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CONTENTS

THE SPOTLIGHT

COLOUR

12

MY STYLISH LIFE Meet fashion designer Mapitso Thaisi of Shweshwekini

14

DIGITAL What’s new on Elledecoration.co.za

18

SPOTLIGHT Trends, word of mouth and innovations

24

REPORT-BACKS All about the exhibition Africa by Design and this year’s Design Joburg

30

STUDIO VISIT Inside the MaXhosa by Laduma studio

34

EXPLORE Discover Johannesburg’s mixed-use hub 44 Stanley

38

SHORTLIST Conceptual artist Lina Iris Viktor on her favourite things

ISSUE

SHOPPING 44

TREND ALERT Refreshing greens, organic woven materials and all manner of stripes

48

ETC A selection of armchairs in a variety of shapes, styles and finishes

50

TECH Ingenious innovations seen at Milan Design Week 2018

52

TOOLBOX Our expert guide to incorporating colour into your home

48

18 24

64

MEDITERRANEAN MODERN A ’70s villa in Cape Town with a curvaceous nature, restrained palette and characterful aesthetic

74

COLOUR CODE A family home in Paris that combines the luxury of urban living with classic countryside charm

84

PAST MASTER A restored apartment in Barcelona retains its original appeal while being given a modern edge

94

POINT OF VIEW A contemporary residential estate home in Johannesburg features expansive glass windows and timeless interiors

LIVING www.elledecoration.co.za

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118 FOOD AND DRINK Grei at the Saxon Hotel in Johannesburg SOUTH AFRICA

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114 TRAVEL Explore Dubai Design District

Colour Crush

BOLD DIRECTIONS IN HOMES & DESIGN

COVER IMAGE BY NICOLAS MATHÉUS

122 HOTELS A glimpse of MGallery by Sofiteli’s Château de Versailles 124 GARDENS The artful practice of topiary 126 ICON We celebrate interior designer Stephen Falcke 130 LAST LOOK Endangered, an exhibition of Porky Hefer’s latest large-scale sculptural seating pods courtesy of the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, SFA Advisory and Southern Guild

PHOTOGRAPHS PIKO SIPAMLA, SARAH DE PINA, ©DARIA ZINOVATNAYA

HOMES


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PUBLISHER’S NOTE

x @khanyidhlomo

idwinter is the perfect season to reappraise our living spaces: we spend more time indoors, out of the cold, where we become more aware of ways to uplift rooms and create a fabulous new environment. And while considerations like scale, fabrics, texture and balance are all essential, nothing has greater power to transform a home than colour. In this issue, we celebrate the hues and shades that give a space its greatest impact. We also showcase homes in France, Spain and South Africa where colour has been ingeniously used to enhance and reinforce an entire ethos. Many of them are shades that have long been overlooked by interior designers, but have now been given centre stage to full and glorious effect. In Africa, with its amazing palette of brilliant colours, we’re surrounded by inspiration in our natural environment and a profusion of diverse cultures. Laduma Ngxokolo, creator of the MaXhosa by Laduma label, who’s interviewed in our Studio Visit feature, is one designer who’s unafraid to infuse brilliant traditional African shades into his work. In this way, his creations not only make a proud identity statement, but offer audacious and tempting departure points for those seeking a deeper connection with our continent’s heritage, as well as its exciting future. We hope the passion in these pages reaches out and ignites a spark in you too. Have a great month! Versace dress R21 895 Steve Madden shoes R1 499 Thula Sindi dress Khanyi’s own Roller table lamp R10 000, Legs11 powder-coated stool R3 900 (excluding fabric) and Nesting bronze crescent table R9 500, all Studio 19 Diamond Shuttle Weave Dhurrie carpet R2 995, Weylandts

‘In Africa, with its amazing palette of brilliant colours, we’re surrounded by inspiration in our natural environment and a profusion of diverse cultures’

6 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE COLOUR ISSUE

PHOTOGRAPH: SHAUN MALLETT; MAKE-UP BY CLARA BANX

 @KhanyiDhlomo


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‘A colour refresh on interior walls has an immediate impact on how one feels’

s a person who’s always been naturally drawn to the darker end of the spectrum in my personal dress (can you ever actually have too many black jackets or LBDs?), I understand the powerful effect of both a restrained approach to colour in one’s choice of clothing and decor, and the glorious emotions unleashed when dipping into the opposite end of the scale. A white shirt, like freshly painted white walls and crisp new linen sheets, for example, energises in a completely different way, compared with being wrapped up in a soft winter scarf in this season’s super-hot mustard yellow, or re-upholstering a favourite sofa in the richest emerald green. Like a lick of red lipstick, a colour refresh on interior walls has an immediate impact on how one feels regarding, well, just about everything. Call it the rose-tinted spectacles effect, if you will, but there’s no denying how moods serve as a filter for even the most mundane everyday experiences. Because our responses to colour are so deeply personal and, often, instinctual – we like it or we don’t, regardless of what the trend forecasters say – the DECO team took an all-tastes-included approach to compiling our July issue, which is both a love letter of sorts to the power of colour and an inspirational guide on how to use it in sometimes bold and brave ways. We hope you find some wonderful ideas in our Toolbox feature, compiled by Decor Stylist Sanri Pienaar and our new Features & Managing Editor, Karen Tennent. Someone who knows a thing or two about how to use colour is interior designer Stephen Falcke who – as he launches his beautiful book detailing some of the impeccably realised projects he’s worked on over the span of his career – seemed a fitting DECO Icon. I recall Falcke offering me a sneak peek inside the pages of the book in its very early stages, so it’s a proud moment to be able to share news of it here. Ever humble, the designer claims that you’re never too old to learn new lessons. We couldn’t agree more.

leigh.robertson@ndalomedia.com x @lil_robertson

STEFAN HOTTINGER-BEHMER Dubai-based Hottinger-Behmer writes about style, design and travel, reporting from all corners of the world. A nomad by nature, Hottinger-Behmer is fluent in six languages and one dialect, and contributes to titles like ELLE, Wallpaper*, The Times and The Ritz-Carlton Magazine. Breakfast on Koh Samui, lunch in Dubai and a late dinner in Zurich? Probably just your average Wednesday for the 40-something-year-old Swiss-Brazilian with a duffel bag always at the ready. 8 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE COLOUR ISSUE

SARAH DE PINA De Pina loves the fact that the camera can capture a specific moment, and enjoys searching for the beauty in the everyday. She’s been taking photographs since the age of 12, when she officially took over as her family’s holiday photographer, and since then it‘s become her career. De Pina is a lifestyle photographer based in Johannesburg whose work has taken her around the country and as far afield as China. She specialises in interiors, decor and portrait photography.

PIKO SIPAMLA Photographer Sipamla covers travel features from the remote Dynjandi Falls of the Westfjords in Iceland to the (official) happiest country on earth of Denmark, but keeps the historic Galápagos Islands at the top of his destination wish-list. This Manhattan-based adventure-seeker avoids Times Square like the plague – he‘d rather hop the ferry to his ‘local’ bar on Governors Island – and enjoys trails with his four-legged side-kick Bailey upstate in the Catskill Mountains.

PHOTOGRAPH ADAM LETCH

ED-IN-CHIEF’S NOTE


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MY STYLISH LIFE

Lesotho

Herman two-seater sofa in Sunday Curry R7 999, Sofacompany.com

x @shweshwekini x @sothogirldiaries

sothogirldiaries.com

Genuine soft sheepskin rug in Black R1 950, Design Store

A fashion designer and business-owner who values versatile, comfortable clothes that make her feel good, Thaisi lives by the motto: ‘The only limit to your success is your own imagination’ Originally from Lesotho, Thaisi is an occupational therapist with a love of fashion who wanted to pay homage to her Basotho culture in the form of shweshwe-inspired swimand activewear. ‘The idea came to me after a year of not buying swimwear because I felt frustrated that there weren’t many Africanprinted options available locally that catered for most South African women,’ she says. So in May last year, she launched Shweshwekini Active Wear and, only six months later, won The Foschini Group’s #SebenzaGirl Competition and the opportunity to have her corporate identity professionally designed. It was the exposure Thaisi needed to take her label to new heights, which she believes has the potential to be among the best local and international swimwear brands, and provide employment opportunities both at home and abroad. ‘My journey’s an inspirational one that I hope empowers people of all ages to strive to be their best, wherever they are, and to follow their dreams boldly,’ she says. What’s inspiring you right now? Modern-day South Africans who, with their dreams and talents, are telling remarkable stories and building empires in the process. The new narrative about creativity being fluid, and existing in many forms and shapes, inspires me to go beyond boundaries. Which decor trend is your favourite at the moment? Rich pigments. While I still prefer grey for the overall look and feel of my interiors, incorporating something like 12 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE COLOUR ISSUE

a mustard-coloured couch or a brightly hued chair to darker shades definitely adds life to a room. Where is your dream holiday destination? I have a few for different occasions. I’d love to visit Mauritius and Zanzibar for a girls’ trip or a family getaway. What role do your heritage and culture play in your work? An integral one. I spent the first six years of my life in Lesotho, where I learnt how to be creative in play activities because we used to make our own toys. My mom wore a lot of traditional shweshwe dresses when I was growing up, which is where my love for fashion and African prints began. A big part of what I do stems directly from those early childhood memories. Which local fashion designer should everyone have their eye on? Laduma Ngxokolo of MaXhosa by Laduma is paving the way for us and showing Africa and the world what South Africans have to offer. Is there a colour you just can’t get enough of? Yellow. I took an Insights Personality test at work, and my dominant colour energy turns out to be ‘sunshine yellow’ – a happy, creative colour. So it’s not surprising that I feel most at home in spaces that have a touch of yellow. What’s on your decor and fashion wish lists? Now that winter’s here, I find myself obsessing over large sheepskin rugs. In terms of fashion, definitely a Basotho blanket coat by Thabo Makhetha, a pair of Cirelle pointed-toe ankle boots from Aldo and a wrap dress by Diane von Furstenberg.

MaXhosa by Laduma

Wrap dress by Diane von Furstenberg Zanzibar

Thabo Makhetha x Shweshwekini

PHOTOGRAPHS NATALIE FIELD, GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES, IMAXTREE.COM

THE STYLISH LIFE OF MAPITSO THAISI


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SPOTLIGHT PHOTOGRAPH THE CORB COLLECTION BY DARIA ZINOVATNAYA

ARCHITECTURE • DESIGN • ART • CULTURE • PEOPLE • PL ACES

A look at what’s hot right now (p18), Chrissa Amuah’s Africa by Design exhibition (p24), Design Joburg 2018 (p26), the MaXhosa by Laduma studio (p30), Johannesburg’s mixeduse hub 44 Stanley (p34) and the wonderful world of conceptual artist Lina Iris Viktor (p38)


TRUE HUES Young global designer-to-watch Daria Zinovatnaya, who hails from the Ukraine, works on projects ranging from interiors to furniture and lighting designs. ‘The basis of my work is colour and geometry, a combination of coloured planes,’ she says, attributing its style to the Russian Suprematism art movement and iconic 20th-century names like Le Corbusier, Charlotte Perriand and Jean Prouvé. Her first furniture concept Cherokee, notable for its ‘simple form in an unusual execution and design’, received a Red Dot Design Award in 2017. Current ranges include Itten, named in honour of Swiss painter and theoretician Johannes Itten, and makes bold use of colour in the manner of its namesake. ‘Itten said that when we give colour to the subject, we give it life,’ says Zinovatnaya. ‘Since colour is the basis of my work, I consider this saying to be absolutely true!’ zinovatnaya.com


SPOTLIGHT: TREND

True tactility Combine soft with hard, coarse with smooth for a luxuriously layered aesthetic full of texture (clockwise, from top left) Arkange mirror R41 230, Roche Bobois; genuine sheepskin rug in bint R1 550, Design Store; Jo side-table floor lamp with shade R10 900, La Grange Interiors; Ma Belle chair by Ceccotti Collezioni R60 000, Limeline; Ultra magnum decanter R2 499 (1.5L), Yuppiechef; glass tealight holder R80, H&M Home; Lammy stool in black R3 995, La Grange Interiors; Ava chair R13 599, Sofacompany.com; Monarch Smoke rug by Alexander McQueen R45 720, The Rug Company; yellow blown-glass bowls from R5 500 each, Anatomy Design; quilted crumpled washed-linen throw R14 900, La Grange Interiors; Masculo dining chair by GamFratesi R20 489, CRÉMA


PHOTOGRAPHS ADAM LETCH

HEART OF THE HOME Not only has luxe kitchen brand bulthaup relocated its Cape Town showroom to the V&A Waterfront’s Canal District, but it’s also partnered with three international brands under the umbrella name of Domum. The capacious showroom, designed by Three 14 Architects and with lighting design by Martin Dolle, is the perfect setting in which to see the ingenuity of bulthaup’s kitchen systems as well as its partners, Italian lifestyle brand Rimadesio, Danish furniture designers Carl Hansen & Søn and Danish flooring company Dinesen. You’ll also find products on display from Mae Artisan Rugs, Mervyn Gers Ceramics, Yuppiechef, Nicolson Russell, Le Creuset and FLOS, whose Round String lights by Michael Anastassiades hang in the showroom. Waterway House, V&A Waterfront, Cape Town. domum.bulthaup.com


SPOTLIGHT: WORD OF MOUTH

Say it with art While the art of old-school letter-writing might have fallen away, there’s always a need for a greeting card. Or, at least, there will be now, because the new stationery range from Ink & Bash, an offshoot of Stellenbosch design team Fanakalo (renowned for its legendary wine and beer labels), certainly provides a compelling reason to pop someone a friendly note. Beautifully illustrated, there are cards suitable for all manner of occasions, while personalised stationery is also available. inkandbash.co.za

