new thing has also been on the rise. When Apple revealed the iPhone in 2007, and competitors like Samsung drafted in with competing products, a much more mature tech sector was ready to respond. At first, few were convinced that users would walk around in zombie fashion, browsing the Internet as they walked the streets. But within a year or two, the race was on — a race that will probably never end. We’ll never wait decades for a game changer again. New websites and apps come on the market every year, every month, and many developers are setting themselves the goal not of making our life just a little better, but of chang-

ing it altogether. Thanks to the always increasing sophisitication of the pocket computers we carry around and call phones, such ambition is more realistic than ever. Uber, an app-based transportation network, is a disruptive innovation that’s been in the news a lot lately, in Princeton and around the country. Uber is a car service that matches individual drivers with people needing a ride. Using the app, which can be downloaded for free, users can call up local drivers to take them to any local destination. They can even track Uber cars on their phones. Ordinarily, if you wanted to get a cab from Princeton to Princeton Junction train station, a 12-minute ride, it would cost you $25. First you’ve got to find a cab. There is no central taxi number for the town, so you’d have to know the number for individual taxi drivers and hope someone answers, or you could chance your luck and call the Nassau Street taxi stand, and hope someone answers. Then an old sedan would pull up and take you slowly and sullenly to your destination. Hope you’ve got cash. Nobody really questioned this though, right? That was how it always worked. Until Uber.

Now, you can grab your smartphone and, in a few clicks and a few minutes, a car you have chosen based on user feedback will be at your door, ready to take you to the train station for $10. Leave your wallet at home: the money will be seamlessly taken out of your bank account. Welcome to Uber, and the start of a whole new world. Uber is as old as Instagram, although most people would be unlikely to realize it. It started out in 2010 as a San Francisco-only service, and has been expanding city by city across the country. The service is one of a new generation of companies known collectively as the ‘sharing economy’, the idea being that we can all share our own resources and make money at the same time, increasing efficiency (for all) and getting rich (for some) while doing it. Uber does it with cars (along with rival services such as Lyft and Sidecar), Airbnb does it with homes and rooms, Instacart does it with shopping, and Taskrabbit does it with anything. Anyone can sign up not only to just use these services, but be a provider as well. Drive people around, rent out your home, do someone’s shopping, or pick up their dry cleaning—be a taxi, a


hotel, a shopper, or a personal assistant. Sounds great. But not everyone is ready to usher in this brave new world. In early January, the topic of Uber was brought up at a Princeton council meeting by the owner of Amigo Taxi, a local cab service. He didn’t mention the car service company by name, but instead called on the council to take action against ‘unlicensed taxis’ in the town. Uber is seen by many as riding roughshod over local laws and regulations put in place to safeguard consumers, and taxi drivers don’t see why they have to play by the rules and Uber doesn’t. They want Princeton to follow the lead of states such as Nevada and cities such as Hoboken, where Uber can no longer operate. But here’s the thing: Princeton can’t ban Uber, because Uber is already banned. “Uber is illegal, according to borough ordinances and state laws,” says Jenny Crumiller, a Princeton councilwoman and member of the Taxi Ordinance Committee assigned to bring the borough’s licensing ordinances up-to-date after the consolidation of the borough and township. The company should not be operating a car service in the area without abiding by the local laws. So how does Uber get away with it? The answer: Because people are using it, and enjoying it, and telling their friends. Like the downloading of music that disrupted the economy in an earlier Internet era, labor sharing services are an opportunity too good to pass up for consumers, many of whom shrug off the legal implications. “If you were to poll people in Princeton, the majority of cab users who have used both Uber and the local cab would probably prefer Uber,” says Steven Strauss, a visiting professor at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs. Uber offers a much better rider experience than cabs do, for numerous reasons. Quasi-monopolies such as the local taxi system in Princeton, mean cabs and drivers no longer have an incentive to make customer experience any better. Additionally, Strauss says, “Uber takes what is normally a non-repeating transaction and turns it into a two-way rateable transaction.” If you get into a cab in New York City, or even Princeton, the likelihood of you ever seeing that driver again, is small, therefore the incentive for the driver to leave you with a good impression is small. With Uber, you rate the driver, and he/she rates you. This means that there is a real incentive for Uber drivers (and Uber passengers) to be polite and helpful. The other big thing is that Uber is cheaper. Uber’s concept of “surge-pricing,” where price goes up when demand rises, such as on holidays or during bad weather, has riled many, but for most

The entrance to Uber headquarters at 1455 Market Street in San Francisco. The ser vice is raising questions in many towns about compliance with local laws. trips, particularly in Princeton, you are going to be paying less in an Uber car than in a regular taxi.

RIDING ROUGHSHOD Uber provides a popular service, but many are still uneasy about using this service or services such as Airbnb. Their disregard for local laws, regulations and ultimately companies and councils, annoys a lot of people. The company and its proponents call this a disruption, and say it is a good way to weed out archaic and byzantine regulations that hinder the economy. It is also the reason Uber can make money: it doesn’t have to sign up to the restrictive licensing systems that taxi drivers do. The same goes for Airbnb. There are plenty of listings renting out rooms and houses in the Princeton area, directly competing with local hotels and businesses. The places listed on Airbnb do not have to submit to the same safety regulations and fire codes as regular hotels and B&Bs, so they can charge far less. Because they are not party to the archaic regulatory system, they can provide a service more in tune with what consumers want, and can adjust to demand fluctuations in the market. But those safety regulations and fire codes are there for a reason. “There are important safety issues and convenience issues with Airbnb that tend to be dismissed too quickly,” Strauss says. Yet Uber and others have chosen to flout those laws. In an article in the Huffington Post, Strauss said that while a lot of regulation can be seen as superfluous, some laws are still absolutely neccessary. Safety inspections on are as applicable to Uber

as they are to taxi companies. Most Uber cars are newer than the town cars taxi companies use, but without specific safety standards you cannot know whether an Uber car is safe to drive. Instead of providing some type of safety testing, Uber has pushed drivers to lease or buy new cars, at their own cost, and through Uber financing. Uber, et al, are gambling on the idea that with consumers on their side, states, cities and municipalities such as Princeton will choose not to fight back. They have been mostly proved right. One city that has chosen to fight back is Hoboken. A crackdown on Uber in the city (the closet thing you can get to a ban on an already illegal service) means police in Hoboken will pull over any Uber car and the passenger will not be able to go any further, and the driver will be fined for driving an unlicensed taxi. This is not something Princeton is keen to consider. Councilwoman Crumiller says that the Princeton Police are not about to start a crackdown on Uber and picking a fight with the company is a lose-lose situation for a town such as Princeton. Uber has already brought their legal heavyweights to bear on cities and towns around the country, and, as Strauss says, it is not a fight that residents really want the council to fight. For Crumiller though, she feels these companies are keeping money for themselves that should really come into the local economy. “These services are good, but they are not sharing. The corporations make money, but the town doesn’t,” she said.

THE NEW ECONOMY Importantly, Uber, Airbnb and others have just made what was already available easily accessible. Unlicensed taxis

and subletting have been around since these laws were first enacted. Ubiquitous smartphone technology and apps have just significantly lowered the transaction costs of such businesses, allowing them almost limitless access to consumers for little outlay. Rather than fight to ban companies such as Uber that are competing with them, taxi companies and other traditional providers finding themselves on the wrong end of this new economy should look at the innovations such apps have brought to the marketplace and take them on board. Easy payment systems, rating systems and even surge pricing can help older companies compete properly. They need a change in the regulations as much as Uber. Another Princeton professor, Alan Krueger, has recently published a joint paper with Uber, looking at who signs up to drive for the company, and how well they do. His findings: Uber drivers are more highly educated and younger than taxi drivers. They are also more likely to be women. He suggests that what is standing in the way of taxi drivers is also what is standing in the way of Uber. “States and municipalities can make it easier for people to become for-hire drivers. If someone with a driver’s license can drive their friend or a loved one to the airport, why can’t they drive someone who pays them for a ride to the airport?” Krueger said. He also suggests that states and cities can have ulterior motives for increasing regulation. “One problem with traditional taxi regulation is that the regulation is done to raise fees for cities and airports and prevent entry, rather than improve service and safety for passengers,” he said. Rather than running Uber out of town, as Hoboken has tried, the state and local municipalities in New Jersey would be better off looking at what they have done to tie the hands of the taxi industry and provide a level playing field for all.

SCARING THE HORSES

What is true, though, is that we have been here before, and we will be here again. Taxi regulations and licences have been around for almost 400 years, when the first licensing restrictions for horse-drawn carriages were introduced in London. In the industrial revolution, as mechanization changed production methods, riots occurred and machinery was smashed by workers suddenly out of a job. When cars were first seen on the streets in the 19th century, horse-drawn carriage owners and locomotive companies lobbied governments for draconian speed limits and weight restrictions to stop the car getting the upper hand. Vermont went so far as to require a man waving a red flag to precede any large

SEE UBER PAGE 8

March 2015 | Princeton Echo7


UBER CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 vehicles on the road, lest it scare the horses. Scare stories about Uber are already prevalent in the media — dangerous drivers, bad insurance, crazy fares — the 21st century equivalent of scaring the horses. But even with all the bad press, Uber is incredibly popular and continues to grow. Even those who are not happy with how Uber operates like the concept. “The Uber app is really good. But I resent them calling themselves the ‘sharing economy,’” Crumiller said. Beyond the problems with their treatment of local laws, a significant problem with the sharing economy is that it is a bit of a misnomer. “Sharing” sounds like we are all helping each other out, but the main thing that gets shared with these jobs, critics say, is risk. For example, it is entirely up to drivers, homeowners, or any other type of micro-entrepreneurs to make the money, while the parent company sits back and creams their profit off the top. There are no guarantees that work will be there to be done, no one to limit competition. The jobs come with no stability, and often require a lot of work of workers to build a portfolio and market themselves. The main bonus for individuals participating in this new economy is flexibility. Krueger’s Uber study cites the ability to smooth out income fluctuations as a reason people signed up for Uber, and flexibility is something that has been sorely missing from the U.S. job market. “The labor force participation rate of women peaked in the U.S. around 2000, in part because the workplace does not offer enough flexibility.” says Krueger. “I hope that in the future employers provide workers more flexibility to take care of their children and aging parents.”

A DRIVERLESS FUTURE One thing is for sure, Uber has the ability to dramatically change the shape of how cars and transport are used, not only in large cities, but out here in the suburbs and small towns such as Princeton. In Princeton, most people need a car. Buses run infrequently and in few places, and as we have seen, cabs are expensive. Households normally need at least one car to get around, and larger families may have two, three or four cars so everyone can get to work, school, practice, and shops. But ride-sharing could make travelling around suburban areas far more efficient. For families that run more than one car, in particular, the extra car or cars spend most of their time obsolete (this is also an issue with taxis in the area – they have significant ‘dead time’ where they are just waiting around). Choosing to use an inexpensive car-

8Princeton Echo | March 2015

sharing service such as Uber could be far more economical than paying for a car, and the requisite insurance, to sit on the driveway. Soon though, even the driver may be obsolete. Uber is already starting to look into driverless technology, following Google down the road of cars that can get from A to B without any human input. Uber drivers may replace taxi drivers, but they in turn may be replaced by lasers, GPS and machine learning algorithms. In fact, the urban landscape of an area such as Princeton may look dramatically different come 2030, as might the economy. A driverless Uber of 15 years hence may be all you need to take you to work — as long as a robot hasn’t replaced you at your job. Think: a car turns up outside your home when you request it, and take you wherever you need to go, dropping you off and picking up the next passenger, the whole ballet choreographed by algorithms that assure maximum efficiency – no ‘dead time’, no sullen drivers, no missed pick-ups. Even if that is not the exact right picture of the future, we can be sure that the future holds great uncertainty in terms of innovation. The dawn of the Internet, viewed from the future, looks now like the end of a dark age. Most of us probably don’t even remember the people we were before we had smartphones. Will we look back on each new technology and service that we came to adopt, and wonder why we ever resisted them? And will we feel, on the inevitable day down the road when Uber is made obsolete by a company with an even grander vision, that Uber should be protected from the encroachment of new competition, because by then it or something like it will be what we have come to know? The apps that change our lives these days don’t just bring us free videos and cheap tunes. They make our lives easier and more efficient. There are concerns, of course. We have yet to see what the true impact of the sharing economy will be. Could it mean the end of regular employment for all? Everyone fighting for scraps as rich corporations count their skim? Uber and the other services will surely need to be calibrated to provide the fairest opportunities for businesses and for consumers. They are flawed each in their own ways, just as the Internet was, just as early model smartphones were. But there’s little debate that the question we’re asking when it comes to each new life changer is when, not if, these new features will be absorbed into the zeitgeist. Which is why towns like Princeton, Hoboken, Austin and San Francisco are, more often than not, looking for ways to work with, and not against, the apps of the future.

WHO USES UBER?

vs After establishing itself in North Jersey locales December 2013, the app friendly car-service network Uber has become widely applauded by many Princetonians who prefer it to taxi companies for its efficiency, cost effectiveness and ease of use. Princeton University freshman Prem Nair, first acquainted with Uber in his hometown of Cupertino, began to use the service in Princeton as transport to airports and off-campus interviews. “I really like that Uber can get you where you are fast,” Nair said. “The service routes the nearest available car to your location, you know exactly where the car is and about how long it will take to get to you, and I don’t have to deal with cash or tips. I don’t have to know the phone number of a taxi company that operates in the area or anything.” For Nair, credibility of Uber is also critical. As a repeat user, Nair finds the service’s driver background checks and consistency as a single brand to be more trustworthy than taxi companies. “With Uber, I have the driver’s name, star rating and license plate,” Nair said. “They definitely have to care more about their service as you have the potential to be a repeat customer wherever you are. Ubers are proof that taxis are an industry ripe for change, and creative destruction is bound to happen if you want society to move forward.” Local employee at Carter and Cavero in Palmer Square, Chris Walton, after downloading the app, took his first free ride in a Tesla, categorized as a black car. Uber has five different services: uberX, known as the low cost Uber, uberTaxi, uberBlack, uberSUV and uberLux, the most expensive service. “You can choose how big car is and what you want to spend,” Walton said. “It customizes how you get around. It was very clean and easy to use.”

Able to choose cars in the area, the service can send a driver within minutes of selecting the car from any phone. Walton’s experience with the speed of Uber and the friendliness of his Uber driver makes him a repeat customer. “It was such a pleasant ride,” Walton said. “The guy was there really fast, and he was showing me all the features of the car because I’m interested. It felt trustworthy and like I was safer in it. It was just a really nice ride back.” Uber drivers are finding the service beneficial as well. Local Princeton Uber driver Jonathan Zissman spent five years driving a taxi both in Phoenix and with a local Princeton company before he chose to apply to Uber. After a two month background check and car inspection, Zissman began driving in late October. Zissman likes the opportunity to meet new people as a driver. He also carries courtesy items like gum, lint rollers and water in his car for customers. “I like to carry that stuff around with me because it makes a potential for using Uber higher, so the better chance I have for earning a reasonable living,” Zissman said. “That’s just sort of my mentality, being proactively thinking about what would be better for a passenger.” Uber also allows drivers to use their own car and set their own hours, and it was this increased freedom as a driver that prompted Zissman to work for Uber. “I can get up in the morning, brush my teeth and start driving,” Zissman said. “More and more people are finding out about it. I don’t see that the business is going to do anything but expand, so I should always be able to do fairly well, and it gives me a level of flexibility so I can work around my life, which to me is an advantage. I have a feeling Uber is going to keep going.” –Rebeccah Barger


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PHS grad dons many hats in making her first feature film

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Cece King on the set of “The Broken Ones.” She is the writer, producer and star of the indie movie.

