Elwood Staffing | 2019 Company & Talent Report

Page 1

COMPANY & TALENT REPORT



TABLE OF CONTENTS 2 | A LETTER FROM OUR CEO Talent Report: Your Guide to Maximizing Each Stage of the Employment Life Cycle S SUCCE EPARAT SSIO ION NP L

S & NNING A

ATTRACTION & A WAR ENE SS

18 | RECRUITING

THE

LIFE CYCLE

G

RECRUITING

EMPLOYMENT MENT ELOP V E &D

6 | AWARENESS & ATTRACTION

24 | HIRING, ONBOARDING & ENGAGEMENT 30 | LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT 36 | SEPARATIONS & SUCCESSION PLANNING Company Report 44 | ELWOOD

R DI N G ONBOA NT E ING, HIR ENGAGEM &

LEAR NIN


A LETTER FROM OUR CEO Dear Friends, Since Elwood’s inception, we’ve strategically focused on analyzing “what makes people tick” and using the information to make better employee placements and overall business decisions. In our nearly 40 years of business, we have learned a great deal from screening over 3 million candidates, employing over 1 million workers, and working with over 20,000 clients. Each and every day, our interactions generate valuable data that we carefully study and use to continually reinvent our strategy at every stage of the employment life cycle. This helps us anticipate and match the shifting expectations of workers and our client employers. We love data, and we love to share our knowledge to help employers like you make informed decisions—that’s why we continue to create and share this annual report. The content is based on our unique industry perspective, giving you insight into each step of the employment life cycle and ways to maximize your positive impact on every single person in every single stage of their employment journey. I hope you find it beneficial.

Mark S. Elwood, Chairman and CEO

2 | A LETTER FROM OUR CEO


“We love data, and we love to share our knowledge to help employers like you make informed decisions ...”

A LETTER FROM OUR CEO | 3


AWARENESS & A TTRA CTIO N


AWARENESS & ATTRACTION


THE BEST IN THE BUSINESS To be known as “the best” in your industry isn’t an easy feat, and it doesn’t come by pouring all your energy into just one segment of the business either. It’s 2019. Attraction and retention strategies at top-ranking employer brands have moved beyond the traditional walls of human resources and out into some other-worldly area where brand strategy and corporate culture collide. LinkedIn put together a list of the most sought-after employers based on billions of user actions that measure four main pillars: reach, engagement, job interest, and new hire retention. Take a peek at the top 10 employer brands, and then do some research on your organization’s benefits, compensation, and engagement and retention strategies. Is your company soon to be topping the leaderboards, too? 1. Amazon 2. Alphabet 7. Comcast NBCUniversal

6 | AWARENESS & ATTRACTION

3. Facebook 4. Salesforce 8. The Walt Disney Company

5. Tesla 9. Oracle

6. Apple 10. Netflix


The top-ranking employer brands’ shiny statuses aren’t just isolated to LinkedIn’s list either—they earn favorable marks on Glassdoor, too. Glassdoor is known for its ability to give job seekers a sense of what working for a specific company is really like, and it calculates its company ratings by taking into account an organization’s culture and values, work-life balance, compensation and benefits, leadership, and career opportunities. Current employees at the 10 top-ranking companies are praising their employers when it comes to these categories, meaning these same employers are also above average with respect to company ratings on Glassdoor. (The average company rating for all 700,000+ companies on Glassdoor is a 3.3/5.0! These employer brands rate higher!) And when so many job seekers say it’s important to be thoughtful and informed about all aspects of a company prior to accepting a job offer, we have to ask, what are your employees saying about you?

BUILDING YOUR OWN BUZZWORTHY BRAND: Take a page out of these employers’ handbooks and build a brand that people are craving to be a part of; you can start by answering these questions. 1. Does your organization lead with purpose? 2. Have you established a strong sense of leadership at all levels in your workplace—one founded on credibility and trust? 3. Is your employer brand clearly established and reflective of your purpose, values, and goals? 4. Do your employees know the organization’s purpose, values, and goals? 5. Do you promote your employer brand with consistent messaging across different channels? If you’ve answered no to any of these questions, you know where you need to start. And if you feel as if your organization has a strong hold on all of the above, delve a little deeper and see where improvements can be made.

LEGAL & LEGISLATIVE CONSIDERATIONS Demographic filters in job advertising: good, bad, or just plain ol’ illegal? The answer? It depends. For the most part, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with using filters such as age, language, and location in online advertising efforts, as long as you can prove the rest of your campaign isn’t exclusive, too. For example, it’s fine to show ads with certain pictures or language to a younger audience on one online platform and to share the same message—but with different pictures and words—to an older audience in a print publication. This is a smart tactic because it helps you appeal to each group, instead of alienating one with language or images that don’t resonate. What you can’t do is actively exclude one or more groups of workers from all of your advertising efforts.

AWARENESS & ATTRACTION | 7


HR IS THE NEW MARKETING Unless you’ve been living without internet access, you’ve seen that recruitment marketing is the new black in the world of talent acquisition. What does it mean, and why should you care? Here’s the lowdown: Gone are the days when simply looking and sounding attractive to interested applicants is enough. If you’re still waiting for job seekers to come to you because you have witty job postings and an awesome careers page, you’re going to be left in your competitors’ recruiting dust. That’s where recruitment marketing gives you a leg up. Its strategy is to actively seek out your ideal candidates (how are they supposed to know you’re a match made in heaven?!) in the places they spend their time and use relevant elements of your employer brand to convince them you’re their employment soul mate. Aaaaaand ... you do that how? Here are a couple of examples: Instead of hosting a traditional job fair (yawn), one employer heavily promoted a series of events that offered attendees a behind-the-scenes look at some of the coolest office spaces in town while featuring a lineup of local craft brews. Another employer added a question to its e-book sign-up form that, based on specific input, generated an email to individuals likely to be target candidates that touted the company’s desirable location and need for talent just like the recipient.

SPOTLIGHT ON TECHNOLOGY Textio, a machine intelligence company, can predict the gender of your applicants by reading the job description you write. After years of reading job posts and analyzing the gender of the people hired to fulfill the role, Textio has—among other things—mastered the art of identifying gendered words, phrases, or job requirements. Your goal (of course) is to write a job ad that is neutral and equally attractive to all genders, and Textio assures you do just that. Even if you don’t use a service like this to screen your job posts before making them public, let it serve as a reminder of the huge impact something as small as a couple of words in a job post can ultimately have on the diversity of your candidate pool and your workforce. 8 | AWARENESS & ATTRACTION


STILL NOT SOLD? HERE ARE 10 REASONS YOU CAN’T AFFORD TO IGNORE YOUR RECRUITMENT BRAND See what these companies did here? They identified their ideal candidate profiles, they determined the interests of those profiles, they put their brand in front of these individuals in the places they likely spend their time, and they used these opportunities to nurture talent before they apply. Brilliant! This strategy not only puts you in control of the conversation but also in front of the people you want to hire, which is invaluable considering a huge portion of the talent market is currently employed and not actively seeking a new job.