BEST OF TURBINE ART FAIR 2018 Jo’burg’s winter art fix is served up at this year’s RMB Turbine Art Fair (TAF), at Newtown’s Turbine Hall from 12-15 July. Founded on the principles of developing and promoting young artists while serving as a platform to encourage the collection of art, TAF has become an allencompassing, richly diverse cultural experience that’s not to be missed. Visitors can view – and easily buy, thanks to an accessible pricing strategy – works presented by galleries and artists from around the country, and enjoy a series of engaging installations, daily walkabouts and an interactive talks programme. turbineartfair.co.za 1 Irma Stern X Emerging Artists Presented by Strauss & Co, Is There Still Life? Some Irma Stern Still Lifes is an exhibition of works by the celebrated South African artist, selected from private collections. What makes this all the more exciting is its juxtaposition with still lifes in various mediums by young students who took inspiration from Stern’s original paintings. 2 Home/Land Graduate Show Sowetan-based artist and photographer Musa N Nxumalo curates Home/Land, an exhibition of paintings and photography by graduates from art departments across SA. ‘We’re interested in exploring how graduate artists regenerate the idea of home, land, space and identity… and how their works speak to their hopes, fears and dreams regarding this subject,’ says Nxumalo. 3 Talent Unlocked Always one of the highlights of TAF – and where many a rising star has been discovered – Talent Unlocked presents the work of emerging artists following an intensive workshop integrating practical art-making and professional training. Curated by Jo’burg-based photographer Fulufhelo Mobadi, participants emerge with a body of work to launch their careers, along with the tools to sustain them.

below (from left) ‘Still Life With Pomegranates’, 1947 and ‘Still Life With Magnolias’, 1949, both by Irma Stern


Storied Italian brand Minotti, which this year celebrates its 70th anniversary, continues to push the boundaries of design, while staying true to its legacy of classic sophistication. Among its new collections launched at Salone del Mobile were designs by groundbreaking Japanese studio Nendo, bringing its eclectic sensibility to the fore. Referencing the undulating profile of the ocean, the Waves coffee table consists of a smoky-hued glass top supported by a painted aluminium structure in sand or bronze tones, while Ring is a family of five tables that play with contrasts between straight lines and curves, and metal frames with customisable tops in bronzed glass, Calacatta marble or Licorice brushed ash. minotti.com

Wordpool While you might not yet lay claim to an architectural masterpiece with ocean views in Clifton, you can at least dream about it – and be inspired by the magnificent contemporary homes presented in Phaidon’s weighty tome, Living on Water (R710). Divided into sections ‘ framed by water’, ‘ built to look at water’, ‘ built on water’ and ‘ built to reflect water’, the book documents some striking examples of homes notable for their elevated design and technical prowess and exceptional settings, whether on the coast or lakeside. phaidon.com


SPOTLIGHT: INNOVATION

BAIE MOOOI Founded by Dutch designer Marcel Wanders in 2001, the Moooi brand, known for its innovation and spirited, unconventional approach to design, can now be found exclusively at Weylandts stores around SA. Among an exuberant collection of furniture, lighting and accessories, Wanders’ iconic creations feature alongside those by luminaries like Jaime Hayon, Maarten Baas, Studio Job, Piet Boon, Danny Fang and Scholten & Baijings. Bertjan Pot’s Random and Non-Random lights are a familiar sight in many a contemporary home, as are Raimond Puts’s Raimond lights and Ron Gilad’s Dear Ingo chandelier. Front’s playful Horse lamp and Pig table are pieces that have become almost synonymous with Moooi’s representation of ‘a life extraordinary’. Moooi CEO Robin Bevers believes the brand’s wellsuited to SA’s sophisticated city-dwellers, with certain products – like Wanders’ Delft Blue plate and Eden Queen carpets, which touch on elements of Dutch heritage – having a particular resonance. ‘A real Moooi piece uses metaphors from the past in a future-forward, post-modern way that has appeal across generations,’ he says. On the importance of a sustainability-led approach to design, he says: ‘One of our goals is to make things that people love and which they won’t get tired of.’ The quality is such that they’re made to last. ‘That’s why you won’t see trends at Moooi and you won’t see us following directions or hype. The more on-trend something is, the more dated it will be very soon. Our maxim is: make pieces which people love so much that they never want to part with them again.’ A selection of signature lighting, furniture, carpets and accessories will be available in the Green Point, Fourways, Kramerville, Umhlanga and Sandton City stores, while the full Moooi range can be ordered through Weylandts. moooi.com, weylandts.co.za

THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 23


AFRICA UNCOVERED Showcasing furniture, textiles and products by designers from six subSaharan countries, Africa by Design showed at New York City’s prestigious WantedDesign in May. DECO spoke to its driving force, Chrissa Amuah, about the exhibition and the growing interest in African design worldwide TEXT LEIGH ROBERTSON PHOTOGRAPHS PIKO SIPAMLA


REPORT-BACK: AFRICA BY DESIGN

Talking stools by Studio-Lani

esigner, creative director and the force behind the exhibition Africa by Design (ABD), presented at New York City’s WantedDesign show, Amuah was born and raised in London but considers herself foremost ‘a daughter of Ghana’. While it’s her parents’ country of origin, and where she has spent extensive time over the course of her life, Amuah’s heritage on her mother’s side also extends to Togo and Benin. ‘I sometimes joke that it might be better to just call me Ecowas,’ she laughs. ‘I was raised with a sense of duality, but it’s very much from Ghana that I draw my design-led inspiration,’ she notes of her interiors brand AMWA Designs and her Adinkra-inspired homeware collection, all underpinned by a desire to combine beautiful design with a deeper meaning. ‘The strong essence of symbolism in Ghanaian textiles, for example, is undeniable and incredibly powerful – it feeds the soul.’ With the objective of celebrating the continent’s design heritage and craft while promoting sustainable commercial opportunities for local creatives, she considers her role in curating and driving the ABD project as a labour of love. ‘Design is very much ingrained in African culture and heritage. If mankind was created in Africa, perhaps we can say that design was too, but in a commercial context it has for many years been neglected,’ she says. ‘Africa’s design ofering sits uniquely in the world. With the right support and exposure, it ofers the opportunity to help shape the Africa of tomorrow that we all so passionately dream of.’ Tell us about ABD. It was launched in Accra, Ghana, to showcase the work of designers from countries such as Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal and Ivory Coast, while the New York showcase follows those in London and Dubai.

this page (clockwise, from top left) Ghanaian textile designer Na Chainkua Reindorf; metal stool by Burkina Faso designer Inoussa Dao; Studio-Lani founder Lani Adeoye, Chrissa Amuah and Reindorf at WantedDesign in New York City; Siso Eko table lamp by StudioLani; opposite Amuah.

‘Design is very much ingrained in African culture and heritage. If mankind was created in Africa, perhaps we can say that design was too, but in a commercial context it has for many years been neglected’ What are the criteria in selecting featured designers and curating their works? We look for the highest level of skill and innovation in design, and for new or little-known stories, or where there’s a bold use of materials. Excellence in craftsmanship and execution is essential, and each of ABD’s featured designers challenge presumptions and definitions of what contemporary African design is. Is there a diminishing of boundaries between craft and design in terms of how design from the continent is viewed globally? There are still strongly rooted notions of craft being ‘lesser’ than design, but there are many that make the case for why traditional practices, such as basketry, should be considered with equal prestige. But as ABD demonstrates, the continent’s design ofering is incredibly strong, symbolic, innovative, political, sustainable and diverse. What was the response to the exhibition? While Europe and Africa have awoken to the relevance of African design for the world, for America, it’s still quite new, but people have been very excited by the rich narratives and details that each of the pieces tells. To have made ABD’s showcase at WantedDesign – New York’s premier celebration of global design – has been very fitting. We’ve just scratched the surface and look forward to showcasing more work next year. Where to next for ABD? We have a number of exciting opportunities that we’re currently exploring, but the plan is to always have a ‘home’ exhibition in Accra. We strive to develop the platform and continue exposing the talent that exists across the continent. Above all else, ABD is committed to spearheading and projecting the relevance of African design on a global platform. Qafricabydesign.org THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 25


W TONIC Greg Gamble and Philippe van der Merwe of interior architectural design studio Tonic continue to impress with their considered and directional approach to interiors and furniture, evident in their new collection and super-stylish booth at Design Joburg: a striking room set notable for its chic, earthy palette – confirming terracotta as the hue du jour – and liberal use of natural textures, thoughtfully paired with artworks by Michele Mathison. The Tonic duo have come full circle, launching their first furniture range at Rooms on View in 2010, and having now been handed the baton to curate Design Joburg as the show’s creative directors in 2019. tonicdesign.co.za x @tonic.design

DESIGN JOBURG The best of South African decor and interior design were in the spotlight at Design Joburg, which returned to Sandton Convention Centre for its successful second edition Considerably bigger than its launch year and showcasing bolder and more creatively conceived booths than ever before, Design Joburg featuring Rooms on View has raised the bar for shows of this ilk in SA. The exhibition offered inspiration and ideas aplenty in an accessible way that invited engagement from a diverse audience, and aimed to encourage collaboration by pairing up-and-coming interior designers with industry stalwarts. While some displays stood out more than others, overall the quality was high, as seen in just a handful of our favourites here. designjoburg.com

LA GRANGE INTERIORS X Founder of Rooms on View and the force behind its revived iteration as an integral part of Design Joburg, Sumari Krige is highly regarded for her richly layered interiors that draw effortlessly on classic and current influences. Her interiors company and store, La Grange Interiors, showed its thoroughly modern green side with a lush presentation of fabrics and furniture that blur the boundaries between indoors and out. Her garden-esque rooms matched shades of green and neutrals with bold patterns and textures – featuring fabrics and wallpapers by Casamance – in a vibrant and appealing way. lagrangeinteriors.co.za x @lagrangeinteriors

W KOHLER AFRICA Kohler Africa took bathroom design to new heights with its three-part booth commissioned to designers Nelson Kubheka of Ommni Design, Kelly Adami of Copperleaf Studio and Sarah de Villiers and Sumayya Vally of Counterspace. Kubheka’s gold-accented African-inspired space hit all the right notes, while Adami’s pink haven was the stuff of dreams and Counterspace’s blue-hued mirrored interior wowed us all. x @kohlerafrica; ommnidesign.co.za x @ommnidesign; copperleafstudio.co.za x @copperleafstudio; counterspace-studio.com x @_counterspace


REPORT-BACK: DESIGN JOBURG

ANATOMY DESIGN T For the past two years, Andrea Kleinloog and Megan Hesse of Hesse Kleinloog Studio (HK Studio) have been the creative drivers of Design Joburg, all the while continuing to build both their interior-design brand and their stunning retail division, Anatomy Design. As was to be expected, the pair’s expertly curated space was a feast for the eyes, with refined furniture possessing all the traits needed to become true modern classics for their attention to detail, immaculate craftsmanship (the ‘Sarah’ bench was one of the more covetable pieces on show) and interior styling. anatomydesign.co.za x @anatomydesign

DONALD NXUMALO S One of the hits of the show, Jo’burg-based interior designer Donald Nxumalo (having rebranded under his own name after previously operating as DNX) kicked off his new-look identity along with an expanded homeware range comprising luxurious candles and sumptuous bedlinen. And what better way to show it all off than in a moodily lit, perfectly plush boudoir setting with a dramatic after-dark ambience and palette, plus layers of greenery and floral displays? ‘I had a concept of what I wanted the stand to look like and what the message being communicated should be, and we managed to do that and beyond,’ he says of his ambitious booth. donaldnxumalo.com x @donaldnxumalo

PHOTOGRAPHS SARAH DE PINA, ELSA YOUNG

BLACKSMITH INTERIORS X JACOLINE SEMA X A collaboration we loved was the one between Jo’burg-based interior designer Ryan Illgner from design agency Blacksmith Interiors and definite name-to-watch Jacoline Sema of Jacoline S Designs. An ultracool bar scene with an elegant adjoining lounge, the space melded elements of African heritage with the height of modern sophistication in terms of materiality and finish, including the slick wall and bar counter by Caesarstone. Sema impressed with pieces from her new furniture collection, including a statement Indzila bar-stool in brass, which draws inspiration from traditional garments and jewellery found in African cultures. black-smith.co.za x @jacoline_s_designs THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 27


ELLE DECORATION Curated by Decor Stylist Sanri Pienaar and Decor Assistant Pieter von Wielligh, the ELLE DECORATION stand matched classic, custom-made pieces by local furniture names Woodbender (with upholstery by Hertex), Lemon, Egg Designs and Houtlander with pared-back wooden flooring by Oggie Flooring and a neutral, sage-toned paint colour by Dulux – all complemented by a collection of accessories worthy of a gallery-meetslounge setting. Boasting a subtle, sophisticated contemporary African flavour, the space invited readers and friends to meet the DECO team while admiring the works on display. Modern and traditional pieces, from furniture to artifacts and woven baskets, blended harmoniously, allowing the palette to emerge as the true hero of the space: muted, earthy tones with bright pops of cobalt, olive green and terracotta. elledecoration.co.za x @elle_deco right (from left) A bespoke screen by Lemon made a statement with its artful wallpaper covering from the brand’s latest collection, and a trio of geometrically shaped coffee tables by Egg Designs complemented light wooden flooring by Oggie Flooring; emerging South African artist Jeanne Geigher’s painterly screen was in perfect contrast to the subtle walls painted in Dulux’s Heavenly Springs, while ceramic vases by Ben Orkin and playful offerings by Seletti and Diesel Living from Generation were an eclectic touch. Adding a tactile element to the custom pieces were fabrics by Hertex, and Houtlander’s sleek, round dining table signified the essence of contemporary South African design.


REPORT-BACK: DESIGN JOBURG

PHOTOGRAPHS SARAH DE PINA

this page Putting craft in the spotlight were woven baskets by Design Afrika and large pots, all available from Egg Designs, as well as a wooden stool from Amatuli. opposite Woodbender turned the table on its typical classical styling by reinventing one of its well-known chairs in cobalt. The hue was echoed in its twoseater sofa, offsetting the green velvet of Lemon’s Hope armchair opposite it.


