Page 1

A COLOURFUL

FUTURE MILAN DESIGN WEEK 2018

STUDIOPEPE, QUINCOCES-DRAGÒ, APPARATUS STUDIO, ANGELA MISSONI, DIMORE STUDIO, PLUS ALL THE NEW DESIGNS & TRENDS

FREE RADICALS

The Australian creatives leading the way in thoughtful design

SKI ESCAPES EUROPE TRAVEL SPECIAL

PLUS INSIDE LAKE COMO’S MOST EXCLUSIVE VILLA


Zaza. 2018 Good Design Award Winner. The award-winning Zaza is the latest collaboration with Australian designer Charles Wilson for King Living. Raising the benchmark in contemporary style and luxury, enticing deep seats and a relaxed feel add supreme comfort to the beautiful lines. Resting on elegant slender steel legs, Zaza’s exquisite organic design features adjustable arms and backs that allow you to personalise your comfort. This is not any sofa. This is the captivating Zaza.

1300 546 438 | KINGLIVING.COM


Rough. Refined Concrete domesticated by Caesarstone® New Rugged Concrete™ www.caesarstone.com.au


SMA18877

UNRIVALLED TRIPLE-FAN FREESTANDING COOKER IN CHOICE OF 8 COLOURS


smeg.com.au

BRINGING THE RICH FLAVOURS OF THE ITALIAN COAST INTO YOUR HOME


play it like Hermès


The ultimate resource for tiles and stone. Introducing the new signorino.com.au

Invisible Blue Marble


The new Signorino website is your first destination for everything tiles and stone. Save time and go straight to the place with everything and more. Browse endless high quality products, including our bestselling Terrazzo tiles and slabs and a huge selection of incredible natural stone. Get inspired by our gallery of stunning completed projects, or make a booking to hand pick stone slabs at Signorino Stone Gallery. Take the first step in finding your perfect tiles - visit us at signorino.com.au or in store today.

484 Church St Richmond, Vic 3121, Australia (03) 9427 9100 | signorino.com.au


Be inspired at miele.com.au/kitchen-experience


The Miele Kitchen Experience. Visionary. Extraordinary. Perfect. Impeccable quality. Liberating technology. Effortless elegance. Extraordinary Miele appliances come together to create visionary kitchen perfection. For everything you really love. Miele. Immer Besser.


No one travels like Australians and no one takes us to the world like Qantas Over 1,000 destinations worldwide with Qantas and partners


Kyoto, Japan


Your home is the ultimate reflection of who you are. The design decisions you make and the materials you choose will determine your lifestyle. With timber windows and doors, your possible palette is almost unlimited, whether you want a traditional feel or are looking to add an organic touch to a sleek modern design. So set your own trend. Explore the Botanica range at trendwindows.com.au

SET YOUR OWN TREND WITH BOTANICA.


FSA/TWD0213/07

BOTANICA Timber series


The Milan home of jewellery designer Cynthia Vilchez Castiglioni (page 114).

JULY/AUGUST 2018

26 30 32

CONTRIBUTORS EDITOR’S LETTER

In Vogue 34

IN VOGUE EDIT Vogue Living’s winter refresh, including the inside word on Catherine Martin’s new collection with Mokum

38

104 PROFILE: HIROMI TANGO

Sculptor, photographer, performer and installation artist Hiromi Tango explores the neurological reach of art and its ability to ignite the senses and to heal

ONLINE NOW… All the hits at vogueliving.com.au

107 ART HOUSE

From their home in inner Sydney, two art aficionados lovingly curate a wall-to-wall selection of eclectic works

Homes 114

FUTURE INVESTMENT Clear your conscience and look to thoughtful design for a better tomorrow

47

CLEAR CUT Play it cool with crystalline pieces that

48

CHARACTER STUDY These artisanal ceramic vessels celebrate

shimmer with icy charm

124 IN THE PINES

Nestled in the Alps and overlooking spectacular Lake Como and the mountains beyond, an imposing 1910 villa glides into 21st-century life thanks to its design-savvy Australian owners

the craftsmanship and unique appeal of the handmade

50

FACIAL RECOGNITION Embraced by abstract artists from

52

CLASH MASTERS Mix geometric patterns with florals and

134 KEEPING IT REAL

Architect Barbara Ghidoni has retained many of the inherent quirks of her 1920s apartment in Milan while infusing it with her distinctive, feminine style

PHOTOGRAPHER: HELENIO BARBETTA

Matisse and Picasso to Klee and Miró, the human face still inspires bold shades with softer hues to create dynamic new looks

Art & Design 91

FREE RADICALS Meet the innovators who preach the ‘reduce, re-use, recycle’ mantra to inform, educate and inspire

100 RENAISSANCE MAN: EMILIO PUCCI

The ‘Prince of Prints’ presided over an ancestral home that has remained as vibrant as his famous swirling patterns

GOLDEN TOUCH Jewellery designer Cynthia Vilchez Castiglioni found a home in the heart of Milan that couldn’t have been more appropriate — a medieval-era former convent in a district historically inhabited by goldsmiths

144 PERFECTLY EVOLUTIONARY

At home, David Alhadeff, founder of The Future Perfect, has created a surprisingly tranquil New York living space that exemplifies his design business

152

TONE POEM Interior designer Michelle Macarounas merged a European aesthetic with fresh Australian ease to breathe new life into a 1920s eastern suburbs home

162 STATE OF PLAY

By designing a home modelled on the village hay barns of Italy’s South Tyrol, where he grew up, architect Stefan Rier has finally realised a childhood dream VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 19


JULY/AUGUST 2018

Milan Design Week 2018 56

THE VOGUE LIVING REPORT For one electrifying week every year, Salone del Mobile transforms the city of Milan into a world stage for the boldest innovations in contemporary design

62

HIGHLIGHT: SIX GALLERY Inside a 16th-century Milanese monastery, local architecture-design studio Quincoces-Dragò & Partners fashion a seductive sanctuary

66

IN CONVERSATION: STUDIOPEPE Melbourne interiors wunderkind David Flack meets Arianna Lelli Mami and Chiara Di Pinto, the creative directors of Milan-based Studiopepe

70

MILAN PROFILES Giopato & Coombes, Gabriel Scott,

74

CROWD FAVOURITE: HERMÈS MAISON Dive into a world of colour with Charlotte Macaux Perelman and Alexis Fabry, the deputy artistic directors of Hermès’ home collection

80

IN CONVERSATION: DIMORE STUDIO Vogue Living talks

84

IN CONVERSATION: APPARATUS STUDIO Melbourne

88

Louis Vuitton, Cristina Celestino, JJ Martin, Tiffany & Co., Villa Borsani, Angela Missoni, Vogue Italia, Local Design

design inspiration with Dimore Studio co-founder Britt Moran interior designer Fiona Lynch and Gabriel Hendifar, co-founder of New York’s Apparatus Studio, discuss the brand’s latest work

HIGHLIGHT: PETER PILOTTO For Peter Pilotto and Christopher de Vos, founders of fashion brand Peter Pilotto, their extension into homewares has created a new area for them to play

PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL BARBERA

At Studiopepe’s installation at Milan Design Week 2018, Club Unseen (page 66), Wiemer table for Co van der Horst; vintage Compasso Wright-Wright chairs by Nanda Vigo for Driade and vintage Aghia table lamp by Roberto Pamio for Leucos; Cloud Nine chandelier for Tecnolux; artwork courtesy Andrea Ferrari.

20 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


FF0718vl

An intimate look. ALFRED SOFA RIVIERA COFFEE TABLE MEMOIRE ARMCHAIR JACQUES COFFEE TABLE SYDNEY 269 Military Road, Cremorne 2090 Tel. 02 9908 2660 MELBOURNE 681 Chapel Street, South Yarra 3141 Tel. 03 9826 8777 PERTH Innerspace Tel. 08 9322 6664 fanuli.com.au

CARMENT OTTOMAN


Inside the Villa Sola Cabiati in Tremezzo, Italy (page 172).

JULY/AUGUST 2018

Concierge

Services

172

110 SUBSCRIBE to Vogue Living and receive a Mews Collective candle 200 SOURCES Contact details for the products, people and retailers

since the 1700s, the Villa Sola Cabiati in Tremezzo on Lake Como is filled with objects dripping with history

178

APPETITE FOR DESIGN Style icon Rossana Orlandi’s taste for quality is reflected in her new Milan restaurant, bistRo Aimo e Nadia

184 RUN WILD

Now is the time to start planning your luxury European winter ski experiences. Here are Vogue Living’s top picks

192 POWDER TRIP

Japan is one of the world’s top skiing destinations. We experience the magic by snowshoe for a change

Social 196 FINE WINE MEETS FINE ART

Sydney’s most glamorous style set gathered for the launch of the Bollinger RD 2004 champagne cuvée

198 LITTLE PROJECTS BREAKFAST 22 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

The Dux property launch

Passions 208 10 FAVOURITE THINGS

Established & Sons designer Sebastian Wrong shares what makes him happy

ON THE COVER The Milan ‘green design boutique’ by florist Irene Cuzzaniti at Six Gallery. Photographer: Paul Barbera. Story, page 62. from left: appliqué lamps (on wall)

by Carlo Scarpa; chairs by Gio Ponti from Six Gallery; QD 06 table by Quincoces-Dragò & Partners; Studio Testo Aedes vases; vintage hanging lamp from SG Gallery; flower installation by Irene at Six. SUBSCRIBE TO VOGUE LIVING: page 110. BE PART OF THE CONVERSATION: #VogueLiving #loveVL

PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL BARBERA

ONCE UPON A LAKE Owned by the same Italian noble family


MINOTTI.COM

A U S T R A L I A BY DEDECE 263 LIVERPOOL STREET - DARLINGHURST - SYDNEY NSW 2010 - T. 02 9360 2722 2 DALE STREET - CREMORNE - MELBOURNE 3121 - T. 03 9650 9600 246 CHURCHILL AVENUE - SUBIACO - PERTH 6008 - T. 08 9388 3975 INFO'DEDECE.COM CUSTOMISED INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICE

LAWRENCE SEATING SYSTEM RODOLFO DORDONI DESIGN


Rebecca Caratti EDITOR editor@vogueliving.com.au CREATIVE DIRECTOR Natasha Allen

THE GOURMET ITALIAN

DEPUTY EDITOR Verity Magdalino ART DIRECTOR Paloma Garay STYLE EDITOR Joseph Gardner CHIEF SUB EDITOR Bonnie Vaughan SENIOR SUB EDITOR Kate Barber DIGITAL EDITOR Yeong Sassall ASSISTANT DIGITAL EDITOR Francesca Wallace EDITORIAL & STYLE COORDINATOR Anna Delprat (02) 9288 3729 MELBOURNE EDITOR & FEATURES WRITER Annemarie Kiely LONDON EDITOR Fiona McCarthy EDITOR-AT-LARGE Neale Whitaker CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Freya Herring, Jason Mowen, David Prior, Lee Tulloch CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER Rebecca Burrell CONTRIBUTING SUB EDITORS Darren Christison, Kasey Clark CONTRIBUTORS IMAGES Paul Barbera, Helenio Barbetta, Gianni Basso, Mark Cocksedge, Michaela Dutková, Sean Fennessy, Felix Forest, Valtteri Hirvonen, Stephan Julliard, Mads Mogensen, Michael Naumoff, Felix Odell, Justin Ridler, Prue Ruscoe, Jeremy Simons, Hugh Stewart, Ivan Terestchenko, Dave Wheeler, Wichmann+Bendtsen, Joachim Wichmann WORDS Andrew Ferren, Martina Hunglinger, Chris Pearson STYLING Chiara Dal Canto, Brad Homes, Helle Walsted INTERACTIVE EDITION PRODUCTION MANAGER Stuart McDowell DIGITAL ASSETS & RIGHTS MANAGER Trudy Biernat BUSINESS ANALYST Umair Khalid CLIENT SOLUTIONS DIRECTOR Ed Faith COMMERCIAL SOLUTIONS MANAGER Hannah Calgary-Booth CLIENT SOLUTIONS SPECIALIST Imogen Rafferty ADVERTISING CREATIVE DIRECTOR Richard McAuliffe ADVERTISING HEAD OF OPERATIONS Eva Chown ADVERTISING HEAD OF ART Caryn Isemann ADVERTISING HEAD OF CONTENT Brooke Lewis ADVERTISING SENIOR ART DIRECTORS Bev Douglas, Nicole Vonwiller ADVERTISING COPY EDITORS Rob Badman, Annette Farnsworth, Tiffany Pilcher ADVERTISING CREATIVE PRODUCERS Jenny Hayes, Sarah Mury NATIONAL PRINT SERVICES MANAGER Mark Moes PRODUCTION MANAGER Chrissy Fragkakis ADVERTISING PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Robynne Beavan MARKETING DIRECTOR Diana Kay DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER Shannon Wylie SENIOR BRAND MANAGER Magdalena Zajac BRAND MANAGER Rachel Christian EVENTS MARKETING MANAGER Natalie Headland ACTING EVENTS MANAGER Genevieve McCaskill MARKETING COORDINATOR Shelby Allen COMMERCIAL INTEGRATION MANAGER Rhonda Maunder GENERAL MANAGER, RETAIL SALES & CIRCULATION Brett Willis NATIONAL CIRCULATION MANAGER Danielle Stevenson SUBSCRIPTIONS RETENTION MANAGER Crystal Ewins SUBSCRIPTIONS ACQUISITION MANAGER Grant Durie PUBLISHER, NEWS PRESTIGE NETWORK Nicholas Gray EDITORIAL DIRECTOR CONDÉ NAST TITLES Edwina McCann MANAGING EDITOR CONDÉ NAST TITLES Louise Bryant

Introducing the Skinny range, stylish kitchen tapware, perfect for your home.

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Sharyn Whitten HEAD OF FINANCE Caspar Deman MANAGING DIRECTOR, NEWS DNA Julian Delany VOGUE LIVING is published by NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd, ACN 088 923 906. NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd is a wholly owned subsidiary of News Limited (ACN 007 871 178). Copyright 2018 by NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. ISSN 0042-8035. 2 Holt Street, Surry Hills, NSW 2010. Tel: (02) 9288 3000. Email: mail@vogueliving.com.au. Website: vogueliving.com.au. Postal address: Vogue Living, NewsLifeMedia, Level 1, Locked Bag 5030, Alexandria, NSW 2015. Melbourne: Level 5, HWT Tower, 40 City Road, Southbank 3006. Tel: (03) 9292 1673. Fax: (03) 9292 1695. Brisbane: 41 Campbell Street, Bowen Hills, Qld 4006. Tel: (07) 3666 6910. Fax: (07) 3666 6911.

SUBSCRIPTIONS: within Australia, 1300 656 933; overseas (+61 2) 9282 8023. Website: magsonline.com.au. Email: subs@magsonline.com.au. Websites: vogueliving.com.au, facebook.com/vogueliving, twitter.com/vogueliving, voguelivingmagazine.tumblr.com, pinterest.com/vogueliving, instagram.com/vogueliving. Reply Paid 1224, Queen Victoria Building, NSW 1229 (no stamp required). Printed by PMP Limited, Paper fibre is from sustainably managed forests and controlled sources. Distributed by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd, Tel: 1300 650 666

FOR STOCKISTS VISIT WWW.BATHE.NET.AU OR PHONE 13000BATHE


#15 f r o m r o b y n c o s g r o v e’s ‘o n e o f a k i n d’ c o l l e c t i o n o f v i n ta g e w o o l r u g s h a n d k n o t t e d i n t u r k e y. a c e l e b r at i o n o f n e w d i r e c t i o n s.

16 8 q u e e n s t r e e t w o o l l a h r a n s w 2 0 2 5 t 61 2 9 3 2 8 7 6 9 2 r o b y n c o s g r o v e . c o m


from left: Joseph Gardner, Paul Barbera, Jenny Nguyen, Fiona McCarthy, Natasha Allen and Verity Magdalino outside the Milanese HQ of designer JJ Martin.

Joseph Gardner

The Vogue Livingg team (above)) in Milan for Salone del Mobile (page 56), ), the biggest and most inspiring celebration of design on the planet, pick their favourite experiences from the week.

STYLE EDITOR

Favourite exhibition Hermès Maison. It had the most incredible home accessories, artistic collaborations and handcrafted furniture, all housed in a captivating maze of cubist rooms covered in vibrantly hued, handmade Moroccan zellige tiles.

the changing forms of water; inside the Palazzo dell’Ufficio Elettorale di Porta Romana; and peeking inside the city’s extraordinary 18th-century palazzos.

Natasha Allen Paul Barbera

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Favourite moment Studiopepe did a collaboration with a shoe company and I was lucky enough to be given a pair of shoes. It was super fun to bump into [co-founder] Chiara Di Pinto, who was over the moon that I was wearing them. She made my day.

Favourite stop Six Gallery by architectural office Quincoces-Dragò & Partners. I’m a big fan of their work, and the gallery adjoining their office, which includes both a florist and restaurant, were all breathtaking. Walking into one of the rooms, we decided to shoot this issue’s cover on the spot, guerilla-style.

Jenny Nguyen

Verity Magdalino

PHOTOGRAPHER

MILAN PROJECT PRODUCER

Favourite piece India Mahdavi’s colour-rich True Velvet banquettes, designed with Pierre Frey fabrics, for the Chez Nina ‘private nightclub’ installation at the Nilufar Gallery.

Fiona McCarthy

LONDON EDITOR

Favourite experiences Escaping a hot Milanese morning within the soothing cool of Snarkitecture’s Caesarstone installation, exploring 26 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

DEPUTY EDITOR

Favourite interior Studiopepe’s Club Unseen, where the design cognoscenti hung out after dark. The interior felt fresh and modern, with a touch of Gio Ponti and ’70s inspiration. Soft, feminine colours mixed with plenty of curvy lines and low-lying lounge areas — the overall atmosphere was warm, welcoming and relaxed, cool yet comfortable; even the music and conversation of the crowd felt quiet and mellow. A triumph of calm amid the chaos.

PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL BARBERA. DRESSES (NGUYEN, MAGDALINO) AND SKIRT (ALLEN) BY JJ MARTIN

CONTRIBUTORS


Design + Performance and Legendary Performance Fabrics are trademarks and Sunbrella is a registered trademark of Glen Raven, Inc. ™ ®

L EG E N DA R Y PE R F O R M A N C E FA B R I C S SU N B R E L L A .CO M

FA D E PR O O F / E A S Y C A R E / B L E AC H C L E A N A B L E


CONDÉ NAST INTERNATIONAL Chairman and Chief Executive: Jonathan Newhouse President: Wolfgang Blau Executive Vice President: James Woolhouse THE CONDÉ NAST INTERNATIONAL GROUP OF BRANDS INCLUDES: UK Vogue, House & Garden, Brides, Tatler, The World of Interiors, GQ, Vanity Fair, Condé Nast Traveller, Glamour, Condé Nast Johansens, GQ Style, Love, Wired, Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design, Ars Technica FRANCE Vogue, Vogue Hommes, AD, Glamour, Vogue Collections, GQ, AD Collector, Vanity Fair, GQ Le Manuel du Style, Glamour Style ITALY Vogue, Glamour, AD, Condé Nast Traveller, GQ, Vanity Fair, Wired, La Cucina Italiana GERMANY Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Wired SPAIN Vogue, GQ, Vogue Novias, Vogue Niños, Condé Nast Traveler, Vogue Colecciones, Vogue Belleza, Glamour, AD, Vanity Fair JAPAN Vogue, GQ, Vogue Girl, Wired, Vogue Wedding TAIWAN Vogue, GQ, Interculture MEXICO AND LATIN AMERICA Vogue Mexico and Latin America, Glamour Mexico, AD Mexico, GQ Mexico and Latin America, Vanity Fair Mexico INDIA Vogue, GQ, Condé Nast Traveller, AD PUBLISHED UNDER JOINT VENTURE: BRAZIL Vogue, Casa Vogue, GQ, Glamour RUSSIA Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Tatler, Glamour Style Book PUBLISHED UNDER LICENSE OR COPYRIGHT COOPERATION: AUSTRALIA Vogue, Vogue Living, GQ BULGARIA Glamour CHINA Vogue, AD, Condé Nast Traveler, GQ, GQ Style, Brides, Condé Nast Center of Fashion & Design, Vogue Me CZECH REPUBLIC AND SLOVAKIA La Cucina Italiana HUNGARY Glamour ICELAND Glamour KOREA Vogue, GQ, Allure, W MIDDLE EAST Vogue, Condé Nast Traveller, AD, Vogue Café at The Dubai Mall POLAND Glamour PORTUGAL Vogue, GQ ROMANIA Glamour RUSSIA Vogue Café Moscow, Tatler Club Moscow SOUTH AFRICA House & Garden, GQ, Glamour, House & Garden Gourmet, GQ Style, Glamour Hair THE NETHERLANDS Vogue, Glamour, Vogue The Book, Vogue Man, Vogue Living THAILAND Vogue, GQ, Vogue Lounge Bangkok TURKEY Vogue, GQ UKRAINE Vogue, Vogue Café Kiev CONDÉ NAST USA President and Chief Executive Officer: Robert A Sauerberg, Jr Artistic Director: Anna Wintour Vogue, Vanity Fair, Glamour, Brides, Self, GQ, GQ Style, The New Yorker, Condé Nast Traveler, Allure, AD, Bon Appétit, Epicurious, Wired, W, Golf Digest, Golf World, Teen Vogue, Ars Technica, The Scene, Pitchfork, Backchannel  VOGUE LIVING subscription rate for 6 issues (1 year) post-paid is $49.95 (within Australia). Copyright © 2018. Published by NewsLifeMedia. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is strictly prohibited. NewsLifeMedia is a licensed user in Australia of the registered trademarks VOGUE, VOGUE LIVING and GQ and has been granted the exclusive right to use those trademarks in relation to magazines published by NewsLifeMedia by the proprietor of the trademarks. Printed in Australia by PMP Limited. Distributed by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd, call 1300 650 666.