1. A strong employer brand leads to 50% more qualified applicants. (LinkedIn Talent Solutions, 2016.) 2. More than 75% of job seekers research about a company’s reputation and employer brand before applying. (LinkedIn Talent Solutions, 2016.) 3. The No. 1 obstacle to candidates in the application process is not knowing what it’s like to work at an organization. (LinkedIn Talent Solutions, 2016.) 4. 72% of recruiting leaders worldwide agreed that employer brand has a significant impact on hiring. (LinkedIn Talent Solutions, 2016.) 5. There is a 50% cost-per-hire reduction for companies with strong employer brands. (LinkedIn Talent Solutions, 2016.) 6. The time-to-hire rate is one to two times faster for companies with strong employer brands. (LinkedIn Talent Solutions, 2016.) 7. Employee turnover can be reduced by 28% by investing in employer brand. (Officevibe, 2015.) 8. 77% of candidates would not accept a job in a firm with a bad reputation even if unemployed. (CR Magazine, 2015.) 9. 48% of candidates had some relationship or interaction with a company before applying. (ICIMS, 2018.) 10. 55% had a positive impression of that company before they applied. (ICIMS, 2018.)

AWARENESS & ATTRACTION | 9


ATTRACT JOB SEEKERS BY APPEALING TO THEIR PREFERENCES Throughout 2018, we surveyed over 70,000 administrative and light industrial job seekers about the relative importance of seven job attributes and the role they play in the job search. We came up with the seven factors based on a combination of common quit reasons and the things associates tell us are most important in a job. This data—collected via our Applicant Sentiment Index™ (ASI)—helps us understand what attracts workers to a job, which, in turn, helps us better understand which job attributes must be above average to attract attention in the marketplace.

SEVEN ATTRIBUTES WE THOUGHT* WERE IMPORTANT IN A JOB SEARCH: · Pay rate · Shift schedule · Physical work environment · Essential job function · Opportunity to learn a new skill · Chance to make social connections at work · Supervisory/management style * After collecting gobs of data, we are very confident that social connections and management style mean very little during the job hunt. This is good information to know, but it’s no longer worth wasting space asking about it on our survey. We’re replacing these two items in our survey, and we’ll report back with new insights next year.

10 | AWARENESS & ATTRACTION

WHAT IS THE ASI?

As part of our standard application process, we ask every applicant to answer a set of questions anonymously so we can measure favorable or unfavorable sentiment toward the local employment landscape: quality and quantity of jobs, quality of wages, and commute times; we also ask about the importance of job attributes. The sheer number of responses and the stability of the questions over time allow us to track shifts in workers’ mindsets to predict and prepare for market shifts.


Pay 4.90 Learn new skills 4.68 Work environment 4.45 Shift schedule 4.43 Essential job function 3.71 Management style 3.44 Social connections 3.10

Pay 5.08 Work environment 4.85 Shift schedule 4.18 Learn new skills 4.16 Social connections 3.67 Essential job function 3.56 Management style 2.84

Differences in preferences abound when you look (See the sampling of local charts below), but there are a few commonalities among workers Pay closely 5.41 Shift schedule 4.76 regardless of where they live: Work environment 4.58 Learn new skills 4.15 Essential job function 3.52

- Pay is still numero uno across the board. Social connections 3.09 - Friends are important, but not whenManagement looking style for 3.08 a job. Same goes for trying to pick a good boss—job seekers aren’t too worried about hunting for the perfect manager. - The essential job function (the very heart of a worker’s daily tasks) is actually pretty unimportant, indicating that most of our job seekers aren’t searching for jobs based on having prior experience. Reconsider the types of “required skills” listed in job advertisements to ensure you aren’t unnecessarily restricting your candidate pool to people with prior experience, if prior experience isn’t truly important. Pay 5.41 Shift schedule 4.76 Work environment 4.58 Learn new skills 4.15 Essential job function 3.52 Social connections 3.09 Management style 3.08

Pay 4.90 Learn new skills 4.68 Work environment 4.45 Shift schedule 4.43 Essential job function 3.71 Management style 3.44 Social connections 3.10

NATIONWIDE Pay 4.90 Learn new skills 4.68 Work environment 4.45 Shift schedule 4.43 Essential job function 3.71 Management style 3.44 Social connections 3.10

Pay 5.08 Work environment 4.85 Shift schedule 4.18 Learn new skills 4.16 Social connections 3.67 Essential job function 3.56 Management style 2.84

Pay 5.97 Shift schedule 4.94 Work environment 4.65 Learn new skills 4.04 Essential job function 3.43 Management style 3.15 Social connections 2.67

MONTROSE, CO

YUMA, AZ Pay 5.08 Work environment 4.85 Shift schedule 4.18 Responses areLearn analyzed and 4.16 weighted new skills Social connections 3.67 Essential job function 3.56 Management style 2.84

Pay 5.97 Shift schedule 4.94 Work environment 4.65 Learn new skills 4.04 Essential job function 3.43 Management style 3.15 Social connections 2.67

CHARLOTTE, NC

on a scale of 1-7 and ranked from “most important” (7) to “least important” (1). AWARENESS & ATTRACTION | 11


WILL YOUR TALENT PIPELINE BE HALF FULL OR HALF EMPTY? Pay continues to be the most important factor job seekers say they consider when looking for a job. But exactly how much is enough to attract attention? We collect wage expectation data on our application; we calculate the wage at which 50% of local job seekers say they will accept a position, and then we calculate how many times greater that wage is than the local minimum wage so you know what it takes to catch the attention of half of your local labor pool. See how your city compares to surrounding areas—the higher the number, the heftier the expectations!