BY SCOTT MORGAN How many people reading this have ever come up with an idea for a movie while they were in the Philippines? No? OK, how about this one: How many of you have ever let a real film crew from Los Angeles use your living room as a set in a movie that someone came up with while in the Philippines? You’d have to be Cece King to be the former and a member of Marti Moseley’s family to be the latter. And if you’re none of these individuals, sit back, because it’s a good story how all this came about. Let’s start in Florida, where King, 27, born and raised in Princeton, went to college at Lynn University in Boca Raton to study communications. As many a college kid finds, King’s original plans to find something in the communications field led her elsewhere. In her case, Italy, where she went at 20 to study things like set design — a field close to that of her “such a rock star” mother, Judy, who owns Judy King Interiors at 44 Spring Street. King is also the daughter of Andrew King, a bond trader who died in the 9/11 attacks in New York. Over a summer break from her Italian studies, King read a book — “Twilight: Director’s Notebook” by the film’s production designer, Catherine Hardwicke, that compelled King to move to Los Angeles and enter the world of cinema. She went to film school there and started acting in 2013 (and has had some solidly regular work since she began). One of her roles came in a film called “Treasure Hunters,” which was the movie that took King to the South Pacific. She’d been inspired by a spate of

the quadruple-threat women — writer, producer, director, actor — who are redefining the indie film world. King had been shooting for a month in the Philippines and then removed herself to an island, where a scene on a train between two characters popped into her head. And by “popped,” it was more like a champagne cork because what followed that pop was 60 pages of draft one of a feature film script called “The Broken Ones.” By the time the shooting script was ready, King was back in Los Angeles and she knew two things: She was making this movie and she was going to shoot a lot of it in Princeton. This, by the way, is a mighty ambitious idea for a small-budget indie production. And no, King won’t reveal the budget, just that it’s “in the low-to-moderate end of the indie scale.” That means less than $2 million, and King said she and her coproducers “took a tactical approach” to finding investors to finance the film. King wanted Princeton because it fits her visual style. Princeton’s architecture, its look and feel, its general vibe all found their way into the story of two “pretty broken” young people who meet and help each other overcome overwhelming personal fears. Making this film was never in doubt. “I never thought in my mind that this isn’t going to happen,” King said. “It wasn’t a matter of if.” One thing to keep in mind is that “The Broken Ones” is King’s way of creating a solid role for herself to play. Roles in films overall can be tough to get, and often, young women at the beginning of their careers in the industry are cast in roles involving short shorts and tiny tops.


Cece King with Constance Shulman, who appears in King’s indie film “The Broken Ones.” Shulman has appeared in a number of movies and television shows, including “Orange is the New Black.”

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Better roles exist, they’re just tough to find. “There’s lots of good material out there, but as an actor, it’s hard to get in on good material,” she said. So she wrote some of her own. Not all of “The Broken Ones” was shot in Princeton. Some was shot in New York, and much of it is still being worked on, and shot, in L.A., until shooting wraps up in, probably, April. “I wanted to shoot all over New Jersey,” King said. “But there’s just so much in L.A. Basically, everybody’s here (in L.A.).” The “everybody” King refers to is a rather impressive collection of actors and crew. The cast includes Margaret Colin, who has performed in large productions like “Independence Day” and “Blue Bloods;” James Russo, probably most notable of late as the slave runner left to a suddenly freed group of slaves at the beginning of “Django Unchained;” and Constance Shulman, whose resume includes “Orange Is the New Black.” These are people who have worked with some of the top directors and cinematographers around, but care about good storytelling so much that they want to help on films like King’s that have something to say, she said. King largely credits New York-based casting director Adrienne Stern, who pulled together an enviable talent pool, as she has for other indie flicks like “The Believer” and “Boy Wonder.” The crew also includes first-time director Elyse Niblett and cinematographer John Hudak Jr., who has cut his teeth on dozens of short films and the camera crews of several features. What was shot in Princeton was partially made possible by Marti Moseley, an agent at Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Real Estate on Nassau Street. Moseley, “a longtime family friend” of the Kings, said she wanted to help Cece make her film and offered a couple properties as sets. One was an unoccupied house on Cleveland Lane, which was one of Moseley’s listings. “The homeowners were incredibly gracious and

accommodating,” she said. Another was Moseley’s own living room in her Princeton home. “It was unusual,” she laughs. “They were in my home over the course of three days. I was very impressed with all that was involved — the number of people, the amount of equipment. This was the real deal.” The crew, Moseley said, made only small adjustments in the house, and put everything back in the proper place. But no one in her family made a cameo. Moseley allowed the cast and crew to shoot for free because “it was a wonderful opportunity for me to feel like I could help her,” she said. The crew also shot at the Peacock Inn on Bayard Lane and on the grounds of Educational Testing Service just outside Princeton. To say that King is grateful for the help she’s been getting in making her first screenplay into an actual movie is an understatement for the ages. Any talk of shooting quickly steers around to how blessed she feels to have so many people at so many levels doing so much to make “The Broken Ones” as good as it can be. King expects the film to be ready for release in 2016, and plans to enter it into as many festivals (yes, Sundance included) as possible. As for what making the film has taught her, well … for one thing, it’s taught her to enjoy wearing so many hats. She’s the writer, star, and producer of “The Broken Ones,” and the producer hat, she said, is a new one. Shooting has also taught her that you can’t always get what you want, but you can get damn close if you work for it. Filmmaking is a lot of compromise and sacrifice, but the end goal, if worked on hard, is worth it. “All you can do as a filmmaker is tell the best story you can,” King said. “It’s about putting yourself out there, about trying to celebrate story. It’s much bigger than you as a writer.”

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Using only a viola and loop pedal, Meyer creates layers of sound BY BILL SANSERVINO

bsanservino@mercerspace.com

Armed with only her instrument and a loop machine — an electronic device mostly used by guitar players, accomplished violist Jessica Meyer turns her live performances into a one-woman stringed orchestra. Meyer will be the featured speaker and performer at the Princeton Public Library on March 4 as she talks about how people can tap into their own inner creativity. The talk, which starts at 7 p.m. in the Community Room, is part of the Princeton Symphony Orchestra Soundtracks series and is co-sponsored by the library. The Soundtracks Series explores music and related topics, including background on the music that the PSO performs, concert themes, and what happens behind the scenes at Princeton’s only professional orchestra, the PSO. Meyer’s presentation is a prelude to the March 15 PSO Classical Concert Series, “Soulful Reflections,” which will feature cellist Zuill Bailey performing Schumann’s Cello Concerto in A Minor and Massenet’s “Meditation” from Thais. The concert is at Richardson Auditorium. As part of her talk, Meyer will tell the story of her journey from performer to rediscovering a talent for composing that she had in her youth. “I wrote a lot as a child and I spent hours at the piano just improvising and making stuff up as a way to process my emotional life, especially as a teenager,” Meyer said. “Then I stopped for 20 years, but there was a very clear moment after becoming a parent, after having my son, when I needed a way to emotionally process what I was experiencing.” Meyer purchased a small piano for her apartment and did some work with a singer-songwriter for a while. “But it wasn’t until I found the loop machine that I really seriously got back into composition,” she said. By using an effects pedal by Boss called a Loop Station, Meyer samples segments of her music as she plays, and then uses the machine to play them back in a continuous loop. The pedal allows her to layer the looping segments on top of each other as she performs, blending them to create a onewoman orchestra. Meyer used the method on her debut album, “Sounds of Being,” which was released in November, and will demonstrate the technique during a 45-minute live performance of music from her CD as part of the library event. In addition to her solo performances, Meyer is the co-founder of the awardwinning and critically acclaimed contemporary music collective counter) induction. She has also appeared with other new music ensembles in New York City, such

Violist Jessica Meyer performs with her loop pedal and speaks at the Princeton Public Librar y on March 4. The event is a prelude to a March 15 Princeton Symphony Orchestra event, “Soulful Reflections,” at Richardson Auditorium. as Ear Heart Music, the American Modern Ensemble, the Either/Or Ensemble, and the Argento Chamber Ensemble, as well as ensembles such as the East Coast Chamber Orchestra (ECCO), and Classical Jam. Last year, her projects on baroque viola included collaborations with the Gotham Chamber Opera at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and with the Paul Taylor Dance Company. In October, she returned to the Met for the debut of her new ensemble, “The Pipeline Collective,” where fellow soloists performed music they com-

12Princeton Echo | March 2015

posed themselves. As the owner of “Chops Beyond the Practice Room,” Meyer coaches and conducts workshops that help musicians improve networking, communication and entrepreneurial skills to help them advocate for their own careers. Her workshops have been featured at The Juilliard School, the Curtis Institute of Music, for the TAs of the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Manhattan School of Music, the Longy School of Music, New York University, and the Chamber Music America Conference. Meyer said that a major inspiration for

her work is Reggie Watts, a comedian and musician whose improvised musical sets are created using only his voice, a keyboard and a loop machine. She first saw Watts perform at a club in Brooklyn, where she had gone to see her friend work as a DJ. “I didn’t know who Reggie Watts was, and he got up there (on stage) with a loop machine, and it was just him standing there turning some knobs and pressing some buttons, basically pulling off the most virtuosic vocal melodies I’ve ever seen,” Meyer said. “He was beatboxing and singing and building up all of these textures and layers and rhythms and just killing it. I remember thinking, ‘I want to do that’.” The experience made her think about approaching the viola a whole different way. “I spent many years exploring lots of different colors on my instrument, but not a lot of rhythms,” she said. “Since I’m a closet percussionist, I wanted to try a drum on my instrument and maybe sing a little bit. I thought, ‘that’s my ticket, I just have to go and get one of those things’.” After telling him she wanted one, Meyer’s husband bought her a loop machine for her birthday and she began the process of experimenting with it. “That’s how I started writing again,” she said. One representation of how this all comes together is a song on her album titled “Afflicted Mantra,” where she used the Loop Station to create myriad layers and performs vocals as well. “That piece really convinced me, not only of the importance of writing as a cathartic process and as a way to distill what’s happening, but also the importance of why I need to keep doing it,” she said. “Like many musicians, I am prone to obsessive thinking,” Meyer said of the piece. “Sometimes, this can work in one’s favor — relentless fervor supplies endless energy as tasks get done and goals are achieved. By the same token, it can easily be destructive and the root cause of anyone’s pain — mentally, emotionally, and even physically. The text of this piece originated from a series of poems I wrote in 2010 during a particularly rough patch.” Meyer said that she often turns teachings from yoga to help break her obsessive-compulsive cycles, and “Afflicted Mantra” is a manifestation of many of those concepts. “What delivers momentary feelings of euphoria or even an intense sense of connectedness in one moment can turn into the very thing that repeatedly allows one to become undone,” she said. “With the loop machine, I am able to create my own harmonium, while the Baroque bow allows me to execute certain harmonics and emote the expressive effects the piece needed.”


Dawes to appear at poetry festival BY BILL SANSERVINO

bsanservino@mercerspace.com

“I believe poetry is important. It teaches us and trains us,” said Kwame Dawes, the award-winning Ghanaianborn Jamaican poet. Dawes, who is one of 12 poets to be featured at the Lewis Center’s 2015 Princeton Poetry Festival this month, will read his works and also be part of a panel on “The Place of Poetry.” The festival, which features national and international artists, will take place March 13 and 14 in Richardson Auditorium. Dawes shared some of his thoughts on poetry in a recorded interview with Knox College posted on YouTube. “There’s a kind of muscular training of the capacity to empathize that poetry gives us,” said Dawes. “I’m unabashed about my feeling that everybody should read poetry. Everybody should attempt to write poetry, because the capacity to empathize, while it might innate, is actually a trained skill.” One way to strengthen that skill is for people to use their imaginations and try relating the lives of others to their own. “If somebody says to me, ‘I can’t imagine how you’re feeling, because I feel distant from you,’ whether it’s racially or gender-wise or geographically, my response is ‘Try’,” Dawes said. “The effort is the effort of the imagination. The effort is the effort of trying to imagine what I’m feeling. You support that effort by trying to find as much of what I have been dealing with, bringing that into the pool and then allowing what you have carried in your life to mix into that to arrive at something we call empathy.” “Look out there. Look at all of that stuff out there. Grab it,” he added. “You think that there’s nothing to write about? Look at everything that’s out there to write about and make it come alive.” Dawes is the author of 16 books of poetry and numerous books of fiction, non-fiction, criticism and drama. He is the editor of Prairie Schooner and professor of English at the University of Nebraska, and also teaches in the Pacific MFA Writing program. Dawes won an Emmy Award in 2009 for LiveHopeLove, an interactive website based on the HOPE: Living and Loving with AIDS project in Jamaica. In 2011, Dawes reported on HIV AIDS after the earthquake in Haiti and his poems, blogs, articles and documentary work were a key part of the post-earthquake Haiti reporting by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting that won the National Press Club Joan Friedenberg Award for Online Journalism. Despite his activism, Dawes said he doesn’t write his poetry with a social or political agenda in mind. “I don’t think of it in that way,” said Dawes. “I think that artwork can have that impact, but as an intention, it’s not there (for me). I do not write the poems to change anything. There’s a distinction between what I do to create in the art and what happens to the art after I’ve created it.” In fact, Dawes said there’s no way to plan the impact of his work. For example, when he writes poems about Haiti, it’s

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(609) 277-1277 Kwame Dawes is one of 12 poets to be featured at the 2015 Princeton Poetr y Festival. not with the intention of getting people to donate money. “I’m writing for the people who experience what I’m writing about. When they read the poem, I hope they will say to me, ‘That’s it. That’s what I’ve been feeling and I didn’t know how to say it’.” Organized by Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and Princeton professor Paul Muldoon, the Poetry Festival has grown since it first debuted six years ago. “The festival started off with a very strong line up — Seamus Heaney and John Ashbery in that first year — so part of the trick has been to try to maintain that standard,” said Muldoon, professor of creative writing in Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts. Muldoon is also director of the Princeton Atelier and chair of the University’s Fund for Irish Studies. As with the first three festivals, there is a strong international aspect in the selection of poets. This is by design, said the Irishborn Muldoon, to counteract a tendency toward insularity in the United States. “Princeton is truly an international venue; writers not associated with the university live in the area, and we like the idea of bringing internationally renowned writers into that mix.” Muldoon said. “We’re also committed to giving the wider community the chance to celebrate with us and our students.” International poets joining Dawes include British poet Paul Farley, Scottish poet Kathleen Jamie, Belarusian poet Valzhyna Mort, Polish poet and translator Tomasz Rózycki and Vietnamese poet Ocean Vuong. Also featured are seven poets from the United States, including Ellen Bryant Voigt, finalist for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award; Major Jackson, winner of a Whiting Writers’ Award and finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; Maureen N. McLane, winner of the National Critics Circle Award in autobiography; as well as Ada Limón, Michael Robbins and Ray Young Bear, a member of the Native American Meskwaki Nation. Tickets are $15 for each day, free for students and $25 for a two-day Festival Pass. They are available through Princeton University Ticketing at (609) 2589220, on-line, or at the Frist Campus Center Ticket Office.