Rest in a Ruche The Red Dot Award winning Ruche Bed features luxuriously ruched upholstery to give the ultimate in sophisticated comfort.

Ruche Bed by Inga SempĂŠ for Ligne Roset.

Explore the DOMO collection at one of our seven showrooms across New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia and Victoria or online at

www.domo.com.au


THE MAGIC OF MILAN

We have the pick of Milan Design Week 2018, with the top new products, exclusive interviews and much more.

DUX RICHMOND HILL

CRUISE THE PACIFIC

GLORIOUS GAUDÍ

SYDNEY STYLE

Vogue Living co-hosted the launch of this luxury Melbourne residential development — head online to see all the photos.

We show you how to visit Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand and the Cook Islands in just eight days with Crystal Cruises.

Take a tour of legendary Spanish architect Antoni Gaudí’s first residential house, now open to the public in Barcelona.

Fresh from the launch of Sydney’s One Barangaroo, its lead interior designer Will Meyer chats about global interior trends and more.

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU/EVENTS

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU/TRAVEL

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU/DESIGN

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU/DESIGN

VIDEO

In light of another tableware collection with Royal Albert, we delve inside Miranda Kerr’s sun-drenched Malibu home.

FOLLOW US 30 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

Vogue Living |

@vogueliving |

Vogue Living |

Vogue Living Magazine |

@VogueLiving

EDITED BY YEONG SASSALL. PHOTOGRAPHERS: PAUL BARBERA (MILAN), PETER CLARKE (DUX RICHMOND HILL), RHIANNON TAYLOR (CRYSTAL CRUISES), POL VILADOMS (GAUDÍ). SYDNEY STYLE IMAGE COURTESY ONE BARANGAROO CROWN RESIDENCES

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU/MILANREPORT


EDITOR’S LETTER

R E BE CCA CA R AT T I

32 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

above: inside Studiopepe’s Club Unseen, one of the highlights from Milan’s 2018 Salone del Mobile. See the full Vogue Living edit, starting on page 56. PHOTOGRAPHERS; MICHAEL NAUMOFF (PORTRAIT), PAUL BARBERA

When I was first given the honour of editing one of Australia’s best-loved design magazines, I have to admit I felt both privileged and just a little overwhelmed. After spending over a decade in fashion, however, it was a natural progression to step into the wonderfully colourful realm of interior design. And what better way to begin my journey into the world of Vogue Living than by diving straight in to edit our Milan issue, where I had the chance to absorb the team’s energy and passion as they immersed themselves in 2018’s Salone del Mobile. Our Milan report (page 56), produced with thanks to Qantas and Hermès, is what I’d call a trans-national dialogue between some of our favourite Australian design talent and a crosssection of the most inspiring international designers attending Salone. Here you’ll find candid conversations between designers about all the emerging trends and highlights from this year’s fair. The Italian pilgrimage continues with a look inside the stunning Villa Sola Cabiati on Lake Como, now part of the region’s prestigious Grand Hotel Tremezzo (page 171). Back on home ground, our Melbourne editor, Annemarie Kiely, speaks to innovators in science and design who are forging an important path to a more thoughtful and sustainable future (page 91). Also this month, immerse yourself in the decadence of the 1970s. This distinctive era in design was one of the leading trends to come out of Milan, and each fabulous home we feature in this issue includes some subtle ’70s details. I hope you love this issue as much as I have loved being a part of it. I’m excited to take you on a new journey with Vogue Living — some adaptation and reinvention is on the cards, but we will remain forever true to the Vogue Living vision you know and love.


IN

EDIT Vogue Living’s Living winter refresh. ILLUMINATE: Designer Charles de Lisle launched his cherry-blossom-inspired Linden collection for The Future Perfect at NYCxDesign. thefutureperfect.com

ONE MINUTE WITH:

Catherine Martin The designer shares insight into her latest collection, Majorelle by Mokum. My creative process with Mokum is extremely collaborative. I enjoy translating designs on paper into textile and wallcovering applications. My inspiration for this eclectic collection came from my recent foray into tropical floral and fauna patterns. The collection references Jardin Majorelle, the botanical garden in Marrakech by French Orientalist Jacques Majorelle. I seek a style where being Baroque is elegant and modern. This collection is meant to be both glamorous and playful by combining animal print, embellished tropical design and a luxurious palette. jamesdunloptextiles.com

READ:

LUXURIATE: Designer Rugs’ latest collaboration with Hare + Klein is an earthy, abstract mix of hand-knotted rugs made from Tibetan wool, hemp and silk, such as the Aceto. designerrugs.com.au

KEEP TIME: Panerai, partnering with Kennedy Luxury Group, has launched its first store in Australia. Patricia Urquiola designed the space to complement the timepieces, like the Luminor Submersible. kennedy.com.au/panerai

34 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

Edited by ANNA DELPRAT

PHOTOGRAPHERS: EMILY ANDREWS (PORTRAIT), JORGE RIVERA (BOOK STILL LIFE)

“I wanted a very personal and human book,” says Jean-Philippe Demeyer of his sumptuous sumptu s new Fearless Living. The Th Belgian designer curated the publication’s every element elem to convey his unique vision. jpdemeyer.com


SHARP Collection parisi.com.au


IN VOGUE

AMBLE: Belynda Henry’s show, Landscape Lines, at Australian Galleries, features her lyrical colours and expressive forms to convey the elation and serenity she feels in the Australian bush. Until 1 July. australiangalleries.com.au

DINE: Artist Nigel Peake’s new collaboration with Hermès, A Walk in the Park, is a floral tableware collection that’s perfect for a picnic.

VISIT:

australia.hermes.com

PLAY: Designed by Muller Van Severen, Valerie Objects’ playful collection, including Rocking Chair, comes to Spence & Lyda. spenceandlyda.com.au

OBSESS: The Invisible Collection welcomes Sophie Ashby (left) as its first British designer. The Studio Ashby founder brings distinct pieces, such as the Leaf desk, to the brand. theinvisiblecollection.com 36 VOGUELIVING.CO VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

PHOTOGRAPHER: JON GORRIGAN (PORTRAIT). BELYNDA HENRY ARTWORK, WILD WAY OIL ON CANVAS PAINTING

Art gallery Zeuxis, just opened by French art curator Amélie du Chalard, has made its home in a two-storey Paris townhouse. Designed by Batiik Studio, Zeuxis showcases a rotating collection in every room, from the bathroom to the reception area (pictured here), with its salon-style hang and terrazzo-fragment floor. zeuxis-art.com


this page: Zanat Tara shelving unit, $2574, from Hub Furniture. Dan Schneiger sculpture, $2400, from Becker Minty. Smaller Objects Panama hat stand, $295, from Seeho Su. Cast glass clouds, from $26 each, from Planet. on wall: Wood Wash stain tinted in Agave, from Porter’s Paints. opposite page, from left: Muuto Halves coffee table, $605, from Living Edge. Molo Design Cantilever table, $10,100, from Seeho Su. on table, from left: Locals Only Hydria vessel, POA, from Alana Wilson. Sculptural stone vase 4 , $770, from Jardan. Whitewash glass bowl, POA, from Alana Wilson. Cartocci vessel by Paola Paronetto, $770, from Fanuli. Ode chrome flashed flared bowl, $920, from Alana Wilson. Republic of Fritz Hansen Grand Prix chair, $1007, from Cult. Le Klint 101 brass pendant by Kaare Klint (on chair), POA, from Great Dane. Vitra Akari UF4-L10 lamp by Isamu Noguchi, $4030, from Living Edge. on wall: Cumulus Cloud 3 wallpaper in Blush by Jody D’Arcy, from Scandinavian Wallpaper & Decor. on wall and floor: Wood Wash stain tinted in Baby Doll, from Porter’s Paints. Details, last pages.

“This sculpture is made from construction debris — [XMKQÅKITTaZWWÅVOQV[]TI\QWVIVLXQMKM[WN architectural woodwork from a demolished middle [KPWWTQV5QIUQ1PI^MIT_Ia[KWV[QLMZMLUa][MWN ZMKTIQUMLUI\MZQIT[LQ^MZ\MLNZWUTIVLÅTT[\WJMIV QUXWZ\IV\MTMUMV\WNUa_WZSI[I KWUUMV\IZaWV W]Z\PZW_I_IaK]T\]ZM” — DANIEL SCHNEIGER

38 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


F U T U R E INVESTMENT Clear your conscience and look to thoughtful design for a better tomorrow. Produced & styled by Joseph Gardner Photographed by Felix Forest

39


INSPIRE

40


“Flotsam consists of over half a million fragments of ocean microplastic sourced from the sea. <PMaÆWI\\W\PM[]ZNIKMWN\PMJMVKP, much the same way as when travelling across the ocean” — BRODIE NEILL this page, from left: Made in Ratio Cowrie chair by Brodie Neill, $4060, and Vitra Cork Family stools, $780 each, all from Living Edge. Gärsnäs Emma armchair, $4324, from Seeho Su. Karakter Copenhagen Lungangolo shelf, $10,204, from Cult. Accumula Vortex sculpture by Lyn & Tony, $920, from Becker Minty. Flotsam series bench by Brodie Neill, POA, from Living Edge. Moba tumbler in Frost, $40, from Jardan. on walls, from left: Solo Cloud and Cumulus Cloud 3 wallpaper, both in Blush, by Jody D’Arcy, from Scandinavian Wallpaper & Decor. on floor: Wood Wash stain tinted in Baby Doll, from Porter’s Paints. opposite page, clockwise from top left: Zeitraum 1.3 Low Stool, $975, from Cafe Culture + Insitu. Carl Hansen & Søn Egyptian table by Mogens Lassen, $3714, from Cult. on table, clockwise from top left: Shino teapot by Malcolm Greenwood, POA, from Koskela. Cube Formation Series sculpture by Morgan Shimeld, $1980, from Living Edge. Vintage Japanese vase, $320, from Planet. Herman Miller Saucer Bubble pendant by George Nelson, $860, from Living Edge. Karakter Copenhagen Tripod lamp, $714, from Cult. on floor: Wood Wash stain tinted in Agave, from Porter’s Paints.

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 41


INSPIRE

Bow Bench by Tom Fereday, $4570, from Design by Them. on bench, from left: Molo Design Cappello light, $522, from Seeho Su. Co-exist Hydria II vessel, POA, from Alana Wilson. Buhrich houses by Natalie Rosin, $85 each, from Jardan. on wall: Wood Wash stain tinted in Agave, from Porterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paints. 42 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


INSPIRE “The Innate Credenza is made from locally sourced timber, meaning the logs have been sustainably grown, cut and milled from the same site over and over again. It is also a collectible piece that will last for generations. This in itself contributes to a sustainable way of living” — JON GOULDER Herman Miller Spot stool 18H, $2320, from Living Edge. Innate Credenza in Night by Jon Goulder, $13,655, from Spence & Lyda. on credenza, from left: 1882 Ltd bowl by Max Lamb, $60, from Bradford. Karakter Copenhagen Vases 1, $432, from Cult. Ritual Vessel prelim II, $880, from Alana Wilson. Szilvia György Dint lights, from $457 each, from Planet. SO Glass Light by Carman Skeehan and Tom Skeehan, $1300, from Skeehan Studio. Nau Bilgola screen, $4172, from Cult. on back wall: Solo Cloud wallpaper in Blush by Jody D’Arcy, $99/sqm, from Scandinavian Wallpaper & Decor. on left wall and floor: Wood Wash stain tinted in Baby Doll, from Porter’s Paints. Details, last pages.

44 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


I N VO G U E From totally transparent to artfully abstract and organically tactile, these are the design trends youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be obsessed with this season. Produced & styled by JOSEPH GARDNER Photographed by DAVE WHEELER

Clear cut Crystalline pieces that shimmer with icy charm. clockwise from top: Chanel boots, $1780. Laurence Brabant Bavarde pitcher, $365, from Criteria Collection. Caja Caja vase by Anna Torfs, $375, Areaware Prism Magnifier, $50, and Lee Broom Fulcrum candlestick, $530, all from Space Furniture. Karakter Copenhagen #6 glass (top) and #4 glass from the Sferico collection by Joe Colombo, $75 each, from Cult. Chanel clutch bag, $17,790. Vintage candleholder, $365, from Becker Minty. Poesia glass bricks, from $39 each, from Brickworks. Details, last pages.

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 47


IN VOGUE

Character study These artisanal ceramic vessels celebrate the craftsmanship and unique appeal of the handmade. clockwise from top left: Heather Rosenman Ceramics Scribe vessel #3239, $1520, and Lava vessel #3515, $1615, both from Spence & Lyda. Vase 1 by Natalie Rosin, $325, from Becker Minty. From This Angle vessel (2018) by Paige Northwood, POA, from Jerico Contemporary. Summer Echelon vessel, $990, and Ode Bell Amphora vessel, $880, both from Alana Wilson. Stepwell vase by Nicolette Johnson, $520, from Saint Cloche. African-inspired sculpture by Emma Gale, $140, from Nikau Store. Perforated Hydria vessel, $990, Perforated Titanium Cycladic bowl, POA, and Titanian Mayan vessel (with ďŹ&#x201A;owers), POA, all from Alana Wilson. on floor: Terrazzo Multi Circle tiles, $160/sqm, from Earp Bros. Details, last pages. 48 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


RELIC - HANDKNOT

DESIGNER RUGS - THE HOME OF LUXURY HANDKNOTS VISIT OUR SHOWROOMS TO EXPERIENCE OUR COLLECTION OF READY-MADE AND CUSTOM DESIGNER RUGS SYDNEY | MELBOURNE | BRISBANE | AUCKLAND 1300 802 561 | designerrugs.com.au/vogueliving


Facial recognition Embraced by abstract artists from Matisse and Picasso to Klee and Miró, the human face continues to inspire. clockwise from left: The Beloved (2018) by Christiane Spangsberg, POA, from Jerico Contemporary. Hand-painted plate, $85, and pitcher, $120, both from Atelier. Turning Point (2017) sculpture by Tatjana Farkas, $558. Large Face (Mask) (1952) by Henri Matisse card from the Royal Academy of Arts. The Space Within (2018) by Holly Ryan, POA, from Jerico Contemporary. background: Jean Paul Gaultier by Lelièvre Paris Gouache wallpaper in Nude; enquiries to South Pacific Fabrics. Details, last pages. 50 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

EXCHANGE RATE AT TIME OF PRINT IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

IN VOGUE


IN VOGUE

Clash masters Mix geometric patterns with florals and bold shades with softer hues to create dynamic new looks. Styled by JOSEPH GARDNER Photographed by PAUL BARBERA

2 1

3

5 6 1. Lelièvre Paris Regate fabric in Nautique; enquiries to South Pacific Fabrics. 2. Osborne & Little Canalasso fabric in 03; enquiries to Seneca. 3. Warwick Ribbon fabric in Sunset; enquiries to Warwick. 4. Evitavonni Hatton fabric in Platinum; enquiries to Westbury Textiles. 5. Pierre Frey Elvis fabric in Encre; enquiries to Milgate. 6. Dedar Rosetta fabric in Colorado River; enquiries to South Pacific Fabrics. Details, last pages. 52 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

FLAGS CONSTRUCTED BY SERGIO VELOSO

4


A L EPH C O L L E CT I O N

WE BELIEVE IN BEAUTY, CRAFTSMANSHIP & TRADITION

Sydney, CLASSIC 133 New South Head Road, Edgecliff NSW 2027 +61 2 9328 6144 Sydney, CONTEMPORARY 498 Glenmore Road, Edgecliff NSW 2027 +61 2 9328 9188 Melbourne, CLASSIC & CONTEMPORARY 442 High Street, Prahran VIC 3181 +61 3 9510 7799

CLASSIC, CONTEMPORARY & CUSTOM RUGS

¼Ö§ªÃ¢ä§ĆÙÝä¼ääÙÊ¡ä§)Ùõ ÃTÙݪü֧äÝÙªÝä§ connection to the time honoured õôªÃ¢ä§ÃªØéÝéÝäÊÙä䧪Ý ÊÙª¢ªÃ¼ʼ¼äªÊÃÊ¡ćäõôÝIJ õõõIJÙûÝIJÊÂIJé


IN VOGUE

1 2

3

5 4

1. Harlequin Banzai linen in Cerise/Lagoon/Indigo 132649; enquiries to Domestic Textile Corporation. 2. Osborne & Little Craquelure in 03; enquiries to Seneca. 3. Warwick Ribbon fabric in Acid; enquiries to Warwick. 4. Christian Lacroix Geisha fabric in Prisme; enquiries to Radford. 5. Dedar Say Goodbye Flora fabric in Pomponette; enquiries to South Pacific Fabrics. Details, last pages. 54 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


Bachelor of Design September 2018 Intake

Apply now Interior Design Creative Direction & Styling Fashion Design

Sydney | Melbourne

www.whitehouse-design.edu.au

Interior Design by Bachelor of Design student Annie Antonio TEQSA Provider Number 12065 CRICOS Provider Code 02863C RTO Provider Code 91319


MILAN DESIGN WEEK 2018

T HE VOGUE LIVING REPOR T For one electrifying week every year, Salone del Mobile transforms the city of Milan into a world stage for the boldest innovations in contemporary design. Produced by VERITY MAGDALINO, NATASHA ALLEN & JOSEPH GARDNER Photographed by PAUL BARBERA Additional research by JENNY NGUYEN Vogue Living travelled to Milan with Qantas. Visit qantas.com


VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 57


Hanna Anonen

Poltrona Frau

THE FUTURE

Green revolution

Gebrüder Thonet Vienna

Hay

Milan burst with verdant colours inspired by nature and the integration of plant life into installations, furniture and lighting. Sustainable design was another hot topic.

Loewe

Baxter

CC Tapis

Charles Wilson for King Living

Marni

Knoll

Arflex rfl

Studiopepe’s installation, Club Unseen

PA L E T T E

Giopato & Coombes

MOOD

Social club

Swarovski

Wine reds

Optimism took centre stage with nightclubs as inspiration, from Studiopepe’s Club Unseen and India Mahdavi’s Chez Nina to CC Tapis’s exhibition Rave, Rave, Rave.

Deep, autumnal hues from dark burgundy and saturated cassis to earthy pink ochre heralded a return to richer palettes, from sofas at Cassina to an entire dark red room at Giopato & Coombes.

Cassina

Gufram

Cassina

Glas Italia

CC Tapis

Moooi

Matthew McCormick Studio


MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018

Moroso

he mood at this year’s Salone del Mobile can be summed up by one word: Emozione. That’s the title of a 1970s album spotted on our last day in Milan when the Vogue Living team dropped in to the exquisite oasis-like interior Six Gallery. Architects and curators David Lopez Quincoces and Fanny Bauer Grung’s transformation of a former monastery into an emotive, fragrant sanctuary complete with soothing soundtrack and a wheat field-covered ceiling created that magic of Milan moments; a sense of poetic calm in the blur of new product launches and brand installations. It’s escapist spaces like these that create a deep sense of resonance and stay imprinted on the mind. New York-based lighting designer Lindsey Adelman sums up the feeling of being inside these interiors as like “being on a high”. Among other sensorial highs this year was London-based Ambra Medda’s curation of Villa Borsani, a 1940s Modernist dream elegantly dressed in spring blooms by New Zealand-based florist Sophie Wolanski. There was also Caesarstone’s cinematic collaboration with Snarkitecture; the theatre of Dimore Studio’s Bedouin-style tents — set up as a Silk Road-inspired journey inside the darkened rooms of the duo’s 19th-century palazzo-turned-gallery; and one of the most Instagrammed destinations of the week — the soft 1970s tones and laid-back atmosphere of Studiopepe’s Club Unseen. The 1970s are having a moment — and it feels curiously fresh. The new appeal of the decade of disco, macramé and maximalism may lie in the comfort of nostalgia and in people’s need in uncertain times to wrap themselves up in the warm hug of texture, pattern and unbridled embellishment. But it’s the optimism at the heart of this aesthetic that’s the hero in this 2018 reimagining. The desire for happy design could also be seen in the proliferation of nightclubs as inspiration, from Gufram’s collection shown in dazzling glitter-ball surrounds to CC Tapis’s exhibition of rug designs titled Rave, Rave, Rave. But it was Milanese gallerist Nina Yashar of Nilufar and Parisian designer India Mahdavi’s collaboration on the club Chez Nina — a moody haven of plush rainbow velvet and hand-painted gilded aluminium de Gournay wallpaper — which was a standout, magically converging disparate eras, materials and cultures. “My dream, since I was very young, was to have a bar,” says Yashar, who, like her friend Mahdavi, was born in Tehran. “Mixing patterns and colours is something that we do in a very free way because this is very specific to our upbringing, and to Iran,” explains Mahdavi. “This is my portrait of Nina… but the space is also about giving comfort and I think we all need comfort — that human moment where you sit down, relax and stop because we’re always running.” The continued rise of biophilia was also significant — the human desire to seek connection with nature — realised via a profusion of varying shades of green and the he integration of plant life into showrooms, furniture and nd lighting. There was also a deeper focus on sustainable able design. Waste No More, an exhibition of work by American fashion designer Eileen Fisher, highlighted hlighted the emerging circular economy (an alternative tive to the traditional ‘make, use, ››

T

Magis

Sagitine

TREND

Colour block Bitossi

Bold, graphic treatments emphasise the new playful attitude of the happy design aesthetic.

T H E EVEN T T H A T S T OPS

Lara Bohinc

Dimore Studio

T H E DESIGN COMMUNIT Y,

2018 SALONE DEL MOBILE.

SILHOUETTE

Circular forms

Richard Yasmine

Classicon

From British designer Lara Bohinc’s collection inspired by planets to the sculptural arc of a Muller Van Severn desk, fine circular shapes are having a moment.

Marni

HERE IS OUR EDIT.