SAMPLE CALCULATION Columbus, Indiana

$13.50 / $7.25 = Desired Wage, 50th Percentile

Local Minimum Wage

1.9

ALABAMA

1.4

1.8

1.4

1.6

1.7

1.6

1.6

1.7

1.4

1.4

Albertville

Birmingham

Clanton

Decatur

Florence

Fort Payne

Gadsden

Huntsville

Mobile

Montgomery

ARIZONA

ARKANSAS

1.5

1.7

1.6

1.7

1.2

1.3

1.3

1.2

1.0

1.4

Opelika

Oxford

Talladega

Tuscaloosa

Glendale

Kingman

Mesa

Prescott Valley

Yuma

Conway

12 | AWARENESS & ATTRACTION


CALIFORNIA

COLORADO

1.2

1.2

1.4

1.4

1.6

1.3

1.4

1.4

1.4

1.4

Bakersfield

Torrance

Arvada

Aurora

Brighton

Colorado Springs

Durango

Fort Collins

Grand Junction

Greeley

FLORIDA

GEORGIA

IDAHO

1.4

1.2

1.3

1.6

1.6

1.9

1.6

2.1

1.7

1.8

Longmont

Montrose

Pueblo

Sarasota

Carrollton

Douglasville

Newnan

Norcross

Rome

Boise

INDIANA

1.7

1.7

1.7

1.7

1.7

1.6

1.9

1.9

2.0

1.9

Idaho Falls

Nampa

Pocatello

Twin Falls

Anderson

Angola

Clarksville

Columbus

Elkhart

Fort Wayne

1.9

2.0

1.7

1.9

1.9

1.9

1.7

1.9

1.9

1.8

Franklin

Goshen

Greenfield

Greensburg

Indianapolis

Lafayette

La Porte

Lebanon

Plainfield

Plymouth

KANSAS

KENTUCKY

1.9

1.8

Elizabethtown

Florence

1.7

1.9

1.9

1.7

1.7

1.9

1.9

1.7

Richmond

Seymour

Shelbyville

South Bend

Valparaiso

Warsaw

Olathe

Bowling Green

AWARENESS & ATTRACTION | 13


LOUISIANA

MICHIGAN

1.6

1.9

2.0

2.0

1.9

1.4

1.4

1.4

1.4

1.4

Hopkinsville

Louisville

Shepherdsville

Bossier City

Lafayette

Coldwater

Grand Rapids

Hillsdale

Holland

Lansing

MISSISSIPPI

MISSOURI

NEVADA

NEW MEXICO

1.2

1.4

1.5

1.7

1.7

1.5

1.6

1.9

1.9

1.7

St. Joseph

Sterling Heights

Sturgis

Hattiesburg

Jackson

Belton

Kansas City

Reno

Winnemucca

Clovis

NEW YORK

NORTH CAROLINA

NORTH DAKOTA

1.2

1.9

2.1

2.8

1.5

1.6

1.7

Charlotte

Minot

Williston

Bryan

Marysville

Springdale

1.9

2.1

Farmington

Hobbs

2.1 Roswell

Jamestown

OKLAHOMA

OREGON

OHIO

SOUTH CAROLINA

1.5

1.3

2.3

1.3

1.3

1.3

1.3

1.4

1.1

1.9

Troy

Zanesville

Oklahoma City

Albany

Eugene

Klamath Falls

Medford

Portland

Roseburg

Greenville

TENNESSEE

1.7

1.7

1.7

1.9

1.4

1.7

1.9

1.6

1.9

1.9

Seneca

Bristol

Chattanooga

Gallatin

Greeneville

Knoxville

Lebanon

Morristown

Murfreesboro

Nashville

14 | AWARENESS & ATTRACTION


TEXAS

1.9

1.8

1.7

1.8

1.7

1.6

1.7

2.2

2.0

1.7

Abilene

Amarillo

Arlington

Bryan

Cleburne

El Paso

Graham

Houston

Lewisville

Longview

UTAH

1.7

2.6

2.6

2.4

1.9

2.0

1.9

2.1

2.0

1.9

Lubbock

Midland

Odessa

San Antonio

American Fork

Brigham City

Cedar City

Delta

Draper

Layton

1.9

2.0

1.9

2.0

2.0

1.9

1.7

2.0

2.0

1.9

Logan

Moab

Ogden

Orem

Price

Provo

Richfield

Salt Lake City

Spanish Fork

St. George

WASHINGTON

VIRGINIA

2.0

1.7

1.6

1.7

1.4

1.1

1.3

1.2

1.2

Vernal

Christiansburg

Lynchburg

Roanoke

Everett

Kennewick

Kent

Prosser

Yakima

WYOMING

2.1

2.1

Cheyenne

Rock Springs

AWARENESS & ATTRACTION | 15



RECRUITING

RECRUITING


PROFILING: THE LEGAL WAY Imagine a world in which you knew where to find workers who have the highest chances of being successful, high-performing employees. That world is a pretty great place, right? WELL, GUESS WHAT—IT EXISTS! Recruiting is both an art and a science— you just have to find balance between blindly following data and totally ignoring it.

18 | RECRUITING

You don’t need to hire a team of data scientists if you want to uncover some important information about your workforce. You just need to know what to ask and where to look. After years of crunching numbers, we’ve identified a few things that tend to predict success on the job: Unemployment rate in area of residence. It probably comes as no surprise that the higher the unemployment rate, the less likely people are to quit because a replacement job is more difficult to find. If voluntary turnover is one of your biggest challenges, look for workers in areas with above-average unemployment. ZIP code of residence. Each situation will be a little different, but the approach is the same: Identify what success looks like in your facility, and then analyze who is most successful and where they live. If you aren’t recruiting many workers from your most-successful ZIP codes, try increasing your efforts in those areas. Take a look at this sample from an analysis we performed in the South. In this specific instance, there were two ways we defined success: staying on assignment 520 hours (90 days) and/or having a successful assignment outcome (which could include meeting a shorter contract length or being hired on by the customer).


WHAT’S IN AN ADDRESS?

ASSIGNMENT SUCCESS BY ZIP CODE OF RESIDENCE ZIP CODE

# OF CANDIDATES PLACED

% WHO WORKED MORE THAN 520 HOURS

SUCCESSFUL OUTCOMES

362XX

43 (3.18%)

39.53%

23.26%

362XX

31 (2.29%)

41.94%

19.35%

362XX

55 (4.06%)

45.45%

18.18%

362XX

54 (3.99%)

37.04%

16.67%

350XX

56 (4.14%)

35.71%

16.07%

362XX

101 (7.46%)

44.55%

12.87%

351XX

360 (26.59%)

45.56%

12.78%

351XX

122 (9.01%)

37.70%

10.66%

351XX

57 (4.21%)

36.84%

10.53%

350XX

39 (2.88%)

51.28%

10.26%

362XX

22 (1.62%)

45.45%

9.09%

362XX

22 (1.62%)

54.55%

9.09%

351XX

25 (1.85%)

40.00%

8.00%

350XX

86 (6.35%)

40.70%

6.98%

Since 2015, we’ve surveyed over 250,000 job applicants about commute time preferences, and the trend is clear: As the job market has heated up over the past couple of years, job seekers’ willingness to commute more than 30 minutes has been on a steady decline. Use this type of knowledge to your benefit; don’t waste your time and money trying to convince workers to make a long commute to your work (unless, of course, you have data to prove that workers from one area are successful employees!). It’s best to keep your recruiting radius tight. But be careful of one thing: Don’t actively avoid or weed out candidates from certain parts of town based on conscious or subconscious biases, like the reputation of a neighborhood. % OF JOB SEEKERS WILLING TO COMMUTE MORE THAN 30 MINUTES TO & FROM WORK 45%