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS Sunday March 1

sity department of Music, Cafe Vivian, Frist Campus Center, 609-258-2800. princeton. edu/music. Free. 11 p.m.

Winter Farmers Market, Slow Food central new Jersey, Tre Piani, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609-577-5113. www.slowfoodcentralnj.org. Locally grown cheeses, breads, baked goods, produce, jams, wine, mushrooms, and more. Live music. $2 admission. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. richardson chamber Players, Princeton university, Richardson Auditorium, 609-2589220. puorchestra.org. “Pierrot’s Stage.” $15. 3 p.m. Family Matters, Westminster choir college, Bristol Chapel, Princeton, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. Kenneth Ellison on clarinet, Suzanne Lehrer on piano, and Phyllis Alpert Lehrer on piano. Works by J.S. and J.C. Bach, Felix and Fanny Mendelssohn, Robert and Clara Schumann, and Lili and Nadia Boulanger. Free. 7:30 p.m.

Friday March 6

Family Furniture, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. Drama set in the early 1950s by A.R. Gurney about morals and manners. $29.50 to $31.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m. Princeton university orchestra, Princeton university, Richardson Auditorium, 609-2589220. puorchestra.org. Respigh’s “Pines of Rome.” $15. 7:30 p.m. Folk dance, Princeton Folk dance, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-912-1272. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner needed. $5. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Monday March 2

SaTurday March 7

Paddy Maloney and the Chieftains, Mccarter Theater, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Sean Keane, fiddle, Matt Molloy, flute, and Kevin Conneff, bodhran drum. 7:30 p.m.

TueSday March 3

The city Lost and Found Film Series, Betts Auditorium, School of Architecture, Princeton, 609-258-5662. www.artmuseum.princeton.edu. Los Sures and Living Los Sures are screened. 6 p.m. Keith Franklin Jazz Quartet, Witherspoon Grill, 57 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-9246011. 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. International Folk Dance, Princeton Folk dance, Kristina Johnson Pop-Up Studio, Princeton Shopping Center, 609-921-9340. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Ethnic dances of many countries using original music. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner needed. $5. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Princeton Sound Kitchen, Princeton university department of Music, Taplin Auditorium, 609-258-2800. princeton.edu/music. Video works and multi-channel audio works by Princeton composers. Free. 8 p.m.

WedneSday March 4

cornerstone community Kitchen, Princeton united Methodist church, Nassau at Vandeventer Street, Princeton, 609-9242613. www.princetonumc.org. Hot meals

Paddy Maloney and the Chieftains are at McCarter Theatre on March 2. served, prepared by TASK. Free. 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. National Theater Event, Garden Theater, Nassau Street, Princeton. thegardentheatre. com. Screening of “Of Mice and Men,” the Broadway revival starring James Franco and Chris O’Dowd. $18. 7:30 p.m.

ThurSday March 5

Grade School Visiting Morning, Waldorf School, 1062 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, 609-466-1970. www.princetonwaldorf.org. 8:30 a.m. Tribute to Women annual awards dinner, YWCA Princeton, Hyatt Regency, Carnegie Center, West Windsor, 609-497-2100. www.ywcaprinceton.org. Annual celebration for honorees who have made significant contributions in their professional fields and the community. Honorees include Nyaradzayi Gumbonzvanda, World

YWCA; Karen Andrade Mims, UIH Family Partners; Maria Evans, Arts Council of Princeton; Patricia Fernandez-Kelly, Princeton University; Robin Fogel, Robin Fogel & Associates; Mary Sue Henifin, Buchanan, Ingersoll & Rooney; Susan Hoskins, Princeton Senior Resource Center; Jayne O’Connor, Capital Health; and Elyse Pivnick, Isles. $165. 5:15 p.m. to 9 p.m. Meeting and Program, Garden State african Violet club, Robbinsville Library, 42 Robbinsville-Allentown Road, Robbinsville, 609-2597095. www.princetonol.com/groups/gsavc. Free. E-mail gsavcmail@gmail.com for information. 7 p.m. Argentine Tango, Viva Tango, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-948-4448. vivatango.org. No partner necessary. $15. 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. university Sonny rollins ensemble and university Free to Be ensemble, Princeton univer-

early child open house and Sample class, Waldorf School, 1062 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, 609-466-1970. www.princetonwaldorf. org. Ages 2-5 with caregiver. 9 a.m. ronald e. hatcher Science on Saturday Lecture Series, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Forrestal Campus, Route 1 North, Plainsboro, 609-243-2121. www.pppl.gov. “Once Upon a Time in Kamchatka: The Extraordinary Search for Natural Quasicrystals” presented by Paul Steinhardt, director of Princeton Center for Theoretical Science. The program is aimed at a high school level on a wide variety of science topics. For students, parents, teachers, and community members. Photo ID required. Free. 9:30 a.m. Getting to Know Your Digital SLR Camera, Princeton Photo Workshop, Princeton Theological Seminary, 20 Library Place, Princeton, 609-921-3519. www.princetondigitalphotoworkshop.com. Basic photography techniques for ages 12 to 17. Presented by Frank Veronsky. Register. $59. 10 a.m. to noon. Less is More: Painting with a Limited Color Palette, Grounds For Sculpture, 126 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www. groundsforsculpture.org. Demonstration, personal instruction, group critique and outdoor painting exercises. Materials list provided upon registration; participants will need to bring their own. Instructor: Joe Gy-

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cheese, beef, eggs, pickles, honey, baked goods, candles, and more. 11 a.m. Baskerville: a Sherlock holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. 7:30 p.m. Argentine Tango, Viva Tango, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-948-4448. vivatango.org. No partner necessary. $15. 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.

Friday March 13

Voices Chorale features Irish Harp and Song with the Jameson Sisters at Nassau Presbyterian Church on March 14. urcsak. $180 members; $195 non-members. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Family events, Garden Theater, Nassau Street, Princeton. thegardentheatre.com. Screening of “The Lorax.” $4. 10:30 a.m. Workshop, astrological Society of Princeton, 173 South Harrison Street, Princeton, 609-924-4311. www.aspnj.org. “Follow the Ruler” presented by Janet Booth. Register. $60. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Meeting, Bhakti Vedanta Institute, 20 Nassau Street, Princeton, 732-604-4135. bviscs.org. Discussion, meditation, and Indian vegetarian luncheon. Register by E-mail to princeton@bviscs.org. 2 p.m. Family Furniture, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. Drama set in the early 1950s by A.R. Gurney about morals and manners. $29.50 to $31.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m. Latin Dance, central Jersey dance Society, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. Lesson followed by open dancing. No partner needed. $15. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Princeton university orchestra, Princeton university, Richardson Auditorium, 609-2589220. puorchestra.org. Respighi’s “Pines of Rome.” $15. 7:30 p.m.

Sunday March 8

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SaTurday March 14

ronald e. hatcher Science on Saturday Lecture Series, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Forrestal Campus, Route 1 North, Plainsboro, 609-243-2121. www.pppl.gov. “Scientific Opportunities and Challenges in the Upgraded National Spherical Torus Experiments” presented by Jonathan Menard, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The program is aimed at a high school level on a wide variety of science topics. Free. 9:30 a.m. Graffiti Art Class, hive 307, 40 Muirhead Avenue, Trenton. www.jerseygraf.com/graffiti/ vicious-styles-art-class-2015. This session covers history, styles and traditions. Classes are held every Saturday to March 28. $180 for three sessions. $70 for one session. $20 each class. Register. 10 a.m. Winter Farmers Market, Slow Food central new Jersey, D&R Greenway, Princeton, 609577-5113. www.slowfoodcentralnj.org. Locally grown cheeses, breads, baked goods, produce, jams, wine, mushrooms, and more. Wineries and live music. $3 admission. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

See CALENDAR, Page 16

ney about morals and manners. $29.50 to $31.50 includes dessert. 1:30 p.m. Breath of Paris, Westminster choir college, Bristol Chapel, Princeton, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. Elem Eley, baritone and J.J. Penna on piano. Works by Boyle, Faure, Milhaud, Poulenc, and Debussy. Free. 7:30 p.m.

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TueSday March 10

Baskerville: a Sherlock holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Through March 29. 7:30 p.m. International Folk Dance, Princeton Folk dance, Kristina Johnson Pop-Up Studio, Princeton Shopping Center, 609-921-9340. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Ethnic dances of many countries using original music. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner needed. $5. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

WedneSday March 11

Baskerville: a Sherlock holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. 7:30 p.m. Jazz Vespers, Princeton university chapel, Princeton campus, 609-258-3654. www. princeton.edu. A service of poetry, music, and meditation featuring members of the Chapel Choir and Jazz Vespers Ensemble. Free. 8 p.m.

ThurSday March 12

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CALENDAR continued from Page 15 Less is More: Painting with a Limited Color Palette, Grounds For Sculpture, 126 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www. groundsforsculpture.org. Demonstration, personal instruction, group critique and outdoor painting exercises. Materials list provided upon registration; participants will need to bring their own. Instructor: Joe Gyurcsak. $180 members; $195 non-members. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Meeting, Bhakti Vedanta Institute, 20 Nassau Street, Princeton, 732-604-4135. bviscs.org. Discussion, meditation, and Indian vegetarian luncheon. Register by E-mail to princeton@bviscs.org. 2 p.m. Baskerville: a Sherlock holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. Family Furniture, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. Drama set in the early 1950s by A.R. Gurney about morals and manners. $29.50 to $31.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m. Ballroom Blitz, central Jersey dance Society, Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 50 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, 609-945-1883.

www.centraljerseydance.org. Lesson followed by open dancing. No partner needed. $12. E-mail ballroom@centraljerseydance. org for information. 7 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. chita rivera, Mccarter Theater, 91 University Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Singer, dancer, and Tony award winner. 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. a Midsummer night’s dream, actors’ neT, 635 North Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville, PA, 215295-3694. www.actorsnetbucks.org. $20. 8 p.m. concert, Princeton Pro Musica, University Chapel, Princeton University, 609-683-5122. www.princetonpromusica.org. “A Festival of Choirs” for three choirs and orchestra includes works by Tavener, Byrd, Tallis, and Wadsworth. $25 to $60. 8 p.m.

Sunday March 15

Baskerville: a Sherlock holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. 2 p.m. Sunday Matinee Series, Grounds For Sculpture, 126 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, 609-5860616. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Visual Acoustics: The Modernism of Julius Shulman. Post-Discussion with James Leynse, Architectural/Corporate Photographer, James

Lensye Photographer. 3 p.m. hiromi, Mccarter Theater, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Solo piano. 3 p.m. Classical Series: Soulful Reflections, Princeton Symphony orchestra, Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University, 609-497-0020. www.princetonsymphony.org. Works by Currier, Schumann, Sibelius, and Massenet. Zuill Baley, cello. Rossen Milanov conducts. Pre-concert lecture at 3 p.m. 4 p.m.

Monday March 16

Princeton chamber, Woodrow Wilson School, 609-924-1776. www.princetonchamber.org. Albert Einstein Memorial Lecture, with Nobel Prize winner Adam G. Riess. Free to attend. 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

TueSday March 17

St. Patrick’s day Party, alchemist & Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609924-5555. www.theaandb.com. Irish music, Guinness, Irish fare, and the annual Longbeard contest winner is revealed. noon. Keith Franklin Jazz Quartet, Witherspoon Grill, 57 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-9246011. 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. International Folk Dance, Princeton Folk dance, Kristina Johnson Pop-Up Studio, Princeton Shopping Center, 609-9219340. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Ethnic dances of many countries using original music. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner needed. $5. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

ThurSday March 19

Westminster conservatory at nassau, Westminster choir college, Niles Chapel, Nassau Presbyterian Church, Princeton, 609-9212663. www.rider.edu. Hyun Soo Lim and Dezheng Ping on violin. Free. 12:15 p.m. Baskerville: a Sherlock holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. 7:30 p.m. Argentine Tango, Viva Tango, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-948-4448. vivatango.org. No partner necessary. $15. 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.

Friday March 20

Baskerville: a Sherlock holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. 8 p.m. Folk dance, Princeton Folk dance, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-912-1272. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner needed. $5. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Mary Gauthier, Princeton Folk Music Society, Christ Congregation Church, 50 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-799-0944. www.princetonfolk.org. $20. 8:15 p.m.

SaTurday March 21

Graffiti Art Class, hive 307, 40 Muirhead Ave-

Soprano Robin Leigh Massie, above, Amy Zorn, contralto, and Thomas Faracco, tenor, perform at Westminster Choir College’s Bristol Chapel on March 29. nue, Trenton. www.jerseygraf.com/graffiti/ vicious-styles-art-class-2015. This session covers history, styles and traditions. Classes are held every Saturday to March 28. $180 for three sessions. $70 for one session. $20 each class. Register. 10 a.m. Meet the Music, Princeton university concerts, Richardson Auditorium, 609-2582800. princetonuniversityconcerts.org. “Inspector Pulse Pops a String.” For children 6 to 12 and their families. 1 p.m. Meeting, Bhakti Vedanta Institute, 20 Nassau Street, Princeton, 732-604-4135. bviscs.org. Discussion, meditation, and Indian vegetarian luncheon. Register by E-mail to princeton@bviscs.org. 2 p.m. Baskerville: a Sherlock holmes Mystery, McCarter Theater at Matthews, 91 University Place, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. california Mix, central Jersey dance Society, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. Lessons followed by social dance. No partner needed. Refreshments. $12. 6:30 p.m.

Sunday March 22

Westminster conservatory Showcase, Westminster conservatory, Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University, 609-258-9220. www.rider.edu/arts. The program features ensembles from the Westminster Conservatory of Music including the Westminster Community Orchestra, Westminster Conservatory Children’s Choir, and the Trenton Children’s Choir. $15. 3 p.m.

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TueSday March 24

International Folk Dance, Princeton Folk dance, Kristina Johnson Pop-Up Studio, Princeton Shopping Center, 609-921-9340. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Ethnic dances of many countries using original music. $5. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

WedneSday March 25

rat’s restaurant presents Gastro Pub & Belgium Beer dinner, Grounds For Sculpture, 126 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Featuring the artisanal beers of Belgium and gastro pub food. $85 plus tax and gratuity. For information and reservations call (609) 5847800. 6:30 p.m.

ThurSday March 26

Argentine Tango, Viva Tango, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-948-4448. vivatango.org. No partner necessary. $15. 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Lisa Batiashvili, Violin and Paul Lewis, Piano, Princeton university concerts, Richardson Auditorium, 609-258-2800. princetonuniversityconcerts.org. Program of works by Schubert, Bach, and Beethoven. 8 p.m.