AT WORK: LADUMA NGXOKOLO Situated in an industrial part of inner-city Johannesburg is the factory where Laduma Ngxokolo and his team create unique pieces for the luxury knitwear brand MaXhosa by Laduma, one colourful yarn at a time TEXT NTOMBENHLE SHEZI PHOTOGRAPHS SARAH DE PINA PRODUCTION SANRI PIENAAR


STUDIO VISIT

n the seven years of its existence, the colours and shapes that have become synonymous with MaXhosa by Laduma’s brand iconography are diicult to miss both on and off the runway. In less than a decade, the young designer from Port Elizabeth has achieved what takes others years to accomplish. Outside of his flagship store in Newtown Junction Mall, his pieces can be found stocked all over the world, from Japan to New York. Ngxokolo’s brand has picked up a string of accolades, including Design Indaba’s Most Beautiful Object in South Africa award in 2016 for his Xhosa-inspired shawl, and he was recently commissioned by New York City’s Museum of Modern Art to create a jersey for its Is Fashion Modern? exhibition. When asked where he finds his inspiration, Ngxokolo cites his hometown in the Eastern Cape, to which he often returns and where his journey as a designer began. Here he created his first-ever piece – a knitted blue jersey – in 2001 with his late mother, who’d just bought a knitting machine. ‘Blue was my favourite colour and the jersey was striped and shaded in light blue, royal blue and cobalt,’ he says of the piece, saying that the experience left him both fascinated and overwhelmed by the idea of turning raw material into a unique design. The MaXhosa by Laduma brand philosophy is about using only natural materials such as wool, and specifically mohair sourced in Port Elizabeth, which is home to the biggest spinning mill in the country and mohair industry in the world. Ngxokolo’s suppliers source the material, and wash, spin and dye it to his specifications. As per the brand’s design blueprint, only nine colours are used in the making process: yellow, red, blue, beige, pink, turquoise, white, orange and black. From there, the materials are sent to the Jo’burg plant and put into knitting machines to create the fabrics. Prior to that, the team would have already drawn up samples, designs and size variations, and once the fabric’s ready, it’s steamed, cut and assembled before being packed for distribution. MaXhosa by Laduma consists of a small, multi-functional team, with Ngxokolo acting as the MD and art director, overseeing the brand’s vision every season. His elder sister Tina recently joined the studio as the production manager and creative director of their atelier services. ‘What I didn’t know when I was starting out was the power of including family in the vision, and organically, MaXhosa by Laduma is a family business,’ he says. The production side involves a group of 17 people, who work in sectors ranging from the manufacturing plant to quality control. In 2014, the company branched out into homeware, after seeing the potential that could come from entering lifestyle spaces. For Ngxokolo, adding rugs to the range was something he felt was an easy direction to take – it wasn’t too conventional and would maintain the high standard seen in the knitwear line. ‘With interior pieces, we know that they’re not informed by trends, can be sold across seasons and will last for centuries,’ he says. ‘When we apply our artwork, we do so knowing that the value we put in them is about more than just selling the product.’ maxhosa.co.za x @maxhosa

this page (from top) The MaXhosa by Laduma team cuts and assembles the finished fabric based on samples they’ve made; located in Jo’burg, the studio is a vibrant and inspiring space. opposite Knitwear designer Laduma Ngxokolo.


WHERE DO YOU GO TO FIND INSPIRATION? As a creative and

entrepreneur, it’s important to adapt to the changing times, but whenever I need to feel grounded, I go home to Port Elizabeth. It’s an important place for me, full of resonance, and it’s there that I’m able to connect with a lot of people and experience a different energy that I don’t feel anywhere else in the world. Also going abroad on business trips always refreshes my way of thinking, as well as visiting museums and galleries, with New York’s Museum of Modern Art being one of my favourites. DO YOU CELEBRATE MILESTONES IN YOUR BUSINESS?

Our fifth year was our first celebration because they say that if a business lasts five years, only then is it valuable and sustainable. Every year we evaluate the business and work to fix what’s broken. We reflect on and look at the value of what we’ve brought into different spaces, from the design space and anthropological space to the black consciousness space and the space of cultural currency. HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE FACT THAT MANY PEOPLE CONSIDER YOUR DESIGNS TO BE NOT ONLY FASHION, BUT ART? This is how I saw the vision initially. When

I started, I used to go through the production process by hand, back when one jersey would take a week of crafting. I still return to that when creating once-off pieces and perceive the work as making art. WHAT DOES CULTURE MEAN TO YOU? For me, culture is

a way of being that informs the future. It makes up the fabric of our society and is a way of living that drives our lives. WHAT’S NEXT FOR MAXHOSA BY LADUMA? We’ve been thinking of going into furniture production, something more industrial. We have a few crafters on our radar who we know will be able to interpret our values into furniture very well. Personally, I feel I’ve only achieved about 2% of my personal capacity. I think of myself as an academic and would like to study further and pursue my PhD. There are a lot of design loopholes in South Africa that I’d like to close.

this page (clockwise from top left) Ngxokolo in the Jo’burg factory; knitting machines create the fabrics from sourced materials; as MD and creative director, Ngxokolo oversees the production of every piece; only natural wool and mohair are used; the brand’s design blueprint consists of nine colours. opposite Besides clothing, MaXhosa by Laduma includes homeware such as rugs.


STUDIO VISIT

‘What I didn’t know when I was starting out was the power of including family in the vision, and organically, MaXhosaby Laduma is a family business’

THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 33


44

STANLEY AVE REVIVAL

On the dawn of its 15th birthday, Jo’burg’s pre-eminent workplay precinct has been put under the looking glass, studied and polished, emerging as a flagship destination for the city TEXT MILA CREWE-BROWN PHOTOGRAPHS GRAEME WYLLIE

this page (clockwise from top left) The Storer by Lisa Storer; Rowdy Bags leather duffels; Odrin founder Taire Avbovbo; Bonsai Studio by Henk Swanepoel is an outdoor offering in one of the leafy courtyards at 44 Stanley; Alister Eugene Koeresies of Rowdy Bags. opposite The Storer, with its mix of jewellery, homeware and accessories.


EXPLORE

CHECK OUT Odrin x @odrin_menswear

Rowdy Bags x @rowdy_bags

KuNa Kids x @kunakids

Chocoloza x @chocolozabelgianchocolates

The Storer x @ thestorer.co

Milestone Kitchens x @milest0ne_kitchens

evotees of Jo’burg’s charismatic, mixed-use hub 44 Stanley will have noticed a subtle, but manifest change in the past year or so. 44 Stanley’s combination of creative studios, bespoke stores, restaurants and cafés is a recipe that’s defined its success. Coupled with its urban industrial edge as a result of its location on the fringe of town, and its outdoorsy layout of leafy, store-lined courtyards, the precinct offers a curated, multifaceted experience that turns the ubiquitous mall model on its head. As it approaches its 15th birthday, 44 Stanley is thriving more than ever. There’s a palpable magic to the place, which buzzes with a diverse crowd; here an interior design studio, a coffee roaster and a tailor can co-exist. Thanks to a string of changes, the precinct has truly come into its own. ‘44 Stanley has never been a traditional retail space, and we recognised a couple of years ago that we needed to be innovative and relevant to survive tough trading conditions,’ explains Vicky Ross, Property Manager for Group 44. Beyond marketing for the precinct, Ross hand-picks and manages its occupants, giving careful consideration to the bigger picture. In addition to placing varied new tenants, they’ve carved up a few of the larger spaces, giving more opportunity to prospective stores and studios. ‘We sought out new businesses that are not only complementary to our existing ones, but are unique, independent and local, with strong and passionate management,’ Ross says. Celebrated Cape brands like Mungo and Pichulik recently elected to make 44 Stanley their Jo’burg home, while emerging businesses such as Bed Bath and Body, with its locally made bodycare products, have launched here. When the popular The Leopard eatery closed its doors last year, it was at 44 Stanley that it chose to open its new deli and café. With the increasing need for tailored, lifestyle-centric retail spaces in the city of Jo’burg, 44 Stanley is at the heart of that movement, and gaining in popularity. 44 Stanley Ave, Milpark, Johannesburg. 44stanley.co.za

THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 35


‘44 Stanley has never been a traditional retail space, and we recognised a couple of years ago that we needed to be innovative and relevant to survive tough trading conditions’

Milestone Kitchens

Rowdy Bags

KuNa Kids’ Shingai Nyagweta


EXPLORE ODRIN ‘We want to build a complete wardrobe of high-quality, affordable basics, with the average man in mind,’ says Lagos-born Taire Avbovbo of his impressive menswear label, whose offerings are made using the finest natural fibres like cotton and wool. Having earned his MBA in America, Avbovbo later came back to Africa, working as a management consultant for retail brands. When he finally gave in to his calling and opened Odrin, Avbovbo brought a rare mix of sartorial savvy and business know-how to the table. ‘When I’m really on point, I feel that, given my background, there are few people who can do what I do,’ he says. odrin.com

KUNA KIDS

Milestone Kitchens

Zimbabwean-born Shingai Nyagweta had a diplomatic upbringing in Europe for most of her youth, but on her return to Africa, she says she was suddenly ‘thrown into a world of colour’. ‘I wanted to incorporate African prints into pieces with modern styling.’ Having honed her skills at The Foschini Group, Marianne Fassler and the Branson Centre of Entrepreneurship, it was Nyagweta’s late niece Kunashe who gave rise to the brand KuNa Kids, which became the source of multiple orders for print-centric garments. Today, Nyagweta’s store vibrates with her collection of kids‘ clothing and accessories made from traditional ankara, chitenge and shweshwe fabrics. kuna.co.za

THE STORER Chocoloza’s Vicki Bain

The Storer is undeniably one of the best-looking shops to arrive at 44 Stanley. Globetrotting owner Lisa Storer’s mix of homeware, accessories and jewellery has been created by community elders, craftsmen and small-town artisans who craft by hand using sustainable resources. The brand came about when Storer was seeking something more meaningful than the mass-produced, cost-cutting retail market that many major names have created. Artfully styled in her large shop, you’ll find an exotic array of woollen rugs, woven textiles, brass tableware and ceramics, all bearing the marks of their makers. thestorer.co

ROWDY BAGS Heavy with the smell of leather, rows of beautifully crafted slings, totes and backpacks hang in this small store, offering customers well-priced and well-made classics with a social conscience. It was founder Nick Meinert’s grandfather’s backpack that inspired the making of a new generation of honest leather staples. ‘Our whole philosophy is about giving back,’explains Jo’burgbased Operations Manager Alister Eugene Koeresies – so much so that the brand empowers its staff by housing and upskilling them. rowdybags.com

CHOCOLOZA Odrin’s Avbovbo

Devoted environmentalist Vicki Bain’s Chocoloza beckons you from outside with a cocoa-scented trail and casual café scene. It’s here that Bain’s allwomen team crafts the brand’s famous range of artisanal chocolates. Taking the best of Belgium and partnering it with the best of Africa, Bain uses only Belgian chocolate with no artificial additives, and incorporates locally, sustainably farmed ingredients like granadilla, macadamia nuts, berries and coffee from 44 Stanley’s Bean There roastery. It’s not surprising to learn that Bain lived in Belgium for over a decade, qualifying as a chocolatier under the guidance of the world’s foremost chocolate artisans. chocoloza.co.za

MILESTONE KITCHENS KwaZulu-Natal-based Silvia Miles launched the first physical store of her online business Milestone Kitchens at 44 Stanley just a few months ago. With its stylish interior, this alluring space offers customers the opportunity to experience the brand’s solid-wood, modular kitchen units in a lifestyle setting. We love that Milestone Kitchens has filled a gap in the market for locally made, competitively priced, free-standing units, from its kitchen-ina-cupboard to its steel-topped pastry island. Our top pick is the Njabulo bookshelf, with its spacious built-in sleeping area designed for pet dogs or cats. milestonekitchens.co.za THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 37


SHORTLIST Palm of our Hand brooch and medallion, both by L‘Enchanteur

1. SOULL OGUN-ANT OF L’ENCHANTEUR

She’s one of my dear friends an a jewellery designer who’s mad of my most cherished pieces. 2. MEXICO CITY, MEXICO

x @linaviktor

linaviktor.com

The Mexican capital is my best city to date. I always have super-transcendental experiences there. 3. WHAT HAPPENED, MISS SIMONE?

Tripé chair by Lina Bo Bardi

‘Nandikeshvara’, 2009, by Nandipha Mntambo

Aromanticism by Moses Sumney

With work comprising painting, performance, sculpture and installation, Viktor is a talented conceptual artist who has practised across many disciplines Viktor describes her work as dealing with greater macrocosmic issues that affect humanity at large – posing questions about our place within the universe, while also being informed by her cultural heritage and landscape. ‘I’m always concerned with my/our place as Africans within the current ecosystem – what that connotes regarding the accepted misrepresentation, stereotypes and misinformation that are so prevalent,’ she says. As an artist, she believes it is her mandate to show what’s readily accessible, but often dismissed and overlooked by society. As someone of Liberian heritage, her current work is focused on excavating lost histories and historical realities, with her Constellations series being born of her impulse to encapsulate a big idea within a minimalist palette – ‘as minimalist as 24ct gold can be within a contemporary reading,’ she explains. Woven into the series are symbols and cosmologies from different cultures that have existed throughout time. Her references to languages and symbolisms of African historical civilisations and empires are a way of reminding us of where Africans originated – before the destruction that came with power and dominance. When observing Viktor’s work, one also gets a sense of futuristic elements, something she sees as an important lingual space for many artists of African descent. ‘Our recent history has been so stymied and curtailed by forces, of which we are all aware, that to reminisce on recent history is both illogical and painful. We foresee and imagine rich and fantastic futures, as that’s the only way to actually progress through the wreckage,’ she says. Viktor is currently showing at the Manifesta 12 Palermo until November 2018, and is also in production for her first solo museum show, which opens in October 2018 at New Orleans Museum.

This documentary about Nina Simone’s life really captured my soul. 4. NANDIPHA MNTAMBO

She’s currently my favourite artist on the continent – I love her work. 5. LINA BO BARDI

A house by the ocean designed in this Brazilian architect’s signature style is on my design and decor wish-list. 6. 24CT GOLD-PLATED ARTISANAL RIYA CLUTCH BY PEET DULLAERT

It’s a stylish and covetable piece, with stunning craftsmanship. 7. AROMANTICISM BY MOSES SUMNEY

I adore Sumney’s debut album and always have it playing on repeat. 8. COCONUT OIL AND OLIVE OIL

These are the two beauty and skincare products I can’t live without. 9. BRION CEMETERY IN SAN VITO D’ALTIVOLE, ITALY

This is my favourite work of architecture by Italian architect Carlo Scarpa. I also love the Museo Tamayo in Mexico City’s Chapultepec Park. 10. CHRIS OFILI

If money weren’t an object, I’d buy any of Ofili’s artworks, especially those that were on display at his Within Reach exhibition at the Venice Biennale in 2003. A section of ‘Within Reach 7’, 2002-2003, by Chris Ofili

PHOTOGAPH GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES/ALAMY

LINA IRIS VIKTOR


make a

statement.