Muller Van Severen in Life in Vogue at Vogue Italia

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 59


Sé Collection

Matter Made

Studiopepe’s installation, Club Unseen

Louis Vuitton

‹‹ dispose’ economy, it embraces regenerating products to create less waste); Eindhoven-based design group Dutch Invertuals partnered with London-based Driade FranklinTill in Mutant Matter, an exploration of the ‘remade’ materials of the future; and on a more poetic level the lighting of Giopato & Coombes intertwined brass bees, forest creatures and delicate tendrils of lichen in its collection, Supernatural Daydream. Technology advanced its march of seamless integration into our lives, too. There was Kartell’s hybrid I-table, designed by Piero Lissoni, which transforms from desk to cooktop, and Google’s Softwear exhibition curated by legendary Dutch trend forecaster Li Edelkoort and shown at the equally legendary Rossana Orlandi Gallery. The influential Orlandi also made an impact at the Australian group show in Milan’s 5 Vie district. Numbering 26 designers it was the biggest ever collective of Australian creatives showing under the banner of Local Design, lead by the inimitable Emma Elizabeth. If 2017 was the year Australian design finally came of age then 2018 is the year it stepped right into the spotlight. Inside the elegantly decaying palazzo housing Local Design’s exhibition, the atmosphere was pure rock ‘n’ roll. The cream of Australia’s design scene casually lounged outside on the balcony, while inside visitors meandered through rooms of furniture and lighting exploding with colour and confidence. It was this attitude that appealed to Orlandi, who dropped in to pick up a Christopher Boots oxidised pendant light and a colourful Sagitine storage stand to add to her eponymous gallery. “It was so surreal,” says Elizabeth. “But I think the fact that there were more than 1300 Fuorisalone exhibitions throughout the city, and Rossana chose to come to ours, was the best way to finish a very sleep-deprived and intense week.” VL

IT ’S T H E OP TIMISM A T T H E

Rounded edges Voluptuous proportions and playful shapes provide an almost human embrace of comfort and softness from marshmallow-like armchairs to roly poly side tables.

HEAR T OF T H E 1970S LOOK T HA T ’S T H E H ERO IN T HIS 2018 REIM AGININ G

G RA P H I C

Ombré

Nada Debs

Nanimarquina

Natuzzi

60

Sé Collection

Wittmann

Graduated shades continue their ascent but in more unique treatments, from wallpaper to mirrors and even marquetry as portrayed by Lebanese designer Nada Debs.

German Ermičs at Rossana Orlandi Gallery

Nada Debs at Rossana Orlandi Gallery

Republic of Fritz Hansen

FO R M


Lindsey Adelman

MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018

Glas Italia

B&B Italia

Tom Skeehan M AT E R I A L

Henge

Glass

Earth tones Wonderglass

Moving on from sunset red was an almost nostalgic g mood for the comforting g earthier shades of clay, rust and amber.

Viabizzuno

Transparency in the form of delicately coloured and sculptural glass was a standout from the Bouroullecsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; vessels for Wonderglass g to Tom Skeehanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pink So lamp at Local Design.

CO LO U R

Arflex

Timothy Oulton

Bonaldo Editions Milano

Roda

S U R FAC E

Rich stone

Roda

Henry Wilson

Rooms

Gubi

A rise in natural stone, including the tactile texture of travertine, joined the continued prevalence of boldly pigmented, richly veined marbles used in fresh and inspiring treatments.

Altered States by Snarkitecture for Caesarstone

Apparatus Studio VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 61


MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018

HIGH LIGH T

SIX GALLERY Inside a 16th-century Milanese monastery, local architecture-design studio Quincoces-Dragò & Partners fashion a seductive sanctuary. By Verity Magdalino

62


PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL BARBERA

this page: Fanny Bauer Grung and David Lopez Quincoces, the husband-and-wife team behind Quincoces-Dragò & Partners. opposite page: the courtyard of Six Gallery, established inside an abandoned site in ‘old Milan’.

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 63


SIX GALLERY The vision of entrepreneur Mauro Orlandelli, Six Gallery is the base for a collective of creatives that includes Spanish-Norwegian architects David Lopez Quincoces and Fanny Bauer Grung of Quincoces-Dragò & Partners, the studio behind its design and curation. During Salone, the duo also launched a complementary collection of furniture. “We wanted to create a cultural hub where every partner contributes to projects in a different way.” says Bauer Grung of the space, which houses a florist, design gallery and bistro. “The gallery is like a centre for research. It changes constantly.” The duo took inspiration from a sunset-hued melting pot of north African architectural influences and colours drawn from the American desert. “It’s not about having one-off collectors’ items or very expensive things,” says Bauer Grung. “It’s more about the atmosphere, what works together and what we’re working on in that moment so clients can visit and understand our vision.” VL Visit six-gallery.com

this page, clockwise from top left: shades of the desert inform the gallery’s palette. Gio Ponti’s Leggera chairs around a table. Courtyard flowers by Milan florist Irene Cuzzaniti. Bauer Grung and Lopez Quincoces. opposite page: inside Irene at Six, Cuzzaniti’s green design boutique. 64


MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 65


MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018

IN CONVERSA TION

S T UDIOPEPE Melbourne interiors wunderkind David Flack meets Arianna Lelli Mami and Chiara Di Pinto, the creative directors of Milan-based Studiopepe.

T

David Flack: It’s wonderful to meet you, Arianna and

Chiara. Vogue Living asked me who I would like to interview for its Milan issue and you were both on top of my list. What was the initial concept for Club Unseen? Arianna Lelli Mami: The starting point for us is always the same — things we personally love. This year we wanted to create a place where people can sit together and relax. Chiara Di Pinto: We wanted somewhere away from the hectic life of Salone del Mobile. We wanted somewhere calm but where we could listen to music… Mami: A place where we could meet nice people. That’s why we decided on a club. It’s a secret club because in the beginning, we really wanted to just invite friends and people we like. We really don’t want it changing into a party — that’s not our idea. From a style point of view this year, we have been fascinated by the Radical Design movement in architecture from the 1970s. Flack: Such as Gio Ponti? Mami: Yes. Last year, our installation felt almost middle class, with minimalist materials mixed with high-end velvet curtains and brass details. This year we wanted to reference something more contemporary, so we looked back to the utopias of the 1970s. The glass bar with the neon light is very [Italian designer and artist] Nanda Vigo — we admire her work. We’ve used subtle colour but with a hint of a strong accent like a blue neon light — things that remind you of the ’70s and early ’80s but with a modern twist. Even the cocktails are a reinterpretation of classic ’70s cocktails. 66 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

Flack: How does your creative process evolve? Di Pinto: We always start with an atmosphere that we

would love to create, and then we find different things that work together. One of the first ideas for Club Unseen was the counter for the bar. We don’t like the fact that, in clubs, people should be in front of the counter to order, to have to queue, and get pissed off about having to wait. Mami: We wanted to turn the waiting time into something pleasant, something that is a real experience. Flack: In other words, an experience of design rather than an experience of hordes of people. Mami: Yes, that is correct. And sometimes people forget they are waiting for something, when it is just beautiful to watch and they stay there. Di Pinto: We wanted to put the focus on the movement of the [gloved] hands. We thought about the theatre that’s created when this happens. It’s one of the most important things in the whole project because it’s about focusing attention on quality, on the handmade. Hands are the basis of many of our designs. Flack: When did you start planning and first working on the concept for Club Unseen? Mami: The first real idea for it came from a visit to Montreal a year ago, where we found a secret bar where you had to knock on the door to enter. Inside, the atmosphere was amazing, but it was very 1920s with velvet cushions. We loved the mood but the style was too old for us. We wanted something different, but we both very much liked the idea of a secret bar — a speakeasy with a twist. Flack: There are so many facets to creating these sort of spaces. The lovely thing about you both is your approach — you reference history but are also so contemporary. Di Pinto: We are very much the clash between the old and new, the fine and rough. It’s very layered. Flack: What does Milan Design Week mean to you? Mami: We love it. Ever since we were students, we’ve been going. It’s always a nice time to discover our city and, apart from seeing the designs, meeting new people. Flack: And there’s also something really electric about the atmosphere surrounding the event… Mami: Yes. It’s spring time, with the sunlight, when you discover a hidden courtyard, and the wisteria is blossoming. So it’s a beautiful time for the city. VL Visit studiopepe.info; clubunseen.com

PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL BARBERA

he pastel-hued surrounds of Club Unseen, Studiopepe’s installation at Fuorisalone, are everything you’d expect of a discreet, invitation-only club. The company’s creative directors, Arianna Lelli Mami and Chiara Di Pinto, drew their inspiration from the latter works of Italian architect Gio Ponti, and comprised their own bespoke designs created in collaboration with brands such as French-Italian rug company CC Tapis, Italy’s Agape and LA’s Atelier de Troupe, styled with artworks and classics from the likes of Tacchini and Cassina. Central to the 19th-century former warehouse space was a glowing, backlit bar counter, where only the white-gloved hands of the bartenders mixing cocktails were visible. The mesmerising, theatre-like effect served to elevate cocktail creation to a whole new level of performance art.


Studiopepeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Arianna Lelli Mami (seated) and Chiara Di Pinto in the bar of their installation, Club Unseen, with Melbourne interior designer David Flack. 67


MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018

“WE WANTED SOMETHING DIFFERENT, BUT WE BOTH VERY MUCH LIKED THE IDEA OF A SECRET BAR — A SPEAKEASY WITH A TWIST” — ARIANNA LELLI MAMI In Studiopepe’s installation, de Sede DS-600 sofa, Atelier de Troupe OS table and Cassina LC1 chairs.

68


VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 69


PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL BARBERA

MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018

70 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


GIOPA T O & COOMBES Solid brass bees, forest creatures and plant life entwine the new range of lighting from Italian-British duo Cristiana Giopato and Christopher Coombes, imbuing it with an enchanting romance. Titled Supernatural Daydream, the collection explores the link between light and emotion and features an array of lights — some of which can, at the turn of a dial, cast a warm golden glow or the cool blue gleam favoured in tropical climates. giopatocoombes.com

71


GABRIEL SCO T T

LOUIS VUIT T ON

It was the right time, right place for Canadian designers Gabriel Kakon and Scott Richler when they pitched Maurizio Stocchetto, owner of Milan’s Bar Basso, with an idea for an installation. “Maurizio has this easygoing nature and was really into it,” says Richler (above, left, with Kakon). The duo customised their blown-glass Myriad lighting into amber tones inspired by the colour of the bar’s Negroni Sbagliato cocktail for a window display. Inside, they adorned the pink walls with their Welles Glass alabaster pendants. “It’s a nice way to have a presence away from the Salone,” says Richler. gabriel-scott.com

Patricia Urquiola, Marcel Wanders and the Campana Brothers were just some of the heavyweight designers who collaborated with Louis Vuitton for the debut of its Les Petits Nomades collection — a line of luxurious decorative objects, such as Wanders’ Diamond Mirror (above). Also on display under the crimson origami-inspired flowers suspended from the ceiling at the Palazzo Bocconi were releases from the brand’s travel-inspired Objets Nomades furniture and lighting collection, including André Fu’s ‘conversation’ chair inspired by the movements of traditional Asian ribbon dances. au.louisvuitton.com

72 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL BARBERA

MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018


CRIS TINA CELES TIN O Italian architect and interior designer Cristina Celestino turned a 1920s Milanese tram into a travelling salon titled Cinema Corallo for the week. Once on board, visitors were treated to the designer’s romantic take on retro glamour, with custom interiors featuring coral silk brocade window coverings by Venetian fabric house Rubelli, bold teal carpet and jewel box-like seating. “I wanted to create an experience typical of Milan,” says Celestino. “At the end of the tram, the open window acts as a cinema screen and the subject of the movie is the streets of the city.” cristinacelestino.com 73


MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018

CROWD FA VOURIT E

HERMÈS MAISON Dive into a world of colour with Charlotte Macaux Perelman and Alexis Fabry, the deputy artistic directors of Hermès’ home collection, and Vogue Living style editor Joseph Gardner.

A grid of glossy zellige tiles lines the walls of the Hermès installation at Milan’s La Permanente museum. The home collection includes the Bouchon stool and Phi box (in foreground).

74


Joseph Gardner: With seven incredibly tall pavilions, your

installation for Design Week feels almost monumental in scale. Your use of glossy, boldly coloured tiles in particular give it this luminous, magnetic quality, like an immense jewel box. How would you describe your vision for Hermès this year? Charlotte Macaux Perelman: Hermès has a habit of staying true to its values. This year, among all the values Hermès cherishes — which include rigour, fantasy, imagination and colour — we chose colour. We wanted to place our objects against a bright and inspiring setting. For that, we wanted materials that convey this idea of colour, materials that had to be handcrafted, so we thought of zellige tiles, which are hand-cut and hand-enamelled in Morocco. Gardner: What was the inspiration? Macaux Perelman: The important thing was to create a shrinelike experience where the architecture serves a twofold purpose — to present our work and be a reflection of it, and to be intimate and bring us close to the objects it enshrines. Gardner: What is the story behind the zellige tiles? Macaux Perelman: There are approximately 100,000 clay tiles in the installation, and each tile is processed in a very artisanal way. First, the wet clay is spread out and frames are used to cut out the tiles, which are dried on large tables in the sun and then enamelled and fired — everything happens in the open. The colour of each tile is also different and depends on whether you apply the enamel in the morning, the afternoon or the evening. You get a slightly different shade that makes the overall colour so rich and deep. This all makes each zellige tile unique — look at each tile closely enough and you can tell they’re not the same. Gardner: How has this collection evolved from last year’s? Alexis Fabry: Every year in Milan, a trend seems to point to design mastery in big volumes. We decided to do the opposite and focus on the parts of the collection that have small details, such as stitches or any other gesture that will prove the accuracy in what we do.

clockwise from top left: Périmètre vases. The zellige tile walls were created by London’s Mosaic del Sur. Alexis Fabry and Charlotte Macaux Perelman. Cashmere blankets are hung up like beach towels.

Macaux Perelman:

But this approach also felt natural. With most of our time — I would say on a daily basis — we work on this sort of small scale. We will spend hours perfecting a stitch, on just the edge of a leather piece. We do spend a great deal of energy on small objects. VL Visit australia.hermes.com

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 75


MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018

clockwise from left: Parcelles jacquard fabric; Périmètre vases; Droit Fil scarf box.

76 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


J J M A R TIN

PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL BARBERA

For JJ Martin, the American-born, Milan-based founder of lifestyle emporium La Double J, this is the year her bold, bright ‘best of Italy’ aesthetic made its mark. Drawing inspiration from Italian design heritage and her personal passion for vintage prints, Martin collaborated with Italy’s Kartell, upholstering a line of its signature furniture pieces in her trademark maximalist designs. There was also a capsule collection of out-of-this-world, hand-blown glassware based on 17th-century glass goblets, made in collaboration with Venice’s Salviati; a new range of porcelain plates, trays and espresso cups with Verona-based Ancap; and a bold new dragonfly print alighting across a range of tabletop pieces for Martin’s homewares line, La Double J Housewives. ladoublej.com


MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018

TIFFANY & CO. The works of Australian artist and sculptor Anna-Wili Highfield took centre stage at Tiffany & Co.’s Milan boutique. Comprising intricately sewn and constructed paper birds and blooms, Highfield’s sculpture erupted from a sterling silver, copper and glass greenhouse, the latest addition to Tiffany & Co.’s home and accessories collection, and forms part of the brand’s The Greenhouse Project. “Greenhouses bring life, so I loved the idea of something springing from this glass box,” says Highfield. “There’s something about the sculpture being ephemeral. It will only last if it’s being looked after and it has to be treated lightly to survive.” annawilihighfield.com

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 79


MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018

IN CONVERSA TION

DIMORE S T UDIO Vogue Living style editor Joseph Gardner talks design inspiration with Dimore Studio co-founder Britt Moran, on the roof terrace of the studio’s Milan gallery. Joseph Gardner: You’ve really stepped it up this year

with three installations at Salone. Can you talk about the inspiration behind each? Britt Moran: In the gallery, we’re doing collaborations with young artists and we also built a strong historical collection of pieces from the 1930s and ’40s all the way up to the ’80s, which spans various nationalities. The concept tells the story of a traveller who has collected objects and furniture as he moves through life. For the studio space, we wanted to surprise and shock people. We stepped away to a new direction because everyone expects a certain atmosphere when they come and see us. We pared down all the decorative elements — it’s a white box, with just one object from our collections in each space. It’s meant to feel like you’re in an incubator with parachute material on the walls. Gardner: Can you talk about the materiality of the pieces and the 1970s influence you seem to be channelling? Moran: Everything you see this year that looks like brass, such as the metallic sides on the bamboo-topped table, has actually been plated in gold, because it has a really nice depth to it. This bamboo-and-plated gold table is a reference to [Italian furniture designer] Gabriela Crespi, who we’ve really fallen in love with. It’s a continuation of our newfound passion for the ’70s and the chic, elegant way of living between Milan and Rome that these aristocratic families had. They would mix new, avant-garde pieces with more historical furniture passed down from family collections. Gardner: I notice your use of lacquered wood in the collection, which feels new for you. Moran: Yes, we’ve worked a lot with wood this year. We’ve gone back to using the old methods of shellac, where the wood is highly polished and has a beautiful, deep dimension to it. We work with a gentleman who does restoration in churches. He’s our age but he has an amazing passion. Gardner: Could you explain the Limited Edition range? Moran: Emiliano wanted to do something completely on his own. It was top-secret, so when I walked in just before the installation opened, my jaw hit the floor. The idea was to take cumbersome, heavy pieces of furniture — things you’d perhaps find in your grandmother’s best room — and rebuild them. They’re made from exquisite wood, and the problem when you try to reproduce pieces like this is that the wood looks new. It’s a combination of the beauty of the old world, which has its own patina and lovely, burled details, and a contemporary vision. The addition of polished steel and gold-plated brass makes them feel more modern. And it’s really beautiful. VL Visit dimorestudio.eu. For Britt Moran’s guide to his favourite places in Milan to eat, drink and be inspired, visit vogueliving.com.au

80 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL BARBERA

a

massive queue comes with the territory at Dimore Gallery, always one of the most popular destinations at Milan Design Week. This year, the trio of installations created by Italian designer Emiliano Salci and his US-born business partner, Britt Moran, seals the duo’s status as design-world rock stars. Inside the Dimore Gallery, they pitched a series of Bedouin-style tents curated with an edit from their ‘historical’ collection. Across the courtyard at Dimore Studio, they presented Perfectly Imperfect, featuring key pieces from their Progetto Non Finito and Oggetti collections. The finale was the debut of Salci’s Limited Edition collection inside a mist-enshrouded exhibition space.


Dimore Studio’s Britt Moran (seated, right) and Emiliano Salci (standing) with Vogue Living’s Joseph Gardner. opposite page: Salci reveals part of Dimore’s gallery installation. 81


VILLA BORSANI

MISSONI

Those who ventured to Villa Borsani, a half-hour drive from Milan, were rewarded with a modernist dream of soaring ceilings, magnificent staircases, and exotic spring blooms. Creative director Ambra Medda curated a minimal but emotive intervention of textiles, fragrance, music and florals in this grand 1940s home, built by Italian architect Osvaldo Borsani, founder of the Tecno group. Titled Casa Libera!, the open home was the precursor to a show on Borsani’s work at Milan’s Triennale Design Museum, which runs through September 11. triennale.org

Angela Missoni discovered American textile artist Rachel Hayes — the creator of the prismatic Blowing in the Wind installation that took over Missoni’s Via Solferino showroom (above) — on Instagram. “It was the first time I had the courage to contact someone I didn’t know on social media,” says Missoni (above). “This work is about the shadows, the diffusion of light and the beauty of reflections.” Hayes’ art echoes Missoni’s signature colour-fuelled aesthetic, and her pieces have graced the brand’s catwalk, its Madison Avenue flagship store in New York and star in its spring/summer 2018 ad campaign. missoni.com

82 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL BARBERA

MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018


LIFE IN VOGUE Vogue Italia editor-in-chief Emanuele Farneti invited creatives including Faye Toogood and Patricia Urquiola to reimagine the magazine’s offices, by exploring the intersection between office and lounge and the way we use workspaces. Toogood lined the editor’s headquarters in hand-painted canvas, and Urquiola conjured a royal blue sanctuary luxuriously draped in floor-length curtains. The SpanishNorwegian husband-and-wife team David Lopez Quincoces and Fanny Bauer Grung of Quincoces-Dragò & Partners took the meeting room to a whole new level of chic. 83


MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018

IN CONVERSA TION

APPARA T US S T UDIO ebuting five new collections under the title Act III at Milan Design Week, Apparatus Studio’s creative director Gabriel Hendifar took inspiration from his Iranian heritage for a range of exquisitely crafted pieces. They intertwine Persian techniques such as Khatam, an ancient style of marquetry, with classical Western forms, and materials including alabaster, fluted brass and travertine.