Friday March 27

Folk dance, Princeton Folk dance, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-912-1272. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner needed. $5. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Spring concert, Westminster choir college, Bristol Chapel, Princeton, 609-921-2663. www. rider.edu. Westminster Schola Cantorum, conducted by James Jordan. $20. 8 p.m.

SaTurday March 28

Meeting, Bhakti Vedanta Institute, 20 Nassau Street, Princeton, 732-604-4135. bviscs.org. Discussion, meditation, and Indian vegetarian luncheon. Register by E-mail to prince-

ton@bviscs.org. 2 p.m. Latin Sensation, central Jersey dance Society, Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 40 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. Lessons followed by social dance. No partner needed. Refreshments. $12. 6:30 p.m.

Sunday March 29

richardson chamber Players, Princeton university concerts, Richardson Auditorium, 609-258-2800. princetonuniversityconcerts. org. “Pierrot’s Stage,” mixed chamber works by Schoenberg and Biber. 3 p.m. robin Leigh Massie and Friends, Westminster choir college, Bristol Chapel, Princeton, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. Robin Leigh Massie, soprano, Amy Zorn, contralto, and Thomas Faracco, tenor. Stephen Yarbrough’s song cycle Julian’s Showings and other works. Free. 3 p.m. Princeton cares, Princeton university Players, Frist Film and Performance Theatre, 609258-3000. www.princeton.edu/pup. 8 p.m.

Monday March 30

art exhibit, Princeton day School, The Great Road, Princeton, 609-924-6700. www.pds. org. “In Search of (Im)Possibilities” by Matthew Cordell. On view to April 23. 5 p.m.

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Keith Franklin Jazz Quartet, Witherspoon Grill, 57 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-9246011. 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. The Peking acrobats, Mccarter Theater, 91 University Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Gymnasts, cylclists, jugglers, acrobats, and tumblers. 7:30 p.m. International Folk Dance, Princeton Folk dance, Kristina Johnson Pop-Up Studio, Princeton Shopping Center, 609-921-9340. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Ethnic dances of many countries using original music. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner needed. $5. 7:30 p.m.

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March 2015 | Princeton Echo17


From the Princeton Merchants Association

Put your best beard forward BY ARTHUR KUKODA St. Patrick’s Day at the Alchemist & Barrister is where the wearin’ o’ the green meets the wearin’ o’ the Longbeard. This year marks the 35th anniversary of A&B’s Longbeard Contest, where Princeton-area fellows sport their best face moss for fun and to help raise money for a great local cause. This year is our first animal charity. Funds raised from the 2015 Longbeard Contest will benefit SAVE Animal Rescue (www.save-animal.org), which is hoping to complete a new shelter for homeless pets in Montgomery Township. The site was chosen as a nod to one of our employees, who recently rescued a pet from an abusive trainer. The Longbeard Contest runs from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Alchemist & Barrister on Witherspoon Street, when a local barber will cut beard hairs from entrants to see how they measure up. And if you think you have the stuff to grow a beard but not an epic beard, no worries. You can come in first in one of the other categories we make up as we go — shortest beard, ugliest beard, whitest beard, handsomest beard, most creative beard … we’ll find something for you. This year, some 18 fellows signed up, paying their $25 entry fees for the bragging rights to Princeton’s most righteous facial hair, and a plaque to make sure everyone knows he has it. All entry fees go straight to the charity of choice. Other prizes than bragging rights come through the generosity of our great business community. After all, the Longbeard Contest isn’t just an A&B thing, it’s a community event supported by lots of local businesses that donate prizes — good prizes, too, we’ve given away bikes, TVs, MP3 players — and gift certificates. Everyone does something to pitch in, to help keep the contest fun, and to make sure a great time happens for a great cause. The contest started back in 1980 as a nod to Leon Uris’ novel, Trinity, in which the hero escapes a Northern Ireland prison by growing a great beard and walking right out the front door, under the guards’ noses. That’s a great enough story for us to celebrate anyway, but the Alchemist & Barrister formally got whiskers growing when then-owner Tom Schmierer challenged this brother, Jake, to a beard-off. The public liked the idea so much that area fellows joined in, all in the spirit of raising funds for a local charity and putting a positive spin on St. Paddy’s Day. Thirty-five years later, here we are, still growing out our whiskers for charity and fun. Beard-growing season for this year’s contestants kicked off between Feb. 1 and 5, when entrants came in baby-faced, signed up, and then set out for six weeks of growing. By the way, there’s no need to be

18Princeton Echo | March 2015

Irish to enter. Our contestants come from all walks of life. We get Princeton University grad students, 20-somethings, 30-somethings, seniors, married guys, single guys, Irish guys and Irishfor-a-Day guys. We’ve even had a couple Princeton mayors enter the contest over the years — Marvin Reed came pretty close not long ago. And Howard Levy, the basketball coach at Princeton University almost won himself some bragging rights a few years back as well. And yes, I always enter the contest myself, though I never win. I’ve come close a few times, but I still don’t get the bragging rights. Though I do keep the beard until the beginning of the next contest the following year. One thing — you can only win three times. After that, we retire you with a nice plaque in the hall, because, well, we like new faces in the contest, and what fun would it be if one beard always won? So why still do we do this after all these years? Because it’s so much fun and because it brings so much of the community together. As a business owner, you have to be civic-minded. There’s no way around it. The great thing is, none of us in the Princeton Merchants Association have to force it. Bringing the community together and giving back to it just come naturally to us. The Longbeard Contest is our personal favorite way of giving back, here at the A&B. And over the years we’ve raised many thousands of dollars for so many worthy organizations. Typically, we raise anywhere from $3,000 to $10,000 per contest, depending on the organization. We’ve raised money for HiTOPS youth health center, Princeton Nursery School, the William E. Baker Trust, which helps raise awareness of spinal cord injuries, and our most successful campaign so far, the Wounded Warrior Project. The contest is free to watch, but there’s a $2 cover because we have a band, Langaroo, who play the great old Irish ballads and standards. If you can’t grow a beard — or if you’ve grown a few so well that we’ve retired you — come out and watch and have a great St. Paddy’s Day for a great local cause. Arthur Kukoda is a co-owner of Alchemist and Barrister and a member of the Princeton Merchants Association. The Hometown Princeton column is provided monthly by the PMA. On the web: princetonmerchants.org


March 2015 | Princeton Echo19


FOOD AND DRINK

PHOTO BY SUZETTE J. LUCAS

' T I S

T H E

BY PAT TANNER Rarely has a restaurant debuted in the Princeton area that has been so swiftly and thoroughly embraced by the dining-out public as has Seasons 52, which opened in MarketFair in late 2014. In no time flat, snagging a Friday or Saturday dinner reservation for any of its 284 seats became impossible unless you booked a week in advance or were willing to dine before 5 or after 8:45 p.m. (Reservations for Valentine’s weekend were snatched up two weeks ahead of the holiday.) One local restaurant critic even booked a table for her family’s Thanksgiving meal. Not bad for a chain restaurant inside a mall — albeit an upscale chain restaurant inside an upscale mall. “Guests keep telling me there’s nothing like this in the area, that we are filling a niche,” says Kerry Hennessy McNulty, the restaurant’s general manager. “We resonate with the young, the old, those who like to eat well, those who demand atmosphere.” The MarketFair restaurant — in the space that had been Barnes & Noble, which relocated to the other end of the mall — is the 42nd Seasons 52 to open around the country since 2003. Its parent company is Darden, whose other brands include Olive Garden and Longhorn Steakhouse. But Seasons 52 has less in common with those and more in common with Darden’s other fine-

dining property: the Capital Grille group of steakhouses. It resembles that wellregarded brand in its clubby, gleaming, wood-toned ambiance, but instead of steaks, Seasons 52 promises a globetrotting menu that changes with the seasons and features fresh ingredients combined into well-balanced dishes that never exceed 475 calories. If this sounds like a recipe for tiny portions of bland diet food, Seasons 52’s satisfied clientele begs to differ. In fact, recipes are cannily crafted to deliver maximum satisfaction within

the size of a double shot glass and costing a mere $2.75. Winter flavors include mocha macchiato with caramel, lemon curd with blueberries, key lime pie, pecan pie, carrot cake, chocolate and peanut butter, double fudge brownie, and cannoli with raspberry sauce. Lunch has a particularly international flair — Vietnamese banh mi sandwiches, Korean lettuce wraps, black bean tacos, shrimp scampi, hummus (two kinds: minted edamame and roasted red pepper) — but also all-American favorites like burgers with housemade pickles

“Guests keep telling me there’s nothing like this in the area, that we are filling a niche.” -Kerry Hennessy McNulty, Seasons 52 general manager that limitation. Flatbreads, for example, have a crisp, cracker-like base more like lavash, the Middle Eastern bread, rather than, say, soft, caloriedense focaccia. (A typical selection of five to seven flatbreads is offered, and includes blackened steak and blue cheese, artichoke and goat cheese, and lobster and fresh mozzarella.) In keeping within the calorie limit, dessert has been finessed into “signature mini indulgences.” Guests choose from among seven varieties of parfait, each

20Princeton Echo | March 2015

and barbecued chicken salad. The dinner menu, while still eclectic, is a virtual hit parade of everyone’s favorite proteins paired with interesting sides. With an average dinner entrée price of $21.50, selections include, for example, six big, fat caramelized grilled sea scallops atop a bed of butternut squash and leek risotto with sautéed broccolini ($21.50 at lunch; $1 more at dinner) and grilled flatiron steak with “harvest” mushrooms, roasted tomato, broccolini, mashed potatoes and red wine sauce ($15.95).

Seasons 52 sports a full bar that includes signature seasonal cocktails and craft beers, as well as 52 wines by the glass (which change seasonally, like the menu), plus a list of 100 wines by the bottle. All are selected by George Miliotes, who is one of fewer than 250 souls worldwide to hold the title Master Sommelier. “I knew there was a demand for this in the area,” says McNulty, who in addition to her role as general manager is also in charge of booking the restaurant’s two private dining rooms. “There are so many corporate headquarters and pharmaceutical companies.” McNulty, 38, joined the company early in 2010. “Seasons 52 had just opened in Cherry Hill [mall], and I was hired as assistant managing partner.” (“Managing partner” is the company term for general manager, because a portion of the employee’s compensation is tied to performance.) “But then the GM left and I was promoted,” she says. McNulty was born and raised in Haddonfield. After graduating with a BA in French from Drew University in 1999, she went on to the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park, NY, where she worked front-of-the-house positions while earning her culinary degree. “I stumbled headfirst into frontof-the-house,” she says, and never looked back. From there she worked for two high-profile Philadelphia restaurateurs, Jose Garces and Stephen Starr. McNulty recently received an MBA from RutgersCamden and lives in Barrington (Camden County) with her husband Thomas and their three-year-old child. Thomas McNulty works right up the road from his wife: he is the general manager of P.F. Chang’s in West Windsor. That P.F. Chang’s also happens to be where Seasons 52’s executive chef/partner James Petersen last worked. Like McNulty, Petersen joined Seasons 52 in early 2010. He was based in the King of Prussia mall location in Pennsylvania, but was also called upon to open several other locations around the country. The chain seeks out mall locations in particular. In New Jersey, besides the Cherry Hill and Market Fair restaurants, there’s also one in Menlo Park mall and another is coming soon to Bridgewater Commons. The company is headquartered in Orlando, where it originated, and underwent what Petersen calls a “huge expansion” between 2010 and 2014, a pace that will now be slowing down. “The plan never was to be huge,” Petersen says. “Seasons 52 is still a close-knit company. For example, I have the corporate executive chef on speed dial, and he’ll call me to consult on developing new recipes.” A key component of his professional satisfaction, says this chef, is that while the chain’s core menu changes four times a year, dishes that appear in the “Chef’s Selections” column on the righthand side of the menu change weekly. “This allows us to stay current and bring in new things as they become available,” he says. Individual restaurant chefs also have latitude to offer what are normally dinner-only dishes at lunch. Recently, for example, this included an entrée of New Zealand venison chop and venison ragout with sweet potato mash and roasted peppers ($26.95). Chefs also can


Seasons 52 Executive Chef James Petersen ensures the restaurant’s menu focuses on only the freshest seasonal ingredients. (Photo by Suzette J. Lucas.)

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swap individual ingredients in and out, so instead of broccolini with the venison, as the company website lists, Petersen recently substituted asparagus. “And we source locally when we can,” he says. “There’s a whole corporate department that’s been able to source organic, freerange chickens from Pennsylvania’s Amish country for us, for example.” The 32-year-old Petersen oversees a kitchen staff of 38, all of whom have been with him since opening day (Nov. 1). “I’m proud to report that none have them have left!” he says of this rare phenomenon. As is company policy, he got to hire his own workers, and reports being shocked when he found “a line out the door” the day he arrived to begin interviewing candidates. Petersen lives in Chalfont, Pennsylvania, with his wife of two years. But he’s a local boy: he grew up and went to high school in Hillsborough, where his family still lives. He ventured out to Arizona for

college, earning a business degree from Arizona State University in 2005. During college he got on-the-job training while working at a local restaurant as manager and, eventually, sous chef. After college he stayed in Arizona, establishing a restaurant with two partners in Chandler, a suburb of Phoenix. “By then I had worked with executive chefs who had been certified by the American Culinar y Federation and I had also gained experience working front-of-house. You could say I basically got old-fashioned apprenticeship training,” he says. When the restaurant folded in 2007, Petersen returned home to central New Jersey and for the next two years managed the P.F. Chang’s on Rt. 1 in West Windsor, before joining Seasons 52. He takes pride in knowing that the single most frequent comment on Yelp! about any Seasons 52 restaurant is: “It doesn’t feel like a chain.”

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March 2015 | Princeton Echo21


FOOD FOR THOUGHT Anderson, Beard Award nominee, looks to May Elements re-opening BY PAT TANNER

ples, which will ring a bell with Agricola regulars, include Flatiron Steak with Green Garlic Gremolata, Spicy Mushroom Flatbread with Fried Egg, and Warm Granny Smith Apple Bread Pudding. The book can be preordered on Amazon, but for those who like to support local booksellers, farms, and at least one restaurant, or who might want to snag an autograph, events featuring Thomsen and Great Road Farm farmer Steve Tomlinson may be on the horizon.

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Whither the re-opening of Elements? “Late, late May” is the new target date for the debut of the relocated Elements, says Scott Anderson, executive chef and co-owner, whose Princeton restaurant has been among the highest rated in the state since it opened in 2008. In the interim, Anderson has been named a semifinalist for a 2015 James Beard Award in the category of Best Chef: MidAtlantic. Finalists will be announced on March 24, and the winner on May 4. Last June, when Anderson vacated the space on Bayard Lane/Route 206 that had housed his flagship property, he projected a January opening. Meanwhile, a brand new space is under construction on the second floor of the building at the corner of Hulfish and Witherspoon Street that houses Anderson’s second restaurant, Mistral. (The scaffolding is hard to miss.) He and partner Steve Distler own the entire two-story building. Anderson says typical construction and engineering issues have delayed progress, and is hoping that winter’s frigid temperatures won’t extend into early spring. “Once it’s warm enough to lay concrete, we could be open within five or six weeks,” he projects.