Atlantis

086 166 7242 www.douglasjones.co.za VISIT OUR SHOWROOMS CAPE TOWN B1 Prime Park, Mocke Road, Diep River 021 706 7251 JOHANNESBURG 1SIXTY Jan Smuts Avenue, Rosebank 011 447 4199


SHOPPING PHOTOGRAPH HOTEL SAINT-MARC BY DIMORE STUDIO, ©PHILIPPE SERVENT/HANSLUCAS

DE TAILS • DECOR • TRENDS • TIPS • PALE T TE • SURFACES

Discover the three decor trends on our radar (p44), an array of chairs with unexpected shapes, colours, materials and finishes (p48), inspiring tech innovations shown at this year’s Milan Design Week (p50) and our expert guide to incorporating colour into your home (p52)


Soft blanket R399, H&M Home

Ambit pendant light by Muuto POA, CRÉMA Creative TRC 7 tiles R540 each, Opia Design

Egg of Columbus ceiling lamp by Seletti from R1 173, Generation

Tamegroute server R900, The Storer

Free-form malachite earrings R1 500, Matter of Fakt

MINTY

Fresh Snowball vase R6 240, Roche Bobois

From bottle and sage to avocado and emerald, green can be used as an energising base colour or accent in any space Velvet seat cushion R149, H&M Home The Klein wall light R5 600, Studio 19

L’Oiseau accessory by Vitra R1 687, CUBE Bell sidetable by ClassiCon R47 000, Limeline

Slit side-table by HAY R3 787, CRÉMA Madame O chair R9 150, Roche Bobois Alexander McQueen Fall/Winter 2018, Paris Fashion Week

Unearth wallpaper in WPL0203 R570/m2, Lemon

No 8 footrest R1 999, Sofacompany.com

Henry three-seater sofa R26 995, Block & Chisel

Forest green vase R4 900, La Grange Interiors


Cape cane cupboard by NM Design R10 500, Design Store

TREND ALERT

Hanging rattan pendant light R2 330, Cécile & Boyd Supernova occasional chair R17 995, La Grange Interiors

Dante fabric in Aqua R863/m, St Leger & Viney

PHOTOGRAPHS IMAXTREE.COM

Emperor suspension lamp by Moooi R55 850, Weylandts

N AT U R A L

Touch Chanel Fall/Winter 2018, Paris Fashion Week

Bamboo lantern with handles R899, Zara Home

Organic woven materials are making waves, with rattan, wicker and cane being incorporated into a multitude of designs

Neem U Sitplek bench by NM Design R14 700, Design Store

Fora Mesa table lamp R24 003, CRÉMA

Armand Bridge chair from R25 360, Roche Bobois Bodystuhl chair by GTV POA, Generation

Hideout armchair by GTV POA, Generation

Rattan cage side-table R1 999, Zara Home

Grasscloth Stripe III fabric in Multi R948/m, St Leger & Viney


TREND ALERT Round Mosaic stool R4 400, Cécile & Boyd

Jenga dining table R19 500, SHF Jacquardweave blanket R599, H&M Home

Dessins Dans Le Sable wallcovering in RM 223-80 from the Washi collection by Élitis POA, St Leger & Viney

‘Paris’ print from R1 272, Lemon

IN

Mango wood and bone tile box R420, Cécile & Boyd Platner side chair from R57 000, Limeline

Line

Maison Lacroix end table from R17 000, Roche Bobois

Whether bold or fine, horizontal or vertical, stripes add visual appeal and instant interest

Striped vases by Bosa from R9 075 each, Limeline

Optical suspension lamp by Lee Broom R10 418, CRÉMA

Mungo Mali cushion covers from R590 each, Mungo

Isabel Marant Fall/Winter 2018, Paris Fashion Week

DS1 table from the Maestri collection by Cassina R78 450, True Design

Scallop bedside unit R11 100, Studio 19 Love Run blanket R3 650, Design Store


hot seat Designers continue to re-invent the classic armchair with unexpected shapes, colours, materials and finishes, proving that the possibilities are endless when it comes to this quintessential piece of furniture PHOTOGRAPHS SARAH DE PINA PRODUCTION AND STYLING SANRI PIENAAR PRODUCTION ASSISTANT PIETER VON WIELLIGH

(clockwise, from bottom left) Seraphinite round rug R70 690, Roche Bobois; Lehnstuhl-Hocker footstool by GTV R12 837, Generation; Diagonal stripe wooden vase R995, Block & Chisel; May teak coffee table R7 995, La Grange Interiors; Paint in Pebble Drift 4, Dulux; La Bohème stool by Philippe Starck for Kartell R3 105, True Design; mantelpiece urn by Clementina R2 550, Kim Sacks Gallery; Tonga stool R328, Amatuli; Zig-zag vase in Cobalt by Clementina R1 815, Kim Sacks Gallery; Bump tall vase by Tom Dixon R2 764, CRÉMA; block armchair from R8 739, Mezzanine; Around coffee table by Thomas Bentzen for Muuto R8 680, CRÉMA; Satellite lamp by Foscarini R10 800, CRÉMA


ETCETERA

Cone chair by Verner Panton for Vitra R27 133, CUBE Gallery

Smoking chair in Leather from R17 000, Egg Designs

Caleb chair R13 000, SHF

Afteroom lounge chair by Afteroom for Menu from R4 226, Establishment.co.za

Silver Lake armchair by Patricia Urquiola for Moroso R36 420, True Design

Ava armchair R13 599, Sofacompany.com

Loafer lounge chair by Space Copenhagen for &tradition R36 920, CRÉMA

Fil Noir armchair by Minotti R52 350, Limeline

Bruce tan chair R5 499, @home

Niels occasional chair R12 110, Weylandts

Derek armchair in Velvet R21 000, Anatomy Design

Cité armchair by Jean Prouvé for Vitra from R35 435, CUBE Gallery

THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 000


TECH

INSPIRING INNOVATIONS With its focus on the intersection between technology and design, this year’s Milan Design Week included a range of installations and products created to enhance our lifestyles in both a digital and aesthetic way NEW DIMENSIONS T Spanish technology firm Nagami made its official debut with a collection of 3D-printed chairs created in collaboration with three renowned designers to highlight how technology and design are influencing each other more than ever. Named Brave New World: Re-thinking Design in the New Age of Technology, the exhibition introduced the Bow chair and Rise chair, both by Zaha Hadid Architects, the Robotica TM stool by Ross Lovegrove and the Peeler chair by Daniel Widrig. By crafting every detail – from the early conception of a product to the software that brings it to life – and combining computational design with large-scale robotic 3D printing, Nagami reveals how technology is enabling creatives to realise visions they never could have before. nagami.design

Peeler chair by Daniel Widrig

50 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE COLOUR ISSUE

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF SONOS, SONY, ©NAGAMI AND ©ANGEL FERNANDEZ NUÑEZ

TEXT KAREN TENNENT

SOUND EFFECTS S United by their mutual commitment to creating accessible, high-quality offerings with a modern, appealing feel, Sonos electronics teamed up with Danish design brand HAY in a bold reinterpretation of the Sonos One smart speaker that explores the convergence of product, colour and sound design in the home. The HAY Sonos One Limited Edition collection presents the same iconic compact speaker loved for its voice control function, only this time in a range of five shades based on HAY’s palette. It’s a breath of fresh air for a company whose design language revolves around black and white tones, and emphasises Sonos’s mission to produce products that are beautiful, but also able to blend into their environment. sonos.com

SENSORY STIMULATION X Reflecting the brand’s aim of exploring new forms of communication through unobtrusive technology that blends seamlessly into our everyday lives, Sony’s Hidden Senses exhibition encouraged visitors to immerse themselves in ‘a sensorial experience visualising an enriched lifestyle for a new tomorrow’. Sony unveiled five case study rooms, each one showcasing different ways in which design is applied to technology to interact with people, spaces and things. From a shelf whose material changes according to the needs of whatever’s placed on it to objects that can be used as intuitive interfaces that receive information without a smartphone or tablet, Hidden Senses presented a digitally motivated, design-driven world in which the practical and personal combine. sony.net


Diversity of Style

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Laser II PU Leather

Hue Linen Blend

Mercury Crib 5 Performance PU

New Romo Basics collections from

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Port Elizabeth 041 373 1266


MOODY HUES Infused with earthy undertones and calming shades, the dark colour palette has been given a modern update. Up the opulence factor by introducing artisanal furniture and vibrant bursts in sumptuous materials, such as drapery in gold silk and upholstery in cobalt velvet

PHOTOGRAPH SARAH DE PINA

Acrylic PVA paint in Scottsdale Brown, Dulux

(clockwise, from bottom left) Santorini rug from R29 000, Paras Carpets; Hilfford Grey glazed jug R1 320, Egg Designs; Quartz fabric in col 661 R664/m, Halogen International; Senulo stool R6 200, Kim Sacks Gallery; acrylic PVA paint in Scottsdale Brown, Dulux; Stompers R580 each, Amatuli; Sprout Mushroom side-table by Frank Bohm Studio R9 545, Paul Alexander Collective; Hex vase in Brass by Ferm Living R1 300, Mezzanine; Blue Sand paperweight ball R895, Block & Chisel; Hex vase in Rose by Ferm Living R610, Mezzanine; clay pot R680 and Banana ring R68, both Amatuli; Grivas side-table R5  600, Studio 19; tall hand-blown tumbler R136 and short hand-blown tumbler R127, both by Laurie Wiid van Heerden at Wiid Design; marbled resin tray R700, Studio 19; Magical fabric in Solar R320/m, Hertex


PHOTOGRAPH GUILLAUME GRASSET

TOOLBOX

THE ALCHEMY OF COLOUR From paint to pattern, moody to muted, this is your expert guide to incorporating colour into your home TEXT KAREN TENNENT COMPILED BY SANRI PIENAAR ASSISTANT PIETER VON WIELLIGH


‘AFFORDABILITY AND ACCESSIBILITY IS THE NEXT BIG THING IN FABRICS, AND PEOPLE ARE EMBRACING TEXTURES SUCH AS TWEEDS, COARSE LINENS AND VELVETS THAT BLUR THE LINES OF CONVENTION. DON’T BE SCARED OF PATTERN: INTRODUCE IT VIA ACCENTS SUCH AS SCATTER CUSHIONS OR EVEN STATEMENT FURNITURE. STICK TO TWO OR THREE CLASHES TO CREATE INTERESTING TENSION.’ – GARTH WASTIE, U&G FABRICS

(clockwise, from bottom left) Princeton fabric in Terracotta by Jim Thompson R1 939/m, T&Co Fabrics; Chanel fabric in Brownie R805/m, Home Fabrics; Belfast linen in Terracotta R1 090/m, St Leger & Viney; Inca fabric in Tiger's Eye by Jim Thompson R5 103/m, T&Co Fabrics; Ballito fabric in Jungle R736/m, Koolhide fabric in Celery from the Smooth Move collection R1 138/m and Bamako fabric in Sugar Cane from the Terra Nova collection R1 472/m, all Hertex; Zebra fabric in Chartreuse R943/m, Lula Fabrics; Harvard fabric in 11 R335/m U&G Fabrics; Batik fabric in Charcoal R869/m, Home Fabrics

GRAPHIC WALLPAPER

Pay attention to size and select a pattern in relation to your space

(from left) Gesneden Blad wallpaper in ochre and black from the Het Bos collection by Sarah Corynen R752/m2, Robin Sprong; Washi wallcovering in RM 225 80 from the Les Baguettes de Masako collection R5 344/panel, St Leger & Viney; Blocks 3 wallpaper R570/m2, Lemon

WAYS WITH WALLS With a little bit of know-how, wallpaper can be used to transform any interior. Wallcoverings with vertical stripes or patterns will make a ceiling appear higher and give the illusion of space, while horizontal motifs can make a room feel wider and longer. If the area you’re adorning is a compact one, go for small, tight prints as opposed to large, open patterns, which work best in expansive interiors. Add texture with wallpaper in fabrics such as grasscloth, linen and sisal, and if more light is what you’re after, try offerings with a luminescent metallic sheen.


TOOLBOX

RETRO PALETTES Just as in furnishings, vintage styles are making a comeback, with terracotta, ochre and rich brown tones taking centre stage on the colour front. Pair with muddy greens, African-inspired patterns and organic shapes and textures for a refreshed look

PHOTOGRAPH SARAH DE PINA

Acrylic PVA paint in Sumatran Melody, Dulux

(clockwise, from bottom left) Tibetan sheepskin throw R1 995, Weylandts; Bozo People ceramic vessel R5  800, Kim Sacks Gallery; Kyoto side-table R5  083, Mezzanine; Treviso vase by VG New Trend R10  300, Casarredo; acrylic PVA paint in Sumatran Melody, Dulux; Ode vase in Gold by Sebastian Herkner R7  860, Spilhaus; Root teak side-table R2  200, La Grange Interiors; Chinese douppion fabric in Aqua R1  070/m, Halogen International; Leather Smith chair R9 900, Studio 19; Ethiopian Milk woven vessel R10 800, Kim Sacks Gallery


RICH SHADES

PHOTOGRAPH SARAH DE PINA

Acrylic PVA paint in Emerald Delight 4, Dulux

Whether used on a wall, window frame, furniture or accessories, jewel tones make a bold statement and are bang on trend. Create contrast by offsetting emerald, indigo or amethyst hues with monochromatic styling

How to introduce saturated tones into your home Smaller spaces such as a guest bathroom can take head-to-toe colour, so go all out and paint the walls, skirtings, ceiling and finishes the same colour. If you‘re on a budget, paint areas that will highlight your favourite features, such as the wall or mantel surrounding a fireplace or a ceiling with a standout pendant light or chandelier.