D

Fiona Lynch: Is it true that your aim with this collection was to collaborate with Iranian craftmakers? Gabriel Hendifar: Yes. The idea for it started from a box I inherited from my grandmother, who came to the United

States as a political refugee from Iran in the late 1970s. This collection is my interpretation of what life might have been like for the people I love who came from Iran. It’s a bit of a  fantasy and a futuristic interpretation, because I’ve not personally been there but have heard these nostalgic stories through my parents. We [Hendifar and his Apparatus Studio co-founder Jeremy Anderson] found a wonderful designer in Los Angeles, Shirin Ehya, who’s been going to Tehran all her life and has a great relationship with a woman there who works in this traditional style of Khatam marquetry. It’s a very male-dominated art form and she’s the only woman we’re aware of working in this way. Suddenly it was possible for us to make this limited-edition collection — but then US trade sanctions against Iran were expanded to include all art objects. This has made it impossible for us to create the pieces in any commercial context. Lynch: So these four initial designs are made in Iran? Hendifar: Yes. The process is really incredible. Each one of these tiny points of kaleidoscopic beauty is all fine, reed-like pieces. The white is camel bone, there’s brass and various types of wood. Each reed is glued into a block and sheets are shaved off the top. It’s essentially like a veneer that’s then steamed onto forms. It’s a very specific skill set — and a style that I have fallen in love with. Lynch: But now you can’t even bring one of these artists to work with you in New York? Hendifar: No, as there would be visa issues, but it’s more than that. Even if you brought the artist over, you can’t bring the materials. It’s a conundrum. We really tried every possible way to figure it out. So these pieces have become symbols of this inability to connect. There’s now this tangible thing I can hold in my hand — but we can’t bring it to the world, other than behind glass. Lynch: Hopefully, that might change soon. Hendifar: Yes, to me, the work is also hopeful. It’s an idea of what might be if things do go in a different direction. Lynch: Your work is restrained but you obviously do a lot of editing and refining of your ideas. Hendifar: Thank you. That’s the goal. I’m glad to hear that translates, especially when I’m trying to tiptoe into this world where, to me, the references are more decorative, rich and ornate. And I’m wrestling with how to do that but still have a consistent design language. People know us for having a certain aesthetic. We want to bring them in a direction that still feels familiar but pushes them a little bit outside their comfort zone. This is the balance with everything we do. That’s how you keep it interesting. VL Visit apparatusstudio.com

84 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL BARBERA

Melbourne interior designer Fiona Lynch and Gabriel Hendifar, co-founder of New York’s Apparatus Studio, discuss the brand’s latest work at its Milan showroom.


Apparatus Studioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gabriel Hendifar and Melbourne interior designer Fiona Lynch. opposite page: the Shiraz vessel, bowl and candlesticks are part of the new Apparatus range. 85


LOCAL DESIGN

PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL BARBERA

At a showing of Australian designers in Milan’s 5Vie district, Local Design presented its largest-ever show under the stewardship of creative director Emma Elizabeth. More than 20 creatives (opposite page) filled a 19th-century palazzo with a display of prototypes, finely crafted furniture and sculptural lighting. Among the items on show were the twisting Ouroboros lounge chair by Jonathan Zawada in collaboration with Vela and the Voyage screens by Nicholas Fuller (below). The showing drew fans such as design doyenne Rossana Orlandi, who chose pieces from Christopher Boots and Sagitine to join the stable of design stars in her gallery. localdesign.com.au

86


MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018

Local Design creatives in Milan. front row, left to right: Christopher Boots, Emma Elizabeth. second row, left to right: Anna Varendorff, Walter Barda, Nicholas Fuller, Charles Wilson, Tina Clark. third row, left to right: Tom Skeehan, Arthur Seigneur, Jamie Durie, Adam Cornish, Fiona Lyda, Jon Goulder, Fred Ganim. back row, left to right: Ross Gardam, Volker Haug, Adam Goodrum, Tom Fereday, Patty Hava, Emma Aiston, Daniel To, Adam Lynch.

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 87


MIL A N D E SIG N W E E K 2 018

Christopher de Vos (left) and Peter Pilotto. The Arbol candelabra for Swarovski (far left).

SPO T LIGH T

PE T ER PILO T T O For Peter Pilotto and Christopher de Vos, founders of fashion brand Peter Pilotto, an extension into homewares has created a whole new area for them to play. he move from designing for the catwalk to creating pieces for the home has been a natural one for fashion label Peter Pilotto. Famous for executing dramatic silhouettes in a melange of kaleidoscopic prints, the brand’s founding duo, Peter Pilotto and Christopher de Vos, draw on their multicultural roots for continual inspiration — whether it’s for a red-carpet dress or a cosy blanket. Pilotto and De Vos cite a number of influences for their design process. First, they take cues from the brand’s celebrity fans — think Michelle Obama, Cate Blanchett and Selena Gomez. “We imagine what their houses are like, what art they have, what they eat and drink from,” says De Vos, who founded the label with Pilotto in London in 2007, after they studied together at Antwerp’s Royal Academy of Fine Arts. “Like us, we know they’re very curious and inspired by everything.” Childhoods spent in a variety of places impact on their designing, too. “Christopher is half-Belgian, half-Peruvian. I’m half-Austrian, half-Italian. We met in Antwerp, and now we live in London,” says Pilotto. “In our minds, we’re constantly connected to different places and different times,” he says, pointing to mood boards with images of Peruvian textiles; a pastel wall in Cuba; and a Luis Barragán house. The eclectic inspirations for their work were evident in the pop-up townhouse they created at last year’s London Design Festival. Here, pieces by friends — such as lighting by Bethan Laura Wood, stools by Martino Gamper and vintage furniture from favourite dealer Schmid McDonagh — were mixed with clothing, rugs, screens and throws made using yarns from previous Peter Pilotto collections.

T

88 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

In April, Pilotto and De Vos created candelabra for Atelier Swarovski studded with large-scale coloured stones sourced from the crystal house’s archives. Having worked with the house on fashion collections since 2010, and awarded the inaugural Swarovski Collective Prize in 2015 for innovative design, the new candelabra are extensions of the design ideology the duo applied to Arbol, a sellout collection of jewellery created for Swarovski in 2016. The candelabra imitate molecular patterns in nature. Ideas for shape and structure also came by way of architect César Manrique’s windmills in Lanzarote and Belgium’s Atomium. (Atomium was designed for the 1958 Brussels World’s Fair and imitates the shape of nine atoms of an iron crystal — magnified 165 billion times.) “It’s something we’d want in our own home,” says Pilotto. They’re exciting additions to a growing collection of homewares that includes patterned handmade plates by 1882 Ltd, which the designers showcased at a dinner for their recent autumn/winter 2018 collection at London nightclub Tramp. “It started out as an artwork for a knit, but actually, it was better on the plate,” De Vos laughs. There’s also glassware designed with Jochen Holz, needle-punched cushions (an offshoot of a design for a boot) and boldly patterned paravans (folding screens) that debuted at Milan Design Week through Nina Yashar’s Nilufar Gallery. “I feel like colour is such a luxury right now,” says De Vos. “We want our pieces to evoke a sense of fun and excitement but to remain timeless, too. Our customers want pieces they can have forever.” VL Visit peterpilotto.com; atelierswarovski.com

By FIONA MC CARTHY Photographed by MARK COCKSEDGE


ILVE.COM.AU MODEL SHOWN PSN120SMP


485 CHURCH STREET - RICHMOND P +613 9428 6111 E info@homeitalia.com.au W homeitalia.com.au

Exclusive stockist of HENGE Italyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest hand-made furniture and lighting


A RT & DESIGN

PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL NAUMOFF. STYLIST: BRAD HOMES. HAIR & MAKE-UP: ALLISON BOYLE. ASSISTANT: MATTEO MACRI. VEENA SAHAJWALLA WEARS: BOTTEGA VENETA COAT; CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN SHOES. DETAILS, LAST PAGES

Professor Veena Sahajwalla, a revolutionary in recycling science.

Free radicals Meet the innovators who preach the ‘reduce, re-use, recycle’ mantra to inform, educate and inspire. By Annemarie Kiely

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 91


ART & DESIGN

MORALITY AND EXPANSIVE MODERNITY have long been difficult bedfellows, but in the dawning of a post-materialist age, aesthetics

are committing to ethics. It’s a relationship shift from the why of it to the how, as a few free radicals of science and design turn market dislocation and discards into major opportunities. Here, we doff our hats to the doers shaping a principled path to beautiful living. THE VISIONARY PROFESSOR VEENA SAHAJWALLA

THE PIONEER FIONA LYDA

As shopping increasingly splays off into omni-channel platforms powered by the insights of big data, there’s something The projection to a future in which waste is considered a valuable reassuringly slow-time and solid about bricks-and-mortar retail. resource rather than a scourge on the planet might sound like It is the new exotic for a generation of digital natives who, science fiction rather than science fact, but for Professor Veena nurtured on the ephemeral, prefer its tactility and eye-to-eye Sahajwalla, that apocryphal tomorrow is bona fide and beginning trust to online purchase. now. Is she talking garbage? You bet. But too few traders get the mindset of millennials, now the largest As a materials engineer and Australian Research Council (ARC) market force on the planet. They expect responsibility, in its full Laureate Fellow who founded and directs the Centre for Sustainable ethical spectrum, to underscore their retail experience. Yes, morality Materials Research and Technology (SMaRT) at the University of is the new black, as we become the choices we make. New South Wales, Sahajwalla game-changed the disposal of waste “It is the only way forward,” says Fiona Lyda, owner-operator of more than a decade ago, when her research led to the commercialisation of the world’s first ‘green steel’ manufacturing process. design store Spence & Lyda, who began championing altruism and ethics two decades before this demographic began impacting design. Using recycled rubber tyres from end-of-life vehicles as part replacement for the coal-based carbon in electric arc furnace steel“The mantra of ‘it is business’ justifying the price hike on a lifesustaining drug because it’s market-driven is not acceptable. We all making, Sahajwalla proved that the elements essential to making steel could release from the molecular structure of these have a responsibility for the wellbeing of our fellow man — and that means not taking advantage of our position.” discarded objects when subjected to precise high-temperature conditions. Her patented Lyda concedes that the attitude flies in the face of free-market economies but argues that this process required less energy, reduced both the carbon emissions and the ‘slag’ waste of model has to change. “Our current economists do not understand a model that doesn’t include traditional smelter, and reframed rubbish as a valuable resource. It has resulted in her being constant growth,” she says. “We must find a new economic understanding that looks at awarded the 2017 Jubilee Professorship by the Indian Academy of Sciences. sustainability, not constant growth, or we are lost.” The proposition behind this paradigmWalking the talk with design collaborations shifting discovery, with its alchemising potential that prioritise proposition over profit, Lyda to turn the estimated yearly discard of participated in the PET Lamp project — 1 trillion plastic bags and 1.5 billion car tyres into Spanish designer Alvaro Catalán de Ocón’s FIONA LYDA cities of steel, was, according to Sahajwalla, luminous efforts to repurpose the PET plastic seeded on the streets of Mumbai. bottles choking the Amazon. More recently, she aided in the birthing “There’s the noise, the pollution, the factories and the incredible of Adelaide furniture designer Jon  Goulder’s Innate collection, dynamic of life that goes on around you,” she says, recalling the a capsule of furniture pieces that posit the question of an furious energy of the city in which she spent her childhood. “One of Australian aesthetic in moulded saddle leathers, black-as-night the things I found so appealing was the entrepreneurial economy Adelaide granite and pickled Tasmanian timbers. based on end-of-life materials. Nothing was ever seen as waste. Your Innate alludes to Lyda’s instincts with design and her long-held little glass medicine bottle might be collected, taken away, cleaned belief that we must sustain the creative endeavours and critically and re-used for another purpose. Much to the annoyance of my endangered ecosystems within this country. parents, I actively participated in this economy, but I claimed that “One of the current conundrums in our industry is the love of I was helping them clean up while making my pocket money.” imported woods,” she says. “This notion of shipping timber all over Still connecting to that childhood thrill of watching ‘waste the world has clear negatives, so we have sought to showcase our warriors’ extract value from innocuous discard, Sahajwalla has Australian native timbers. We have treated them with reverence recently evolved her technology into the UNSW-funded ‘e-waste — and, to that end, we have chosen not to coat the timber in a skin microfactory’. This prototype factory, which fields the fastest-growing of paint but to colour them with an organic process that reacts area of waste in Australia, works on the back of various modules naturally with the tannins in the wood. made to deal with detritus at a local community level. “I remember my daughter asking Alvaro if he saw himself as an “We don’t need a big smelter to extract the value,” says Sahajwalla environmental designer,” adds Lyda in response to the question of the alloys, including precious metals that stream offshore or to of a deeper moral consciousness now surfacing in design. “He said landfill. “These microfactories can transform waste where it is created that, for him, taking the Earth and its resources into account was and stockpiled, enabling local businesses and communities to not an imperative that was encompassed in the notion of good design. only tackle waste but to develop a commercial opportunity from the He  was correct. Environmental responsibility should be a given valuable materials that are created.” unsw.edu.au at this point.” spenceandlyda.com.au ›› 92 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL NAUMOFF. PET ES LAMPSHADES AND RUG FROM SPENCE & LYDA; ALU CHAIR BY MULLER VAN SEVEREN FOR VALERIE OBJECTS. FIONA LYDA WEARS: SARA BATTAGLIA COAT, AVAILABLE AT HARROLDS; GUCCI SHOES; EARRINGS BY MELISSA HARRIS JEWELLERY; BULGARI B ZERO1 DESIGN LEGEND BRACELET. DETAILS, LAST PAGES

“We must find a new economic understanding that looks at sustainability” —


Fiona Lyda of Spence & Lyda with the design storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s range of PET ES lampshades, made from re-used PET bottles and palm tree fibre.


ART & DESIGN

THE CONCEPTUALIST DALE HARDIMAN

What a load of old rubbish! It’s a descriptor rather than a denigrator of Melbourne designer Dale Hardiman’s vibrant Common Resources, a collection of Pop-primitive furnishings that are the cartoonish consequence of applying concrete compound and coloured rubber to a Frankenstein-hybrid of found objects. “I’m happy for the work to be defined by what it is made from,” says Hardiman, who uses such conceptual projects to balance his day-to-day business at Dowel Jones — the design studio he co-founded with Adam Lynch to make affordable furniture from minimal material and process. “Rubbish as a raw material isn’t a new idea, but it is one that should be adopted more often.” Exhibiting under Designwork 02 — the second iteration of gallerist Sophie Gannon’s engagement with the National Gallery of Victoria’s Melbourne Design Week (MDW) — Common Resources is Hardiman’s exploration into the increasingly mechanised and globalised production of furniture. “The early work for Common Resources identified the household kitchen as the most common workshop,” he says, nominating cutlery 94 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

and saucepans as its tools. “Why do we keep developing large and complicated machines to make furniture and objects when rudimentary skills serve the same purpose?” The question cut to the curatorial core of MDW’s Design Effects theme, but the pricing and placement of Hardiman’s work in the white cube of Gannon’s gallery potentially gives the cynics aim at just another gratuitous folly flogging itself as sustainability. Is it all a wry post-post-modern pastiche of Ikea parts smothered with impasto, or is there perhaps a deeper point? “Having grown up as part of a generation completely consumed by technology, this work reacts to the growing separation between material use and the understanding of its impact,” says Hardiman. “Furniture is an interesting typology that, outside the research and development of, say, ergonomic chairs, has remained the same as it has been for some time.” Less of an effort to elevate function into art form than a theoretical challenging of the stasis and state of design production relative to unrestrained consumerism, Common Resources reminds of the dire consequences of designing for disposability. dale-hardiman.com ››

PHOTOGRAPHER: SEAN FENNESSY

Designer Dale Hardiman with chairs from his Common Resources collection.


ART & DESIGN

THE GAME-CHANGERS NIGHTINGALE HOUSING

Population growth, housing prices and an unchecked property market have scored a shameful dirge about dollars trumping good design into the skyline of Melbourne — but on the city’s fringes, a sweeter song is issuing from a powerful little bird. Meet the men and women of Nightingale Housing, a not-for-profit group, premised on providing multi-residential constructs, which delivers ‘at cost’ apartments close to the community heart. They are laying the new shell of an architecture that proves low price and high principle are comfortable cohabitants. “Nightingale Housing licenses leading Australian architects to run projects that embody its principles,” says Lola Digby-Diercks, the organisation’s business development lead. “The projects must deliver in terms of affordability, total transparency, sustainability, deliberative design and community contribution. Nightingale provides support to each project… before each dwelling is balloted.” Referring to the waiting list that registers for an apartment before going into the draw for its allocation, Digby-Diercks adds that successful buyers must sign a restrictive covenant over the resale of their lot, ensuring that savings are passed on to the next purchaser. This model was hatched in 2014 on the back of The Commons, a development in the inner northern suburb of Brunswick designed by Breathe Architecture that won awards for multiple housing and sustainable architecture at the 2014 Australian Institute of

Architects National Architecture Awards. Articulating the beliefs of Breathe founder Jeremy McLeod that housing could be more than a commodity, the concept behind The Commons prioritises the interests of owner-occupiers over financial yields in a materially reductive, energy-efficient block that made high design the province of typically out-priced buyers by ditching such ‘excess’ as a basement car park. As an owner-occupier of the complex, McLeod, an architect, explains that The Commons exceeded his expectations in terms of community. “The residents hold monthly craft and drawing classes in their apartments, tend to the gardens on the roof together, have progressive dinners together,” he says. “They are generous and considerate of one another and it is a loving building to live in.” Pushing this prototype into a collaborative enterprise with like-minded colleagues including Architecture Architecture, Austin Maynard Architects, Clare Cousins Architects, MRTN Architects and Wolveridge Architects, McLeod and his design pals plunged their investment dollars into the five-level Nightingale 1 in Brunswick to ensure its success. Their vision of collective nesting — deeply ‘green’ and driven by communal sharing — might have been a hard sell, but the marketplace thinks not. With 12 Nightingale projects currently in development and a waiting list of 3000 hopeful residents, the Nightingale’s song has been heard. nightingalehousing.org ››

PHOTOGRAPHER: JUSTIN RIDLER

from left: Nightingale Housing’s Kate Ryan, community manager, Dan McKenna, senior project lead, Jeremy McLeod, managing director, Lola Digby-Diercks, business development lead, Tamara Veltre, business operations; Fairley Batch, associate at Breathe Architecture.

96 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


Architect: Scale Architecture

If you desire style, build it with Austral Bricks.

www.australbricks.com.au


ART & DESIGN

“We need to become innovators, not just lobbyists” — BRODIE NEILL

THE ENVIRONMENTALIST BRODIE NEILL

As a designer morally aroused by the abuse of ecosystems, Brodie Neill has long made the point about the pursuit of short-term profits in pieces that seamlessly marry digital technology with craft tradition. But the international tipping point for the Tasmanian-born activist, creative director and self-described “default designer”, who has lived in London for the last 12 years, came with the commission to create a piece for the Australian Pavilion at the 2016 London Design Biennale. Theming to the politicised ideal of a Utopia by Design, this inaugural global event played to Neill’s pet passions. He decided to illustrate his concerns about the estimated 150 million tonnes of plastics polluting the ocean in a piece that contemporised the 19th-century specimen table, a glory display of the precious stones plundered from lands far away. “We took the microplastics, the stuff that is coating the coastlines of the world, and treated them as the equivalent of the winemaker’s grapes,” he says of the weathered blue-and-green composite that was inlaid into the Gyro Table, so-called after the currents circulating ‘soups’ of plastics around the planet. “They are precious bits that we reappraised as gems and re-contextualised in an object that makes people think about their everyday practices.” To the question of where these ‘gems’ were sourced, Neill recalls joining with the like minds of marine science and sending out the 98 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

call on social media for beachcombers of the world to aid in bagging washed-up plastics. The reaction was immediate and immeasurable. From Cornwall in the United Kingdom to the once-pristine beaches on Bruny Island, part of Neill’s home state of Tasmania, the stuff poured in for cleaning, processing and colour-coding into sacks of micro-bits that became known as ‘ocean terrazzo’. They arrange in latitudinal and longitudinal display in the circular surface of the Gyro Table — which, suggestive of the urgency for round-table talks on single-use plastics, seditiously draws the viewer into its galactic haze. Exhibiting amid the maritime history paintings as part of the National Gallery of Victoria’s 2018 Triennial, the Gyro Table made its most eloquent point about the conquering impulses of man and their consequences. “Because we can just channel our waste back into a circular economy, oil and mining companies keep pulling raw materials out of the Earth’s core,” says Neill. “We don’t really need more, but I think we need to lighten up about practice and process. We need to become innovators, not just lobbyists.” Parlaying the ‘ocean terrazzo’ of microplastics into a commercial venture that motivates beach clean-ups and creates revenue streams for charities, Neill is leading an aesthetic movement that questions the morality of both consumer and creator choice. “Is it time for a sea change?” he asks. “You bet!” brodieneill.com VL

PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL BARBERA

Designer Brodie Neill, with his Cowrie chair (left) and Pleat bench, is a champion of repurposing plastics that wash up on coastlines around the world.


ICONIC STYLE

EMILIO PUCCI The ‘Prince of Prints’ presided over an ancestral home that has remained as vibrant as his famous swirling patterns, writes Jason Mowen.

D

uring a trip to New York in 1999, I bought my now-cherished copy of the Christie’s catalogue The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe, a monumental book that gave unusually intimate insight into the actress’s life, as told through the story of her personal possessions. Alongside annotated film scripts, Ferragamo stilettos and ever-immortalised sequined frocks, one of the most intriguing aspects of the sale was Monroe’s extensive collection of one particular designer — her wardrobe of choice when she was not, so to speak, being ‘Marilyn’. The designer was none other than Emilio Pucci, whose silk jersey shift dresses, which hinted at the coming sexual revolution, the actress collected in multiple, sherbet-like hues.

100 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

If Monroe was the quintessential modern woman before her time, then Pucci was the designer for the modern woman, granting her unprecedented freedom of movement in his pioneering of luxurious, almost weightless stretch fabrics. Born into one of Florence’s oldest noble families in 1914, the Marchese Emilio Pucci di Barsento became known as the ‘Prince of Prints’, a play on his aristocratic heritage as well as his signature swirling patterns that captured, and even informed, the psychedelic spirit of the 1960s. The Pucci story, however, goes back to the early days of the Renaissance, and Emilio was certainly a Renaissance man. He was multilingual, American-educated, an Olympic skier — his first designs were in fact ski outfits — and an air force pilot. After WWII, he established his atelier in the Palazzo Pucci in Florence, a grand, Patrician pile his family had occupied since 1480. ››

PHOTOGRAPHER: IVAN TERESTCHENKO (MONTAGE). PORTRAIT COURTESY PUCCI ARCHIVES

RENAISSANCE MAN


101


ICONIC STYLE clockwise from right: models on the roof of Palazzo Pucci in Florence wear evening dresses, palazzo pyjamas and terrycloth capes from Pucci’s spring/summer 1967 collection. A bedroom and drawing room inside the palazzo.