40%

35%

30%

Q4 2015

Q1 2016

Q2 2016

Q3 2016

Q4 2016

Q1 2017

Q2 2017

Q3 2017

Q4 2017

Q1 2018

Q2 2018

Q3 2018

Q4 2018

RECRUITING | 19


DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DESIRED AND ACTUAL WAGE

EFFECT OF UNDESIRABLE PAY ON VOLUNTARY TURNOVER

1-10 Days

11-30 Days

31-60 Days

61-90 Days

91+ Days

TIME ON ASSIGNMENT BEFORE QUITTING

Difference between desired wage and the position’s pay rate. Job seekers tell us that pay is the most important factor they consider when looking for a job, so it’s no surprise that pay impacts voluntary turnover. Across the country, we’ve found that the gap between desired and actual pay impacts the length of an employee’s assignment. On average, employees who quit within the first 10 days are working for $1.06 per hour less than they want; employees who quit between 11-60 days are working for $0.90 per hour less than they want; and employees who stay on assignment 90 or more days are earning only $0.25 per hour less than they desire. Sure, you can talk anyone into taking your job, but our data show that you can’t make them stay. It’s against the law in many cities to ask job seekers to disclose prior earnings, but it’s totally legal to ask about pay expectations (so do it!). If you find that everyone’s pay expectations are higher than your pay rates, it might be time to visit your finance team.

Level of achieved education. We’ve run this study multiple times over the years, and the outcome is always the same: Workers without a high school diploma or equivalent (HSD/ GED) outperform their peers with more education. Reconsider your hiring requirements if you require an HSD/GED or refocus your recruiting efforts on applicants without a diploma; chances are good that you’ll not only have access to a larger talent pool, but you’ll see an improvement in turnover. Many positions don’t actually require skills learned in high school (or the skills can be taught on the job). And since so few employers are willing to hire workers without a diploma, these workers are less apt to jump ship.

EDUCATION LEVEL AND ASSIGNMENT END REASONS

25% 28%

34%

47%

38%

No diploma or degree indicated Successful

20 | RECRUITING

28%

At least HSD/GED Quit

Terminated


SPOTLIGHT ON TECHNOLOGY What can a fancy algorithm do for your recruiters? Answer: Probably not too much today. The news is flooded with stories about computer algorithms that enable companies to track successful workers and their unique traits and use the information to identify best-fit workers in the future. While this sounds so great (despite some infamous blunders, like Amazon’s algorithm that discriminated against female tech workers ... oops!), the reality is that the vast majority of off-the-shelf applicant tracking systems available on the market today simply don’t contain much of this technology. Current products are getting better at parsing resumes, making suggestions, and matching profiles based on specific keywords, but they are missing one critical component: the ability to teach themselves more. The unfortunate reality is that all this newfangled recruiting technology is still very Jetsons—very cool, very futuristic, and largely inaccessible.

LEGAL & LEGISLATIVE CONSIDERATIONS It might be time to remove that pesky little “salary history” question from your list. You can’t legally ask, “How much did you make at your last job?” if you’re an employer in California, Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Oregon, Puerto Rico, New Orleans, Philadelphia, or New York City, and national employers should consider eliminating the question altogether to avoid a misstep in one of the locations listed above. This growing legislative trend is aimed at eliminating a practice that unfairly reduces a worker’s future earning power and gives employers the upper hand in salary negotiations. A better question is, “What is your pay expectation for this or similar positions?”

RECRUITING | 21


AR D IN G, O N BO ING, EMENT HIR ENGAG &


HIRING, ONBOARDING & ENGAGEMENT


HIRING & ONBOARDING BEST PRACTICES LEGAL & LEGISLATIVE CONSIDERATIONS Is the time spent in orientation compensable? Yes— almost always. Under the Fair Labor Standards Act, an employee’s time is compensable if it meets at least one of these four criteria: attendance is during the employee’s regular working hours; attendance is mandatory; the course, lecture, or meeting is directly related to the employee’s job; or the employee performs productive work during such attendance. In almost every scenario, a new employee onboarding or training program meets at least one of these criteria. And as a reminder, these hours count toward overtime calculations for nonexempt employees.

24 | HIRING, ONBOARDING & ENGAGEMENT

The hiring process (all that stuff that comes after the conditional job offer, like drug screening and background checks) and the onboarding and engagement processes are the first real insights a new employee has into your organization, how it’s run, and how they can expect to be treated as an employee. TREAT YOUR NEW HIRES WELL, AND WORK HARD TO GET THEM TO ENGAGE WITH YOU EARLY ON.

There are a lot of employment timelines available if you spend a few minutes looking around, but why look at those when you can look at this? We’ve combined important employment statistics with hiring, onboarding, and engagement activities to create this “dataline”—a timeline of events and ideas supported by data.


HIRING & ONBOARDING “DATALINE” The early bird gets the worm! The average hiring process in the U.S. lasts 23.8 days, but it’s less than half that for entry-level, low-skill jobs.

Half full or half empty? Neither is a good description of a newly hired workforce! It varies by industry, but our historical turnover data tell us that between 30 to 55% of turnover happens in the first 30 days.

HIRING

ONBOARDING: DAYS 1 – 10

Speed up your hiring process!​

Get the job off to the right start!​

·E ngage with candidates immediately after receiving an application; don’t wait on an arbitrary application review date.​ ·R econsider the applicability of background screens, multiple interviews, and multi-step preemployment tests. Reducing or eliminating unnecessary steps can shave five to ten days of idle waiting time off your process.​ ·D on’t ask candidates to visit your office multiple times. Process all paperwork in one visit, or offer an online system that can be accessed on a home computer or mobile device.

· Before the first day: Provide an informational sheet that details where to go, what to wear, and who to ask for.​ · Day 1: Provide a detailed, five-day training schedule, and offer an on-site orientation and welcome meeting.​ · Day 2: Take the new employee to lunch.​ · Day 3: Have the HR team conduct a check-in call. ​ · Days 5 – 10: Schedule a check-in meeting with the supervisor or team lead.​ · Day 10: Give the employee some logo wear. Go team!

TLC matters—we mean tender loving care, not the band. Our survey results indicate up to 30% of workers might need extra attention at the 30-day mark.

Seven weeks in heaven? Doesn’t seem like people feel that way. Our average worker quits after only 279 hours, with the two most common reasons being “personal” and “other job with higher pay.”

EARLY ENGAGEMENT: DAYS 11 – 90

Ask for feedback, and intervene if necessary!​ · Days 21 – 28: During this week, send a one-question survey asking about job satisfaction and offer a follow-up conversation if one is desired. (Flip to the next page for information about our survey and its results.)

Make the job so good there’s no reason to look around!​ ·D ays 30, 60, and/or 90: ​ ·O ffer a time-based wage increase as a retention incentive to help combat the desire to look around for a job with higher pay. (See page 20 for details on the effect of undesirable wages on voluntary turnover.)​ ·S upervisors should develop deeper rapport with team members, which can help motivate new employees and identify when “personal” reasons may affect employment. (Guess what? Page 31 has details about a cool, free resource we put together for supervisors.)