Gennaro’s Market celebrates grand opening

Scott Anderson, executive chef and co-owner of Elements, has been named a semifinalist for a 2015 James Beard Award. In the first months of Elements’ hiatus, Anderson traveled around the country doing guest-chef appearances at friends’ high-profile restaurants. These days, he and Mike Ryan, his chef and right-hand-man at Elements, are developing dishes for the opening menu. “Other than that,” Anderson admits,

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“we are bored out of our minds.” When asked if he is tempted to relieve the boredom by stepping into the kitchen at Mistral, which is run by chef Ben Nerenhausen, Anderson says he chooses not to interfere with a good thing. Several months ago Elements’ liquor license was transferred to Mistral, which had been BYOB, but which established a no-corkage-fee policy to accommodate patrons who still want to bring their own beer and wine. The same license will serve not only Mistral and Elements, but also an artisanal bar coming into the first level, which will be under the direction of Elements’ popular bar manager, Jamie Dodge. “It will be an extension of Mistral,” Anderson says. “People can enjoy a drink downstairs before heading up to Elements, or come straight up to the restaurant. Elements will have a full fine-wine list, our own signature cocktails, and premium liquors.” A key feature of the building’s design is an exterior elevator that will carry guests up to the new space. The dining room will sport a view of the open kitchen and only 30 seats, down from the original restaurant’s 80. Plans call for a private dining room as well.

Agricola cookbook to debut this Spring It seems fitting that a Jersey-born chef who put in serious time on the Northern California restaurant scene — including at the French Laundry — then came back home to head up a farm-to-table restaurant in Princeton would produce a cookbook with stylish, hyper-seasonal recipes. The Agricola Cookbook, written by that Witherspoon Street restaurant’s executive chef Josh Thomsen, is due out in late May. It promises 100 recipes inspired by produce from the restaurant’s own Great Road Farm in Skillman, as well as by the Garden State foragers, specialty growers, and other farms that supply the restaurant. Thomsen promises recipes that are “accessible and totally appealing.” Exam-

Over the last decade, Gennaro Costabile has quietly built a large and loyal following for his eponymous Italian restaurant on Route 206, including for private parties and off-premise catering. It was the success and growth of the catering operation, he says, that motivated him to open Gennaro’s Italian Market & Catering on Main Street in Kingston. I caught up with Costabile at the grand opening on Feb. 8, where he welcomed everyone to what he terms his “little neighborhood market.” Pride of place in the 2,000-square-foot space goes to two large cases that showcase a rotating selection of gourmet sandwiches and grab-n-go prepared foods, including Gennaro’s signature eggplant rolatini and fresh mozzarella. Elsewhere are breads (some made in-house, as is the mozz); cheeses; salumi; frozen store-made pasta and ravioli; refrigerated Gennaro sauces, soups, and desserts; and shelves laden with premium Italian olive oils, dried pastas, and other pantry items. The market is situated in a space that has seen a parade of gift shops come and go over the years. Costabile says that one day almost two years ago he drove by and saw a “For Sale” sign out front. “I had a vision,” he says, “I needed a bigger kitchen and I live only two blocks away!” Fast forward 18 months, and the space he now owns has not only seen a complete renovation, but has a 900-foot expansion on the back that houses a gleaming new commercial kitchen. The kitchen will also serve as the site for Costabile’s community service project, Caring Cooks Academy, which combines corporate team-building with good works. Teams of volunteer coworkers participate in a hands-on cooking lesson that ends with the delivery of complete, catered meals to the charity of their choice. “Last year we donated 1,200 meals,” Costabile says with pride. Costabile, 54, tapped Kendall Parkbased architect Jeffrey Kusmick for the market’s design. “We liked the historical feel of the place,” Kusmick told me during the open house, “but wanted to refresh and open it up.” He did that with a soaring cathedral, plenty of pot lights, and a color scheme of terra cotta and cream. Gennaro’s Italian Market & Catering, 4587 Route 27, Kingston. (609) 683-1212, gennarositalianmarket.com


ECHO

DINING Powered by

Guide

Soup’s On! Winter may be waning but we’ll all want to warm up after a frigid February like we’ve just withstood. So we’ve put together a short list of restaurants in the Princeton area that take the time to make broths and bisques are their specialty. Bon appétit!

WHOLE EARTH CENTER

F E AT U R E D

PRINCETON SOUP & SANDWICH a a a a a 49 Reviews

F E AT U R E D

MAIN STREET a a a a a 55 Reviews

$$ • Bars, American

301 N Harrison St Princeton (609) 921-2779 mainstreetprinceton.com “Main Street is a great, no-nonsense neighborhood dining establishment. I like to think of it as Princeton’s “Cheers.” The food is reliably good and reasonably priced. It’s my “go-to.” –Eileen R., Princeton “The bar is really nice ..looks like you are at a beach !..so enjoy the outdoors. Some nice cocktails on the menu. The lamb kebab inside the pita bread was heavenly.” –Nikhil M., Plainsboro Township “Love it love I love it. Doesn’t get much better than this! Gnocchi is best in the world. Baked Alaska is creative and yum. Ravioli stupendous and love the outdoor seating. Food is A plus for years. Would love them in my home.” –B. S., Clinton See our ad on page 23

$ • Soup, Sandwiches, American

30 Palmer Sq E Princeton (609) 497-0008 princetonsoupandsandwich.com “Great soups & sandwiches with several choices always on display. They’ll let you taste anything, and for those of us who must be gluten free, they have GF baguettes, and bagels too!” –Jeff B., Princeton See our ad on page 23

BLUE POINT GRILL

a a a a a 52 Reviews

a a a a a 309 Reviews

$$ • Grocery, Health Mkts, Delis

$$$ • Seafood

360 Nassau St. Princeton (609) 924-7429

258 Nassau St Princeton (609) 921-1211

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“ I love the soups and sandwiches as well as the salads, Mac n cheese, seitan entrees and of course the famous rice nut loaf! You cannot go wrong!” –Nicole W., Neptune

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“Absolutely loved the fresh seafood here! The crab and chowders soup was delicious, highly recommended. It was like a Manhattan crab chowder mixed with a new England clam chowder. !” –Annie H., New York

F E AT U R E D

TRIUMPH BREWING COMPANY a a a a a 380 Reviews

$$ • Breweries

138 Nassau Street Princeton (609) 924-7855 triumphbrew.com “Triumph Brewing Company is pretty much the epicenter of Princeton. Not only because of its location, but also because of its welcoming atmosphere. As you walk down the long hallway entrance, you feel like you are diving into the depths of a secret underground city.” –Chris B., Princeton, NJ “I started coming here as a youngster around 1995, which was an 8 mile bike ride from West Windsor. Fast forward 19 years and I am still coming here. It was the best back then, and even with 200+ meals under my increasingly larger belt, it is still the best.” –Chad N., Princeton, NJ “Hoagie Haven is always my go-to when I want to indulge. Get an extra dirty Sanchez. You won’t regret it.” –Julia N., Princeton, NJ See our ad on page 23

TIGER NOODLES

THE PEASANT GRILL

AGRICOLA EATERY

a a a a a 85 Reviews

a a a a a 33 Reviews

$ • Chinese

$$ • Cafes

a a a a a 213 Reviews

260 Nassau St Princeton (609) 252-0663

21 E. Broad St. Hopewell (609) 466-7500

princetontigernoodles.com

thepeasantgrill.com

“My favorites are the Taiwanese Beef Noodle soup - I think the menu calls it Little Bit of Everything -- not a bad description, family style noodles with pork, and ma po tofu. They also do greens well in season, stuff like yu choi, dow mieu, baby bok choi!” –Julian S., Princeton

“There is no better place for a salad, a delicious cup of soup or a hearty sandwich, not to mention the mac and cheese and lasagna.” –Tara M., Skillman

$$$ • American (New) 11 Witherspoon St., Princeton (609) 921-2798 • agricolaeatery.com “Their kale salad is a must. My boyfriend who had never had kale salad before raved about it. Their vinaigrette dressing softens the tough texture of the green, which is a nice treat when consuming kale. Lovely service, atmosphere and quality food! We had the Eggs Benedict and Farm Burger for our brunch and both were excellent. Will definitely visit again in the future.” –J. Y., Santa Clarita, California

March 2015 | Princeton Echo23


AJIHEI

HOAGIE HAVEN

TORTUGA’S MEXICAN VILLAGE

a a a a a 114 Reviews

a a a a a 352 Reviews

a a a a a 162 Reviews

$$ • Japanese 11 Chambers St., Princeton (609) 252-1158

$ • Sandwiches 242 Nassau St, Princeton (609) 921-7723 • hoagiehaven.com

$$ (cash only) • Mexican 41 Leigh Ave., Princeton (609) 924-5143 • tortugasmv.com

“Sushi freshest fish in the area, the hamachi and eel especially are moist and delicious.” –David D., New York

“The Sanchez is delicious, and a heart attack waiting to happen (mozzarella sticks, French fries, and chicken cutlet all in a hoagie with ‘Sanchez sauce’). It’s so good I never order anything else.” –Ravi P., Manhattan

“Fantastic! One of my favorite Mexican places in NJ. I recommend the California Burrito. It is a BYOB place so make sure to bring something with you. The chips and salsa are great. The staff are friendly and the place is always packed!” –Meg P., Corpus Christi, Texas

MEDITERRA a a a a a 194 Reviews

$$$ • Mediterranean 29 Hulfish St., Princeton (609) 252-9680 • mediterrarestaurant.com “The setting is really nice and it has a warm and inviting interior. I was really pleased with the service as it was attentive but not overbearing or condescending. “ –Amanda G., Somerset

ALCHEMIST & BARRISTER a a a a a 163 Reviews

MAMOUN’S FALAFEL a a a a a 34 Reviews

$ • Middle Eastern 20 Witherspoon St., Princeton (609) 454-5936 • mamouns.com ‘The falafel is very good, and the lamb shawarma even better. –Davey H., Princeton

METRO NORTH a a a a a 64 Reviews

$$ • Pubs, American, Sports Bars 28 Witherspoon St., Princeton (609) 924-5555 • alchemistandbarrister.com

$$$ • American 378 Alexander Road, Princeton (609) 454-3121 • metrogrills.net/index.html

“I always go back for the cheesesteak salad. Crispy romaine topped with roasted red peppers, grilled pickled onions, provolone, sirloin, topped with a mound of potato hay all dressed in a creamy vinaigrette.” –Diane B., Jersey City

“Our meal started with fried calamari—it was fresh, crispy, hot and delicious ... for dinner I ordered the butterfish with lump crabmeat, artichokes, and sundried tomatoes. It was phenomenal.” –Katy M., Old Bridge

CONTE’S PIZZA a a a a a 131 Reviews

$$ • Pizza, Italian 339 Witherspoon St., Princeton (609) 921-8041 • contespizzaandbar.com “Recommend getting the pepperoni and garlic pie with a pitcher of Peroni.” –Vinayak B., Trenton

GENNARO’S RESTAURANT a a a a a 29 Reviews

$$ • Italian 47B State Road (Route 206), Princeton (609) 497-2774 • gennaros-princeton.com “We each enjoyed our selections: lobster ravioli, pappardelle bolognese, filetto gorgonzola and a special with escarole and artichokes. Everything was decadent.” –Shirah M., Princeton

JAMMIN’ CREPES a a a a a 34 Reviews

$ • Creperies, Farmers Market, Cafes 20 Nassau St., Princeton (609) 924-5387 • jammincrepes.com “Good selection of breakfast, lunch and dessert crepes. Perfectly prepared with good service.” –Ron M., Edison

OLIVES DELI AND BAKERY a a a a a 139 Reviews

$$ • Bakeries, Desserts 22 Witherspoon St., Princeton (609) 921-1569 • olivesprinceton.com “Excellent spot. Deli-style takeout (with a couple seats in the back) with pretty consistently good food. Great chicken salad, amazing quiche...definitely recommend. –Julia N., Princeton, NJ

24Princeton Echo | March 2015

MISTRAL a a a a a 148 Reviews

THE PEACOCK INN a a a a a 85 Reviews

$$$ • Hotels 20 Bayard Lane, Princeton (609) 924-1707 • ascendcollection.com “Highly recommend the tuna tartar and gnocchi appetizers. The toffee cake for dessert was excellent. The ambiance from the interior was simple but still elegant.” –Subiya K., Jersey City

WINBERIE’S RESTAURANT AND BAR a a a a a 163 Reviews

$$ • Pubs, American 1 Palmer Square E., Princeton (609) 921-0700 • princeton.winberies.com “First time going there and was very impressed. I had the Cajun Mac and Cheese which was excellent. My GF had the hickory burger which was as tasty and juicy as it was large. Excellent wait staff and management. The environment and ambience also added to the experience.” –Jose C., Perth Amboy

$$$ • Tapas/Small Plates 66 Witherspoon St., Princeton (609) 688-8808 • mistralprinceton.com

WITHERSPOON GRILL

“Some highlights are the roasted sunchokes, the foie gras ... pork ear and tomatillo salad, cured trout, poached fluke.” –Alex S., Chesterfield Township

$$$ • Steakhouses 57 Witherspoon St., Princeton (609) 924-6011 • witherspoongrill.com

PJ’S PANCAKE HOUSE a a a a a 225 Reviews

$$ • Diners, American, Breakfast and Brunch 154 Nassau St., Princeton (609) 924-1353 • pancakes.com “Their pancakes are amazingly fluffy, buttery, and filling. They have a variety of different types of pancakes, but my favorite would be the chocolate chip ... their hashed potatoes are also my favorite, mixed with peppers and onions.” –Cynthia T., Atlantic City

SMALL WORLD COFFEE a a a a a 230 Reviews

$ • Coffee & Tea 14 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ 08542 (609) 924-4377 • smallworldcoffee.com “Their coffee is always robust, flavorful, and tastes of higher quality than a similar blend at Starbucks.” –Jake E., Princeton, NJ

TERESA’S CAFFE a a a a a 301 Reviews

$$ • Italian, Wine Bars 29 Palmer Square E., Princeton (609) 921-1974 • terramomo.com “I’d have to say go with a pizza—they often even have an uovo pizza with an egg on top, and that’s always delicious.” –Garner S., Princeton

a a a a a 196 Reviews

“An institution for the older crowd, serves up classically decadent dishes ... lobster risotto, braised short ribs, pecan crusted salmon and seared sea scallops in a creamy bacon vinaigrette rounding out the show.” –Ali M., New York

HOPEWELL BLUE BOTTLE CAFÉ a a a a a 74 Reviews

$$$ • American, French 101 E. Broad St., Hopewell (609) 333-1710 • thebluebottlecafe.com “Its BYOB too which is rare to find for a place with this level of food. We love the blue bottle salad and get that everytime. They rotate the menu pretty frequently but last time I had an really tasty, lean venison dish for my main course. The fish is always good too. Service is also fantastic.” –Greg W., Austin, Texas