‹‹ As Florence flourished over the centuries, so too did the Puccis. They made their fortune in trade and were close allies of the Medici throughout the 15th century; rose to further prominence, producing three cardinals, in the 16th century; and acquired the fiefdom of Barsento in the 17th century. They were also great patrons of the arts, although it was a gift from Lorenzo de’ Medici to Giannozzo Pucci in 1483 that’s of particular note — a series of four magnificent panels, The Story of Nastagio Degli Onesti by Botticelli, one of which still graces a wall in the palazzo. In keeping with the Florentine architectural tradition, Palazzo Pucci’s exterior is ruggedly handsome rather than beautiful, like many of its Roman counterparts — a difference surely noted by the current mistress, the Marchesa Cristina Pucci di Barsento, who hailed from the Italian capital before her marriage to Emilio in 1959. Following six centuries of renovations and additions, as well as subtle ‘refreshments’ made by the marchesa, the interior is softer and more nuanced. Rooms on the piano nobile, where the atelier was located, retain 16th- and 17th-century frescoes under which, over the

years, Pucci runway shows have taken place. A succession of later rooms unfolds one floor up, such as the Baroque music room, with its stucco pilaster and caryatid-studded walls, and the neoclassical Wedgwood room, created by an English artist in the late 18th century. And under the palace’s ancient eaves sits the circa 1971 Altana by architect Gae Aulenti, a sculptural private apartment in stainless steel that overlooks the Duomo and more resembles a sophisticated spaceship than the attic of a Renaissance palace. Following Emilio’s death in 1992, the Pucci creative baton — no doubt clad in exuberant silk stretch jersey — was passed to his daughter, Laudomia, who has worked, on and off, alongside her father since 1985 and now co-owns the company with LVMH. Over the course of the centuries, popes, kings and queens — and more recently, creative directors such as Christian Lacroix and Peter Dundas — have passed through the palazzo’s wrought-iron gates on their way to the piano nobile. Did Monroe ever cross the same threshold? Sadly not, but I like to think of her in a brightly hued heaven, wearing the green Pucci shift in which she made her final journey to the afterlife, looking down onto the ever-evolving palazzo. VL

PHOTOGRAPHER: IVAN TERESTCHENKO. FASHION IMAGE COURTESY PUCCI ARCHIVES

Visit palazzopuccieventi.it

102 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


ART & DESIGN

profile:

Hiromi Tango

Sculptor, photographer, performer and installation artist, Hiromi Tango explores the neurological reach of art and its ability to ignite the senses and to heal. By ANNEMARIE KIELY Photographed by MICHAELA DUTKOVÁ

I

t’s an abnormally hot Sunday morning in autumnal Melbourne, and Japanese-Australian artist Hiromi Tango is trying to elucidate the work she has just created and committed to film for the 2018 Melbourne Art Week — supporting the rebooted Melbourne Art Fair (MAF). She has pushed her creativity beyond the cultural norm since an uncivilised 4am start, kicking off with full immersion in the fountain of the Kings Domain and following with hours of unscripted performance pulling a 200-kilogram Lizard Tail through the arts precinct of Southbank, site of the MAF. Tango is ready to expire but willing to talk to a wider body of siteand situation-responsive art that spans sculpture, photography, installation and performance. But first, there’s the question of how her tail-dragging epic down the dark of Sturt Street might have been greeted by the clubbers heading home. “Maybe not so strange in Melbourne,” laughs the artist, who has travelled from the relative quiet of Tweed Heads in regional New South Wales. Such surreal disruption is the daily doing in a world increasingly detaching from the real — or so her art serially suggests in an assiduously low-fi, unashamedly colourful and collaborative effort to activate the senses as stimulus for self-reflection and healing. “We are just animals,” Tango says with a nod to her five-metre appendage, a sculpted accumulation of community craft that, intentionally or not, alludes to autotomy — the defence mechanism that allows animals to detach body parts in the presence of predators. “We respond to touch, but in this globalised, virtual age of communication, we need to use our hands more, awaken our senses, because it makes the brain grow in a healthy way. That’s how I make art; I try not to control or predict — just engage with the imagination.” Grounding her creativity in the research of neuroscience, Tango poses questions about neuroplasticity, empathy and epigenetics, frequently collaborating with researchers in health and science to develop processes that build the optimised brain. “For instance, very basic wrapping activates the front-lobe region,” she says. “If you just engage in five minutes of wrapping, it has the same impact as meditation — it instantaneously feels good.”

As an artist who becomes part of the sculpture — “and the sculpture part of me” — Tango wears only monochromes and desists in the decoration of body (save for fluorescing fingernails that melt into her inhabited works). Colour and pattern are purely for art, even in her clean-canvas home, where Tango admits to no sentimentality over objects. “To be honest, information and noise are distractions,” she says. “I can’t compare with other artists, but in my case, time and energy management is precious. I cannot let my life get cluttered.” She lowers to a whisper within the art-filled confines of the Buxton Contemporary museum, past which she earlier dragged her tail, and confides that the attribution of ‘contemporary artist’ doesn’t really mean much to her. “I am more interested in engaging with the disability sector, mental-health groups, addressing women’s and children’s rights,” she says, adding that discussion of her own upbringing is not desired. “It was complex, and there are some memories I need to delete.” That caveat over conversation sorted, she hints at the intense patriarchy and prayer of her childhood in Shikoku, the least populous of Japan’s four main islands, which she left at age 17  to study humanities at the Japan Women’s University in Tokyo. She recalls her final year’s charge to assist artists in residence at the Australia Council’s Tokyo studio, where she met Craig Walsh, a pioneer in the creation of site-responsive artworks that animate natural environments. “I fell in love with his art,” Tango says, sharing the secret that she was moved at 21 to propose to Walsh, with whom she has been ever since. “His work was so innovative and so dedicated to community engagement in the visual context. Everything I had studied about the culture of art was in his work. I started helping him and later collaborating with him; needless to say, he has been my mentor.” In spite of exalting to star status in the Museum of Contemporary Arts 2011 Primavera show and exhibiting in most major national institutions, Tango persists in seeing herself as a humanitarian first. “I’m not an activist, but I love art; it’s a little contradictory,” she says. “But I believe in the power of art to take us to a timeless space, to generate a dialogue of engagement for a healthy future.” VL

“In this globalised, virtual age of communication, we need to use our hands more”

104 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

Melbourne Art Week runs from 30 July– 5 August; visit melbourneartfair.com.au and hiromitango.com


Artist Hiromi Tango drags her Lizard Tail through Melbourneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Southbank as part of the 2018 Melbourne Art Week.

105


BORN TO PIONEER

Overseas model shown.

NEW LEXUS LS The visionary LS delivers the epitome of luxury and innovation with its meticulous craftsmanship and revolutionary technology. Featuring advanced pre-collision safety systems with pedestrian detection^, a reclinable rear seat with shiatsu massaging* and exquisite hand-crafted Kiriko cut glass door panelsâ&#x20AC; , the Lexus LS has to be experienced to be believed. Discover more at lexus.com.au ^Pre-Collision Safety system with Pedestrian Detection is a driver assist feature only and not a substitute for safe driving practices. Driver remains responsible at all times for safe driving. Pedestrians may not be detected in certain conditions including low and harsh light, where partially obstructed from view, where clothing or movement obscures or effects body contours, persons under 1 metre or over 2 metres tall and where carrying or pushing large objects. *Available on LS Sports Luxury variants only. â&#x20AC; Available on LS Sports Luxury variants only as an optional extra.


ART & DESIGN

STYLIST: BRAD HOMES. GROOMING: JOEL PHILLIPS. ELLIOTT WEARS HERITAGE JACKET, SILK SHIRT, GILET, PANTS, SHOES, AND NECKLACE WITH WOLF HEAD, ALL BY GUCCI. EYES WEARS VALENTINO JACKET AND TRACK PANT (AVAILABLE FROM HARROLDS), PAUL SMITH POLO SHIRT AND BALLY MENS GAVINO SNEAKERS. DETAILS, LAST PAGES

Gordon Elliott (left) and Michael Eyes in the upstairs hallway of their Sydney terrace. Eyes holds Rick Amor’s Boy on a Bathing Box painting. The work above the mirror is by John Coburn. All other pieces are by James Gleeson. Details, last pages.

Art house From their home in a corner of inner Sydney, two art aficionados lovingly curate a wall-to-wall selection of eclectic works. By Freya Herring Photographed by Hugh Stewart

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 107


ART & DESIGN

clockwise from above: Mark Whalen’s Constraints; Tanmaya Bingham’s 3 LSFS. Cherry Hood’s Tuyen (partially seen); various works by Clara Adolphs.

clockwise from left: ceramics by Bronwynne Cornish and Nell (on stool); Fabergé plate by Rosenthal. Pinkie and Lust sculptures by Todd Fuller. Eyes and Elliott in the dining room alongside works by Diana Lee-Gobbitt, Ross Watson, Jimmy Rix, Madeleine Child, Euan Macleod, Alex Seton and Terry Stringer. Details, last pages.

Visit theelliotteyescollection.com

108 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

EYES WEARS ACNE STUDIOS TURTLENECK, STELLA McCARTNEY DOUBLE-BREASTED JACKET (AVAILABLE AT HARROLDS), BULGARI OCTO WATCH. ELLIOTT WEARS IVORY TAFFETA JACKET AND PANTS, AND SILK SHIRT, ALL BY GUCCI. DETAILS, LAST PAGES

T

here is something problematic about buying art for one’s own home — and it is that you, and those around you, are the only people who get to experience that artwork for as long as you have it. There are masterful works by Picasso, Kahlo and Bacon holed up in people’s living rooms all over the world. For the rest of us, it’s a loss. That was never going to be an issue for Gordon Elliott and Michael Eyes. They’ve been collecting fine art, from across a range of disciplines, for a decade-and-ahalf. Today, they have some 326 works in their three-bedroom terrace house in Sydney’s Erskineville. Paintings and sculptures decorate every wall and crevice, and feature in both their front and back gardens. A neon piece by Melbourne artist Adam Stone even adorns the ceiling. They don’t keep it to themselves, either — their home is open to the public by appointment, and they will even throw in a glass of champagne while you’re having a gander. “We want to share our collection,” says Elliott, “and to encourage other people to actually look at art, and realise that they can have lots of it in their own home if they want.” Neither he nor Eyes is wealthy — Elliott is a dance teacher and Eyes runs an independent bookshop in Woollahra. They pay off artworks slowly, rather than put all the money upfront. “Once you are known by the galleries, you can normally make arrangements with them to pay off works,” says Elliott. As soon as you approach their house, a sculpture by New Zealand’s Terry Stringer greets you, a bronze wing raised in welcome. The screen door is a commissioned work by Sydney’s Michael Snape. Primal, animalistic sculptures by fellow local Todd Fuller sit on furnishings below giant paintings by artists as diverse as Spanish-based Australian artist Peter Churcher and New Zealand’s Jess Johnson. There is video art; the footstool is a sculpture; other sculptures by Sydney’s Alex Seton dot the premises. There are also works by Charles Blackman, Sidney Nolan, Jeffrey Smart, James Gleeson and Julian Meagher. In the garden, a giant steel piece by New Zealand sculptor Gregor Kregar overlooks the living area, while, upstairs in the spare bedroom, paintings by Southern Highlands-based Clara Adolphs overlook a male nude bedspread picked up from South African artist Brooke Schafer when Elliott and Eyes were in Pretoria. This art-packed house is reminiscent of the Paris Salon. “People are overwhelmed by the amount and diversity,” says Elliott. “And they seem really appreciative that we’ve opened our house up and invited them in,” adds Eyes. With no children, the couple are in the throes of planning the future of their collection. “By the time we kick the bucket, we want to set up a foundation where we’ll pick 10 works and give them to either a regional gallery or an institution as The Elliott Eyes Collection,” says Elliott. Everything else will be sold, and 70 per cent of the annual interest will be gifted to an Australian or Kiwi artist each year, who will produce one work to further the collection. “And they could use the money for whatever they want,” he notes. Until then, the couple will continue to welcome people into their home, to inspire and drive collecting. “Inviting people has never been a problem,” says Eyes. “The people we’ve met — collectors and people who love art — it’s been wonderful.” VL


P O R T O F I N O

One for the


VALUED AT OVER $49!

BONUS GIFT

Mews candle Each vessel features a unique design that matches the fragrance notes and story of the perfume within the candle. Mews Collective uses lead-free cotton wicks for a longer, cleaner and more environmentally friendly burn.

To ďŹ nd out more, visit mewscollective.com or ďŹ nd us on Instagram @mewscollective Terms & Conditions *Offer ends 15 August, 2018 and is available for delivery to Australian addresses only. Choose one of three scents; if your selection is unavailable a replacement scent will be chosen for you. A standard one-year subscription consists of 6 bi-monthly issues. For overseas rates, visit magsonline.com.au/vl.


BONUS SUBSCRIPTION GIFT SUBSCRIBE TO VOGUE LIVING AND RECEIVE A BONUS MEWS COLLECTIVE CANDLE. Mews Collective believes that home fragrance should not only smell divine — it should add to the aesthetic of your living space. Each Mews scented candle is hand-poured in Australia in custom-designed ceramic vessels. From left: Mews Collective candles in Green Sage and Cedar, Sea Salt and Amber, and Iris and Oud. A COLOURFUL

FUTURE MILAN DESIGN WEEK 2018

STUDIOPEPE, QUINCOCES-DRAGÒ, APPARATUS STUDIO, ANGELA MISSONI, DIMORE STUDIO, PLUS ALL THE NEW DESIGNS & TRENDS

FREE RADICALS

The Australian creatives leading the way in thoughtful design

SKI ESCAPES EUROPE TRAVEL SPECIAL

PHOTOGRAPHER: JORGE RIVERA. STYLIST: ANNA DELPRAT

PLUS INSIDE LAKE COMO’S MOST EXCLUSIVE VILLA

Receive 1 year — 6 Print issues for only $49.95* — SAVE 17% + Bonus Candle Select one of three scents as your BONUS Gift: Iris and Oud, Green Sage and Cedar, or Sea Salt and Amber. ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER? Simply extend your subscription with this offer to receive your bonus gift. For Print + Digital Subscriptions and Overseas orders, visit magsonline.com.au/vl.

DON’T MISS OUT! VISIT MAGSONLINE.COM.AU/VL/m1807vli or CALL 1300 656 933 and QUOTE m1807vli


PHOTOGRAPHER: HELENIO BARBETTA

Italian architect Barbara Ghidoni blends the past with the present in her elegant 1920s apartment in Milan. (For the full story, turn to page 134.)

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 113


Golden touch Jewellery designer Cynthia Vilchez Castiglioni found a home in the heart of Milan that couldn’t have been more appropriate — a medieval-era former convent in a district historically inhabited by goldsmiths. By Andrew Ferren Photographed by Helenio Barbetta Produced by Chiara dal Canto

Cynthia Vilchez Castiglioni with her husband, Giovanni, in the LIVING AREA of their apartment; 1960s Egg chairs by Mario Sabot; coffee table from a flea market; Venini Lighthouse table lamp by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec; 1960s Tecno LT8 white lamps (in background) by Osvaldo Borsani; walnut parquet floor. 114 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


115


ynthia Vilchez Castiglioni traded her native Venezuela for Italy when she arrived in Milan in 2008 as a student of fashion marketing. A decade later she has graduated, married a dashing Italian — Giovanni Castiglioni, with whom she has two children — and decorated their family home with youthful freshness and finesse. Along the way she also found time to launch her own artisanal jewellery brand, Aliita, which is celebrating its third year as well as the opening of its first retail location in Tokyo, where the delicate, unfussy necklaces, earrings and other pieces are popular. The jewellery is handcrafted in Italy using 9-karat gold and natural stones, and each collection has been developed in collaboration with interior designer Haidyne Azevedo. Coincidentally, the very first Aliita piece they created was a charmingly simple gold pendant in the shape of a house. Cynthia and Giovanni found their own home, located not far from the iconic Duomo cathedral in the heart of Milan, four years ago. Over time, she discovered that the nearby streets had historically been the goldsmiths’ district of Milan, and to this day the area retains a surprisingly high density of metalworkers and jewellers plying their trade. “I’ll go out for a meeting with one craftsman and along the way I’ll discover three more jewellery makers,” Cynthia notes. “It seemed like a sign that we’d landed in the right place.”

“I’ll be honest, we first fell in love with the building — a former convent from the 1500s with a very simple and beautiful colonnaded patio at its heart — because the neighbourhood was not exactly our usual area” The building had been completely overhauled a few years earlier by architect Piero Castellini, whose original brief was to create a luxury hotel, but along the way the project switched to residential apartments. When the couple bought their 280-square-metre space, they had some big ideas about how to improve its layout and change some finishes, but they quickly learned that the permit process in Italy can stall even the most enthusiastic plans. “We waited and waited for licenses that never came and finally just started living in the house as it was,” Cynthia remembers. “Eventually we realised that some of our proposed changes were completely unnecessary, so in the end all that paperwork and bureaucracy saved us.” With no major renovation to wrangle over, the task of making the apartment their home became a process of pure decoration — wall colours, fabrics, furniture, art and lighting. In this endeavour, the couple let their natural affinities guide them. “Giovanni has such a passion for furniture and objects that we spend part of practically every weekend at vintage furniture markets and antiques fairs,” says Cynthia, noting that her own decorating passions tilt more toward colour and textiles. “We’ve been all over Italy and Europe seeking out the exact pieces he has in mind.” Both of their talents are abundantly displayed in the living room, where standout 1960s designs like the futuristic Egg chairs by Mario Sabot take centre stage while two slender white LT8 lamps by Osvaldo Borsani suggest a visual division between the living and dining areas. Giovanni’s family has been involved in fashion for generations (his parents, Gianni and Consuelo Castiglioni, founded Marni in 1994), so it’s no surprise that the chic vintage Knoll dining table came from his grandmother’s house, as did a massive mirror with a curvy bevelled top that had previously been in her dressing room. The space’s bold juxtaposition of creamy white and intense grey walls and the luxurious mustard-coloured velvet curtains were Cynthia’s doing. For the last three years, the apartment has also housed Aliita’s showroom — although that will change when the growing business soon moves into nearby offices. The couple cobbled together the jewellery gallery’s altar-like centre table by putting a  lustrous new marble top on a curvy bronze base they found at an antiques shop. Providing a vivid counterpoint to the room’s cool Prussian blue walls is a luminous pomegranate-red Chinese silk carpet, another Castiglioni family heirloom. And the well-curated mix of objects on the shelves is just a sampling of Giovanni’s flea market shopping prowess. The designer saw working from home as a win/win situation. “It gave me a chance to be with my children when they were young and really needed me and, as it turned out, clients actually liked coming off the streets into the warmth of a home,” she says. “I had quality time for both my family and my business.” VL Visit aliita.com

116 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


this page: in the DINING AREA, Knoll Tulip table by Eero Saarinen; Venini Colletto vase by Ludovico Diaz de Santillana (left) and Bolle bottles by Tapio Wirkkala (right and on bookcase); Thonet Cesca chairs by Marcel Breuer; 1960s Italian bookcase. opposite page: another view of the COURTYARD.

117


In another view of the LIVING AREA, Cynthia and Giovanni with their children; set of Casaluci 4D sideboards by Angelo Mangiarotti; Murano yellow double-glass vase; Aliita mirror by Haidyne Azevedo; Stilkronen sconces; Fontana Arte magazine holder.

118 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


this page, clockwise from right: detail of flowers in the Aliita SHOWROOM. In the GUESTROOM, 1950s bedside table in rosewood; Stilnovo table lamp; Rosenthal ceramic vases; Eyeball floor lamp by Goffredo Reggiani. Aliita objects by Haidyne Azevedo. opposite page: Cynthia in the showroom beside custom table with Bardiglio Nuvolato marble top and legs from Tecno T102 table by Osvaldo Borsani & Eugenio Gerli; Mim cart by Ico Parisi; 1950s ceiling light.

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 121


â&#x20AC;&#x153;We spend part of practically every weekend at vintage furniture markets and antiques fairsâ&#x20AC;? this page: in the MAIN BEDROOM, 1960s bedside table with lamp by Ico and Luisa Parisi from Hotel Lorena, Grosseto, Bernini, Italy; 18th-century Maria Theresa chandelier. opposite page: in another view of the SHOWROOM, Feal mahogany-and-brass bookshelf; Aliita brass-and-glass objects; Christofle limited-edition champagne glacier.

122 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


this page: a view of Lake Como from the home of Andrea Duff and her partner, Robert Schwamberg. opposite page: the house’s EXTERIOR walls are painted in a colour custom-mixed to match Dulux Antique White USA. Details, last pages.

In the pines Nestled in the Alps and overlooking spectacular Lake Como and the mountains beyond, an imposing 1910 villa glides into 21st-century life thanks to its design-savvy Australian owners. By Chris Pearson Photographed by Prue Ruscoe

124 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


G

EORGE CLOONEY IS LAKE COMO’S most

famous resident and chose a front-row seat to savour one of the world’s most spectacular views — but Australian Andrea Duff and her partner, Robert Schwamberg, preferred the dress circle when they bought this handsome Art Nouveau villa. The peripatetic pair arrived in northern Italy in 2015, having just completed a crossing of the Atlantic Ocean to the Caribbean on their yacht. “We were wondering what to do next,” says Duff, a former fashion stylist. “We had spent many years sailing in the Mediterranean, and we had played the ‘Could we live here?’ game.” Previously, Duff and Schwamberg had been on a five-country motorbike tour of the Alps region that included Lake Como. A Harley-Davidson also brought Clooney here, back in 2001 — and like the US actor, they were seduced by the region’s beauty and bountiful seasonal produce. Living beside the water was less appealing. “Being right on the lake didn’t work for us,” says Duff. “There is only one main road and a lot of congestion during summer. Many homes are built onto the road, and you step out into the traffic. We needed more space and less noise, so we headed for the hills. It’s quieter but with easy access to the lake.”