HIRING, ONBOARDING & ENGAGEMENT | 25


ENGAGEMENT BEST PRACTICES Engagement is measurable, and it represents the degree to which an employee is attached to his or her job, co-workers, and organization. Engagement significantly influences one’s willingness to learn and perform at work, which generates higher productivity and impacts overall company performance and profits. Workers stop engaging when their expectations don’t match the reality of their job. Knowing this is only half the battle; intervening before it’s too late is the other half.

According to a recent Gallup poll, only 3 out of 10 U.S. workers are engaged.

STATS FOR 2018 SURVEYS SENT: 45,000 RESPONSE RATE: 13% 30% OF RESPONDENTS REQUESTED A FOLLOW-UP CALL WE CONTACTED 100% 54% RETENTION

26 | HIRING, ONBOARDING & ENGAGEMENT

To combat disengagement and discontent at a known inflection point (30 days into a new job), we send a survey to every associate as he or she nears the end of his or her first month on the job. If the associate requests a follow-up call to talk about concerns—many do!—we reach out within 24 hours. Here are the stats for 2018: · Surveys sent: 45,000 · Response rate: 13% · 30% of respondents asked us to contact them · We contacted 100% of those who requested it, listened to concerns, and intervened where possible. · Just over half of these associates are still on assignment, successfully completed the term of their assignment, or were hired by our client— meaning they are great employees who may have otherwise quit. Engagement Check List: Are you doing these things?

Make your pay a differentiator.

Explain the process to be hired on permanently.

Create an inclusive environment.

Have a strong team of supervisors.

Collect feedback and act on it.

Provide an orientation and continued learning opportunities.

Explain your overtime schedule.


SPOTLIGHT ON TECHNOLOGY There’s an app for that. No, really, there is. As employers continue to place a greater emphasis on the employee experience, a handful of technology companies have developed onboarding and engagement apps to help out. These apps allow new hires to complete and submit paperwork, give managers a way to send welcome messages and provide information about the first day of work, and afford the company a way to push surveys, collect feedback, share information, and more.

HIRING, ONBOARDING & ENGAGEMENT | 27


LEA R N I N

G

T N E M P O L E V E D &


LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT


ABC COMPANY

A CULTURE OF LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT IS BETTER THAN ANY TRAINING EVENT. “Up or out” shouldn’t be the career path at your company. “Up or around” should. You should always foster an environment of learning at every level. Don’t just train workers to perform their immediate job, but offer cross-training, up-training, and additional learning and development opportunities aimed at making your workers well-rounded employees, potential targets for promotion opportunities, and/or peer leaders.

30 | LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT


Meet Anne, Bret, Mike, and Betty. Their tales of success, failure, promotions, and missed opportunities are lessons for us all. But, more importantly, these folks are characters in two trainings that serve as actual lesson material we present to every associate or that you can use with your staff members.

Engagement, development, and retention go hand in hand: Without one, the other two aren’t possible, and without all three, your workforce will suffer. Engagement initiatives draw workers in and make THEM want to stick around, but it’s learning and development initiatives that ensure your workforce is one that YOU want to have around.

The Associates’ Guide | 9 Simple Ways to Stand Out on the Job. New in 2019, this training, which is administered to all associates as part of Elwood’s mandatory job readiness e-training program, provides strategies to help associates be successful on the job. The module covers topics like the importance of good attendance, performing high-quality work, taking initiative, seeking feedback, and leading by example.

9

9TO KEEP YOUR EMPLOYEES

SIMPLE WAYS

ON THE JOB THE SUPERVISORS’ GUIDE TO IMPROVING EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT & RETENTION

SIMPLE WAYS TO

ON THE JOB The Supervisors’ Guide | 9 Simple Ways to Keep Your Employees Happy on The Job. This is a pocket guide for supervisors, and it provides engagement and retention strategies that any supervisor can implement without upper management or budget committee approval. The story book covers topics like introductions and first impressions, performance feedback, developing mentors, and creating buy-in. VISIT WWW.ELWOODTHINKS.COM TO ORDER A SET & FACILITATOR GUIDE. LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT | 31


SPOTLIGHT ON TECHNOLOGY Don’t let distance put a damper on development. Gone are the days of long hours in a training room! While there are benefits to offering learning and development sessions in person, technology can (and should) be your friend, too. Take us for example: We employ over 130,000 people each year across 250 cities and 31 states, and it’s extremely important that our associates receive very detailed safety training and soft skills development opportunities and that our internal staff know how to perform their job functions, especially regulated ones like certain steps in the hiring process and drug screening. Computer-based training modules are perfect. Not only can they track engagement and verify competency like in-person trainings, they are easy to update, quickly deployed, easily scaled, and they leave no room for training discrepancies or inconsistencies. Enterprise-wide training programs are best served by learning and development software, but you can also use live or recorded webinars and webcam trainings, too. In 2018: ·W e provided over 1.6 million minutes (about 30,000 hours) of computer-based training time to our contingent workforce. ·W e brought our total number of certificate-holding Certified Staffing Professionals© (CSP) to 378 and the number of employees who are studying for the exam to 102. Elwood employs more CSPs than any other company in the world, indicating a higher level of competency in the areas of human resources processes and employment law compared to other staffing providers. ·W e developed over 20 hours of new training for various employee groups.

32 | LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT


LEGAL & LEGISLATIVE CONSIDERATIONS Training on using the intranet? Your security system? The time clock? All really good ideas, but none are legally required. What is? Well, antisexual harassment training, for one (in a few states anyway). Both New York and California have adopted legislation that requires employers to provide initial and ongoing training to employees about sexual harassment—how to spot it, stop it, report it, and more. In this #metoo era, we anticipate that more states will make it mandatory for employers to provide basic training on workplace harassment.

LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT | 33



SEPARAT I O NS & SUC , LEA CESS VE ION S P

N E S B A FO NING AL N

SEPARATIONS & SUCCESSION PLANNING


TURNOVER HAPPENS Employees leave companies for all sorts of reasons— some you can anticipate, some you can’t. The best possible outcome of any employee departure is filling the role quickly and seamlessly with a suitable successor. To do that, you must understand when and why employees leave, and craft a succession strategy that ANTICIPATES your exit patterns.

A tight labor market is nothing new; it wasn’t new a decade ago, and it won’t be new a decade or so from now. Markets are cyclical, meaning: You can’t forgo future planning because you think the problem will be gone by the time you finalize your plans; you should always be planning for a variety of scenarios. Case in point: If you weren’t focused on succession planning from 2009 to 2014 (when turnover was low and job seekers were aplenty), you’ve probably really struggled to keep your head above water and fill critical roles in current years when workers quit frequently and replacement candidates are scarce. Sound familiar?