BRICK FARM MARKET a a a a a 59 Reviews

$$ • Cafés, Bakeries 65 E. Broad St., Hopewell (609) 466-6500 • brickfarmmarket.com “The juice bar is fantastic, and they even have a happy hour! The staff is friendly and the prices are reasonable. The outside patio is a great place to enjoy the weather.” –J M., Jersey City


THE BROTHERS MOON

PALACE OF ASIA

a a a a a 40 Reviews

a a a a a 131 Reviews

a a a a a 51 Reviews

$$$• Bakeries, American, Salad 7 W. Broad St., Hopewell (609) 333-1330 • brothersmoon.com

$$ • Indian 540 Lawrence Square Blvd., Lawrence (609) 689-1500 • palace-of-asia.com

$$ • American, Gastropubs 137 Washington St., Rocky Hill (609) 683-8930 • rockyhilltavern.com

“I love their winter menu, the mushroom risotto, also always the house burger, a burger with a twist. I order it without brie- its delicious with lots of sweet sauteed onions and their special herb mayo.” –Cathy M., Hopewell

“We had the chicken tikka masala and the chana masala (chickpeas & tomato). Very well cooked with delicious rice.” –D K., Chicago

“Love this place! Food is consistently well prepared. The Lamb Burger is delicious. Pork Belly Fries, Pork Belly BLT, Devils on Horseback all wonderful elevated pub food.” –Lauren M., Franklin Park

NOMAD PIZZA COMPANY a a a a a 157 Reviews

$$ • Pizza 10 E. Broad St., Hopewell (609) 466-6623 • nomadpizzaco.com “The food was delicious. My husband and I got the arugula salad, margherita pizza, and the arugula prosciutto pizza. Everything tasted fresh and delicious. It reminded us of our trip to Italy. We also loved that it is BYOB and that the ingredients used are local and organic. .” –Kimberly R., Flemington

VIDALIA RESTAURANT $$$ • Italian 21 Phillips Ave., Lawrenceville (609) 896-4444 • eatvidalia.com

a a a a a 160 Reviews

$$$ • Italian 4484 Route 27, Kingston (609) 497-1777 • enoterra.com “Order the arancini and any of their pastas, especially the ricotta gnocchi.” –Isa D., Plainsboro Center

a a a a a 210 Reviews

PENNINGTON F E AT U R E D

PICCOLO TRATTORIA a a a a a

380 Reviews

$$ • Italian

“We had crab cakes, braised short rib, and the shrimp & grits... everything was excellent ... they make the corn bread themselves. I’ve also tried their pulled pork sandwich & fried chicken at lunch... both excellent.” –Original 6., Lawrence Township

ENO TERRA

AMERICANA DINER

“If you are looking for amazing home made Italian food from a top chief then Vidalia’s is the place. I first ate here over a year ago and keep coming back for three reasons: awesome menu that keeps you guessing, great decor, amazing service.” –Brian W., Newark

a a a a a 10 Reviews

KINGSTON

...AND BEYOND

a a a a a 60 Reviews

SWEETGRASS RESTAURANT $$ • Southern, American (New), Comfort Food 9B E. Broad St., Hopewell (609) 333-8912 • sweetgrassrestaurant.com

ROCKY HILL INN EATERY & TAVERN

800 Denow Road Pennington (609) 737-9050 piccolotrattoria.com “I don’t know what’s about it, but, the pizza has me always coming back here when I am in the Princeton area.” –Wilbur V., Nutley “I ordered a Veal dish served over gnocchi—amazing! The gnocchi are homemade and soft. The sauce had such good flavor ... BYOB and there is conveniently a liquor store in the same complex. –Katie B., Brighton, Michigan “I drive past 4 pizza places to go here. Best Brooklyn pie hands down, great chicken Caesar salad and my son can’t live without their vodka rigatoni pizza.” –Alyssa B., Pennington See our ad on page 23

OSTERIA PROCACCINI a a a a a 144 Reviews

$$ • Italian, Pizza 4428 Route 27, Kingston (609) 688-0007 • osteriaprocaccini.com “I had the Pizzo Doro (sausage, pepperoni, and fresh mozzarella). The ingredients tasted very fresh ... The BF had the Ruchetta E Proscutto (a white pizza with prosciutto, arugula, parmigiano, and balsamic dressing) ... absolutely incredible!” –Liz A., Princeton

AVANTI RISTORANTE ITALIANO a a a a a 31 Reviews

$$ • American, Vegetarian, Wine Bars 23 W. Delaware Ave., Pennington (609) 737-7174 • avantipennington.com “ Their vodka sauce is some of the best, and the Chicken All ‘Arabiata is delicious. Soups are usually always amazing too.” –Scott S., Princeton

LAWRENCE CHAMBERS WALK CAFÉ & CATERING a a a a a 30 Reviews

$$ • American 2667 Main St., Lawrenceville (609) 896-5995 • chamberswalk.com “Their soups are delicious, their salads taste as if they were just picked from the garden. The flavors of their entrees are distinctive yet not overpowering.” –A L., Lawrence Township

ROCKY HILL

$$ • Diners, American 359 U.S. 130, East Windsor (609) 448-4477 • americanadiner.com “Not typical diner food ... Had the paella, bruschetta sampler, and flourless cake.” –S L., Fairfield

ASIAN BISTRO a a a a a 140 Reviews

$$ • Asian Fusion, Sushi Bars, Korean 31 Station Drive, Princeton Junction (609) 378-5412 • asianbistronj.com “The veggie bibimbap in the stone bowl is my favorite meal here. The veggies are always crisp and fresh ... I’ve always had a great experience here. The menu is a mixture of Japanese, Chinese and Korean dishes.” –Lele E., Princeton

BARBARA’S HUNGARIAN RESTAURANT a a a a a 40 Reviews

$$ • Hungarian 1400 Parkway Ave., Ewing (609) 882-5500 “Had the stuffed cabbage one time and the goulash another. Loved both would go back.” –Carla C., Montclair

BLEND BAR & BISTRO a a a a a 22 Reviews

$$ • Bars, American 911 Route 33, Hamilton (609) 245-8887 • blendbarandbistro.com “I would break down the ratings into 5 stars for beer selection, 3.5 for cocktails, and 3 for food. The bar has over 200 types of beer, so it obviously had a huge selection.” –Fiona L., New Brunswick

CAFE 72 BY CUGINO’S a a a a a 59 Reviews

$$ • Breakfast & Brunch, Italian 72 W. Upper Ferry Road, Ewing (609) 882-0087 • cafe72.net “Cafe 72 is one of the best breakfast spots in the area. It gets crowded, so come early!” –Samantha D., Lawrence Twp.

ONE 53

CRISPANINO

a a a a a 99 Reviews

a a a a a 24 Reviews

$$$ • American 153 Washington St., Rocky Hill (609) 921-0153 • one53nj.com

$ • Tapas/Small Plates, Sandwiches 1507 Parkway Ave., Ewing (609) 771-1414 • crispanino.com

“Their mussels are out of this world. Their grilled squid with ink aioli is off the hook good.” –Marc P., Plainsboro Township

“Empanadas were the highlight of the dinner, freshly made crisp on the outside and literally melts in your mouth.” –Raj B., Philadelphia

March 2015 | Princeton Echo25


D’FLORET

OLIVER, A BISTRO

a a a a a 46 Reviews

a a a a a 66 Reviews

$$$ • American 18 S. Main St., Lambertville (609) 397-7400 • dfloretrestaurant.com

$$$ • American 222 Farnsworth Ave., Bordentown (609) 298-7177 • oliverabistro.com

It’s a small place in an unassuming building ... the goat cheese over the roasted tomato was surprisingly delicious appetizer. My wife had the rack of lamb special and loved it ... I had the Wyoming Elk special and was very impressed.” –Eric W., Matawan

“A cozy and intimate setting decorated nicely ... I ordered the crispy chicken entree which was fantastic! Cooked to perfection and paired well with the risotto and vegetables ... We shared the short rib Mac and cheese; outstanding!” –Amy c., Princeton

DE LORENZO’S TOMATO PIES

RAT’S RESTAURANT

a a a a a 173 Reviews

a a a a a 187 Reviews

$$ • Pizza 2350 Route 33, Robbinsville (609) 341-8480 • delorenzostomatopies.com

$$$ • French 16 Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton (609) 584-7800 • ratsrestaurant.org

“Very thin crust and just the right amount of cheese. There will probably be a wait if you go during peak hours.” -Dan R., Manhattan

“The food is top notch and the decor is so fun and classy. The service was very, very leisurely.” –Robert S., Southampton, Pennsylvania

DESTINATION DOGS a a a a a 210 Reviews

$$ • Hot Dogs, American, Sandwiches 101 Paterson St., New Brunswick (732) 993-1016 • destinationdogs.com “Great hotdogs, definitely a must try if you’re within distance. Service was very prompt and attentive to our needs. The Colombian dog was the best in my opinion, and the chili and cheese dog was awesome.” –Billy K., East Rutherford

EL TULE MEXICAN & PERUVIAN RESTAURANT a a a a a 188 Reviews

$$ • Mexican, Peruvian 49 N. Main St., Lambertville (609) 773-0007 • eltulerestaurant.com “Everyone loved their dishes, from ceviche and guacamole to tacu tacu. Even the quinoa flan was fantastic!” –Colin M., Flemington

$$ • Polish 925 N. Olden Ave., Trenton (609) 656-1600 • rozmarynrestaurant.com “Excellent food and the hostess couldn’t be nicer. We had the gypsy special and stuffed cabbage.” –Kenneth M., Philadelphia

SEASONS 52 a a a a a 33 Reviews

$$ • American, Vegetarian, Wine Bars 3535 U. S. 1, West Windsor (609) 799-2152 • seasons52.com “Great seasonal food and wine at a good price. It’s a little loud but very lively. Fun place to go for a night out. Will definitely keep coming back.” –Stella H., Newtown Pennsylvania

STUFF YER FACE

a a a a a 13 Reviews

$$ • Pubs, American, Pizza 49 Easton Ave., New Brunswick (732) 247-1727 • stuffyerface.com

JAFFRON a a a a a 82 Reviews

$$ • Indian 11 W. Bridge St., New Hope, Pennsylvania (215) 862-1677 • jaffronindianrestaurant.com “Had chicken saag, baingan Bharta (spicy). We also had Kashmiri Veg Birayani and garlic naan . Perfection. Birayani was the best I have EVER had outside of Delhi, India.” –Dee S., Annandale

MARSHA BROWN a a a a a 223 Reviews

$$$ • Steakhouses, Cajun/Creole, American 15 S. Main St., New Hope, Pennsylvania (215) 862-7044 • marshabrownrestaurant.com “Good food, good drinks in a really cool old church. Staff was attentive ... call outs, onion rings and the salmon. –Howie G., Closter

26Princeton Echo | March 2015

Top o’the morning to ya! It’s almost St. Paddy’s Day, and you know what that means? (No, not our 32-minute uilleann bagpipe solo of Danny Boy, although we can whip that bad boy out if you’d like.) It’s time for a pint and plenty of craic! Here’s all you need to bring out your inner-Irish in celebration. Slàinte!

a a a a a 40 Reviews

a a a a a 315 Reviews

“The food is so delicious! I had the duck breast and the hot chocolate mousse. Great presentation too.” –Katie S., Princeton

ST. PATRICK’S DAY PICKS

ROZMARYN RESTAURANT

IL FORNO CAFÉ & TRATTORIA $$$ • Pizza, Italian 358 Princeton-Hightstown Road, West Windsor (609) 799-8822 • ilfornowestwindsor.com

The Monthly

“Amazing strombolis and really good appetizer food ... can get super crowded especially on Friday and Saturday nights.” –Jill W., New York

Corned Beef from Teddy’s Luncheonette Photo by Lisa Z., Long Beach, CA

1. Killarney’s Publick House, Hamilton, NJ

“This place has a genuine pub atmosphere and a large menu that I would imagine caters to most diners... From hearty shepherd’s pie to healthy deli sandwiches, the food is delicious at a good value.”

-Jacqueline P., New Hope, PA

2. Tir Na Nog, Trenton, NJ

“This place could not be more authentic Irish pub, right down to the barkeep with the accent! Total dive, but great atmosphere.”

-Nicole I., Lakehurst, NJ

3. North End Bistro, Princeton, NJ

“I had the fish and chips. The batter was spot on. Perfectly crispy, not greasy. I had the fish and chips. The batter was spot on. Perfectly crispy, not greasy.”

THE TIGER’S TALE

-Scott B., Monmouth Jct, NJ

a a a a a 92 Reviews

4. Winberie’s,

$$ • Bars, American 1290 Route 206, Skillman (609) 924-0262 • tigerstalenj.com “A great place to bring friends and they have a large bar that usually had a seat or two available. –Joe W., Oaklyn

VAULT BREWING CO. a a a a a 126 Reviews

$$ • American, Pubs 10 S. Main St., Yardley, Pennyslvania (267) 573-4291 • vaultbrewing.com “They brew their own beer and even offer them in tasting flights ... My favorite is the Buffalo pizza with brown sugar and prosciutto ... try the pad thai popcorn for a start and finish the night off with a s’more! It does get really crowded though.” –Nicholas V., Elmer

Princeton, NJ

“My two favorite items are the Hickory Burger; which is a burger with cheddar, bacon, BBQ sauce and chili fried onions. And of course their Irish Nachos smothered in cheese and bacon and deliciousness. Try not to have them on the same day, but if you do, call me to share.”

-Marlyn V., Trenton, NJ

5. Teddy’s Luncheonette, Cranbury, NJ

“Best Corned Beef Hash. Period... Teddy’s version is mostly corned beef, shredded, with just enough potatoes, seasoned beautifully and served in healthy portions. I usually get a double order with a couple of poached eggs on top.”

-Jason E., Princeton, NJ


AROUND TOWN African Soiree to raise riverblindness funds The sixth annual African Soiree to benefit UFAR (United Front Against Riverblindness) is set for March 21 from 5 to 9 p.m. in the Mackay Center at Princeton Theological Seminary. The evening includes an African market (opening at 4:30 p.m.) followed by a showing of African fashions from FEBA (Woman Cradle of Abundance), a buffet of international and African food and a live auction. The auction will feature Congolese works of art. Traditional Congolese art was affected by influence from abroad that came during the era of colonization, but the individuality and variety of tribal customs has been preser ved. Kuba art includes masks, woven textiles, potter y, beading, figurines and statuettes. UFAR is an African-inspired, Lawrenceville-based nonprofit that aims to eradicate onchocerciasis, a major public health problem in the Kasongo region of the Democratic Republic of Congo. More than one-third of the 60 million people in the DRC are at risk for getting riverblindness, which caused by a parasite and transmitted by black flies that live near the river. Medicine is provided free by Merck & Co., but distributing it poses a challenge. UFAR uses a community-directed

approach to treat more than two million people each year. Annual treatment for each person is required for ten years to eliminate the disease. Tickets are $70. The Mackay Center is located at 64 Mercer Street in Princeton. More information is online at riverblindness.org.