They found Villa Casasco, a 1910 Liberty-style, five-bedroom villa tucked into a valley between Lake Como and Lake Lugano just over the border in Switzerland. Originally built as the local mayor’s home, it had “grand and impressive proportions”, says Duff. “So we have the space and views of the mountains and nature on our doorstep.” Each of its three levels is a generous 200 square metres, while its sprawling grounds extend into woodlands with pines, larches and chestnut trees. “It felt really good,” she says. “We could imagine ourselves in the space. It didn’t feel too grand or big for the two of us.” It also had good bones and was structurally sound. “Not having local knowledge and language skills, we did not want to undertake a major renovation.” However, their dream retreat came with three glaring faults. First, the kitchen and hallway were poky and needed a more effective flow. Elsewhere, the problem was too much flow — as the house was built directly onto the slab with no foundations, damp had seeped into the downstairs walls and floors over the years. Most jarringly, it suffered what could best be described as serious citrus overload. “The villa was painted the most lurid possible shade of limoncello,” Duff recalls. “The inside walls and ceilings were the same oppressive shade, or orange — headache-inducing colour combinations. And the carpet was… yellow!” During a three-month renovation, she and Schwamberg levelled and retiled the downstairs with a hexagonal porcelain tile, to help deal with moisture build-up, and also repaired the plaster walls with a breathable waterproof membrane. They removed a wall between the kitchen and the hallway to let in more light, too, with a steel beam required to support the five-metre-wide opening. Elsewhere, they modernised “dated and cheap” finishes and painted both inside and out white. “We had to get the place back to white, to understand how the property worked,” says Duff. She replaced 1960s orange bubble glass on the internal doors with smart bevelled glass and changed all the door and window hardware to a more substantial nickel, in keeping with the style of the villa. She did retain some zany features, such as “the mad tiled bathrooms that I have come to love. They are so 1970s, and it’s crazy that I am continually adding things to make them even more dramatic”. Duff then furnished the home in what she terms “modern vintage — a mix of Danish and Italian finds from our travels in Europe. There is a bit of a black-and-white theme going on, which is grounding but also gives impact”. She included a nod to her roots, too. “Australian design favours relaxed and liveable spaces — I love beautiful things, but comfort takes priority”. Similarly, the outdoor lifestyle Down Under reflects the way the garden was conceived, “with places to stay in and out of the sun”. The couple spends a lot of time outdoors during the summer, but they bunker down in the brisk winters. “We put the Art Deco club chairs in front of the fireplace and layer up with rugs and cushions for a cosy, layered look,” says Duff. “We do more entertaining during winter, and then the focus is the kitchen, which is large enough for extra chefs and people watching the preparations.” Now even more people can share the fun. Duff and Schwamberg frequently return to Australia to visit family and friends and check up on their farm in Byron Bay. That’s when they rent out Villa Casasco. And what an experience it is. “The views are just breathtaking, from amazing sunsets to crazy summer thunderstorms,” says Duff. “We love watching the clouds go by or the activity on the lake. It’s all so beautiful.” George Clooney doesn’t know what he’s missing. VL Visit villacasascocomo.com

this page: in the HALLWAY, Quaderna console by Superstudio for Zanotta; Cassina vintage chair from Milan’s Navigli flea market; ceramics bought at Milan and Nice vintage markets; artwork by Australian Sally Gabori. opposite page: Andrea Duff at the threshold of her villa.


VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 127


“Australian design favours relaxed and liveable spaces — I love beautiful things, but comfort takes priority” this page, from top: in the LIVING ROOM, 1980s reissue of Eliel Saarinen Cranbrook chairs; Hay Mags sofa; Dux coffee table by Bruno Mathsson; grey vase from Dep Design Store in Como; wall painted in colour custom-mixed to match Dulux Lexicon; black lambskin rug from Lammeskindsbutikken; artworks include cardboard paper frame by Noelle Rigaudie (top right) and Never Trust a Punk by Jamie Reid (bottom right); all other artworks by artists unknown. In the KITCHEN, Carrara marble benchtop; chopping boards from Dep Design Store; Gubi Bestlite wall light. opposite page: in the BREAKFAST AREA adjacent to the kitchen, vintage table from Retro4M; chairs from Milan’s Navigli flea markets; vintage glass pendant light from a secondhand shop in Como. VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 129


In the COURTYARD off the kitchen, outdoor setting from Como garden shop.

130 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have the space and views of the mountains and nature on our doorstepâ&#x20AC;? this page, from below left: original 1970s BATHROOM. In the MAIN BEDROOM, Society Limonta bed linen; bedside table from Cargo in Milan; lamp from a Nice market; rug bought in Turkey. opposite page: in the STAIRWAY, vintage 1940s Gio Ponti chair; Gubi TS marble table by Gamfratesi; artwork by Derek Henderson. Details, last pages.

132 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


Keeping it real Architect Barbara Ghidoni has retained many of the inherent quirks of her 1920s Milan apartment while infusing it with her distinctive, feminine style. By Fiona McCarthy Photographed by Helenio Barbetta Produced & styled by Chiara dal Canto

134 VOGUELIV VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


this page: in the LIVING AREA of architect Barbara Ghidoniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Milanese apartment, leather sofa and iron coffee table by Ghidoni for Storage Associati; Forma Italia 1955 Rib armchair by Martin Eisler & Carlo Hauner from SG Gallery Milano; Isa 1959 wooden coffee tables by Gio Ponti from SG Gallery Milano; Oluce Atollo lamp by Vico Magistretti; marble ashtray by Angelo Mangiarotti; CC Tapis Dipped Origami rug; photograph by Nobuyoshi Araki. opposite page: Ghidoni with her husband, Renato Corazzo, and son, Ludovico, in the living area; painting by Paolo Gonzato. Details, last pages.

135


I

NTEGRITY IS A WORD THAT RESONATES

deeply with architect Barbara Ghidoni, one-third of the Milanese design studio Storage Associati. It’s what guides the firm’s work for such big design names as Dsquared2, Neil Barrett and Dolce & Gabbana, mixing stark, clean lines with a pared-back use of rough, luxe, natural materials. And it’s also what led Ghidoni eight years ago to the 1920s apartment, located in the heart of the city, which she and her family now call home. Left to fall into disrepair by its previous owner, who had lived there for more than 50 years, Ghidoni embraced its quirks. “I always start every project in the same way,” she says. “I look for any traces of its history, no matter how fleeting, and use this as my starting point but rework it with a contemporary spirit. It makes no sense to start from a tabula rasa [clean state] if its story becomes completely absent.” So here, despite the apartment’s compact 120-square-metre dimensions, Ghidoni stayed true to its existing layout, removing only one wall to create the large open-plan living and dining space. Technicalities such as lighting and air conditioning were hidden in the ceiling, original floors maintained and existing ’20s doorframes

136 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

repainted. Stripping back the wallpaper, Ghidoni discovered “uneven plastered walls splattered with paint, traces of glue, and measurements written in pencil”, which she has kept as they were. “I like the way it feels raw and real,” she says. As a result, it lends the space an inherent sense of truth, creating a place Ghidoni feels, as she puts it, “safe and intimate”. Yet the apartment was only intended as a temporary home. “We’d sold our old house and we were waiting to renovate and move into a new one, so it was only meant to be a transition,” says the architect. “But I fell in love with the apartment’s timelessness — the finish of the old wooden and tiled floors, its location and view. I didn’t want to leave.” Ghidoni was enthralled by the apartment’s lofty ceilings, almost four metres high — “typical of old Milanese houses like this” — and the way gentle, dappled light filled the living area throughout the day. Situated close to the city’s elegant 18th-century landscaped Indro Montanelli public gardens, near Porta Venezia, the architect also loved how she could look down at the tops of the plane trees lining the road below. “This is quite a rare experience for Milan — it feels more like living on a French boulevard,” she remarks. Ghidoni takes the same approach at home as she does at her design studio: “playing with contrasts — not only in shape and finish, but in using materials in unexpected ways”. A subtle palette of powdery greys and lilacs reflects the hazy, gentle quality of the Milanese light, making the space feel “very soft, almost muffled”. Many of the walls have been painted with black-and-white skirting. “It’s not a new idea — in the past, this kind of decoration was normal,” she admits. “I just changed the proportions to make it feel more modern.” Furniture is a mix of found and custom-made pieces. Flea market treasures picked up on her travels from Paris and New York to Hong Kong, repaired and reupholstered, sit alongside classics sourced from SG Gallery Milano, one of Ghidoni’s go-to vintage dealers in the city. Bespoke pieces, like the austere iron cabinet designed by Ghidoni that hangs suspended on one wall of the living area, provide a counterpoint to classic designs like the ’50s Gio Ponti coffee tables. A modernist pendant chandelier over the dining table, created by artisans for Storage Associati, is an interpretation of a favourite mid-century Italian light. “Each room has its own personality and character, but in all of them there is a touch of femininity,” Ghidoni effuses. The mood is relaxed and unpretentious, and “almost accidental”. From the raw walls to the paintings found on London’s Portobello Road, “everything has its own little story to tell and each one brings a sensation of energy from the past. This house reflects how happy and good it makes us feel”. VL Visit storageassociati.com


this page: in another view of the LIVING AREA, suspended raw iron cabinet by Ghidoni for Storage Associati; paintings by Paolo Gonzato. opposite page: in a view of the CORRIDOR, photograph by Luciano Bonacini.

137


from top left: in the DINING AREA, antique glassware; painting by Italian artist Greta Frau. In another view of the dining area, Serener Lloyd table; Knoll Bertoia Side Chairs by Harry Bertoia; Italian rattan armchair from SG Gallery Milano; storage unit and chandelier by Storage Associati; photographs by Nobuyoshi Araki.

138 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


139


this page: Barbara Ghidoni wears her favourite Prada shoes. opposite page: other views of the DINING AREA.

140 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


142


this page: in the MAIN BEDROOM, bed by Storage Associati; Society Limonta bed linen and blanket; custom bedside lights by Ghidoni; antique mannequin; hand-embroidered dress bought in Kerala, India; portrait of a Victorian-era woman bought at Portobello Market, London. opposite page: in the CORRIDOR, on the console, traditional Apulian candlesticks from southern Italy; Seletti horn; Buddha statue from a Hong Kong flea market. Details, last pages.

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 143


Perfectly evolutionary At home, David Alhadeff, founder of The Future Perfect, has created a surprisingly tranquil New York living space that exempliďŹ es his design business. By Bonnie Vaughan Photographed by Wichmann + Bendtsen Produced & styled by Helle Walsted 144 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


this page: in the LIVING ROOM, Sanluca chair by Achille Castiglioni for Gavina; Umberto Asnago Naviglio sofa for Arflex; Three Sixty Table; Skaters Lazy Susan by Studio Maurer Hendrichs; Alma Allen bronze bowl; Vincent Collin Zorzi floor lamp; Steven Meisel photograph; walls painted in Farrow & Ball Pigeon; Art Deco Chinese rug bought at auction. opposite page: in another view of the living room, Biedermeier candlesticks by Ted Muehling for ER Butler & Co; Babel light by Àngel Jové for Santa & Cole; Trio console by Neri & Hu for De La Espada. Details, last pages.


L

ooking out from the wraparound terrace of David Alhadeff ’s riverside apartment on Manhattan’s Lower East Side — in an area known as Corlears Hook, which is about as ‘lower’ and ‘east’ as you can get — a visitor could very easily get confused. The view embraces the Empire State Building, One World Trade Center and the Brooklyn skyline all at once. It would seem a geographic impossibility to even the most seasoned New Yorker, and that includes David Alhadeff, founder of The Future Perfect, a US-based platform for collectible contemporary design and bellwether for the industry. “I’d lived in the city for 22 years and before I went to this open house, I’d never been over here,” Alhadeff marvels. “My bubble was drawn in Brooklyn — I had a little circle on my map — but this property is so close, it got pulled into my listings. I remember seeing it and saying, ‘What is that view? What is that balcony?’ My husband [art director Jason Duzansky] and I were both like, ‘That’s too good to be true.’” To their astonishment, it wasn’t. Here, Alhadeff talks about what he loves most about his 212-square-metre, “incredibly serene” living space and how it reflects the 15-year evolution of his design business and the formidable talent he has nurtured over the years (which includes Milan Design Week luminaries Marta Sala, Dimore Studio and Callico Wallpaper). The building was built in the 1950s as a middle-income housing project for seamstress union workers. It was part of

the NYC Housing Authority — it was privatised in the 1990s, and many of the original tenants still live here. Basically, this apartment had not been touched except for the kitchen since the ’50s. There was nothing really appealing about it but this incredible terrace and quality of life. It was all bad, but it was awesome. ›› this page, clockwise from top left: in the DEN, Gubi 2.0 dining table; Philippe Starck chairs. In the DINING ROOM, Eric Roinestad HL03 ceramic pendant. In the ENTRYWAY, Weed sculpture in handpainted bronze by Tony Matelli. opposite page: also in the entryway, Michael Anastassiades brass Beauty mirror; 200 Metalware chairs; photograph by Steven Meisel. 146 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


“There was nothing really appealing p about this apartment but the incredible terrace and quality of life. It was all bad, but it was awesome”

147


148


this page: in another view of the ENTRYWAY, Wild Minimalism Secret Console table by Rooms; Gunnar Nylund Hedgehog vase; Esque Studio Gummy Bear; Jonathan Cross ceramic stoneware vessel; Dimore Studio Jungle Weave wallpaper. opposite page: in another view of the DINING ROOM, Christopher Stuart Glitch dining table; vintage 1970s dining chairs by Pierre Cardin for Maison Jansen; Reinaldo Sanguino ceramic stool; Eric Roinestad custom ceramic sconces; Egg Collective Haynes round mirror; Eric Roinestad HL03 ceramic pendant.

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 149


‹‹ My apartment is the embodiment of The Future Perfect. It’s only with hindsight that I can say that. Without realising it, through the last 15 years I’ve collected a lot of what we’ve shown in the gallery. This project brought everything together and put it all back into this space. You can see the different eras of the people we’ve worked with — some have gone on to other parts of their career. Others, like Lindsey Adelman and Jason Miller, we’ve been working with almost from the beginning of both of our careers. Each is such a success in their own right, and we have all been together for so long — it has been an incredible journey. One of my favourite pieces is the chandelier in the dining room by Eric Roinestad. I met him through Instagram, which is

really cool. He was doing a series of large-scale vessels for us, and I approached him with a custom commission to design an illuminated ceramic fixture for me. He came back with a series of concepts that were so good, I turned around and said, “We need to produce and present more of these.” I launched that lighting collection at Design Miami in 2016, and it was received with incredible interest and attention. We launched version 2 at Design Miami 2017. I really love the handpainted bronze dandelion by Tony Matelli. I’m a huge fan of his work. In the years I’ve gathered objects

and brought them together and lived with them, there are so many I find I tire of, or that fall into the backdrop. But this is a piece that aesthetically for me is always in the foreground. It’s just so whimsical and ironic and yet crafted with such a degree of perfection that it moves me every time I see it. The colour we selected for the living room is Pigeon by Farrow & Ball; it’s painted in a high gloss. It really is the

colour of a pigeon — it’s a green but it’s a blue and it’s a grey, and it morphs into those shades. It changes throughout the day, and it changes wall to wall. Most of the view is sky and water, and we feel this perfectly captures the sentiment. I feel really lucky to have this view — this is an incredibly serene apartment for living in a city as chaotic as New York. VL Visit thefutureperfect.com

this page, clockwise from top left: in another view of the LIVING ROOM, The Future Perfect founder David Alhadeff sits on a Divano 067 sofa covered in Walking and Falling fabric, both from Dimore Studio; Alma Allen bronze stools; Michael Anastassiades Tip of the Tongue brass table lamp. In a detail of the DEN, Transience mirror by Lex Pott and David Derksen. In a HALLWAY, Hopi Kachina dolls collected by Alhadeff and Duzansky. opposite page: in another view of the living room, vintage Sanluca chair by Achille Castiglioni for Gavina; artworks on shelves by Ryosuke Yazaki, Reinaldo Sanguino and Eric Roinestad. Details, last pages. 150 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


151


Tone poem Interior designer Michelle Macarounas merged a European aesthetic with fresh Australian ease to breathe new life into a 1920s eastern suburbs home.

this page: on the BALCONY, designer Michelle Macarounas; stone table from Parterre; Expormim Huma chairs from Ke-Zu; FDC crackle-glaze ceramic horseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head from Becker Minty. opposite page: the ENTRANCE to this Tuscan villa-like home. Details, last pages.

152 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

HAIR & MAKE-UP: ALLISON BOYLE

By Verity Magdalino Photographed by Prue Ruscoe


153


this page: in the ENTRYWAY, Artifort Niloo chair from Ke-Zu; antique gold mirror. opposite page: in another view of the entryway, antique timber table; white sideboards, gold lamps and glass vase, all from Conley & Co; custom-made chandelier; Kelly Wearstler Rarity Female Torso from Becker Minty; Diana Watson artworks.

hen interior designer and devoted globetrotter Michelle Macarounas first glimpsed her most recent project — an expansive 1920s home with a Tuscan villa exterior in a hilly section of Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs — she admitted to feeling a little overwhelmed. “It was a little bit gaudy, and I wasn’t sure whether to embrace that classic Tuscan aesthetic.” But with a career spanning London, Sydney, Geneva and Paris — where she studied interior architecture at École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts — the Australian-born Macarounas eloquently finessed a client brief that called for a unique mix of luxury European aesthetic with casual Australian ease. Here, the founder and director of Infinite Design Studio talks about her passion for the project and her evolving design ethos.

W

More mansion than house, the original home was built in the 1920s. There are eight bathrooms — but we didn’t redo all of

them — five bedrooms, a large private writing room, a cellar/tasting

room, maid’s quarters, an indoor pool, an outdoor pool, a sauna… It’s a fun property and has been an extremely beautiful project to work on — and very dear to my heart. What’s important to us as a design studio — and it may sound like a cliché, but it’s true — is you have to have love in all your projects. And this home has love on so many levels.

The owner, a close friend, has Hungarian heritage but was born in Australia and is the mother of two children. She’s very stylish, sophisticated and also down-to-earth, so it was about bringing all that together and merging a European aesthetic with an Australian outlook.

The original interior of the home was very dark and heavy.

It was old in style — cool and shadowy inside, and outside was very separate, with formal gardens surrounding a tennis court and a swimming pool. It was important to link the grand landscaped areas to the inside entertaining areas of the home. We refreshed one of the key kitchen dining spaces by adding more windows and re-landscaping the immediate surrounding garden. The result was like adding a whole new section to the house.

Updating the more formal areas of the home was a unique experience for me; I’d never really dealt with that traditional, over-the-top opulence. The first big challenge was to link a beautiful

casual lounge and dining area, where the family spent all their time, to these formal areas, where they entertain guests — and still maintain a sense of grandeur and luxury but without the heavy aesthetic. We softened the look by adding layers. We took out the heavy velvet curtains and replaced them with linen and silk for a fresher, more contemporary feel. And we worked tonally. I have a joy for colour, but it’s elegant to work in the same tone — mixing colours in one project can sometimes look too elaborate and messy.

One of my favourite pieces is the La Isla lounge for Sancal.

Every woman is in love with this piece. It’s not simply about the pink colour; it’s the curves and the social element to it, too. I can imagine two girlfriends sitting and having a martini. It works really well.

For me, the standout space is the home’s outdoor area.

It looks onto the pool and a landscaped garden we refreshed and it is just divine. It feels like you’re in Italy. The Australian aesthetic is much more relaxed, and I think that’s why we’re getting international attention right now. In

Europe, it’s harder to create that easy sense of indoor and outdoor flow that’s so intrinsic to our interiors. We’re not pretentious. And we’re not as serious as the Italians. There’s something fresh that’s reflected in the way we design. I love Italy, and especially Milan. Milan Design Week provides me with inspiration for the year ahead. Interior design can be a lot of hard work, but the energy and excitement of Milan gets me through everything else. It’s not just about design and business; it’s the concepts, the inspiration and the emotion behind everything. Italians are the only ones who can do it to this level. My approach to design is changing. I used to be pared-back and a little masculine in my aesthetic, but I find I’m getting softer. As you mature, you become more empathetic and accepting; you understand people more and become softer as a person, which is reflected in what you create. It’s a more feminine approach, which you can see in many areas of design right now. Even with the Italian brands in Milan this year, many of the installations were rounded and social, and designed to have people facing each other rather than looking at a wall. I think that’s an evolution for everyone. VL Visit infinite.design

154 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


155


this page: in the formal LIVING ROOM, Minotti sofas from Dedece; custom velvet and linen cushions; Sancal Mosaico coffee table from Ke-Zu; antique side tables; XL pyrite heart, Cire Trudon Abd El Kadar gold candle and Thomas Bucich torso fragment sculpture, all from Becker Minty; gold lamp (in foreground) from Conley & Co; Parachilna Chinoz table lamp, sourced internationally; Gubi G10 floor lamp from Cult; Robyn Cosgrove silk bronze rug. opposite page: in the KITCHEN, Felix Forest Still XIII 2015 artwork, from Becker Minty.

156 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


157


158 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


this page: in another view of the KITCHEN, antique oak table from Paris; Expormim Fontal chairs from Ke-Zu; leaf bowl from Cavit & Co; vase from Becker Minty; antique crystal pendant light from Italy. opposite page: in the FRONT COURTYARD, Expormim Copa outdoor armchair, Emu Terramare outdoor sofa and stoneware coffee tables, all from Ke-Zu; custom fire pit, seat cushions, and black-and-white cushions.