(from left) Paint in Caramelo, Dulux; Paint in Plush Velvet 3, Dulux; Paint in Golden Harvest, Plascon; Paint in Velvet Pansy, Plascon; Paint in Floral Fantasy, Plascon; Paint in Sea Urchin, Dulux


TOOLBOX (clockwise, from bottom left) Portman side-table R9 660, Lemon; short handblown tumbler R127 and tall hand-blown tumbler R136, both by Laurie Wiid van Heerden at Wiid Design; Magical fabric in Pearl Blue R333/m, Hertex; acrylic PVA paint in Emerald Delight 4, Dulux; The Silo lamp R7  600, Studio 19; Lozi bowl R388, Amatuli; Sonny carafe by Seletti R1  725, Generation; Bump cone vase by Tom Dixon R2  339, CRÉMA; Showcase glass soap bell R1 795, La Grange Interiors; Copycat lamp by Michael Anastassiades for FLOS R15 299, CRÉMA; Sonny goblet by Seletti R1 665, Generation; LC7 swivel chair in green enamel by Charlotte Perriand for Cassina R46 047, True Design

FREYA LINCOLN’S 10 COLOUR RULES A colour specialist with over 30 years’ experience, Lincoln is renowned for her designer’s eye and ability to create bespoke paint hues and specialised effects 1. Light Light is the most important factor when choosing colour, so always check shades in the area where they’ll be painted. 2. Surroundings Look at a wall colour in conjunction with the floor and in the area where you’re going to paint it. What looks good in one space doesn’t necessarily look good in another. 3. Paint swatches Always assess swatches through a tube or isolated with your fingers to give you a better idea of the actual colour. 4. Furnishings Put the flooring, curtaining and furnishing fabric together with your wall colour to get a general impression of the overall interior effect you want to create. Textures and colours bounce off one another, so they must all be in balance. 5. White shades Use white as a colour and not as a default. It’s better to apply an off-white instead of white-out-of-a-tin, as this has a grey shadow, whereas an off-white has a warmer feel. 6. Trims Paint skirtings, doors, cornices and mouldings an off-white hue to soften the lines of a room and achieve a rounded look. 7. Dark rooms Avoid trying to lighten a room by painting it white, because it will still have the same quantity of light. Rather embrace the shadowiness and use a colour – even a dark one – for impact.

‘PAINT SHOULDN’T JUST BE ABOUT THE COLOUR THAT YOU PUT ON THE WALL, BUT RATHER HOW YOU MAKE THE MOST OF THAT COLOUR. PAIR RICH SHADES WITH NEUTRALS FOR BALANCE, SUCH AS FOREST GREEN WITH LIGHT YELLOW HUES AND INK BLUE WITH BLUSH PINK TONES.’ – PALESA RAMAISA, DULUX

8. Accent walls Consider your surrounding wall colours and floor before painting a bright or bold accent wall. 9. Ceilings Don’t be afraid of using stronger colours on a ceiling – it can look fabulous. 10. Colour chart Instead of choosing a colour from a chart, get a paint sample and apply it to a section of wall before making your decision. freyalincoln.com THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 57


MUTED PASTELS A staple in the neutral sphere, soft pastels have developed over the years to become ultra-modern and fashionable, especially when coupled with black steel, smoky glass, light timber and tactile finishes

Double Velvet paint in Hint of Green, Plascon

PHOTOGRAPH SARAH DE PINA

(clockwise, from bottom left) 280 zig-zag chair by Gerrit Thomas Rietveld for Cassina R25 782, True Design; Kyoto side-table R5  083, Mezzanine; Lorraine desk light R7 500, Anatomy Design; Chinese douppion fabric in Pistachio R1  070/m, Halogen International; acrylic PVA paint in Pebble Drift 4 R365/5L, Dulux; More vase R680, Mezzanine; Bubble vase stylist’s own; Max Beam side-table by Ludovica + Roberto Palomba for Kartell R4 877, True Design; double velvet paint in Hint of Green, Plascon; Next armchair in black and white by il Loft R58  000, Maldini; suspension lamp R16 445, Generation; Illusion rug in Gold R50 950, Roche Bobois


TOOLBOX

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‘Print technology has allowed wallpaper design to push past the standard pattern repeat and be used in new ways. While a design may look unusual by itself, it can take on an entirely different meaning when placed in the correct space.’ – KEVIN FRANKENTAL, LEMON

‘SOFT PASTELS ARE BIG RIGHT NOW AND WILL CONTINUE TO BE SO INTO SUMMER, ESPECIALLY ALL SHADES OF MILLENNIAL PINK – FROM SALMON TO CRUSHED BERRY, WHICH PAIR WELL WITH MINT GREEN – AS WELL AS TERRACOTTA. THE ONE-WALL WALLPAPER TREND IS OUT: RATHER OPT FOR WALLPAPER ON ALL WALLS, INCLUDING AROUND CORNERS.’

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– MONIQUE VANDERLINDEN, HERTEX

‘From textured, dynamic prints to chinoiserie, wallpaper is breaking boundaries and being used to reinvigorate blank walls and give interiors a stylish update. Skip the feature wall idea and spread it across all four walls – wallpaper today is even being used on ceilings. A wallcovering brand that’s known for pushing the envelope is Arte, boasting unique offerings with suede padded finishes in cane and lattice designs – they’re just spectacular. When choosing what styles or designs to use in your own home, be bold – it’s only wallpaper.’ – MARC SHOTLAND, HOME FABRICS

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‘Making your home look and feel well curated can easily be accomplished through the use of a great geometric pattern. There’s a big movement towards revamped and modernised ancient African and Asian patterns, with muted colours such as greys, bronzes, whites, beiges and blush pinks coming out on top.’ – ROBIN SPRONG, ROBIN SPRONG WALLPAPERS

(top, from left) Tribe 2 wallpaper R570/m2 and Check wallpaper R570/m2, both Lemon; Line wallpaper in 80700 from the Oculaire collection by Arte R1 366/m; Fanfare wallpaper from the Belvoir collection by Matthew Williamson R3 716/roll, Metric wallpaper in 80504 from the Oculaire collection by Arte R6 169/m and Line wallpaper in 80709 from the Oculaire collection by Arte R1 366/m, all Home Fabrics; Dappled Water wallpaper in peach and green by Tiphaine Alston R752/m2 and Marble wallpaper in Sand by Pappenpop Grafik R752m2, both Robin Sprong; Eldorado wallpaper in VP 880 20 from the Atelier d’Artiste collection by Élitis R5 415/roll and Kandy wallpaper in VP 750 31 from the Her Majesty collection by Élitis R5 093/panel, both St Leger & Viney

‘AS THE PLASCON NEUTRAL OF THE YEAR, AMADEUS IS A COLOUR WITH A RARE BALANCE: IT’S BOTH EXTREMELY USABLE AND REALLY INTERESTING.’ – KERSTIN ESER, PLASCON

Paint in Amadeus, Plascon


Pattern play

(from left) Melusine fabric in Sweet Nymph R1 754/m, Broderique linen in Tangerine R1 807/m and Garden Party fabric in Fruit Punch R1 860/m, all by Gert Voorjans for Jim Thompson, T&Co Fabrics (bottom of page) La Perle trim in Crocus by Jim Thompson R496/m, T&Co Fabrics

‘A two-tone wall is easy to achieve and creates depth and interest. Paint two different colours (such as Rooibos and Belle Aurore, used here), one below and one above dado height. The unlikely mix of rich, earthy reds and pink hues results in the perfect warming contrast.’ – Plascon

‘Prints today are featuring classical painterly themes in unexpected colour combinations, incorporating what were previously considered to be clashing colours to create a visual vibration that’s both exciting and exhilarating.’ – Tanya Sturgeon, T&Co Fabrics

TWO TONE Paint in African Adventure, Dulux

Paint in Peony Blooms, Plascon

Paint in Cool Spring, Plascon

Paint in Spring Breeze, Dulux

When painting a wall one colour in two slightly different shades, apply the darker hue on the lower area to conceal dirt and scuff marks, and ground the room. A lighter shade on top will draw the eye up and help make a space feel higher and bigger.

‘Be bold and play with colour, but also look at what colours already exist within your space. There’s often a common shade that can be identified within our personal spaces, so take a moment to identify that first. When combining clashing hues, the trick is to make use of the colour wheel – you’ll never go wrong if you pay attention to tonal, harmonious and complementary pairings.’ – Palesa Ramaisa, Dulux

‘YOU CAN EASILY ADD BRIGHT COLOURS WITHOUT MAKING HUGE CHANGES TO WHAT YOU ALREADY HAVE: CONTRAST THE COLOUR OF THE PIPING ON PLAIN-COLOURED SCATTERS, BACK A VIBRANT PATTERN WITH AN INTERESTING PLAIN, OR USE A BRIGHT RED TO FRAME A BLACK AND WHITE PRINT.’ – GAIL BUTLER, HALOGEN INTERNATIONAL


TOOLBOX

CONTRASTING BRIGHTS A vibrant, clashing colour scheme may feel daunting, but when executed correctly, it’s a rewarding risk. The key is to give your design balance by mixing complementary shades in a range of saturated and muted tones. Alternatively, place bright patterned additions against a neutral backdrop

PHOTOGRAPH SARAH DE PINA

Double Velvet paint in Violet Dew, Plascon

(clockwise, from bottom left) Quartz fabric in col 707 R664/m, Halogen International; Double Velvet paint in Violet Dew, Plascon; All vase R820, Mezzanine; Verona Italian marble bust R6 850, Billy Moon; Ripple champagne saucers by Ferm Living R660 for set of 2, Mezzanine; Medina server in Antique Brass R6 900, La Grange Interiors; Next armchair in yellow by il Loft R55 000, Maldini; Lenti vase R4  588, Roche Bobois; Blue Sand paperweight ball R895, Block & Chisel; Grivas side-table R5  600, Studio 19; Love Bean vase by Red Hot Glass R9  315, Paul Alexander Collective; Santorini rug from R29  000, Paras Carpets; No 9 footrest R2  499, Sofacompany.com


HOMES

PHOTOGRAPH MANOLO YLLERA

CAPE TOWN • PARIS • BARCELONA • JOHANNESBURG

Inside a curvaceous 70s Mediterranean villa in Cape Town (p64), an architect’s blue-andgreen, four-storey family home in Paris (p74) a charming restored apartment in Barcelona (p84) and a contemporary abode in Johannesburg with an elegant pared-back aesthetic (p94)


this page A sense of calm prevails in the living room of this villa in Newlands, Cape Town, where everything has a curve – from the walls to the ceiling and even the fireplace. opposite In the light-filled, all-white kitchen, homeowners Anna and Jorge kept to a simple palette of marble worktops, oak floors and track lighting. ‘I don’t like downlighters,’ says Anna. ‘They make me feel like I’m in a hotel.’


HOME CAPE TOWN

MEDITERRANEAN MODERN Restrained use of colour and savvy design have transformed this curvaceous ’70s Mediterranean villa in Newlands into a svelte and timeless family retreat TEXT KERRYN FISCHER PRODUCTION LUANNE TOMS PHOTOGRAPHS ELSA YOUNG/FRANK FEATURES

THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 65


this page A carpet of ivy clads the exterior walls, emphasising their curvaceous nature while taking the edge off the bright, white façade. opposite (from left) Jorge reclines on a Tulip chair by Eero Saarinen in the informal dining area just off the kitchen; the airy entrance hall is home to a driftwood sculpture from The Barnard Gallery and an industrial rope reel that’s been repurposed as a table for collectibles.


HOME CAPE TOWN

he family home that film producer Anna Mira D’Ecole and her film director husband Jorge Rubia share with their twin daughters, Greta and Sofia (10), strikes an incongruent pose in the Cape Town neighbourhood of Newlands village where genteel Victorian homesteads, faux Georgian mansions and Cape Dutch hybrids abound. With its curvy white walls and exaggerated arches overgrown with ivy, the house has a compelling charm heightened by the way in which it’s cleverly set back from the road with a wide, boulevard-style entrance leading grandly up to the front door. Designed and built by architect Peter Robson in 1970, the abode was bought by Jorge in 1990 more for the extravagance of its spaces than aesthetic reasons. ‘It was a typical Spanish-style adobe house that, despite its dark, cavernous rooms, had ample space for a home office and studios where I could indulge my practice of the arts,’ he says. Born in Barcelona and with a peripatetic childhood spent in various South American and African countries, Jorge’s irreverent eye had finally found a place where, in homage to the home’s architectural roots and inspired by Frida Kahlo’s house in Mexico, he could paint the walls blue and layer them with his collections of Art Deco furniture, African art, acoustic guitars and old cameras. But things took a turn in 2001 when Jorge fell in love with Italianborn Anna while on a job in Cairo. Anna, who studied set design in Milan at the Brera Academy of Fine Arts, possessed an ordered, style-driven aesthetic which, then as now, was in total contrast to Jorge’s love of chaos. Three months later they were married, with Anna swapping the contemporary calm of her Milan apartment for the colourful clutter of Newlands. ‘Our styles were worlds apart,’ she says, ‘but while the interiors didn’t resonate with me, the generosity of space the house ofered did, particularly compared with what I was used to living in, in Italy.’ Over time, Anna toned down Jorge’s penchant for colour by opting for a clean palette of white and grey, although the original brown Bakelite floor tiles and dark wooden doors had to remain until they could renovate. The next few years was a busy time for the couple, with Jorge travelling constantly while Anna continued with Cartello Directors, her agency that represents international directors. Then,

in 2004, Anna founded Bang Bang Films, a service production company renowned for sourcing the best crews to shoot in the most obscure places that flourished thanks to her impeccable aesthetic and reputation for ‘having one of the best little black books in the business’. So much so that an office overhaul with a separate street entrance and easy access to the house became a necessity in 2010. ‘Our twins were born in 2007, so it was important that I had a professional set-up at home that allowed me to be close to them,’ says Anna. Another renovation followed in 2012, where they opened up the spaces to let in light and create more of a connection to the garden. ‘We initially toyed with changing the house substantially and removing some of the curves to make it more symmetrical and square, but we’d have had to demolish the house and blow our budget, so we decided to work with what we had,’ she says. In the end they made few structural changes, letting the curvaceous nature of the house dictate what they could and couldn’t do. ‘As such, the biggest transformation was when we laid the oak wooden floors and painted all the teak doors white,’ says Anna. Today the abode is a clever contrast of organic lines with modern design that enhances the beauty of the interiors, while lightening things up significantly. Thanks to Anna shipping the entire contents of her Milan apartment to Cape Town, names such as Cappellini, Le Corbusier, Gio Ponti, Marcel Breuer and Achille Castiglioni add a certain gravitas to the whimsical, yet solid nature of the architecture. The same is true of the antiques that come from Anna’s family home and Jorge’s collections which still remain, although now cleverly regrouped by Anna in cabinets or as a focal point in one area. ‘I learnt a lot from my friend Charlotte Mello Teggia, who’s a fantastic interior designer and taught me how to mix things,’ says Anna. ‘I didn’t want a super-minimalist space filled with designer furniture, but rather a collection of disparate things we absolutely love that, when put together, could work as a canvas for our life.’ That’s been perfectly achieved, for this home is nothing short of a bravura display of Anna and Jorge’s considerable creative clout. Q bangbangfilms, cartellodirectors.com THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 67


this spread Two gold Oro 220 wall lights by Enzo Catellani and an Arco lamp by Achille Castiglioni illuminate the living area, with its L-shaped sofa from Weylandts and Model LC4 leather and chrome lounger by Le Corbusier. An antique hatbox and an old film projector box have been used as a central coffee table, while wooden stools act as side-tables.