Variety Theater to present modernized Cinderella Princeton Variety Theater, sponsored by the Arts Council of Princeton, is set to present “Cinderella, the UGGly Version: A Panto In The British Style” on Saturday March 7 at 2 and 7 p.m. and Sunday, March 8 at 4 p.m. at the Stuart Little Theater at Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart. The show involves more than 50 community members both on stage and back stage, including singers, dancers, acrobats and musicians. The plot follows self-obsessed and whiny Cinderella (Victoria Wayland) who can’t get her act together, owing to poor self-esteem. She is held back by her scheming stepmother (Beth Harrison) and two overbearing stepsisters (Alastair Binnie and Robert Hebditch). When Hulit the shoe boy (Winston Peloso) makes a delivery, Cinderella falls for him, but only magical intervention from the Fairy Guidance Counselor (Gretchen Zimmer) can

make her venture outside. The script, written by Zoë Brookes, Todd Reichart and Per Kreipke, features local businesses and local stories. Brookes, Reichart and Plainsboro music teacher Michael Jacobsen have created original music for the show. Tickets are $15 for adults and $12 for Arts Council members, children and seniors. More information is online at artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Communiversity 2015 applications due March 2

YingHua International School: The Area’s Only YingHua International School: Mandarin Immersion The School Area’s Only

International School

The Arts Council of Princeton It’s Time to Enroll for announced that applications are avail- Small classes. School Year Cam able for Communiversity ArtsFest 2015. Great 2015-2016 teachers. 2015 Summer Communiversity is a celebration of Extended day options. & 2015 Summer Camp th music, dance and arts and crafts that attracts more than 40,00 people to PrincFull NJ Curriculum. eton every spring. 609.375.8015 www.yhis.org info@yhis.or This year’s event will take place on Chinese math. Apr. 26, from 1 to 6 p.m. rain or shine. to achie Small classes. All interested participants including fluency in Chinese a artists, crafters, merchandise and Great teachers. food vendors, non-profit organizations Englis Extended day options. and performers should visit artscouncilofprinceton.org to download and 2 ½ years through 8th grade print an applications. All potential participants must submit their applications by Mar. 2. Because 609.375.8015 Communiversity is a juried event, appliwww.YhIS.org info@yhis.org cations postmarked after the deadlines will not be considered.

2 ½ years through 8 grad No prior Chines required

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CONGRATULATIONS 2 Anna Shulkina, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE PLATINUM RE/MAX of Princeton

Joseph R. DeLorenzo, BO 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE GOLD RE/MAX Platinum Club RE/MAX IN TOWN

Joan Eisenberg, SA/O 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE GOLD RE/MAX Platinum Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Bob Weber, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Pamela Bless, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Mark A. Brower, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Joan Martinez, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Gina Marie Mazur, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Neil Paul, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Smita Shah, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE GOLD RE/MAX Platinum Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Christine Barrett, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX Platinum Club RE/MAX Tri County

Jane Belger, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Jennifer L. D’Alesio, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX Platinum Club RE/MAX Tri County

Sabrina E. Chell, SA Carla Z. Campanella, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County RE/MAX Tri County

Martyn Daetwyler, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX of Princeton

Martha Dee, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX of Princeton

Desiree Daniels, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Maria A. Remboski, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Rebecca Rogers, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX of Princeton

Fred Sarstedt JR., SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX of Princeton

John Sullivan, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX of Princeton

Karma Estaphanous , SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE GOLD RE/MAX Platinum Club RE/MAX of Princeton

Dawn Petrozzini, BO 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

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28Princeton Echo | March 2015

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CENTURY 21

COLDWELL BANKER

This chart combines “total units sold” and “total volume sold” for residential listings for all office locations of each organization identified from 1/1/14 – 12/31/14. It includes which listings were sold by such organization itself, or with the aid of a cooperating broker for the state of NJ and time period indicated, according to the data by the following Multiple Listings Services in NJ: Trend MLS, Garden State MLS, Monmouth County MLS, Middlesex MLS, South Jersey Shore MLS, New Jersey MLS, Hudson MLS, Ocean MLS, and Cape May County MLS. This representation is based in whole or in part on data supplied by each MLS listed. Each MLS does not guarantee or is in any way responsible for its accuracy. Data Maintained by each MLS may not reflect all real estate activity in the market. This chart lists up to the top 7 competitors in the market indicated. Each RE/MAX office is independently owned and operated. Equal opportunity employer.

WEICHERT

ELITE

NEW JERSEY STATEWIDE MARKET SHARE TOP BRAND RANKING YEAR TO DATE: 1/1/2014 - 12/31/2014

14,928

13,461

8,889

5,461


S 2014 AWARD WINNERS! Diane DeLorenzo, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Sue Fowler, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX of Princeton

Joan C. George, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Joseph Lombardo, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Maria Picardi Kenyon, SA Linda S. November, SA/O 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton RE/MAX Tri County

John Ratico, JR., SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Vanessa A. Stefanics, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SILVER RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Heather F. Davidson, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Thomas R. Elliott, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE The NJAR Distinguished Sales Club Award RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Arlene Feinstein, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Joseph Giancarli, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Laura Hall, SA Yolanda Gulley, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County RE/MAX Tri County

T. Christopher Hill, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Tri County

Leonard Kirkuff, BA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Paula S. Wirth, SA 2014 NJAR CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE BRONZE RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Marna Brown-Krausz, SA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Karen Evertsen, SA RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Bruce Evertsen, SA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Elliott Eisenburg, RA RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Douglas Gibbons, BA Cyril (CY) Gaydos, SA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton RE/MAX of Princeton

Judy Peraino, SA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Anna Marie Pratico-Radice, SA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Edmund “ED” Schoen, SA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Tri County

Cynthia (Cindy) Schwartz, SA RE/MAX 100% Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Jame (Jim) Simmons, BA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Hong Xiao, SA Barbara A. Wirth, BA RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Executive Club RE/MAX Greater Princeton RE/MAX Tri County

OUTSTANDING AGENTS. OUTSTANDING RESULTS. RE/MAX Tri County 2275 Route 33 Suite 308 Hamilton, NJ (609) 587-9300

RE/MAX Greater Princeton 112 Village Blvd. Princeton, NJ (609) 951-8600

WWW.REMAX-NJ.COM

RE/MAX IN TOWN 181 Franklin Corner Rd. Lawrenceville, NJ (609) 895-0500

RE/MAX of Princeton 343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ (609) 921-9202 March 2015 | Princeton Echo29


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2850 Brunswick Pike (Business Rt. 1) Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 609-883-0900


CLASSIFIEDS LOCAL CLASSIFIED

PAYROLL & BOOKKEEPING

IN-HOME DOG BOARDING

PAYROLL & BOOKKEEPING *Small Business Rates on a budget. 609.249.4390.

HOMEBODIES IN-HOME DOG BOARDING-Avoid the stress, expense and inconvenience of a kennel. We provide comfort, safety, attention and no disruption in your animal companion’s routine. CCBC Vet Tech certified. Call Sharon: 609-730-0600.

CAREGIVING CAREGIVER-I provide compassionate services for the elderly. I have 30+ years experience with references and own transportation provided. Live-in preferred. Call 609-882-1292. CARING IN SO MANY WAYS-Affordable caregiving. $10-$12 an hour for full-time work. 28 years experience. References available. Call 609-3945128.

FOR SALE CEMETERY PLOT IN PRINCETON MEMORIAL PARK FOR SALEDD Lawn Crypt. Moving out of area. Must sell. Price very negotiable. Call 609-414-3335 for more information. FIRE WOOD-Seasoned hardwood. $180 per chord for local delivery. 609731-2822. FOR SALE-Ice cream equipment & freezer for sale. Call 609-712-1688.

FOR RENT FOR RENT-Hamilton Twp.-Store for Rent 800+ sq. ft w/parking. Call 609712-1688.

WANTED WANTED-BETTER QUALITY CAMERAS AND PHOTO EQUIPMENT, FOUNTAIN PENS AND OLDER WATCHES FAIR PRICES PAID CALL HAL609-689-9651.

CHILD CARE CHILD CARE-Safe and loving environment for your child in my home. Reasonable rates. References. 10+ years experience. Patty 609273-3790.

TEA LEAF READINGS HOST A GROUP TEA LEAF READING OR HAVE AN INDIVIDUAL HERBAL READING. 609-455-3743. www. sacredtealeafreadings. com.

JOB TRAINING Mercer Med Tech offers philabotomy, CNA, CMA, EKG Certification with internship. We are looking for energetic people to work in Labs, Nursing Homes. Flexible schedule with affordable payments plan. Call 609-712-5499. www. hshnj.org.

HELP WANTED EXPERIENCED PAINTERS AND CARPENTERS WANTED-Must have driver’s license and own transportation. Top pay. Call 609-540-9400. AREA PROPERTY INSPECTORS-Supplement Your Income-Perfect for Part-Time. Earn up to 30KNo Experience Needed/ We Train. 609-213-9823/ newcareerkim@aol.com. COMPASSIONATE SENIOR CARE NEEDED IN THE PRINCETON AREA; major home healthcare service is seeking Certified Aides (CHHAs) for flexible hourly and live-in schedules. Call 732-3298954x112. TRANSPORTATION COMPANY SEEKS EXPERIENCED LOCAL/ OTR BUS/MOTORCOACH DRIVERS. FT/PT. Experience preferred but will train right person. Competitive benefits package. Driver Rewards Program. Apply: Stout’s Transportation. 20 Irven St. Trenton, M-F 8-5pm, S-S 8-11am. Fax or email resume 883-6682 hr@ stoutstransportation.com. HAIR STYLIST-Full or part-time position available. Following required. Right in the heart of Hamilton Square. Ryanns Hair Salon. 609-890-9008. Hamilton pet bakery and retail store is currently seeking a PART-TIME STORE CLERK. Must be willing to bake and lift 40lb+ on a daily basis. Flexible schedule with ability to work nights and weekends is required. Send resume and cover letter to Gregg or Melissa at barkeryjobs@gmail. com. RETIRED TEACHER NEEDED-If you are a Mercer area retired teacher and could work 2 to 8 hours per week, we have a teaching position for you. Please email your resume to qlc4044@quaker-bridge. com or call 609-933-8806 to make an appointment. Exciting Opportunity/ New Career Professional Wanted/Take control of your future. We provide all necessary training. 609213-9823/newcareerkim@ aol.com. STANDARDBRED RETIREMENT ASSOCIATION SEEKS ADDITIONAL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT-Experienced Administrative Asst, who can wear a variety of hats is needed to assist w/ ongoing projects related to fund raising, general office responsibilities, managing your own projects, creative writing, website updating & other responsibilities. Small pleasant office.

Must be available for an occasional weekend event. Please respond only if you have a minimum of 4 years of an administrative background, and are highly proficient on the computer. Email resume to Judejude2000@aol.com PART-TIME/FULL-TIME CASHIERS NEEDED. Dolce and Clemente. 609259-0072. Inquire within. PROPERTY INSPECTORS NEEDED-PT to 20K/FT to 80K. No experience needed, we provide all training! 609-213-9823/ newcareerkim@aol.com. SEEKING SCHEDULING COORDINATOR FOR HIGH QUALITY ORTHODONTIC OFFICE. Must be friendly w/ excellent customer service/ phone skills. Hard-working, dependable, responsible. Organized & detail oriented. Computer literacy required. Dental office experience preferred. Approx. 30 hrs/ week. Competitive pay & benefits. Email info@ BordentownBraces.com. IHOP COOKS/SERVERS NEEDED, Ewing IHOP is in need of line cooks, and servers, for more information please call Ana @ 609-403-8174. BAGEL SHOP-Must be available for early morning/ afternoon shifts. Open 7 days/week & holidays. Must be able to work in fast-pace work environment. Food background preferred but training available. 18 & older. Starting rate: $9/hour, raises based on performance. Email slillis14@hotmail.com for more information or to apply. HELP WANTED-Commercial dry cleaning plant looking for experienced pressers. Call Mike at (609) 468-7195. LINE COOK POSITION AVAILABLE, experience required, Part time. Bar Back position available for weekends will train. call Mary @ 609-291-7020. NOW GROWING! VCSALON, a Top 10 salon in NJ is hiring nail therapists, massage therapists, guest service pro’s, hair/nail/spa apprentice programs available. If you’re just starting out & need a safe place to grow & succeed Vc could be right for you! Company-sponsored health care plans, 401k, profit sharing, paid vacation time, in-house education, 3 or 4 day FT work schedule, product & lifestyle shop discounts, Career Pathing – growth opportunities, Community/ Fashion & Editorial Events. If you believe in our mission to create a transformative, “wow” experience, & inspire people to look & feel beautiful everyday & you “Run With Scissors,” apply online @ vcsalon.com and click on the CAREERS tab, or stop in to fill out application. APPOINTMENT SETTING/LEAD GENERATION IN LAWRENEVILLE, CASUAL ENVIRONMENT. Needed Skills: Well-spoken, upbeat, good

50 cents a word $10 minimum. For more information call 609-396-1511 typing, to call businesses for outbound phone work. Previous sales exp. a plus but not required. 7 hrs each day during business hrs. Hourly + commission = $11-$15 hr. + bonuses. Opportunity to grow within the company-looking to promote to Campaign Manager or Business Developer. Apply at www.MarketReach.biz.

MUSIC LESSONS MUSIC LESSONS: Piano, guitar, drum, sax, clarinet, F. horn, oboe, t-bone, voice, flute, trumpet, violin, cello, banjo, mandolin, harmonica, uke, and more. $32 half hour. Summer Music Camp. Call today! Montgomery 609924-8282. West Windsor 609-897-0032. Hightstown 609-448-7170. www. farringtonsmusic.com.

at Traditions 55+ community! Lrgst 2 BR model. Move in condition! Optional sunrm, 2 car grg, Upgraded EIK, hrdwd flrs, LG master suite w/full BA & huge walk in. Huge LR/DR, sep study & 2nd BR, rear patio w/view. $305,000 RE/MAX IN TOWN Joe DeLorenzo 609-895-0500x107 www. joedhomes.com/6483496 HAMILTON-Completely remodeled 3BR, 2 full BA, huge yrd. Move-in ready! EIK w/new ss applncs, tiled back splash, cherry cabs, gorgeous granite, 2 main flr BRs, upper lvl MSTR suite w/remodeled full BA, walk-in closet! Brand new roof, new siding, freshly painted. $175,000 RE/MAX IN TOWN Joe DeLorenzo 609-895-0500x107 www. joedhomes.com/6465216 EWING-Completely redone 4 yrs ago, like new 3 BR, 2 full BA ranch. A lovely deck off the DR overlooks fully

fenced rear yrd. Full BSMT w/walk out stairs, 4 yr old kitch, BA, wndws, heater & A/C. Close to Shopping & park. $192,900 RE/MAX IN TOWN Lorraine McCormick 609-895-0500x125 www. mercercountyhouses. net/6521795

Upgraded BAs & ceiling fans in all rms. Well-maintained. Nicely lndscpd w/private fenced in patio. Convenient access to major highways. $245,000 RE/MAX IN TOWN Joe DeLorenzo 609-895-0500 ext 107 www.joedhomes. com/6521472

LAWRENCEVILLE-Lovely Nassau 1 community, bi-lvl, 3 lrg BRs w/hrdwd & 2 full updated BAs. Main lvl has good size EIK, LR & formal DR w/hrdwd. Lower lvl has lrg FR. Nice size yrd w/beautiful deck. Conveniently located. $299,999 RE/MAX IN TOWN Joe DeLorenzo 609-8950500x107 www.joedhomes. com/6520488

LAWRENCEVILLE - Spacious 4 BR Ranch w/2.5 BA. Updated kitch Lrg, bright living w/wood burning FP, Formal DR & sunrm. MSTR BR located in separate wing, w/private BA, generous sized BRs. Fin BSMT w/FR, play rm. 1 car grg, laundry rm, large fenced in rear yrd. Convenient location! $349,900 RE/MAX IN TOWN Joe DeLorenzo 609-8950500x107 www.joedhomes. com/6544567

LAWRENCEVILLE-Beautiful 3-BR, 2.5-BA, 2-Story home in 55+ Community. Open flr plan, cathedral ceilings, Nice sized kitch w/corian, ceramic tile floor, pantry, 42” oak cabs. DR w/chair rail molding.