159


this page: in the MAIN BEDROOM, Artifort Niloo chair from Ke-Zu; antique dresser; Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Objet Teo vase and Cire Trudon Marie Antoinette bust decorative candle, both from Becker Minty; Diana Watson artwork. opposite page: in another view of the main bedroom, Sancal La Isla sofa from Ke-Zu; Knoll Saarinen Tulip round side table from Dedece; Gubi F.A.33 mirror from Cult; Ondene cushions; Parachilna Aballs table lamp from Ke-Zu; brass bedside lamp from Conley & Co; Diana Watson artwork. Details, last pages.

160


“One of my favourite pieces is the La Isla lounge for Sancal. Every woman is in love with this piece... I can imagine two girlfriends sitting and having a martini”

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 161


this page: the EXTERIOR of architect Stefan Rierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s modern hay barn in the village of Alpe di Siusi, near the Italy-Austria border, is made using the crossing wooden beams traditional to the region. opposite page: in a detailed view of the LIVING AREA, Monkey pendant light from Seletti. Details, last pages.


State of play By designing a home modelled on the village hay barns of Italyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s South Tyrol, where he grew up, architect Stefan Rier has ďŹ nally realised a childhood dream. By Martina Hunglinger Photographed by Mads Mogensen

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 163


opposite page: in the LIVING-DINING AREA, custom dining table by Möbel Rier, the owner’s father; Vermissen velvet dining chairs; purple glass vase (on table) from Nordal Denmark; small green ceramic vase and diamond-shaped ceramic vase (on table), both from Lifestyle Home Collection; Karman Domenica pendant lights; velvet sofa and ottoman from Fischnaller Interior Designs; Vermissen copper side tables; Spartherm fireplace; wallcoverings on overhead cubes from the Arte collection for Effeitalia; cast industrial resin flooring.

E

ENGLISH WRITER, POET AND PHILOSOPHER

GK Chesterton once said, “The true object of all human life is play... heaven is a playground.” Architect Stefan Rier seems to have taken this notion to heart with the design of his own home, once the site of the historic Messner Haus (the house of the sacristan, or keeper of the sacred vessels and vestments of a religious house) in the Italian village centre of Alpe di Siusi. Cofounder of studio NOA architects, based in Bolzano, South Tyrol, Rier has realised his childhood dream of living in a hay barn, creating a home softly implemented in keeping with the traditional appearance of the local village. Having grown up in Alpe di Siusi, in the UNESCO World Heritage-listed area of the Dolomites, Rier spent many winters as a child playing with his friends in the village’s hay barns. “It was the best playground; we had so much fun jumping from the open upper floors into the soft, fresh hay,” Rier recalls. These ‘playgrounds’, with their sweeping spaces and exposed wooden beams, became the main source of inspiration for his home. A circus-like exuberance resonates throughout Rier’s home, which he shares with his wife, Stefanie; in fact, he admits he drew inspiration from Alice in Wonderland and the surrealist 1958 Jacque Tati film Mon Oncle. Two black plastic monkeys swing through the large living space on pendant lamps; a huge copper turtle pokes unhastily through the guest bathroom; and a colony of white mice dances on the exposed beams and sills of the top-floor sauna. “At some point, I was asked by Steffi, who has a more grounded approach to interior decoration, to limit myself in order not to go too wild,” Rier says with a laugh. He was given free rein with his material choices, however. For example, Rier designed the bedrooms as three individual cubes that tie in to the home’s wooden framework. These cubic rooms, though supported by wooden beams, give the impression of being suspended — as though they float on air. Washable Trace geometrical wallcoverings from the Arte collection for Effeitalia adorn the cubes, providing a natural linen look. Laser-cut metal forms the staircase, and colourful glazed terracotta relief tiles from Milan’s Domenico Mori cover most of the kitchen and bathroom elements. The house’s outer shell remains faithful to the aesthetic

164 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

of the area’s other buildings — that is, homes with both a stone base, which often houses the garage, laundry, cellar and guestrooms, and a wooden structure above it, which serves as the private residence. (The region’s stables and haylofts are also made this way.) Rier likewise designed the home with a stone plinth for the lower levels, which house the garage and a guest apartment. On top of this, too, a wooden timber frame forms the hay stable for the private home. But in the interior, apart from the three secluded and ‘suspended’ bedroom cubes, there’s no such separation: the main floor’s living area and kitchen are open, intercommunicating spaces. The higher you ascend on the decorative staircase, which winds across the space like a ribbon, the more intimate the rooms become. The bedrooms — and openplan bathrooms — are on first floor. But the most personal space sits on the top floor, which is devoted to the sauna area and an outdoor terrace featuring a spa. “It  is the space dedicated to inner and outer cleansing — the ideal sanctuary to withdraw into after a busy day at work… and so close to heaven,” he says with obvious delight. From here, Rier and family can observe nature, monitor the weather and enjoy breathtaking views of the Dolomites and the surrounding valley. Though Rier opted for classic materials — wood, stone and felt — his colour choices are quite the opposite. Rather than limiting himself to conventional combinations, he chose unexpected shades, including blue, turquoise and ‘petrol’. “I combined the two worlds in which I grew up,” he says, referring to both his childhood in South Tyrol and his educational years near the Mediterranean, where the region’s use of patterns and colours influenced him. The architectural supporting structure has shaped the interior design and allows light from the large roof skylights and tall glass front to circulate throughout the open space. “The main sensations of living in the house come from its opening, its views and its light games on the walls,” says Rier. “But what makes me happiest is when I observe an amused smile on the face of our guests. It’s a fun, playful space that evokes positive sensations, which we are so lucky to experience daily.” VL Visit noa.network


“It is the ideal sanctuary to withdraw into after a busy day at work... and so close to heaven”

this page: in the SAUNA, Vermissen velvet chair; Moessmer felt curtains; Bianca floor lamp from Lifestyle Home Collection. opposite page, from top: in the KITCHEN, Electrolux cooktop; Domenico Mori tiles; Karman Sahara glass pendant lights. In the main bedroom’s ENSUITEDRESSING ROOM, Karman make-up mirror lamps; wallcovering from the Arte collection for Effeitalia.


VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 167


168 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


this page: a glimpse of a GUEST ROOM from the laser-cut staircase; wallcoverings from the Arte collection for EďŹ&#x20AC;eitalia. opposite page: in the BATHROOM, Teuco freestanding bathtub; Vermissen brass side table; Domenico Mori tiles. Details, last pages.


Escape with Vogue Living anytime, anywhere

NOW AVAILABLE ON YOUR PHONE!

JULY/AUG 2018 JULY/AUG 2018

SUBSCRIBE NOW! Subscribe to our digital subscription package for only $19.99* for 12 months and save 44% To subscribe, visit magsonline.com.au/digital-vl or call 1300 656 933 *Offer ends 15 August, 2018. A standard one-year subscription consists of 6 bi-monthly issues. ^Our App is available on all Apple iPad and iPhone devices with iOS8 or greater. Also available on all Android Tablet or Smartphone devices using Android version 4.4 or greater. Apple and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Google Play is a trademark of Google Inc.


PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL BARBERA

CONCI ERGE

Weapons dating from the 16th century on display in Villa Sola Cabiati in Tremezzo, Italy. Turn the page to learn more about the historic villa. VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 171


Once upon a lake Owned by the same Italian noble family since the 1700s, the Villa Sola Cabiati in Tremezzo on Lake Como is ďŹ lled with objects dripping with history. By Freya Herring Photographed by Paul Barbera

172 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


CONCIERGE

this page: in the Sala Degli Stucci, the main fresco by Francesco Conegliani depicts Virgilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aeneid; the ornate stucco is by Muzio Canzio. opposite page: view of Lake Como from Villa Sola Cabiati, with La Grigna mountain in the background. 173


CONCIERGE CONCIER this page: the front façade of the 16th-century villa. la. opposite page, clockwise from top left: the lobby walls are covered in frescos; halberds (weapons behind drums) from the 1571 Battle of Lepanto; panto; breakfast is served in the dining room; one of the bedrooms in the exclusive villa.

n the 1932 movie Grand Hotel, Great Garbo seeks to entice her lover with the words, “We’ll go to Tremezzo. I have a villa there. The sun will shine… We’ll be happy and lazy.” We can’t all be like Garbo, sporting a villa in Tremezzo — one of Lake Como’s most exclusive villages — but we can get a taste now that the lake’s most prestigious hotel, the Grand Hotel Tremezzo, has added the Villa Sola Cabiati to its portfolio. The six-bedroom villa is now the hotel’s most luxurious suite, frequented by royalty and Hollywood stars. “The Villa Sola Cabiati is one of the great, iconic villas on Lake Como,” says Valentina De Santis, whose family owns the Grand

I

174 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

Hotel Tremezzo. “Lake Como is dotted everywhere with beautiful villas, but few of them have special historical value. Most of them are now open to the public, but the Villa Sola Cabiati is not one of them — it’s the only one that has always remained private.” Built in the 16th century, the villa was renovated by the noble Serbelloni family when they purchased it in the 1700s. It has remained in the family ever since. “When they acquired it they added two wings, upgraded the façade, and added the marvellous Italian gardens that are in front of the villa,” explains De Santis. “They also called in important Italian artists — the frescos are from the school of [Giovanni Battista] Tiepolo.” ››


175


CONCIERGE this page, clockwise from right: the villa’s pool; guests can enjoy boat trips on Lake Como as part of their stay; the property from the rear. opposite page: the Sala Degli Stucchi offers views overlooking the lake.

‹‹ Walking through the gardens and into the villa, you enter into a lobby dripping with grandeur — ornate stucco and pastel-toned frescos are surrounded by antique furniture. Upstairs, overlooking the lake, the Sala Degli Stucchi features frescos on the walls and ceiling that depict Virgil’s Aeneid. Here, guests enjoy long, lingering lunches with windows wide open to the glistening blues of the lake. The rest of the afternoon might be spent lazing by the pool set among the rambling Tuscan-style gardens behind the villa. When you stay here, everything is covered — including your own private chef and a boat for trips around the lake. The villa possesses private museum rooms that can be explored with a guide. A highlight is a bed that once belonged to Napoleon Bonaparte, whose bedroom was moved to the villa in its entirety from the Serbelloni family’s Milanese residence during

World War II. “One night, hiding everything, they moved all the furniture from Napoleon’s bedroom in Palazzo Serbelloni,” De Santis recounts. “Shortly afterwards that wing was bombed and completely destroyed. They saved it.” Even the clothes of Napoleon’s wife, Joséphine de Beauharnais, remain, tenderly folded in a chest. Every object and room seems to tell a story — from the halberds used at the Battle of Lepanto and black Pietro Giovanni Mantegazza violins played at the 1780 funeral of Holy Roman Empress Maria Theresa, to the perfectly preserved upper apartments of poet Giuseppe Parini and mathematician-cumastronomer Paolo Frisi, who spent their summers tutoring the child Gian Galeazzo Serbelloni. Each of today’s guest suites projects its own personality — some feature walls lined with silk; some are bright and uplifting, others are dark and sombre. For De Santis, the villa offers something few hotels can. “Staying at the villa means you take a step back in time; to really live like 200 years ago. The villa breathes its history everywhere, and you are living that history.” VL Visit grandhoteltremezzo.com/en/villa-sola


VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 177


Appetite for design Style icon Rossana Orlandi’s taste for quality is reflected in her new Milan restaurant, bistRo Aimo e Nadia. By KURT G STAPELFELDT Photographed by GIANNI BASSO/VEGA MG

178


CONCIERGE this page: detail of a table ta setting at designer Rossana Orlandi’s bistRo, bist with vintage table and Sé Beatley chair, Untitled U by Massimiliano Locatelli tableware and Etro Home wallpaper. opposite page: McCollin Bryan’s resin-and-brass Aurora screen dominates screen dominate the main dining area.

C

onventional wisdom dictates that you should never meet your idols, as they inevitably disappoint you. Not true, as anyone fortunate enough to encounter Rossana Orlandi will testify. The grand dame of international design gallerists, Orlandi has been an icon in Milan for more than a decade, with her Gallery Rossana Orlandi a must-see experience for thousands of tourists throughout the year. Her latest venture is bistRo Aimo e Nadia on Milan’s Via Matteo Bandello 14, just around the corner from her gallery. A collaboration with the two-Michelin-starred Il Luogo di Aimo e Nadia, it brings together what Italy is best known for — food and design. “This restaurant needed to be a point of reference for me,” says Orlandi, “a place I can bring friends or clients. With [Il Luogo di

Aimo e Nadia’s co-owners] Fabio [Pisani], Alessandro [Negrini] and Stefania [Moroni], we have created a synergy of reciprocal energies.” Orlandi envisioned a space in the spirit of Galleria Rossana Orlandi, where hospitality, comfort and pampering are key. “We’ve managed to create something special,” she says. “The chefs did the outfitting of the technical areas, the kitchen and bar, but for the restaurant’s interior, that was all me and my team — with constant feedback from the chefs, of course, because they are the ones who come to work every day.” The interior is pure Orlandi. The furniture is wildly eclectic, a mix of periods, materials and styles that brings into focus why Orlandi is so good. There is a harmony in how she mixes the pieces, a synergy. There are some very important items, such as a screen by British ›› VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 179


CONCIERGE this page, clockwise from right: Rossana Orlandi, in an Etro dress. In the bar, on the table, is Nacho Carbonell’s Hot Kettle Transformation — On the Move jug; in the corner is Jaime Hayon’s Hope Bird sculpture for Bosa. Another dining setting, with a vintage marble table, vintage chairs, Agnès Sandahl tableware, Andreu Carulla’s Wild Ware brass cutlery, Flos Bon Jour table lamps and Etro Home wallpaper.

‹‹ designer McCollin Bryan and Spanish designer Nacho Carbonell’s Hot Kettle Transformation jug, mixed in with vintage pieces and humble ones, such as Seletti’s Charley toilet brush. By design, bistRo is in a state of perpetual evolution — a living place that must be inhabited to be fully appreciated. “Everything must be useable, otherwise it just doesn’t make sense,” says Orlandi. Her pragmatic approach is evident everywhere, from the heavy industrial lighting — a throwback to the building’s original existence as a factory — to a choice of wallpaper that had to withstand washing without being damaged. It was a chance meeting in London during the PAD London art fair that inspired her collaboration with Etro Home, an offshoot of the leading Italian fashion house. “I was being

hosted at Loulou’s club in Mayfair and loved the way that [Turkishborn British fashion designer] Rifat Özbek did its interior,” says Orlandi. “I felt so welcomed there and knew my new place should be done that way. At almost the same time, I ran into [Etro accessories, home fabrics and textiles creative director] Jacopo Etro and suggested we do this. All of the wallcoverings are theirs. I am very happy with the results.”

“The guests take over, almost as if it was their own home” Orlandi and the chefs, Pisani and Negrini, are also taking bistRo to the gallery. Design-obsessed diners can book a private dinner, cooked by the chefs and served in one of the space’s vast rooms. “The idea is that when you arrange the dinner, you also take possession of the gallery,” says Orlandi. “I come in, give a welcome, have an aperitivo and then leave the gallery to them. The guests take over, almost as if it was their own home.” Any time spent with Orlandi, however brief, provides a new perspective on this design doyenne. It soon becomes clear what is most important to her — the hospitality Italy is renowned for and her attention to detail in every aspect of it. Her new business is not just an eatery; it is a big part of who Orlandi truly is — elegant, sophisticated, welcoming and, yes, even a little ironic. VL bistRo Aimo e Nadia, Via Matteo Bandello 14, 20123 Milan. Visit bistroaimoenadia.com

180 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


T H E WO R L D O F C R Y S TA L®

ILLUMINATES E VERY JOU RN E Y

Beyond destinations. Past expectations. Shines a world that redefines what it means to travel. OCEAN

RIVER

YA C H T E X P E D I T I O N

AIR

CRYSTALCRUISES .COM | 1300 059 262 | CONTACT YOUR TR AVEL PROFESSIONAL ©2018 Crystal Cruises, LLC. Ships’ registries: The Bahamas and Malta.


Watch Maggie cook her favourite roast chook recipe at www.miele.com.au/kitchen-experience


â&#x20AC;&#x153;For me, continuous improvement is the real essence of life... Why do I love my Miele kitchen? Because the innovations Miele integrate into every appliance, have revolutionised the way I cook. By constantly pushing myself to learn more and do even better, my Miele kitchen has been a revelation!â&#x20AC;? Maggie Beer - Cook, Food Author and Presenter. Miele. Immer Besser.


184

IMAGE COURTESY ELEVEN

Deplar Farm, on the Troll Peninsula in northern Iceland.


CONCIERGE Deplar Farm ICELAND CELAND For the ultimate retreat, you can’t get much more isolated than Deplar Farm in the northern hern climes of Iceland. Whether you’re taking a room or hiring out the entire lodge, chef will make every meal for you and your guests. Att night the aurora borealis illuminates the skies, and if powder’s your poison then staff will take you heli-skiing in the mountainous surrounds. ounds. For the rest of us, there’s crosscountry skiing, snowshoeing ng and the onsite spa. elevenexperience.com

Run

WILD Ski season in Europe is just a few months away, so start planning your luxury winter experiences now. Here are Vogue Living’s top picks. By Freya Herring

W

HEN THE SNOW COMES TO EUROPE in the

autumn, and thousands of fairy lights are put up to decorate the streets of quiet mountain towns, suddenly these places, so sombre in the summer, become busy and bustling again. Fondue pots are fetched from cupboards and hordes of staff move in to take care of guests. The season has begun. From ski-in, ski-out hotels hoisted up onto mountains to heli-skiing in Iceland or France, we’ve found some of the best luxury ski experiences on the continent. And for those more aesthete than athletic, then cold-clime hotels like L’Apogée Courchevel, designed by India Mahdavi and Joseph Dirand; and the architectural triumph of Treehotel in Sweden will see that nobody misses out. Because the best thing about snow is its ability to shroud the world in its own serene, soft, boundless kind of beauty — skiing’s just the tip of the iceberg. ›› VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 185


this page: Val d’Isère, France. opposit page: inside the Oberholz opposite Alpine hut, in the Dolomites, Italy.

186

Val d’Isère FRANCE

Oberholz ITALY

France’s famed ski town is undergoing a massive $320 million facelift, so you might not recognise it next time you see it. The project, known as Le Coin de Val d’Isère, includes an entire redesign of the town centre, two new hotels, two apartment complexes, the medieval-inspired Val Tower, a new run that takes skiers down to the centre of town, and an underground moving walkway to take them back up again. valdisere.com

Situated in the heart of the Dolomites in Italy’s South Tyrol, and at 2096 metres above sea level, the Oberholz Alpine hut is an architectural feat set within some of the most spectacular scenery in the world. With expansive windows, an exterior of larch wood and an interior of spruce, the building was designed by Pavol Mikolajcak and Peter Pichler (a student of Zaha Hadid, no less). Experience the space by dining at the onsite restaurant. oberholz.com


PHOTOGRAPHERS: MADS MOGENSEN (OBERHOLZ), JOACHIM WICHMANN (VAL D’ISèRE)

CONCIERGE

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 187


PHOTOGRAPHERS: STEPHAN JULLIARD (L’APOGÉE COURCHEVEL), FELIX ODELL (TREEHOTEL)

CONCIERGE

188


this page: pag a guest suite at L’Apogée Courchevel, in the French Alps. opposite op page: The Mirrorcube, designed by Tham & Videgård architects, at Treehotel in Harads, Sweden. Videgår

Treehotel SWEDEN

L’Apogée Courchevel FRANCE

Ever dreamt of waking up in the treetops? At Treehotel in Harads, a village in far north Sweden just 50 kilometres south of the Arctic Circle, guests sleep in pods high atop the canopy, watching the snow fall and land on the branches around them. Every treehouse has been designed by such renowned Scandinavian architects as Bertil Harström, Thomas Sandell and Mårten Cyrén. treehotel.se

Designed by India Mahdavi and Joseph Dirand, L’Apogée Courchevel in the French Alps is a bucket list hotel for any winter wanderer. Its sense of luxury is pared back and considered, with intimate, darkened spaces that cosily envelop the dweller after a day on the slopes. There’s even a private ramp to bring you back to the hotel when it’s time for après. oetkercollection.com VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 189


Kakslauttanen FINLAND

Chetzeron SWITZERLAND

The hotel everyone wants on their Instagram feed. Kakslauttanen’s celebrated glass igloos are the big drawcard, where you can watch the Northern Lights swish and sparkle from your bed. Not only that, but given its Lapland locale, the site also plays host to Santa’s Home — a yuletide chalet experience, where you can book a personal visit with Father Christmas himself and send the kids into a festive frenzy (in the best possible way, of course). kakslauttanen.fi

Like a Bond villain’s lair, Chetzeron near Crans-Montana in the Swiss Alps is situated halfway up a mountain, and is only accessible by snowcat in winter. This ski-in, ski-out hotel features contoured concrete and natural timber set against a shattered glass aesthetic. Laze by the heated swimming pool or gaze over views of the Matterhorn and Mont Blanc from indented window seats in each of the 16 rooms. designhotels.com

PHOTOGRAPHER: VALTTERI HIRVONEN (KAKSLAUTTANEN). IMAGE COURTESY CHETZERON

this page: Glass igloo at Kakslauttanen, north of the Arctic Circle in Finland. opposite page: Chetzeron, in the Swiss Alps, is housed in a former gondola station.