ANNUAL TURNOVER 475%

Recession

450% 425% 400% 375% 350% 325% 300% 275% 250% 225% 200%

2007

2008

2009

2010

Manufacturing Sector

2011

2012 Distribution Sector

2013

2014 Cross Sector

2015

2016

2017

Staffing Industry

Sector data come from Elwood Staffing’s database. Staffing industry data published by the American Staffing Association.

36 | SEPARATIONS & SUCCESSION PLANNING

2018


Departures happen for three main reasons: employees quit, employees get fired, or employees take a short-term leave of absence.

OUR DATA TELL US ONLY 44% OF DEPARTING EMPLOYEES LEAVE WHEN YOU WANT THEM TO

56% VOLUNTARY

TURNOVER

(and even then, it’s probably not convenient!)

44%

According to the BLS, there are about 5.5 million job separations each month in the U.S.

INVOLUNTARY

SPOTLIGHT ON TECHNOLOGY What’s cool? Computer algorithms that take in tons of data points, analyze them, and flag workers who may be apt to leave the company soon. What’s not cool? Also, computer algorithms that take in tons of data points, analyze them, and flag workers who may be apt to leave the company soon. The upside to this blossoming artificial intelligence initiative is that it can provide valuable information that may otherwise be overlooked, which helps managers intervene early and prevent unwanted turnover—or at least plan for it. The downside is that algorithms can incorrectly identify “happy” workers as disgruntled, which may affect the way they are viewed or treated by management. It can also infringe on employees’ expectations of privacy if it means monitoring written communications on company-owned systems; though it doesn’t infringe on rights to privacy in most scenarios, we think it’s safe to assume most employees probably won’t enjoy the notion that their words are being monitored, and that could have a disheartening effect on otherwise “happy” employees. SEPARATIONS & SUCCESSION PLANNING | 37


LEGAL & LEGISLATIVE CONSIDERATIONS Growing popularity of paid family and medical leave: Washington joined New York as the second state to offer a statesponsored paid family and medical leave program, and Michigan is poised to join the duo sometime in 2019. Though the details vary between states, the aim is the same: Offer nearly every worker access to wage replacement during a qualifying leave period. Unlike leave offered under the federally mandated Family and Medical Leave Act (which can be unpaid and is only guaranteed to workers at large organizations), paid family and medical leave programs are employee- and employer-funded programs (everyone pays a bit out of every paycheck), and paid leave is sought from and granted by the state, not an individual employer. We fully expect more states to enact similar legislation in the coming years, which means more workers will qualify for—and can afford to take—time off. Don’t overdo your noncompete. Why deal with a lawsuit you’ll likely lose while trying to manage the rest of the fallout from an employee’s departure? Save yourself the headache! Noncompete enforceability tests vary from state to state, industry to industry, and situation to situation, but a good general rule to follow is to stay away from “janitor clauses” in your noncompete agreements. These clauses—totally unrelated to a janitorial position—are overly broad restrictions that prohibit former employees from engaging in any type of relationship with a client or competitor, regardless of the nature of the relationship or its potential impact on your company, and they rarely hold up in court. Think twice before including phrases such as “in any manner” or “in any capacity” in your noncompete agreements, and instead, take the time to outline specific relationships and the rationale behind them. Qualifying leave or just an unexcused absence? A recent case decision highlights an important nuance of the Family and Medical Leave Act’s (FMLA) notification procedures, both for an employee and employer. While it’s true that an employer is required to notify an employee of his or her rights under the FMLA even if the employee does not specifically request leave under the FMLA, it’s conditional upon the employee providing enough information that the employer recognizes the need to alert the employee of his or her rights under the FMLA. In this recent case, the employee—who had a history of medical issues known to her employer—called off work one day but did not give a reason for the absence. Because the employee failed to notify her employer of the medical necessity of her leave, the court ruled that the employer did not have an obligation to notify her of her rights under the FMLA and that it acted appropriately when it dismissed her for violating its attendance policy.

38 | SEPARATIONS & SUCCESSION PLANNING


HAVE AN EXIT STRATEGY You should have different types of succession plans for different scenarios and different types of employees. It’s likely obvious that you need to have a formal plan for how to handle the permanent departure of any employee (most companies do this), but don’t forget about short-term absences, like medical or military leave. And remember: Your strategy for each scenario will be different based on the type of employee who needs to be replaced and your company’s long-term goals for that position. We’d be remiss if we didn’t remind you to always assess job candidates against their ability to fulfill a current opening and take on growth opportunities down the road.

STOP & THINK!

Should you always reassign tasks to current staff members or should you always reassign a temporary worker to handle short-term vacancies? Every situation is a little different but consider this: Asking employees to do more (especially if it requires taking on another person’s entire task list) just to save a buck by not hiring and training a short-term replacement doesn’t feel good for an extended period of time. Reasonable employees expect to pitch in on someone’s sick day or during a vacation (people understand and expect to have co-workers cover their sick and vacation days in return), but it’s unreasonable to expect your workers to take on a second job for an extended period. Don’t just look at the costs of a replacement; consider other costs—tangible and intangible—like overtime costs for hourly workers with added tasks or the risk of burnout and turnover. SEPARATIONS & SUCCESSION PLANNING | 39


SUCCESSION PLANNING MATRIX Succession planning isn’t wasted time. It has many benefits. Employers who have a plan to handle separations or leaves of absence experience fewer business interruptions when one occurs, and employees who know they’ve been identified as successors to other employees are more likely to stick around because they have visibility into a career path.

BEST REPLACEMENT OPTION WHAT TYPE OF SKILL SET DOES THE POSITION REQUIRE?

LOOKS LIKE YOU’RE DEALING WITH:

YIKES!

· Family or medical leave · Short-term disability · Military leave · Other

LOOKS LIKE YOU’RE DEALING WITH:

TURNOVER

Management and executive level

YOU’VE LOST INSTITUTIONAL KNOWLEDGE QUICKLY.

SHORT-TERM LEAVE IS THE LEAVE PERMANENT?

Entry level, niche technical, or skilled trades

· Company-initiated dismissal · Employee resignation · Personal, medical, death, or other

DON’T HIRE A REPLACEMENT. Senior leaders can’t be replaced for a short period; a big part of their value is institutional knowledge, and they already have a team who takes care of the day-today tasks. Your best bet is to divvy out any confidential assignments or planned engagements among other senior leaders and accept that a seat in the boardroom may be empty for a bit.

WHAT TYPE OF SKILL SET DOES THE POSITION REQUIRE?

Entry level

Management level

Executive level

WAS IT PLANNED?

GREAT! THIS

EMPLOYEE MIGHT BE ABLE TO HELP WITH THE TRANSITION. · Promotion · Department transfer · Retirement

40 | SEPARATIONS & SUCCESSION PLANNING

TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT COMPANY OR TECHNICAL CONTRACT SEARCH FIRM. Don’t risk burnout among other employees by reassigning tasks that can easily be tackled by short-term help.