STATELY FARMSTEADSpringfield Twp $450,000. 4BR, 2.5BA Farmhouse LR, DR, EIK, FR, Lndry, Loft, Foyer

& Library. Renovated Circa 1697. New well & septic, htr, electric, winds, siding & roof. MLS# 6459138 / 21438035 ERA Central Realty 609.298.4800 / 609.259.0200 ERACentral.com. COLONIAL-Ewing Twp $208,000. 4 BR 2.5 BA One of kind on over-sized lot. Looking for ample space, then look no further. Large attic & full basement w/walkout for additional space. MLS# 6495720. ERA Central Realty 609.298.4800 / 609.259.0200 ERACentral.com. UPPER FREEHOLD TWP $110,000. Beautiful 1.84 acre lot in desirable Cream Ridge. Located on the corner of Burlington Path & Route 539. Endless possibilities! Come take a look today. MLS# 6500659 / 21500037COMPANY INFOERA Central Realty 609.298.4800 / 609.259.0200 ERACentral.com.

EMERSION MUSIC LESSONS-Jazz-latin-funk. 1,2 or 3 hour sessions. Inexpensive-by donation. First hour session free. For info, call Drew Gibbs 360-791-5144.

REAL ESTATE HAMILTON-DISCOVER RURAL HAMILTON! Weathersfield Estates, Steinert Schools! 6,000 sq ft w/ more than $600K in upgrades. 2,000 sq ft fin BSMT. 2 story entrance foyer w/circular stair case, Custom designer kitch upgraded, 2 story FR w/gas & wood burning FP’s, huge formal DR, LR w/double sided FP to Conservatory. Custom crown molding, columns, archways & wainscoting throughout! Back yrd w/IG pool. $1,300,000 RE/MAX IN TOWN Joe DeLorenzo 609-895-0500x107 www. joedhomes.com/ 6498252 PLAINSBORO-STUNNING AND SPACIOUS-WW-P SCHOOLS! Over 2,300 sq ft + full, fin bsmt. 4BR, 3.5BA. Lrg EIK, Formal LR & DR, Huge Master w/5 piece BA & walk-in closet, 3 add’l nice size BRs, 2nd Fl laundry, paver driveway, 2 car grg. Bsmt w/wet bar, private offc, full BA. Hrdwd flrs & crown molding throughout most of home! $750,000 RE/MAX IN TOWN Joe DeLorenzo 609-895-0500x107 www. joedhomes.com/6496568 LAWRENCEVILLE - DESIRABLE FOXCROFT! Almost 1.5 acres, landscaped, Cov’d patio, deck, Koi pond, IG pool. 4BR, 3.5BA Colonial. Lg EIK w/ tile flr, granite. LR, formal DR w/ new hrdwd. Tiled FR w brick FP, home offc. Lrg Master suite. $575,000 RE/MAX IN TOWN Joe DeLorenzo 609-895-0500x107 www. joedhomes.com/6351866 ROBBINSVILLE-Updated 2BR, 1.5BA Town home. Metic. maintained, move-in ready! Upgrades! Kitch w/ custom cabs., brkfst bar, newer applncs. Generous sized Formal DR w/sliders to lovely, well manicured back yrd. Spacious & open LR. Award winning schools! $215,000 RE/MAX IN TOWN Joe DeLorenzo 609-8950500x107 www.joedhomes. com/6443261 *ALSO FOR RENT $1,750 www.joedhomes.com/6475312 * HAMILTON-Pierson Model

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B and B Hair Color Studio ............................ 2

Paychex- Rudy Patel .................................... 13

Blue Mountain Ski Area ............................... 31

Pennington Montessori School..................... 17

Chapin School..........................................11,17

Piccolo Trattoria ........................................... 21

ChazMaTazz Formalwear .............................. 16

Princeton Air Conditioning, Inc. ................... 2

CMS Refrigeration ........................................ 33 Colavita Jewelry ........................................... 27 Complete Health and Chiropractic Center .... 11 Delhagen Plumbing and Heating .................. 32 Dolce & Clemente Italian Market ................. 35 Dragonfly Farms, Inc. ................................... 30

www.delhagenplumbing.com Plumbing Lic # BI0104900 I Lic # 13VHO1158200 Service & Maintenance I Agreements Available delhagenplumbin@optonline.net

Fashionaires ................................................ 17 Firehouse Subs ............................................ 22 Guys and Dolls Hair Salon ............................ 15 Haldemen Lexus .......................................... 10 Jammer Doors .............................................. 30 Lawrence Antique Gallery ............................ 14 Lewis Center for the Arts ............................. 4

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32Princeton Echo | March 2015

Princeton Pro Musica ................................... 4 Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce .. 5 Princeton Soup and Sandwich Company ...... 21 Princeton Theological Seminary- Chapel ...... 16 Radiology Affiliates Imaging ......................... 18 Re/Max Mercer County..............................28,29 Regent Flooring............................................ 10 Robert Wood Johnson Hospital ..................... 4 Social Village at PSLLC .................................. 5 Square Dance Club....................................... 17 The Bronc .................................................... 32 Trenton Country Club ................................... 9 Triumph Brewing Company .......................... 21 YingHua International School ....................... 27

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Call 877-900-1077 to ask a question or get personal advice. To ask a question gain valuable advice call 877-900-1077! And don’t forget toand listen online at www.1077TheBronc.com or via our new Andon-air, don’t forget to at listen online at www.1077TheBronc.com or via our new Life St. Francis ............................................. 34 Listen online www.1077TheBronc.com or via our free Android or iPhone apps for free. Search WRRC. Android or iPhone apps for free. Search WRRC. Android or iPhone apps. Search WRRC. Main Street Bistro ........................................ 21

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This support sales position assists the sales team to maintain and strengthen relationships with clients. This role is responsible for various administrative duties.

Essential Functions: • Answer email, phone requests and inquiries, data entry, form processing, correspondence with clients on behalf of the sales team.

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SOUNDING OFF Walking bad in Princeton BY RICHARD K. REIN Princeton being Princeton and having a small but charming downtown attractive to shoppers, diners, sightseers, and office workers, you can always count on problems with traffic, parking, and — now more than ever, I predict — pedestrians. Pedestrians didn’t use to be much of a problem. When I first moved to town, it was simple. When pedestrians wanted to cross a street, they stopped, looked, and listened and made sure no car was coming fast enough in either direction to hit them. Then they crossed. But New Jersey eventually became more like California — motorists had to yield to pedestrians in crosswalks and at intersections. As Princeton has become more congested, regulating the flow of vehicles and people has become a challenge. And the matter is likely to get heated now that the town is advocating that the state making one downtown intersection — Nassau Street at Vandeventer and Washington Road — an “all-way walk” intersection. That means that for some precious seconds in every traffic light cycle, motorists coming from all four directions will have to sit (and stew) while pedestrians freely traverse the intersection every which way. Of course in a town like Princeton pedestrians are the true kings of the road. They are the lifeblood of the walkable Princeton that we all cherish. And if you think about a pedestrian confronting a motor vehicle it’s difficult not to be sympathetic to the former. To take the side of the motorist against the pedestrian feels wrong, like pulling for the big box store on Route 1 to put the mom and pop shop on Nassau Street out of business. But since I do a lot of walking myself in downtown Princeton, I feel entitled to offer some constructive criticism of our precious pedestrians. Entitled is an appropriate word because entitled is how all too many Princeton pedestrians seem to feel. Yes, pedestrians, you have the right of way in crosswalks but please make sure that the oncoming motorists see you (particularly at dusk) and have a reasonable time to stop for you. When the motorist does come to that grinding stop, please don’t stroll as slowly as a Parisian flaneur as you cross. And while it’s not necessary, it sure doesn’t hurt to acknowledge the motorist with a wave or a nod. Also, if you are seeking protection in a crosswalk as a pedestrian, then be a pedestrian. Don’t linger on the curb in front of the crosswalk, gabbing with a friend. Don’t be engrossed in a cell phone conversation that puts you in different place and mindset from the busy street you are attempting to cross. And

do pay attention to the signals. At intersections with “walk” and “don’t walk” signs, it ought to be easier for motorists and pedestrians to exist in relative harmony. But that depends on pedestrians obeying the signals. At Nassau and Witherspoon that’s often not the case. Here motorists on Nassau Street heading east (toward Kingston) get a small break: a green arrow that permits them to turn left onto Witherspoon Street before the traffic from the other direction gets under way and blocks that turn. It’s a small amount of time — around 10 seconds — that improves traffic flow on Nassau Street a lot. But it only works if pedestrians obey the “don’t walk” instruction. All too often they don’t and then the first car in the queue trying to turn left from Nassau onto Witherspoon is blocked. The cars behind have to hope to make it through later in the cycle. One light further east, at Nassau and Vandeventer, the intersection is slightly more complicated because there are two delayed green traffic signals for motorists making left hand turns, and two delayed “walk” signals to permit motorists to make right hand turns before the pedestrians clog the crosswalk. Some pedestrians, however, jump the gun and block the motorists’ path, making that intersection less efficient and more dangerous. So now the state, which has jurisdiction because Nassau is a state highway, is considering making the intersection an “all-way walk” crossing. Word on the street (what better source?) has it that the intersection signals could be changed by the fall. Princeton already has one all-way walk at the other end of Nassau, where it meets Bayard Lane and Stockton Street. But that intersection is lightly used by pedestrians. Nassau and Vandeventer can be pedestrian central. Will motorists sit patiently while walkers criss cross in front of them? Motorists, of course, need to respect the community through which they drive. If they want to have the roads and intersections all to themselves, they should drive around the state offices in Trenton at night. But pedestrians need to cooperate. If they don’t, they should take a hike. Richard K. Rein, editorial director of Community New Service, has lived and walked in downtown Princeton since 1972. The Princeton Echo welcomes opinions from people on issues of concern impacting the community. If you would like to have your opinion or views printed in Sounding Off, send an email to bsanservino@mercerspace.com. All commentary might be edited for clarity or space reasons.

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A farewell to Scheide’s Bach BY PIA DE JONG

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PARTING SHOT My friend’s husband recently died, so on a foggy February morning, I ask her over for a cup of tea. “Oh, no, please come to my house instead,” she says, “and you can still see Bach’s portrait before it goes forever to Leipzig.” Bach’s portrait in her house? Bach sat for only two portraits in his lifetime. One is in poor condition. The other, painted by Elias Gottlob Haussmann in 1746, is in excellent condition just a few blocks away from me in Princeton. An elderly gentleman who introduces himself as the “house manager” lets me into my friend’s house. “Madame is still getting ready,” he says. “Make yourself at home.” Curious, I look around the crowded living room, which is a cross between a church and a library. Half of the room is occupied by a gleaming Holtkamp organ. Under a glass plate is a handwritten musical score with the name: Johann Sebastian Bach, signed with a flourish. On a lectern is an open Gutenberg Bible. Suddenly, I am standing face-to-face with perhaps the greatest composer who ever lived. I know the famous portrait from the jackets of the old record albums my father used while preparing music for his church, and then later on from CD covers and busts sitting on pianos around the world. Bach was 61 when his portrait was done. He is a stout man with a double chin and an unhealthily ruddy skin. He wears a white blouse with sleeves puffed at the wrists; over it is a black jacket with hard buttons. On his head, like a weird hat, is a white wig. In his right hand he holds a tiny piece of sheet music. On it is written, “Canon triplex á 6 Voc.” Then Judith enters, the widow of musicologist and philanthropist Bill Scheide, who died in November at the age of 100. She is momentarily distracted, shuffling around the room, but when she sees me in front of the painting, she brightens. “Ah,” she says, “you’ve already met him.” The house manager brings in a tray of tea, and Judith takes a sip. “Bill bought this painting 62 years ago,” she says. “It was his most prized possession. Our mornings always started here, in this room, with the music of Schubert. Bill said that listening to Schubert first gave him permission to listen the rest of the day to Bach.” I had heard about the wave of emotion in church during Bill Scheide’s funeral when Schubert’s String Quintet in C Major was played. Arthur Rubinstein called this composition “the gateway to heaven” and wished to have it played at his own funeral. “He looks very serious, huh?” Judith says, with a glance at Bach, “but he was a gentle man.” She then sits at a Bösen-

dorfer piano which I had completely overlooked. “Whoever makes music, makes something of love,” she says as she opens the Notebook for Anna Magdelena Bach. As we listen to Bach’s Bist du bei mir (“Be thou with me”) playing in the background, Judith seems to turn into a girl. Bach, who watches from the wall, is suddenly no longer the pompous man with the quizzical look that Haussmann gave him but a distant third husband watching his much younger wife. I listen to the song’s words and think of my father, who died three years ago today: “Be thou with me, and I will go gladly to my death and my rest.” “It is time that the cantor of St. Thomas Church return to Leipzig,” Judith says, looking softly at the painting. “But how I will miss him.” Editor’s note: William Scheide was well known in music circles as the owner of the Haussmann painting, which they called the “Scheide Bach portrait.” Upon Scheide’s death it was bequeathed to the Bach-Archiv in Leipzig, Germany, of which Scheide was founding curator and later director emeritus. In February, Princeton University announced that Scheide had left the school his collection of rare books valued at nearly $300 million, including a Gutenberg Bible, an original printing of the Declaration of Independence, all four of Shakespeare’s Folios and musical manuscripts written by Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Schubert and Wagner. Pia de Jong is a Dutch novelist who moved from Amsterdam to Princeton in the summer of 2012 with her husband, Robbert Dijkgraaf, after he was named the director of the Institute for Advanced Study. She currently writes a weekly column for the Dutch newspaper NRC, called Flessenpost (Notes in a Bottle) about her life in the USA. Her columns are also featured on the Huffington Post. De Jong will speak on March 2, from 7 to 9 p.m., at the Princeton Public Library. She will speak about her adjustment to writing in English and what it has taught her about the immigrant experience.


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