HOME CAPE TOWN

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With its curvy white walls and exaggerated arches, the house has a compelling charm


this page (clockwise, from top left) An inherited cabinet that dates back to the 1400s holds an assortment of objets; the kitchen, with its exquisite light, has an austere simplicity; included in the formal dining room are chairs by Marcel Breuer and an Art Deco cabinet. opposite Ingo Maurer’s Zettel’z chandelier hangs above a dining table by Eero Saarinen.

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The abode is a clever contrast of organic lines with modern design that enhances the beauty of the interiors


HOME CAPE TOWN

THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 71


this page An array of much-loved prints crown the bed in the main bedroom. opposite (clockwise from top left) Greta sits in an Eames lounge chair in the family room, backed by a Gatto lamp by Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni; Anna’s dressing area features a steel Diamond chair by Harry Bertoia; Sofia on the drums in the family room; leading off the family room is Jorge’s art studio.

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This home is nothing short of a bravura display of its owners’ considerable creative clout


THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 73


this spread Greens and blues have been used to demarcate the four floors of architect Anne Geistdoerfer’s family home in Paris, France, and highlight the original central staircase. Two pedestals by Geistdoerfer’s agency Double G combine black oak with white and grey marble tops, while a beaded box from Curiosity Paris echoes the geometric effect on the wall.


HOME PARIS

Colour Code Who better than a pro to experiment with colour? In the home of architect Anne Geistdoerfer of Double G agency, shades of blue and green contrast with black accents, resulting in striking interiors that are cheerful, daring and really successful

TEXT LAURENCE DOUGIER PHOTOGRAPHS NICOLAS MATHÉUS

THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 75


this page (clockwise, from top) The green-hued summer dining room on the top floor includes a small kitchen, allowing for meals to be easily enjoyed on the terrace; polished concrete floors offset detailed Kvitter wallpaper by Hanna Werning for Borüstapeter on the daughters’ level; cleverly restored, the house opens out onto a garden entirely conceived and planted by Guillaume Geistdoerfer.


HOME PARIS

iscovering the house of an architect is always a curiosity – even a privilege – and a rare opportunity to unveil a personality and all its achievements. The new home of Anne Geistdoerfer, co-creator of design and architecture agency Double G, is a colourful refuge perched on the heights of the 18th arrondissement of Paris, France. A real house, with a garden and a large terrace on the last level, it ofers the luxury of living in the city, while giving the feeling of being in the countryside. ‘It was during a construction project with my business partner, Flora de Gastines, that I saw this terraced house standing completely dormant, with an abandoned garden,’ recalls the architect, who was immediately taken with the neglected abode. ‘I wasn’t looking to move, but the discovery radically changed my plans.’ Two years of discussions and an auction sale later, and this exceptional property was hers. ‘I had many sleepless nights before signing for this new life,’ she says. A year of work was needed before Geistdoerfer, her husband and their two daughters, Leia and Colette, could move into the house, which has now been completely transformed. ‘Of the cloistered building with three small apartments and an artist’s studio, only the original staircase remains. I redesigned everything,’ says Geistdoerfer, who adds that the kitchen and libraries in particular were incredibly cramped. Now the building consists of four separate floors, all linked by the spiral staircase. Each level of the house tells a story. The family’s life centres around the garden level, which is entirely dedicated to a kitchen-cum-dining room with a large bay window that opens out onto the vegetable garden. ‘My husband Guillaume loves gardening,’ explains Geistdoerfer. ‘On the property he’s planted vines and fig, pear and apple trees, and also created an incredible kitchen garden.’ The first floor is the domain of the couple’s daughters, who each have a bedroom with a working space, and share a bathroom. Cosy and comfortable, the second level houses the master bedroom and dressing room. Once an ultra-bright artist’s studio with a huge bay window, the third floor is now an open-plan living area that’s been painted duck-egg blue and dotted with photographs, artists’ drawings and furniture, with upholstery carefully dyed to match the walls. Geistdoerfer’s also set up an office for her husband and, on the mezzanine level, a room for friends. Sheltered on the top floor, a summer dining room and large terrace ofer breathtaking views of the rooftops of Paris. Magic. Qdoubleg.fr

THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 77


HOME PARIS this spread What was once an artist’s studio has been redesigned as a living area, where vibrant blue walls complement the original light-wood parquet floors from Didier Cabuy. A vintage chaise longue re-upholstered in Hot Madison fabric by Chivasso is topped with woollen cushions from Lindell & Co, while in the left-hand corner, a photograph by Mathieu Mauvernay is paired with a white lamp by Christophe Delcourt.

‘Of the cloistered building with three small apartments and an artist’s studio, only the original staircase remains. I redesigned everything,’ says Anne

THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 79


this spread Designed by Geistdoerfer, the kitchen combines khaki and light blue with cement tiles from Mosaic del Sur. A white Corian worktop and sink contrast with black lacquer drawers, while a blue carpet from Kinnasand subtly grounds the dining area. Paper suspension lights by Paola Navone for Monoprix hang above the table by Double G.


HOME PARIS

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A real house, with a garden and a large terrace on the last level, it offers the luxury of living in the city, while giving the feeling of being in the countryside

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Each level of the house tells a story

this page A Les Acrobates de Gras N°326 pendant lamp by DCW Editions acts as a graphic focal point in the living area, emphasising the room’s high ceilings. India Mahdavi’s Bluff coffee table is positioned between two Adar couches from Caravane that are lined with duck-egg blue fabric and furnished with peacock-blue smooth velvet (also from Caravane).


HOME PARIS

(clockwise, from top left) Saddle fabric in Marine R550/m, Home Fabrics; Costa Verde wallpaper in Carneiros by Élitis R5 468/m, St Leger & Viney; European FSC oak flooring in Rustic Brushed Mink Grey from the Oliato collection R990/m², Oggie Flooring; Fall wallpaper in Wave R1 656/ roll, Hertex; Loopy Link wallpaper in Teal by Kirkby Design R2 760/ roll, Romo; Terra-stone in Light Grey R41/sheet, Union Tiles; Saddle fabric in Emerald R550/m, Home Fabrics; Nero Marinace polished granite slab R4 600/m², WOMAG; European FSC oak herringbone flooring in Natural Diamond Oil from the Legno Living collection R730/m², Oggie Flooring; Dalmata marble slab R6 900/m², WOMAG; Tumbling Blocks tape in Bleu by Schumacher POA, St Leger & Viney; Modo low sheen PVA paint in Deep Sea Green from R970/20L, Builders; Greek Key embroidered tape in Green by Schumacher POA; and Costa Verde wallpaper in Nacre Vichy by Élitis R6 202/m², both St Leger & Viney THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 83


this spread A New Zealand woollen rug by interior designer Jaime Beriestain dominates the living area of the 260m2 Barcelona apartment that he renovated. From the two Onda (Wave) lounge chairs by Giovanni Offredi in berry suede to Bosco Sodi’s rust-hued artwork ‘Untitled‘, 2007, on the back wall, the space is home to an array of eye-catching pieces in a gradation of red.


HOME BARCELONA

PA S T M A S T E R The contrast of charming original features with arresting modern elements is what gives this restored apartment in Barcelona its edge TEXT KAREN TENNENT PHOTOGRAPHS MANOLO YLLERA

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this page Aitor Ortiz’s photographs of perforated aluminium – ‘Noúmenos 006’, 2013, and ‘Threshold 001’, 2013 – make a graphic statement above a vintage server from the Jaime Beriestain Concept Store, which was customised with a black Nero Marquina marble top and polished gloss finish. opposite Beriestain is the founder of Jaime Beriestain Studio, an award-winning interior design and landscape architecture firm based in Madrid and Barcelona.

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‘I’ve given the apartment a prior history, a past, in order to renovate it completely,’ says Beriestain


HOME BARCELONA

hen tasked with the redesign of a previously unloved office space in Barcelona’s Eixample district, interior designer Jaime Beriestain was quick to determine that a historical approach was the way to go. ‘In designing this apartment, I took my inspiration from the pre-existing patinas, with everything aimed at restoring its yesteryear charm,’ he says of the lightfilled space, which spans 260m2 and includes a large terrace. The main goal of the conversion work was to interact with the previously existing materials, such as traditional Catalan brick vaulting, giving them a sophisticated feel. To achieve this, Beriestain used exclusive elements to ensure that the project was unique, as can be seen in the hallway, which he clad in weathering-steel plates with visible welding at the joints. Cloth-covered electrical wiring was mounted on the walls – some of whose surfaces were carefully recreated in line with the original design – and switches with a certain vintage air were installed, complementing the filament bulbs that were used in the lighting. Copper accents are present in the form of an extractor hood and air-conditioner pipes, and all of these touches combine to create a distinct interior full of character. ‘I’ve given the apartment a prior history, a past, in order to renovate it completely,’ explains Beriestain, who carried out a great deal of preliminary research into both materials and the items used on a daily basis (radiators, copper bathtubs, lighting) to ensure that they provided a harmonious fit with the home’s industrially refined and timeless aesthetic. As a result, everything comes together to form a natural part of the space. The entrance to the apartment is in the kitchen, which – thanks to its location in the central part of the home – receives very little natural illumination. ‘I tried to turn this weakness into a strength. To do so, I conceived a dark space, giving it a cosier, warmer touch with special lighting and Matisse and Smoke patinas, shade atop shade,’ says Beriestain. In contrast, one area of the house was designed as if it were a greenhouse and features a glass roof to take maximum advantage of light, thereby creating a tranquil spot infused with peace. From here, you can look out onto the terrace, with its lush garden that ofers plenty of privacy and encourages you to enjoy meals outdoors. Existing patinas in each of the bedrooms served as inspiration for the rest of the apartment, providing the starting point for developing its other rooms. The paintwork called for a lot of testing to achieve the desired hue and efect, and only once the final colours of the wall paints were decided upon could the end design – with the furniture and works of art to fit them – be created. ‘I believe in subtle colours and delicate tones when painting a home,’ explains Beriestain. ‘This means you can avoid getting bored with them. On the other hand, if you want to create a really powerful efect – like the apartment’s black kitchen – then the initial concept has to make real sense and have a strong argument behind it.’ It’s this carefully considered palette that provides the ideal backdrop for a range of artworks, all expertly selected and arranged to give the apartment rhythm and vibrancy. While Beriestain’s chief mission was to preserve the home’s original charm, the modernity of the art co-exists in perfect harmony with the space’s authenticity: the latter’s heritage sets of and brings out the bright colours and contemporary nature of the artworks and, in turn, the works’ energy helps accentuate the diferent historical details of the apartment. By combining the old with the new, Beriestain has successfully created an abode that embraces the past while simultaneously securing its place in the present. Q beriestain.com

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this spread With its glass roof and French doors that lead out onto the terrace, this light-filled area was designed in a similar manner to that of a greenhouse, and includes a long table adorned with a JWDA Concrete lamp by Jonas Wagell, two photographs from Erwin Olaf’s 2011 series The Keyhole, and a collection of traditionally enamelled clay vases produced in Spain by Beriestain.

It’s this carefully considered palette that provides the ideal backdrop for a range of artworks, all expertly selected and arranged to give the apartment rhythm and vibrancy


HOME BARCELONA

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this page Playing up the fact that it receives very little natural light, Beriestain created a cosy feel in the kitchen by layering dark shades on the walls and incorporating warm copper and wooden elements. opposite ‘Sp95’, 2015, by Yago Hortal is a colourful counterpoint to the breakfast nook‘s neutral palette.


HOME BARCELONA


this spread ‘Painting of Birds’, 2015, by Fernando Prats complements the bed in the bedroom, where a bedspread made of Colombo Guijarro fabric from the Jaime Beriestain collection for Grupo Lamadrid is dressed with a grey alpaca blanket from the Jaime Beriestain Concept Store.


HOME BARCELONA

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this page The beautifully pared-down arrival court of this Johannesburg home – whose timeless interiors were designed by Sumari Krige of La Grange Interiors – was inspired by classic country homes. opposite Flanked by expansive glass windows, the dramatic gallery casts its gaze toward Cornelia Stoop’s ‘Jackal’ sculpture.


HOME JOHANNESBURG

Point of View This contemporary Johannesburg home with country roots bucks residential estate trends and looks outside for inspiration TEXT MILA CREWE-BROWN PHOTOGRAPHS ELSA YOUNG

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this page In the living room, Krige has paired Triboa hanging lamps from La Grange Interiors with a rug from Lund Rug Gallery and a customdesigned Helsinki sofa upholstered in fabric from ROMO. opposite (from left) Mark Swart’s ‘Reading Man’ sculpture awaits visitors from the arrival court and entrance hall; Krige is known for creating carefully balanced interiors.