190


CONCIERGE

BEST OF THE REST: ON-PISTE + Stay on a yacht cruising the Norwegian fjords and go skiing every

BEST OF THE REST: OFF-PISTE + Treehotel’s second hotel, Arctic Bath, opens at the end of this year

day in the Lyngen Alps with Elemental Adventure. If you fancy cruising around in a chopper, try their Icelandic heli-skiing trip; eaheliskiing.com + If the French Alps are more your thing, your very own ski concierge at the Four Seasons Hotel Megève will find the best conditions around, prepare a customised itinerary and, if you’re feeling adventurous, transport you by helicopter; fourseasons.com/megeve + Riksgränsen is Sweden’s most northerly ski resort, some 200 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle, and offers the rare opportunity of skiing in the midnight sun as late in the season as June; riksgransen.se

in Harads, Sweden. In summer the rooms float atop the Lule River, and in winter they form part of its frozen crust; arcticbath.se + Altapura in France’s Val Thorens takes the lodge aesthetic to another level with chic, Nordic-style interiors set among the highest ski area in Europe; altapura.fr + For the ultimate ‘New Nordic’ food experience, head to Fäviken in far north Sweden, where you’ll enjoy a sauna with drinks, have dinner by candlelight in an 18th-century barn, and wrap up with fireside Negronis in a tepee; favikenmagasinet.se

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 191


The village of Nozawa Onsen, in the northern part of Japan’s Nagano Prefecture, is famous for its pristine powder snow. It receives on average 4.5 metres of snow annually; during peak season the village can have dumps of up to 40–50cm in 24 hours.

Powder

TRIP

With its abundant snowfall, rich culture and sublime food, Japan is one of the world’s top skiing destinations. But why not experience the magic by snowshoe for a change? By Freya Herring Photographed by Jeremy Simons 192 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU


CONCIERGE


CONCIERGE

We climb a mountain and eat bento boxes at the top, seated at a table our guide carves out of the snow

s we crunch through feathery, twometre-deep snow in our snowshoes, we cross through a cedar forest, each tree resting its tall shadow softly upon the snow so that it starts to resemble a monochromatic print rather than a real-life scene right in front of our eyes. “It’s called komorebi — the way the shadows fall from the trees onto the ground,” says our guide. “It’s what we might call ‘dappled light’.” We’re touring through Nagano Prefecture with Walk Japan, on their Snow Country Trek. In our first 24 hours we eat giant bowls of soothing, deeply flavoured broth with tangles of soba noodles and crisp fried mochi in a quiet rural restaurant. We wander up to a shop where a man crouches in the corner making the wares — bamboo baskets and tiny, carved wooden spoons — by hand. Everywhere we go, ski slopes grace the mountains. But our trip is about snowshoeing; it’s about a slower pace. We meet our guide, Daniel Moore (he was raised here, so like all WJ guides, he is fluent in Japanese), in Tokyo and take a two-hour Shinkansen to Nagano city, where we are picked up and taken to our accommodation, a pilgrim’s lodge on temple grounds, some 300 years old. The roof is thickly thatched, the bedrooms decorated minimally with tatami flooring and paper blinds. At night we stare up from our futon at the ancient log beams lining the ceiling, willing us to sleep with their very history. Every day we walk through the powdery snow, crossing frozen lakes and through the cracks in pillaring mountains. At night we warm our bodies in mineral-rich onsens and eat giant feasts of tiny dishes like crisp fried flounder, creamy homemade tofu, silky swathes of pale white local trout, and always rice — in our yukata robes. In the mornings we’re revived with hot miso and what feels like a thousand kinds of fish and seaweed. One day we meet a sixth-generation bear hunter by the name of Fuku Hara, who tells us about the ancient practice of hunting in this area. On another we hike in traditional bamboo snowshoes to one of Japan’s remotest villages, Karayama, where the snow can reach three metres. Then we’re in Nozawa, a frozen town dotted with steaming, sulphur-rich onsens. Locals cook onsen eggs in the 80ºC water and sell them on the street in colourful buckets of warm water. We climb a mountain and eat bento boxes at the top, seated at a table our guide carves out of the snow. We find ourselves in an inn high up in the mountains drinking sake with the kitchen staff until the wee small hours, singing songs from our respective countries and bellowing “Kampai!” with every new milkytoned bottle of locally made wine. The silence is heavenly, the walking invigorating, the winter air bracing. It feels like we are seeing a part of Japan that would be hidden from us if we weren’t on a tour like this. Perhaps it’s all that glittering snow talking, but it feels like magic here. We must go back. VL Visit walkjapan.com

194 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

The rice paddies on the outskirts of Nozawa Onsen, on the route of Walk Japan’s Snow Country Trek.

VOGUE LIVING RECOMMENDS Walk Japan’s Snow Country Trek begins in Tokyo, so make the most of your stopover in one of these luxurious hotels. FOR THE SERVICE Shangri-La Hotel Tokyo Like all of these hotels, Shangri-La Tokyo is located within walking distance of Tokyo Station (where the walk begins, and where you’ll catch the train to Narita airport). Staff lay out pyjamas for you at bedtime, and serve lavish Japanese breakfasts down in the bar. shangri-la.com FOR THE DESIGN Aman Tokyo When you get back to Tokyo after your tour, make time for a pampering night at Aman, which must be the capital’s most beautiful hotel. Situated on the top six floors of the Otemachi Tower, the lobby is some 30 metres high, and the rooms feature stunning pale timber interiors and stone baths overlooking the skyline and Imperial Palace Gardens. aman.com FOR THE FOOD Mandarin Oriental This magnificent hotel boasts no less than three Michelin-starred restaurants, and a lobby on the 37th floor with floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the dynamic city sprawl. Make sure to stop in at the bar to watch the sun set over Mount Fuji — a Tokyo must. mandarinoriental.com


SOCIAL The glittering table setting in the foyer of the AGNSW.

Fine wine meets fine art Sydney’s most glamorous style set gathered for the intimate launch of the Bollinger RD 2004 champagne cuvée, set against art in the grand entrance court of the Art Gallery of New South Wales. 196 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

PHOTOGRAPHER: ALICE MAHRAN

BOLLINGER RD 2004 LAUNCH


Sigourney Cantelo, editor, Beauticate.

Guy de Rivoire (left), international sales director, Bollinger, and Matthew Drummond.

INSIDE THE ART GALLERY OF NSW

Bollinger RD 2004 launch dinner At an exclusive black-tie event at Sydney’s AGNSW, Bollinger’s cellarmaster Gilles Descotes introduced the RD 2004. The RD in the champagne’s name stands for ‘recently disgorged’, meaning the wine’s sediment is only removed in the year of its commercial release. This makes the wine taste fresher despite its age. Dinner guests, including Tamsin and Patrick Johnson and Vogue Living’s editor-at-large Neale Whitaker, enjoyed a main course of lobster tail. VL Danika Windrim, marketing manager, Bollinger.

Designers Genevieve Smart, Heidi Middleton and Alexandra Smart.

Monika Radulovic, model.

VOGUELIVING.COM.AU 197


SOCIAL

Leighton Pyke (left), development director, Little Projects; Jasmin Chia, marketing coordinator, Little Projects.

Vogue Living Melbourne editor Annemarie Kiely.

INSIDE MELBOURNE’S THE DUX Little Projects launched its latest property development, the Dux, at a breakfast on the building’s poolside terrace in Melbourne. A mix of townhouses and apartments sitting high on Richmond Hill, the Dux makes the point that when good contemporary design defers to local context and historical content, the market responds. Little Projects founder and chairman Paul Little presided over the event and panel discussion hosted by Vogue Living on the future of Melbourne apartment housing. Project architect Stuart Marsland of Rothelowman and Miriam Fanning of Mim Design shared their insights into design concepts that captured the Deco industrialism of the site’s former Dux factory. VL Visit littleprojects.com.au

Left to right: Vogue Living Melbourne editor Annemarie Kiely; Miriam Fanning, founder and managing director, Mim Design; Stuart Marsland, principal, Rothelowman architects.

Sarah Dowling (left) and Miriam Fanning of Mim Design.

Paul Little, chairman and founder, The Little Group.

198 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

WORDS: ANNEMARIE KIELY. PHOTOGRAPHERS: PETER CLARKE (INTERIORS), TIMOTHY BURGESS AT IMAGEPLAY. FURNITURE STYLIST: ZUSTER

Little Projects breakfast


AUSTRALIAN MADE FIX TURES W I T H 2 0 Y E A R S WA R R A N T Y, AVA L I A B L E I N P V D F I N I S H E S .

+61 1300 800 300 EN Q U I R I E S @ B RO DWA R E.CO M B RO DWA R E.CO M


SOURCES

FOR THE TRADE Domestic Textile Corporation domestictextile.com.au Milgate milgate.com.au Radford radfordfurnishings.com.au Seneca senecatextiles.com.au South Pacific Fabrics southpacificfabrics.com Warwick warwick.com.au Westbury Textiles westburytextiles.com EDITORIAL/ADVERTISING 1st Dibs 1stdibs.com Acne Studios acnestudios.com Adam Stone adam-stone.com.au Alana Wilson alanawilson.com Alex Eagle alexeagle.co.uk Alex Seton enquiries to Sullivan + Strumpf; sullivanstrumpf.com Alma Allen enquiries to The Future Perfect; thefutureperfect.com Atelier melissa@atelierstudios.com.au Bally 1800 781 851 Becker Minty beckerminty.com Bottega Veneta (02) 9239 0188; Bradford bradford. studio Brickworks brickworksbuildingproducts.com.au Bronwynne Cornish enquiries to Avid Gallery; avidgallery.co.nz Bulgari (02) 9233 3611 Bzippy & Co bzippyandcompany.com Cafe Culture + Insitu cafecultureinsitu.com.au Cavit & Co cavitco.com Chanel chanel.com Cherry Hood cherryhood.co Christian Louboutin (02) 8355 5282 Clara Adolphs enquiries to Mick Fine Art; mickfineart.com Conley & Co conleyandco.com Criteria Collection criteriacollection.com.au Cult cult design.com.au Dedece dedece.com Derek Henderson enquiries to Michael Reid; michaelreid.com.au Design by Them designbythem.com Deyrolle deyrolle.com Diana Watson dianawatson.com.au Domenico Mori boffistudio.com.au Earp Bros earp.com.au Electrolux electrolux.com.au Eric Roinestad erstudiola.com Euan Macleod enquiries to Watters Gallery; wattersgallery.com Fanuli fanuli.com.au Flos euroluce.com.au Galerie Riviera galerieriviera.com Great Dane greatdanefurniture. com Gregor Kregar enquiries to Gow Langsford Gallery; gowlangsfordgallery.co.nz Greta Frau enquiries to The Flat — Massimo Carasi; carasi.it Gucci gucci.com Harrolds harrolds.com.au Hub Furniture hubfurniture.com.au Jamie Reid enquiries

200 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

to John Marchant Gallery; @isisgalleryuk Jardan jardan.com.au Jerico Contemporary jericocontemporary.com Jess Johnson enquiries to Ivan Anthony Gallery; ivananthony.com Jimmy Rix enquiries to Maunsell Wicks Gallery; maunsellwickes.com Jonathan Cross jonathancrossstudio.com Julian Meagher enquiries to Olsen Gallery; olsengallery.com Karman lightco.com.au Ke-Zu kezu. com.au Koskela koskela.com.au Living Edge livingedge.com.au Luciano Bonacini lucianobonacini.com Luke Edward Hall lukeedwardhall.com Madeleine Child enquiries to White Space Gallery; whitespace.co.nz Mark Whalen enquiries to Bett Gallery; bettgallery.com.au Matches Fashion matchesfashion.com Michael Snape enquiries to Australian Galleries; australiangalleries.com.au Nell enquiries to Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery; roslynoxley9.com.au Nikau Store nikaustore.com Nobuyoshi Araki arakinobuyoshi.com Noelle Rigaudie @noellerigaudie Paolo Gonzato @gonzatopaolo Parterre parterre.com.au Paul Smith paulsmith.com Peter Churcher enquiries to Australian Galleries; australiangalleries.com.au Planet planetfurniture.com.au Porter’s Paints porters.com.au R & Company gallery r-and-company.com Reinaldo Sanguino reinaldosanguino.com Rick Amor enquiries to Liverpool Street Gallery; liverpoolstgallery.com.au Robyn Cosgrove robyncosgrove.com Ross Watson rosswatson.com Royal Academy of Arts royalacademy.org.uk Ryosuke Yazaki enquiries to The Future Perfect; thefutureperfect.com Saint Cloche saintcloche.com Scandinavian Wallpaper & Decor wallpaperdecor.com.au Seeho Su seehosu.com.au Seletti seletti.com.au Skeehan Studio skeehan.com.au Space Furniture spacefurniture. com.au Spence & Lyda spenceandlyda.com.au Stella McCartney enquiries to Harrolds; harrolds.com.au Steven Meisel enquiries to The Future Perfect; thefuture perfect.com Tanmaya Bingham enquiries to May Space; mayspace.com.au Tatjana Farkas @tatjanafarkasTeuco delsa.com.au Terry Stringer enquiries to Robin Gibson Gallery; robingibson.net Todd Fuller enquiries to May Space; mayspace.com.au Tony Matelli tonymatelli.com Valentino enquiries to Harrolds; harrolds.com.au

PHOTOGRAPHER: HELENIO BARBETTA

Detail from Italian architect Barbara Ghidoni’s 1920s Milan apartment (see page 134).


Exp 31.08.18

A specialist collection of beautifully produced fabrics and wallpapers available to purchase online

NICOL AL AWRENCE.COM.AU

Commission a Master Maker Accredited designers + makers in wood

Ä?", Ä?  181,9Ä&#x160;+1Ä?/9Ä&#x160;/  /" >Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;i`iĂ&#x153;>Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;>`vĂ&#x152;Ă&#x192; hello@kccmdesign.com.au

www.kccmdesign.com.au

Introducing

OUR NEW DESIGNER BISTRO CANE FURNITURE RANGE

Gerard Lane Furniture Hand woven and aesthetically designed for function and beauty using traditional techniques. Perfect for Residential and Commercial use.

40 Parramatta Road, Stanmore NSW 2048 (02) 9516 3888 / Open 7 days

www.leforge.com.au

www.studiowoodworkers.org.au

HOME, INTERIORS & DESIGN

FREE $30 VOUCHER Use the Code VOGUE30 at checkout


HOME, INTERIORS & DESIGN

Reserve a FREE 15 min phone consult with code VOGUEJULY

The Art of Sustainable Living Australian designer renovation, architecture and interiors.

dwellingdesign.com.au

RUG

ADDICTION CLASSIC BUTTERFLY & TRIPOLINA CHAIRS

AGED OAK WIDE FLOORS Handcrafted TIMBER FLOORS 0423 194 240 muumuudesign1@gmail.com

To advertise call 1300 139 305

www.rugaddiction.net

escea.com/DS1400

www.muumuu.net.au photo courtesy of Megan Morton

SHOWROOM MELBOURNE | 03 9690 2822 | 263 Park St, South Melbourne SHOWROOM SYDNEY | 02 9363 0808 | 85 New South Head Rd, Rushcutters Bay AUSTRALIA WIDE 1300 559 297 LOS ANGELES Opening Fall 2018 | NEW YORK Opening Spring 2019

agedoakfloors.com.au


ARTISTS & GALLERIES

Belinda Wilson Visual Artist

563 SYDNEY RD SEAFORTH

www.markcairnsartist.com

belindawilsonart.com.au

Jessica Watts

sydneyroadgallery.com

ORIGINAL AUSTRALIAN ART & PRINTS

To advertise call 1300 139 305

PANOPLYGALLERY.ONLINE


POSTSCRIPT From the living room to the kitchen, dress your home in supreme style with these must-haves.

LAURA KINCADE Hickory Chair — one of America’s finest furniture companies — has been making exceptional handcrafted furniture for more than 100 years. Luckily for Australia, Laura Kincade has been proudly representing the brand since 2004 and offering its inspired assortment of timeless designs that nod to the classic forms and craftsmanship of old. Available exclusively at laurakincade.com

SMEG Designed in collaboration with renowned Italian architect Guido Canali, Smeg’s new premium kitchen appliance collection, Dolce Stil Novo (which translates to ‘sweet new style’), seamlessly integrates beauty, style and innovative technology. From ovens to wine cellars to coffee machines, the refined collection will surely add a big dollop of elegance to your kitchen. Visit smeg.com.au

PORTER’S PAINTS Porter’s Paints expands its collection of premium engineered flooring with Rustic Oak in Heritage Natural. Each board is beautifully hand-finished and brushed to accentuate its unmistakable French oak grain. Tongue-and-groove joins both on the sides and at the ends provide a seamless finish, while a durable UV-cured sealer keeps the boards looking great for aeons. Go to porterspaints.com

GAMMA The stunning Aston sofa takes inspiration from classic design but adds a modern twist. Manufactured in Italy by Gamma, it features an exquisite, hand-tufted, Chesterfield-like capitonne frame and back, a curved design and contemporary details such as linear cushions and chrome legs. Available in various finishes, it’s a fresh way to bring a sense of solidity and tradition to a room. Head to gammafurniture.com.au

MINOTTI With its curved lines, formal identity and unconventional approach, Minotti’s Tape collection (named after the couture detail that holds the bronze-coloured metal feet to the exterior) is big on character. It’s customisable in a wide range of leather and fabric coverings. Find out more at minotti.com

CAESARSTONE The white-on-white, cloud-like patina of Cloudburst Concrete from Caesarstone delivers a truly unique look. Its low-reflective matte surface works beautifully alongside light and dark timbers, stainless steel and concrete surfaces (including Caesarstone’s Rugged Concrete), meaning it will suit and blend in with any decor from industrial to Scandinavian to minimal contemporary. Visit caesarstone.com.au


VOGUE LIVING PROMOTION

ROYAL OAK FLOORS Concreate concrete panels are easy to install and a great way to add sophistication and texture to your home. Suitable for gluing to new constructions or existing walls and ceilings, the 4mm-thick panels show the irregularities and character of polished off-form concrete. Available in six colours. Visit royaloakfloors.com.au

ANGELUCCI 20TH CENTURY Inspired by the timeless beauty of mid-20th-century lounges conceptualised by the great American furniture designers, Angelucci’s Hollywood sofa would fit right in on the set of a Hitchcock classic. The plush combination of understated elegance and incredible comfort will add just the right amount of glamour to your home. Custom-made to order with a choice of length and fabrics, this piece is sure to take a starring role in any home. Visit angelucci.net.au

FANULI Unveiled at Milan

BOFFI STUDIO SYDNEY Italian company Salvatori’s eco-friendly Romboo tiles are rhombus shaped, which, when placed together, create a spectacular three-dimensional hexagonal effect that is particularly dramatic when bathed in light. The textured tiles are ideal for feature walls and bathrooms, especially shower floors thanks to superior grip, and will completely transform your space. They’re available in various stone finishes including Bianco Carrara (above). Visit boffistudio.com.au

Design Week 2018, Italian brand Kristalia’s new collection is designed to be used both indoors and outdoors. The range includes the sturdy Be-Easy Slatted table and chairs. Made from anodised aluminium, zinc/ powder-coated steel and teak wood from FSC-certified plantations, the furniture is built to last yet still kind to the environment. For more details, see fanuli.com.au

ROBYN COSGROVE For the finest handmade rugs, look no further than Robyn Cosgrove, Australia’s leading specialist dealer in fine handwoven rugs and carpets. Magnificently hand-knotted in Nepal from pure handspun silk, this 278x364cm rug displays a striking dragon design and is colourfully decorated to enliven just about any space. To see the complete collection of exquisite rugs, visit robyncosgrove.com

YARRABEND Situated on the banks of the Yarra River, YarraBend — Melbourne’s newest suburb and just 6.5 kilometres from the CBD — is set to become the city’s most sought-after place to live. Underpinned by design, wellness and technology, YarraBend will redefine urban living and come complete with community gardens, a tech concierge service and an eagerly awaited cosmopolitan dining precinct. Visit yarrabend.com.au


PASSIONS

3

1

The Filigrana light by Established & Sons featured at Milan Design Week 2018.

2

favourite things

Established & Sons designer Sebastian Wrong shares what makes him happy. 1. PHOTO OF MY SIBLINGS I recently found this picture of my brother and sister, Mark and Christina, taken at a church in the village we’re from in Hertfordshire. It makes me laugh because of what they’re wearing and how long ago it was. 2. HEIDI STOOL I designed this based on a traditional Swiss milking stool. In the 1970s there used to be a children’s program called Heidi, about a young girl who lived a rural, alpine life. The stool is a bit tongue-in-cheek about that. 3. THE SCOTTISH HIGHLANDS I like the wild emptiness there. Last New Year’s Eve we went to a spot near Inverness called the Cawdor Estate. 4. UMBERTO BOCCIONI is one of my all-time hero artists. His work is an amazing transition between figurative work and abstraction — he had a brilliant ability to formalise energy and dynamic movements. 5. MORITO tapas bar in Exmouth Market, London. The food is Spanish, Portuguese and Moroccan, but with a modern twist — it’s extremely delicious.6. CAROLINE ACHAINTRE is a Londonbased German artist. Her work is quite punk —it bridges fashion, music, street culture and materials. 7. PAZUZU DEVIL Apparently this little figure is Syrian. It’s an immaculate object, bursting with energy and life. This character actually features in the 1973 film The Exorcist. 8. MAX is a rescue dog who came to live with us a year ago. He’s a Podenco, a rural hunting breed from Andalucía, in Southern Spain. He’s a real character. 9. MOULTON BICYCLE, created by Dr Alex Moulton. He’s famous for designing bikes with small wheels and beautifully engineered frames. The suspension system makes it very comfortable, so it’s the perfect city bike. 10. CAST CONCRETE HOUSE near the Écal art and design school in Lausanne, Switzerland, where I teach. I think it’s a very clever piece of architecture. VL

5

6

7

8

9 208 VOGUELIVING.COM.AU

Visit establishedandsons.com; livingedge.com.au

PHOTOGRAPHERS: GETTY IMAGES (UNIQUE FORMS OF CONTINUITY IN SPACE BY UMBERTO BOCCIONI AND SCOTTISH HIGHLANDS)

1

4


rtewqasffghhj18  
rtewqasffghhj18  
Advertisement