WHAT TYPE OF SKILL SET DOES THE POSITION REQUIRE?

Entry level

Management level

Executive level


BEST REPLACEMENT OPTION NEW HIRE OR INTERNAL, LATERAL TRANSFER. Entry level positions are easy to backfill, but don’t only look outside your company. Promote the job internally, too; you never know who might want to make a department transfer. PROMOTE FROM WITHIN. Given the abrupt loss of knowledge, the transition will likely go smoother if you can promote up. There are a few reasons for this: A current employee has already developed rapport and relationships with colleagues, can upskill, may stick around longer if he or she receives a promotion, and doesn’t have the extra learning curve associated with a new hire who doesn’t know the nuances of your company (or, possibly, your industry). APPOINT AN INTERIM DIRECTOR FROM WITHIN. Given the abrupt loss of knowledge, the transition will likely go smoother if you appoint an interim director from within because that person knows the business, is familiar with the current team members, and can help pass the baton when a long-term replacement is identified. Loss of an executive leader has a large trickle-down effect, and changing leadership too quickly can have a big impact on subordinates. There’s no saying you can’t permanently promote the interim director or hire from the outside, but giving an “interim” title to an existing employee helps manage the disruption to business downstream and allows you to avoid a hasty hiring decision that may have unwanted implications long term. NEW HIRE OR INTERNAL, LATERAL TRANSFER. Entry level positions are easy to backfill, but don’t only look outside your company. Promote the job internally, too; you never know who might want to make a department transfer. Regardless of who you hire, engage the existing employee in the hiring process, set up a formal training schedule, and set expectations for the length of the transition. Existing employees who promote or change departments often drag tasks with them; ensure there’s a detailed plan to pass off existing job duties permanently and to free the existing employee to do his or her new job. PROMOTE FROM WITHIN OR HIRE AN EXPERIENCED PROFESSIONAL. We’re keen on promoting from within, but—if you truly don’t have an existing employee with a critical skill set—hiring a new employee into a management position isn’t always a bad idea. New talent who have the opportunity to work under an existing employee can learn the business, learn from the existing employee, and still bring new ideas to the table. Be careful not to alienate existing employees though; if you always hire from the outside—especially if you have the talent inside—you’ll get a reputation as a dead-end employer.

It goes without saying, but you should always have a short list of employees who would be shoe-ins for open positions in a situation like this. If you don’t, pull out a pencil and paper now!

PLAN CAREFULLY, AND PROMOTE FROM WITHIN OR HIRE EXTERNALLY. Executive departures may be unexpected, but sometimes they are easy to plan for. (For example, retirement announcements are often made months or even years in advance.) Some executives stay on as consultants with their former employers. For these reasons, it’s not unreasonable to think that you can easily promote from within. If you choose to hire from the outside, consider using a professional or confidential search firm. A high-visibility search for a new executive can further alienate senior-level employees who expected to be considered for the position; have a plan in place on how to address hurt feelings and possible departures. SEPARATIONS & SUCCESSION PLANNING | 41



ELWOOD


OUR YEAR IN REVIEW FEBRUARY

Elwood Staffing’s Chairman and CEO Mark Elwood appeared in Staffing Industry Analysts’ annual list of North America’s 100 most notable influencers for the fourth year! We are proud to have a leader who is continually recognized for bettering the lives of workers and job seekers across the nation. We are also pleased to share that the Berks & Beyond branches acquired in 2016 began operating under the Elwood Staffing brand. While we were working as one company with a united purpose for two years, this change brings our internal employees, customers, and associates even closer together. 44 | ELWOOD


MARCH

Our first Easter egg hunt in Columbus, Indiana, was an egg-citing day for our associates and their families! Eggs, donuts, games, and a photo op with the Easter Bunny himself made for a holiday hoopla not to be forgotten. We cherish this opportunity to celebrate with our associates, family, and friends.

JUNE

In a formal ceremony celebrating the fifth anniversary of our acquisition of SOS Employment Group, we inducted more than 100 employees into the Rolex Club—the biggest group ever! (The Rolex Club is our internal group of employees who have reached five years of service with Elwood.) And, yes, each and every employee received a shiny, new Rolex to commemorate his or her work anniversary.

SEPTEMBER

We hosted our third annual employer Workforce Intelligence Summit with over 100 client representatives in attendance. This event allows us to take our role as a staffing provider one step further by bringing industry professionals from across the nation together to collaborate and share ideas. We look forward to you joining us this year on October 3rd in Indianapolis at the Hyatt Regency.

OCTOBER

We sponsored the Southern Automotive Conference in Atlanta, and we had the pleasure of leading a breakout session on employee engagement.

NOVEMBER

We opened our beautiful new corporate office building in Columbus, Indiana. We are excited to have the room for growth and expansion. The new building has an open concept and increases the number of collaborative spaces available to our employees, a thoughtful design point intended to reflect our continued commitment to fostering an environment of innovation.

DECEMBER

We acquired and rebranded the commercial staffing operations of Lyons HR. The acquisition expanded our footprint in Alabama into four new cities: Decatur, Florence, Huntsville, and Opelika. ELWOOD 45


2018 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE Having a financially stable staffing partner with resources to invest in solutions is important to the success of your business. As a privately owned business, Elwood manages finances with an emphasis on long-term sustainability and growth. Through disciplined decision making and a conservative approach to balance sheet management, Elwood consistently generates profits that provide sufficient liquidity to support our clients’ current and future labor needs.

REVENUE

Revenue for 2018 was $944 million, which represents a 2% decline from the prior year. A drop from 53 weeks in 2017 to 52 weeks in 2018 was the primary driver, although weakening demand in the energy sector created a significant headwind as well. Excluding the energy sector, organic revenue growth was approximately 5% for 2018. Elwood also expanded client diversity by invoicing a record number of companies during the year. The majority of our placements continued to be in the manufacturing industry, and the decline in energy-related positions was partially offset by expansion within the logistics industry. Our geographic representation was similar to the prior year, with Western states showing slightly stronger growth than other regions. We expanded our presence in the Southeast by opening a few additional branches and acquiring one competitor in Alabama.

Revenue $ in Millions $964

Revenue by Geography $944

Revenue by Industry

Southwest 11%

$852 $804

Food & Pharmaceutical 9%

Construction & Other 4%

Midwest 27% Northeast 13%

Manufacturing 45% Logistics 28%

West 28%

2015

46 | ELWOOD

2016

2017

2018

Southeast 21% Energy 14%


OPERATING COSTS

Low unemployment continues to create a competitive environment for qualified applicants and drives up recruiting costs. Investments in additional recruiters and marketing initiatives designed to reach applicants fueled an increase in operating costs. Total costs increased from 9.6% of revenue to 10.1%, with more than two-thirds of the cost being attributable to staff labor costs. We anticipate recruiting costs to remain high for 2019 and will continue to diligently manage ancillary costs to keep total costs within an acceptable range.