The home takes inspiration from examples of classic farmhouses, with its dominant rectangular form, pitched, galvanised iron roof and expansive entrance court


HOME JOHANNESBURG

ucked down a gated lane in one of Jo’burg’s best-loved estates, this unassuming home steers clear of grand statements, giving little away at first glance. From the street, a cleanlined, white-walled, barn-style building with a neat roof emerges from its inconspicuous position below road level, more striking for its simplicity than its flashiness. The home takes inspiration from examples of classic farmhouses, with its dominant rectangular form, pitched, galvanised iron roof and expansive entrance court, which makes arrival an occasion in its own right. A stripped-back façade belies what awaits inside, save for a large glass window that peers into a courtyard where Mark Swart’s ‘Reading Man’ sculpture reclines among the tall grass. Stepping through the front door into the entrance area with its low-slung ceiling, the house opens up dramatically and suddenly into a staggering double-volume living area and vast glass wall that ofers the garden up to viewers, determinedly connecting the two. Due to the owners’ love of the outdoors, the view was of utmost importance. Diminishing the separation between inside and out, glazing extends the full length of the northern façade from floor to ceiling, while an axial view from the front door in the south through the glass in the north ensures a strong bond from the outset. ‘This axis from arrival court to garden, by means of exciting serial vision, strengthens the unity of house and garden, making the one part of the other,’ explains Johan Bergenthuin of Bergenthuin Architects. Openings along the way also link the spacious covered veranda with the interior, drawing you out. Together with interior designer Sumari Krige and her team at La Grange Interiors, they were tasked with conceiving an understated and comfortable home, with interiors that wouldn’t date. ‘They wanted a family home, not a showcase,’ Krige recalls of her brief

from the homeowners, a couple who have demanding corporate jobs and are raising two teenagers. While Krige has injected the space with a handful of juicy colours, she’s steered clear of pieces that ‘shout’, and defends her reputation for carefully balanced interiors. Inky blue and aubergine-hued velvets are teamed with warm wood, light grey walls, oak floors and raw concrete, while an inventory of collectable artworks by the likes of Jordan Sweke and Deborah Bell animate the walls. The result is an aesthetic that’s both stylish and relaxed, but designed not to distract from the all-important vistas. In the voluminous living room, Krige opted for a well-positioned sofa and a set of Prato open-backed armchairs, chosen for their low back height and translucency. ‘We anchored the room with a group of transparent pendant lights that we designed in-house,’ she adds of the light feature that links the space with the lofty expanse above it. The open-plan kitchen and lounge area is a nexus for the family, whose lives intersect in this welcoming zone. From the kitchen, with its interactive bar counter and intimate breakfast area, to the cosy TV lounge and study area for the kids, it’s a space designed to cater to everyone’s needs. Upstairs, a sense of calm prevails, thanks to a predominantly pale grey and white scheme, with oak to bring balance. All three bedrooms claim a stellar vantage point over the garden, which was designed by renowned landscape architect Patrick Watson. Together with Rekopane Landscapes, he’s created an understated layout with wild grasses and clipped lawn that steps down a series of small terraces. It’s a low-key plan that capitalises on the scale of the site while concealing neighbours and street traffic with a thicket of trees along its boundaries. Just like the interior, there’s a thread of restraint that runs through the impressive garden, with the two in constant dialogue with each other. Q lagrangeinteriors.co.za, bergenthuin.co.za 

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this page The breakfast area features a Cone Wire light, UP dining chairs and a Max dining table, all from La Grange Interiors. opposite (clockwise from top) Flask lights from La Grange Interiors pick up on the oak inserts in the duco-sprayed kitchen cabinets, which are topped with SileStone quartz; a painting by Samson Mnisi takes pride of place in the main bedroom; mirrored cabinets provide storage in the bathroom.


HOME JOHANNESBURG

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HOME JOHANNESBURG this spread Adjoined to the open-plan kitchen, the veranda features low-slung teak units from La Grange Interiors’ Copenhague range, open-back Passel chairs from their Triboa Bay collection and an outdoor rug from Hertex.

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The result is an aesthetic that’s both stylish and relaxed, but designed not to distract from the allimportant vistas

this page La Grange Interiors’ M light illuminates a custom-designed ED dining table, while above the staircase, Jordan Sweke’s ‘Fragmentary Void No 6’, 2015, echoes the various blue accents present elsewhere in the dining area.


HOME JOHANNESBURG

(clockwise, from top left) African blue slate tile R160/m², Tile Africa; European FSC oak herringbone flooring in Natural Diamond Oil from the Legno Living collection R730/m², Oggie Flooring; Volakas Kyknos polished marble slab POA, The Tile Gallery; Cobble Ridge air carpet in Mellow Ramie from the Lifestyle collection R400/m², Belgotex Floors; Silver Shadow polished tile R1 264/m², WOMAG; Foulards wallpaper in Abaca by Élitis R3 825/roll; and Lin enchanté fabric in Illusion by Élitis R3 932/m, both St Leger & Viney; Chalk Blanco glazed ceramic wall tile R369/m², Italtile; Cashmere Light polished marble slab; and Venus Grey polished marble slab, both POA, The Tile Gallery; St Moritz fabric in Fjord R1 207/m, Home Fabrics THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 103


HOME CAPE TOWN

shop the look . 1

Balance out soft interiors by incorporating pops of black and warm metallic accents

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1. (from left) Montblanc 5043 slab from R2 400/m, Caesarstone; FINOak flooring in Corn Silk from R688/m2, FINfloor; Luxus linen fabric in Flax R673/m, St Leger & Viney 2. Concrete tray R400, Studio 19 3. Decor squares from R140 each, MRP Home 4. ‘Interlude’ by Mareli Esterhuizen R1 100, Salon Ninety One 5. Guild copper ceramic pot R495, La Grange Interiors 6. Textured black epoxy side-table R3 190, LIM 7. Dash lantern R650, SHF 8. Eames-style lounge chair and ottoman from R84 548, All Office 9. Basket with handles R1 410, Cécile & Boyd 10. Isoti stool R2 620, Weylandts 11. Rabbit sculpture R295, Block & Chisel 12. Interlace throw from R1 725, Mungo 13. Astro chandelier R34 995 and 14. Question Mark table lamp R1 795, both Weylandts


HOME PARIS

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1. (from left) Venetian Smalti tiles in Holly Leaf R225/sheet, Douglas Jones; Herringbone flooring from the Legno Living range R711/m2, Oggie Flooring; Paint in Emerald Isle, Dulux 2. Black epoxy coat stand R2 300, LIM 3. Maxx armchair R26 174, Okha 4. Angolo bowls R11 100 for set of 3, Roche Bobois 5. Custom-order rug POA, Gonsenhausers 6. Voe Tattoo coffee table R11 390, LIM 7. Formakami JH4 pendant light by Jaime Hayón for &tradition R3 985, CRÉMA 8. Stoneware dinnerware in Deep Teal R1 070 for set of 4, Le Creuset 9. Kelso side-table R9 950, SHF 10. Youth planter in Charcoal R3 699, Gold Bottom Pots 11. Game single-arm wall lamp R2 290, Pezula Interiors 12. Small rink pot R550, SHF 13. Tilt green scatter cushion R2 770, The Rug Company


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HOME BARCELONA

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HOME JOHANNESBURG

shop the look . 1

Tactile finishes and interesting textures will draw the eye and result in a layered look

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1. (from left) Fortune stone glazed porcelain tile R149/m2, Italtile; Narvik fabric in Sapphire R603/m, St Leger & Viney; Oliato flooring in Danish White R1 313/m2, Oggie Flooring 2. Aila salad bowl R302, Country Road 3. Swirl side-table R1 895, Block & Chisel 4. Intense white glass vase R795, La Grange Interiors 5. Organic blown-glass vase R399, @home 6. Dakar Heirloom rug from R5 750, Esque 7. Allie armchair R6 599, Sofacompany.com 8. Chiara and Fosca side-tables by Elisa Strozyk for Pulpo from R14 200 each, Casarredo 9. Chenille scatter cushion R180 and 10. Woven fringe floor cushion R400, both MRP Home 11. Caprivi throw in Caviar R500, Haus at Hertex 12. Prato chair R11 400 and 13. Triboa hanging lamp R12 995, both La Grange Interiors


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LIVING

PHOTOGRAPH DUBAI DESIGN DISTRICT

TR AVEL • FOOD • DRINKS • PEOPLE • GARDENS

Everything you need to know about Dubai Design District (p114), the Saxon Hotel’s new finedining restaurant, Grei (p118), MGallery by Sofitel’s Hôtel Le Louis Versailles Château in Paris (p122), the practice of topiary (p124) and iconic interior designer Stephen Falcke (p126)


DESIGN CAPITAL Located in what has come to be known as the Middle East’s design capital, Dubai Design District is the undisputed home of the region’s creative community and a shrewd coming together of slick shopping venues, zippy eateries and a vibrant mix of businesses in a city that has it all TEXT STEFAN HOTTINGER-BEHMER


TRAVEL

DUBAI DESIGN WEEK Staged in partnership with Dubai Design District, Dubai Design Week is the Middle East’s largest creative festival covering a range of disciplines including architecture, products, furniture, and interior and graphic design. It acts as a catalyst for the growth of the design scene in Dubai, attracting over 60 000 visitors during the six-day event. 12-17 November 2018 | dubaidesignweek.ae

Selectshop Frame

pread across 11 low-rise buildings with pedestrianised sidewalks, alleys and boulevards, D3 (as Dubai Design District is called by insiders) has become a hub for regional and international fashion brands, art galleries, media enterprises, star architects, graphic designers, and furniture and interior design companies of the higher-end variety. A collaborative eco-system of sorts, this is where small businesses exist alongside global players in flexible offices and communal co-working spaces, with cuttingedge infrastructure to match. Exhibitions, talks, events and a series of swanky popups keep visitors to Dubai’s trendiest neighbourhood on their toes – be that in the comfort of sneakers when the annual footwear and street culture showdown Sole DXB takes place, or in high heels, strutting their stuff down the catwalk when the fashion pack set up camp during Fashion Forward, arguably the region’s most important runway event. There are casual and relaxed street-style eateries aplenty along the district’s wide and stylish walkways, a novelty in terms of pedestrian experience in Dubai comparable only with the Financial District’s batchblueprint or City Walk’s open-air layout nearby. During lunch hours, The Lighthouse, with its cool, calm and carefully curated concept store and kitchen, is the hot ticket. Operating a strict walk-in policy, it’s the unofficial canteen of the creative set and a firm city favourite for weekend brunch. Half-concept store, half-restaurant, it’s also the go-to gift shop for design aficionados looking for swish tabletop accessories, handmade glassware and coffee-table books, while the all-day kitchen offers Mediterranean-inspired dishes and freshly baked Viennoiserie. After work, the aperitivo crowd takes over this neighbourhood meet-up to the tune of nu-disco beats. Not that far away, French fare is served at Chez Charles along with a fine selection of wines. It’s an ultimate powerlunch destination, where the movers and shakers of the fashion industry come to cook up Dubai’s glamorous parties as Chanel, Fendi, Burberry, Hugo Boss and friends entertain their regional HQs in D3. For a more informal dining experience, hungry hearts can head to Akiba Dori, the new-generation resto-bar for lovers of Japanese street food. A food hall-style indoor alleyway presents seven storefronts serving everything from bar food to ‘Tokyopolitan’ fusion pizzas cooked in wood-fired ovens in less than a minute. While Dubai’s design quarter is definitely not short of dining options, it also delivers on the shopping front. From international furniture-design brands to local fashion and jewellery designers, D3 has it all. Most prominent, perhaps, is the presence of an array of concept stores, a trend that has swept Dubai in recent times. At Selectshop Frame, a Japanese-style culture store, visitors will find a wide THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 115


range of handcrafted products or ‘timeless items’ curated around the concept of ‘permaculture’. Vintage books, stationery, homeware, apparel, toys, accessories, you name it, and Selectshop Frame will have the hip version of it in store. And what would an authentic concept-store experience be without the appropriate hand-dripped coffee to match? Each cup of Selectshop Frame’s artisanal, ultra-sustainable brew takes threeand-a-half minutes to make and while your ‘Sunny Latte’ is being prepared, a retro selection of vinyls will keep you company. Just next door is Montroi, a concept store with a clear commitment to the needs of frequent travellers, created to ‘celebrate nomadism’ through handmade travel bags and accessories, fragrances, curated city guides, cultural talks and events. It’s the brainchild of mod-nomad Enrique Hormigo, whose offerings are defined by their resistance, with a focus on ageing well and being as light as possible. ‘Our products are designed for longevity and are timeless in style,’ Hormigo explains. ‘There was a time when a bag would last for years and would become more beautiful over time: this is true luxury.’ Unsurprisingly, the handcrafted softleather backpacks are a worthy bestseller. Art-lovers will discover a handful of pop-up galleries around the district, while more permanent addresses are slowly opening their doors. One such gem is East Wing gallery, located on the outer boulevard facing the downtown skyline, with the impressive Burj Khalifa skyscraper poking into the skies. Hailed as one of Dubai’s most promising independent galleries for photo, video and print art, the up-and-coming East Wing promotes international off-the-grid artists and dialogue through photography. Its current exhibition, Habibi Funk: A Spotlight on Arab Grooves, runs until late August and ‘traces the steps of a fusion of sounds and artists created in various Arab cities that are geographically distant from one another, yet share a common thread in its vanguard beats’, according to the gallery’s director, Elie Domit. Due to its mixture of work and play, D3 also caters to the more practical needs of its visitors. Grooming is an essential part of life in Dubai for both men and women, so the neighbourhood includes a healthy dose of well-appointed hairdressers, nail salons, spas and gyms for the essential maintenance routine of any self-respecting hipster. At Chaps & Co, trendy locals and expats come to have their beards perfectly trimmed or to get the latest razor-sharp haircut. The traditional English-style barbershop may have other branches around Dubai, but its D3

YUi restaurant at Selectshop Frame

Chaps & Co

Akiba Dori

DOWNTOWN DESIGN Downtown Editions is a curated exhibition of bespoke and limitededition design, providing visitors with the opportunity to buy and commission unique design objects, as well as a rare chance to learn more about the regional design scene. Part of Dubai Design Week | downtowndesign.com