ASSETS AND LIQUIDITY

Elwood continues to maintain a strong asset base to fund working capital and investments in infrastructure. Total assets as of December 2018 were $164 million, and our ability to meet near-term obligations as measured by current ratio improved from 3.5 to 3.7. Technology continues to be the largest category of infrastructure investment. Ongoing investments in network security as well as launching an upgrade to our operating software platform were two major initiatives for 2018.

Operating Costs % of Revenue 10.4%

10.2% 9.6%

Operating Costs by Category Facilities 7.9%

10.1% Operations 10.9%

Recruiting & Selling 13.0% Labor 68.2%

2015

2016

2017

2018

Total Assets $ in Millions

Current Ratio

$178 $168

$164

4.3

$150 3.5

3.7

3.2

COMPLIANCE

Elwood is committed to operating in full compliance with all laws. To ensure we are complying with  financial requirements, we engage the services of independent experts. Our financial statements are audited annually by Blue & Co., LLC. Income tax returns are prepared by Grant Thornton LLP.

2015

2016

2017

2018

2015

2016

2017

2018

ELWOOD | 47


ELWOOD THINKS MONTHLY NEWSLETTER Emailed the first Tuesday of every month, the newsletter contains a little personality and a healthy dose of proprietary research, employment law updates, current events, and anything else we think is worth your time. Sign up by emailing elwoodthinks@elwoodstaffing.com

Feb. 2019

Coming at you the first Tuesday of every month, this newsletter contains proprietary research, employment law updates, current events, and anything else I think is worth your time. ELWOOD

PEOPLE

LAW

MONEY

LISTEN & LEARN

PEOPLE The gig economy isn’t so grand after all. Two economists who predicted the upheaval of the traditional American work model in favor of odd jobs in the “gig economy” have since stepped back on many of the statements made in their 2015-2016 study. At the time of the study, growth of the gig economy seemed astronomical—but it turns out that was due to some calculation error, ambiguity of the definition of a “gig job,” and (most likely) a lagging indicator of the recession. Phew! We need all the workers we can get, right? Read more

Automation, AI, and their anticipated influence.

48 | ELWOOD

The Brookings Institution released a new report indicating it expects automation and artificial intelligence (AI) to take over about 25% of today’s jobs. Who is most at-risk of losing out? Men, minorities, people without a college degree, much of the Midwest, and anyone who nods “yes” when asked if their job is boring and repetitive. Yikes! Obviously, I’ve distilled the list down quite a bit and made some generalizations, but the story is clear: Jobs that can be automated will eventually be automated, and those jobs are held predominately by the people and in the places I listed. Check out the report for more details and a cool map that depicts areas of the U.S. that will likely see the most growth in automation.


Visit ElwoodThinks.com This is where we post all the other good stuff we produce: white papers, guidebooks, quarterly reports, and more.

ELWOOD | 49


WE WORK WHERE YOU WORK

ALABAMA Albertville · Birmingham · Clanton · Decatur · Florence · Fort Payne · Gadsden · Huntsville · Mobile · Montgomery · Opelika · Oxford · Talladega · Tuscaloosa ARIZONA Glendale · Kingman · Mesa · Prescott Valley · Yuma ARKANSAS Conway CALIFORNIA Bakersfield · Glendale6 · Newport Beach5 · San Diego3 · Torrance COLORADO Arvada · Aurora · Brighton · Colorado Springs · Denver2 · Durango · Fort Collins · Grand Junction · Greeley · Longmont · Loveland6 · Montrose · Pueblo FLORIDA Orlando6 · Sarasota · Tampa GEORGIA Carrollton · Douglasville · Newnan · Norcross · Rome IDAHO Boise · Idaho Falls · Nampa · Pocatello · Twin Falls INDIANA Anderson · Angola · Camby · Clarksville · Columbus1 · Elkhart · Fort Wayne · Franklin · Goshen · Greenfield · Greensburg · Indianapolis2 · La Porte · Lafayette · Lebanon · Plainfield · Plymouth · Richmond · Seymour · Shelbyville · South Bend · Valparaiso · Warsaw KANSAS Olathe KENTUCKY Bowling Green · Elizabethtown · Florence · Hopkinsville · Louisville · Shepherdsville LOUISIANA Lafayette · Bossier City MICHIGAN Coldwater · Grand Rapids1 · Hillsdale · Holland · Lansing · St. Joseph · Sterling Heights · Sturgis MISSISSIPPI Brandon · Hattiesburg MISSOURI Belton · Kansas City NEVADA Reno · Winnemucca NEW MEXICO Clovis · Farmington · Hobbs · Roswell NEW YORK Jamestown4 NORTH CAROLINA Charlotte NORTH DAKOTA Minot ·Williston OHIO Bryan · Marysville · Springdale · Troy · Zanesville4 OKLAHOMA Oklahoma City OREGON Albany · Beaverton · Eugene · Klamath Falls · Medford · Portland · Roseburg PENNSYLVANIA Allentown · Breinigsville · Camp Hill · Carlisle · Chambersburg · Hanover · Harrisburg · Hazleton · Lancaster · Lebanon · McMurray · Mountain Top4 · Pottstown · Reading4 · Wyomissing · York SOUTH CAROLINA Greenville · Seneca TENNESSEE Antioch · Bristol · Chattanooga · Farragut · Gallatin · Greeneville · Lebanon · Morristown · Murfreesboro TEXAS Abilene · Amarillo · Arlington · Bryan · Cleburne · El Paso · Graham · Houston · Lewisville · Longview · Lubbock · Midland · Odessa · San Antonio UTAH American Fork · Brigham City · Cedar City · Delta · Draper · Layton · Logan · Moab · Murray6 · Ogden1 · Orem · Price · Provo · Richfield · Salt Lake City · Spanish Fork · St. George · Vernal · West Valley VIRGINIA Christiansburg · Forest · Salem WASHINGTON Everett · Kennewick · Kent · Prosser · Yakima WYOMING Cheyenne · Rock Springs All sites offer Elwood Staffing services, unless noted otherwise. 2 Includes Elwood Professional services Includes Elwood Tradesmen services 4 5 On-site location only Elwood Professional services only | 50 ELWOOD 1

Includes Elwood Professional & Tradesmen services Elwood Tradesmen services only

3 6


ELWOOD | 51


LEADERSHIP Mark S. Elwood, Chairman and CEO John A. Elwood, President Michael D. Elwood, President, Elwood Professional Steven J. Hunnicutt, CPA, CGMA, CFO J. Michael Stockard, Executive Vice President Lia R. Elliott, General Counsel

52 | ELWOOD



CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS 4111 Central Avenue Columbus, IN 47203 812.372.6200 www.elwoodstaffing.com