TRAVEL

Montroi Fashion Forward

outpost is the newest, and is also home to the United Arab Emirates’ (UAE’s) first female barber. Closer to a gentlemen’s club than your standard in-and-out barber, Chaps & Co offers the full palette of grooming services for men, while a women’s salon next door makes sure that no-one misses out on a well-deserved beauty break. Dubai’s new design epicentre was fashioned after other worldly creative clusters such as London’s Shoreditch, Miami’s Design District and New York City’s Meat Packing District to create a flourishing scene that ’s unique in the UAE. ‘We wanted to use the best of everywhere when we began making our own creative hub,’ explains D3’s CEO Mohammad Saeed Al-Shehhi. Phase three will soon boast residential canal-front towers, marinas and a range of painfully cool boutique hotels. As the district grows and construction around it picks up to deliver luxury housing and five-star accommodation, the foundations for a vibrant community have been set, and D3 is fully operational and a much-loved destination for those in search of a slightly less gentrified Dubai experience. While Dubai Design District follows its inspired ambitions to place itself amongst the world’s leading creative centres, it serves as a charismatic destination for both the local community and its visitors, putting design in Dubai firmly on the map. Q dubaidesigndistrict.com

ADDRESSES East Wing Gallery D3 Building 2 | east-wing.org x @eastwingphoto Akiba Dori D3 Building 8 | x @akibadori

Downtown Design

Montroi D3 Building 7 | montroi.com x @montroi

The Lighthouse D3 Building 6 | thelighthouse.ae x @thelighthouse_ae

Selectshop Frame D3 Building 7 | selectshopframe.com x @selectshopframe

Chaps & Co D3 Building 6 – Mezzanine Floor | chapsandco.ae x @chapsandcobarbershop

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HIGH CONTRAST The serene backdrop at Grei, the Saxon Hotel’s new fine-dining restaurant in Johannesburg, shines a spotlight on Head Chef Candice Philip’s colourful, meticulously crafted plates TEXT AND PRODUCTION FIONA DAVERN PHOTOGRAPHS ANNALIZE NEL

x

@thesaxonhotel

Guava mousse, cream cheese citrus gel, beetroot biscuit, beetroot meringue, hibiscus flowers and bee pollen


FOOD AND DRINK

King crab, broad bean pesto, pickled almonds, dashi cream and verbena oil

s plate after detailed plate emerges from the kitchen at Grei, the approach to the quiet decor – a blend of greys, tactile finishes and textured white tablecloths – begins to make sense. ‘The intention was to create a calm, understated canvas and to draw the focus to what we’re bringing to the table,’ says Philip, whose pea wasabi mousse was such a thing of beauty, it was nominated for the Design Indaba’s Most Beautiful Object in South Africa award in 2016. After working at the Saxon Hotel for 13 years under Chef David Higgs and then Chef Luke Dale-Roberts, Philip says it’s surreal to be opening Grei, which is driven by her own long-held vision. ‘It’s so fulfilling when the dishes we create are appreciated; when people are on the same journey and they’re in the moment,’ she says. At Grei, the culinary approach is an amalgamation of the chef’s signature plating style and her love of unexpected pairings and herbaceous flavours. Philip says she wouldn’t be able to do it without the support of her team, which includes Sous-Chef Wynand van Wyk, Megan Meikle, Besele Moses Moloi, Lebisa John Tau and Amy Stanley. ‘It’s great to have a little family team,’ she adds. Inspiration for her imaginative dishes often strikes when she’s wandering around the hotel’s rooftop organic garden, a favourite retreat for some reflective time out. ‘I’m always in the garden. For me, the herbs are often the unsung heroes,’ explains Philip. ‘They bring an enticing aroma to the food, and also add wonderful flavour and colour.’ Philip and her team work closely with Linda Galvad, owner of Sought After Seedlings, which maintains the garden and stocks a large variety of organic and imported seeds. For insight into the complexity of the dishes, the jus for the lamb consommé is reduced from 40L to 1L over a period of three days. ‘It’s like gold!’ says Philip, who’s also specially created simplified, yet tasty recipes to make it easier and quicker for home cooks. The six-course menu (vegetarian and pescatarian available) is paired with international and local wines, and a unique non-alcoholic pairing is also on offer, comprising infusions designed to complement the herbal components of each dish. Grei is open Tuesday to Saturday from 6.30pm. 36 Saxon Road, Sandhurst, Johannesburg. 011 292 6000. saxon.co.za.

Each element of this guava mousse dessert takes hours to make, but whipping up a verbena mousse is very doable and it pairs beautifully with berries and chocolate shavings. VERBENA MOUSSE • 140g cream cheese • 140g plain yoghurt • 300g cream • 8g gelatine leaves • 50g egg yolks • 80g castor sugar • 15-20 lemon verbena leaves, chopped

Whisk the cream cheese, yoghurt and cream on medium speed until thick. Set aside in the fridge. Soak gelatine leaves in cold water until soft. Cook egg yolks with the sugar and lemon verbena over a double boiler until the egg mixture becomes pale and creamy, and ribbons form on the surface. Whisk gelatine into the egg mixture and mix through until melted. Pass through a fine sieve to remove the lemon verbena. Gently fold the cream cheese mixture into the verbena custard. Pour into a serving vessel and allow to set in the fridge.

Chef Philip was inspired by the broad bean plant to create the fresh dish above, whose pesto is a great accompaniment for crunchy crostini or crispy fried gnocchi. BROAD BEAN PESTO • 200g broad beans removed from husk • 7g Parmesan cheese • 1 clove of garlic • 80ml olive oil • 10 fresh mint leaves • lemon juice, to taste • salt and pepper

Place all ingredients except the seasoning into a blender and pulse. Your pesto shouldn’t be completely smooth – it’s better to have some texture. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 119


Lamb consommé, pumpkin purée, lovage pesto, lamb jus jellies and brown butter pumpkin seeds

At Grei, the lamb consommé is just one element of a highly complex dish, but at home, you can enjoy it as a starter with crusty bread, or as a main with vermicelli or tortellini. LAMB CONSOMMÉ • 750g lamb mince • 500g chicken breast • 4 egg whites • 1 large knob of butter • 2 carrots, finely diced • 1 onion, peeled and finely diced • 3 celery sticks, finely diced • 1 leek, finely diced • 3 sprigs of thyme • 2,5L cold lamb stock

Blend the lamb mince with the chicken breast and egg whites so that it forms a fine farce. Heat butter on a medium heat in a deep pot and braise the carrots, onion, celery and leek. Then fold into the lamb, chicken and egg white mixture and add the thyme. Using a whisk, incorporate the lamb stock into the farce. Slowly bring mixture to a simmer, stirring continuously. As soon as it starts to simmer, stop stirring and allow raft to form. Turn onto a low heat. Allow to simmer for 15-20 minutes – you’ll see the liquid begin to clarify. Using a ladle, scoop clear consommé from the centre of the raft and strain through two layers of muslin into a clean container. Check seasoning and keep warm until ready to serve.


FOOD AND DRINK UPPER BLOEM The sister restaurant of La Mouette in Sea Point, Upper Bloem has a lunchtime tapas menu that changes daily, as well as a three-course sharing-plate tasting menu for dinner. Head Chef and co-owner André Hill celebrates the flavours of his childhood and pays homage to the Mother City’s diverse culinary heritage with ingredients like samphire, snoek and kabeljou. Expect dishes like spiced duck breast with quince, samoosa crisp and salted radishes. As for the decor, interior designer Liam Mooney took a historical approach. ‘The inspiration for Upper Bloem was really to channel the icons and colours that are so rooted in Cape Town’s history, from the blown-out Victorian tiling layout you find in so many historic buildings to the vibrant, summery colours of the BoKaap,’ he says. Shop 1, Winston Place, 65 Main Road, Green Point, Cape Town. 021 433 1442. upperbloemrestaurant.co.za

PHOTOGRAPH OF UPPER BLOEM PAULITA ZAPATA

LUXE REDS Le Riche Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon 2014 Thanks to its spending 22 months maturing in French oak barrels, this classic 100% Cabernet Sauvignon is elegant and rich, with blackcurrant, cedar and cassis lingering on the palate. Enjoy it with fillet or rump steak. From R500. Ageing potential: 8-10 years

ÉPICURE Offering a variety of African tastes, Épicure is headed by Chef Coco Reinarhz, who grew up in Kinshasa in the DRC and was trained at Ecole Hôtelière Provinciale de Namur in Belgium. Start off your evening at the restaurant’s terraced Épic Bar, which focuses on chic rum-based cocktails. Épicure’s menu changes regularly: for example, to celebrate Senegal Independence Day, the tasting menu included kilishi green mango salad with toasted yam shards and Dibi-style lamb shank croquette. Central Square, cnr West Road South and Lower Road, Morningside, Johannesburg. 010 594 5336. epicurerestaurant.co.za

PICADAS Perched above House of Machines, Picadas is a vibey South American spot serving modern, street-style tapas with a strong Argentinian twist. It’s perfect for a post-work aperitivo like Fernet Branca and moreish Las Empanadas de Mama (a ground beef-filled pastry with spring onion, red pepper, onions, olives and boiled egg) served with chimichurri. Their chorizo is also legendary. Expect Afro-Latin tunes and energetic salsa, bachata and kizomba dancing sessions. 1st Floor, 84 Shortmarket Street, Cape Town. 083 367 5143. x @picadascpt

Glenelly Lady May 2012 This sublime Bordeauxstyle offering is made for the most part from a single Cabernet Sauvignon vineyard and features notes of thyme, roast beef and cedar contrasting with blackberry tones on the palate. It’s a wine to savour. From R490. Ageing potential: 12-18 years Vilafonte Series C 2015 Voted the best luxury red in blind tastings by Winecellar.co.za, this intriguing wine comprises 57% Cabernet Sauvignon, 19% Merlot, 15% Cabernet Franc and 9% Malbec, and boasts generous layers of fruity sweetness. From R1 190. Ageing potential: 10+ years


SUN KING Russian twin sister designers Irina and Olga Sundukovy treated the interiors of an MGallery by Sofitel hotel located steps away from the Versailles palace and gardens in France to a royal makeover, paying homage to the Sun King’s Baroque style with an irreverent contemporary twist TEXT KRISTIN HOHENADEL PHOTOGRAPHS NICOLAS MATHÉUS

The bar at MGallery by Sofitel’s Hôtel Le Louis Versailles Château


HOTELS

Seating area in Superior room

A gilded gate to the Château de Versailles

Deluxe room

The Château de Versailles and its gardens designed by French landscaper André Le Nôtre is one of the most over-the-top, widely emulated exercises in royal architecture the world has ever known. A few centuries later, Louis XIV’s former home base is still a defining symbol of classical French style. However, design keeps moving forward – so when the time came to renovate the interiors of a hotel located 200m from the château, on the site of a former equestrian arena built in 1854, the brief included respecting the extraordinary history of the location without succumbing to the gilded clichés of the past. This tricky balancing act was entrusted to Irina and Olga Sundukovy, Russian twins with a clever take on classical elegance and a knack for fresh contemporary design, and the hotel was reborn in 2017 as MGallery by Sofitel’s four-star Hôtel Le Louis Versailles Château. ‘As Russian designers, we know what tourists expect from Versailles,’ says Irina. ‘So we tried to mix an interesting perspective of its French historical roots, but in a modern way because firstly, nobody can repeat it now and secondly, we don’t need to repeat it.’ The women first visited Versailles around the time they established the Moscow-based Sundukovy Sisters in 2004, an award-winning firm of 60 that’s designed hotels and restaurants across Europe, Asia, America and Australia. ‘We don’t usually work in this classical style, but of course, it’s like the heart of all the design that came after, so it really made a big impression,’ says Olga. When the sisters returned, they were flooded with inspiration thanks to the architecture and gardens, studying every detail from flooring to wall decorations and the geometrical shapes of the landscaping. To reference the palace’s architectural details, they added French crystal chandeliers, antique mirrors and mouldings in judicious amounts to complement modern furnishings and finishes. Greens and gold tones used throughout are both on trend and inspired by the flora and gilding of the palace and gardens. And they were sure to add a shot of their signature sense of irony, with a portrait in the breakfast room of a young woman from the neck down – a stealthy wink to the untimely demise of the infamous former lady of the house. ‘We didn’t want to be too obvious in our design,’ says Irina. ‘We like to work on a level of ideas where not everyone can find the association, but if someone does find it, they’ll be glad. And if they don’t, they still won’t be disappointed with the design.’ sofitel.com

Reception and concierge desks

Alcove restaurant Hotel lobby


T H E C L I P P E D GA R D E N The ancient practice of topiary has stood the test of time and remains current in modern garden design TEXT MARY MAUREL

Topiary can be defined as ‘the art or practice of clipping shrubs or trees into ornamental shapes’. This practice dates as far back as the Ancient Egyptians and Romans, and has been ever-present throughout the history of garden-making. While perhaps less fanciful and more restrained, clipping is certainly a welcome design tool in the modern garden. I enjoy incorporating clipped spheres, pyramids or hedges into any garden. These are the elements that add to the structure and keep the foliage looking good, regardless of the seasonal variations. They also provide a wonderful tension in their contrast to looser, softer planting. One need only look at the work of Dutch garden designer Piet Oudolf to see how well he contrasts clipped hedges with grasses. Plants that clip well into spheres and low hedges: Dune crow-berry (Searsia crenata) Australian rosemary (Westringia fruticosa) Salt bush (Rhagodia hastata) Shrubby germander (Teucrium fruticans) Cape leadwort (Plumbago auriculata) Orange jasmine (Murraya exotica) Littleleaf Boxwood ‘Faulkner’ (Buxus microphylla ‘Faulkner’) Plants that clip well into taller hedges: Holly oak (Quercus ilex) Outeniqua yellowwood (Podocarpus falcatus) Pambati tree (Anastrabe integerrima) Viburnum (Viburnum tinus and Viburnum sinensis)

A few ideas for topiary in your garden: Clipped spheres in pots Even if your garden’s limited to a few pots, you can try clipping into spherical shapes. ‘Hedge on legs’ This is a useful tool for the urban garden when faced with the challenge of screening an unsightly neighbouring building. The trunks of the hedge remain bare at the lower level, thus not encroaching on the limited space, while dense screening is offered at the higher level. Contrasting foliage For a layered effect, combine clipped elements with soft ornamental grasses or with spiky, architectural plants as in the image above.

PHOTOGRAPH MADELINE STUART GARDEN BY JONATHAN BECKER, MADELINESTUART.COM

GARDENS


DECO ICON:

STEPHEN FALCKE Having repositioned African design and created award-winning spaces the world over, almost 40 years after beginning his career, this titan of interior design maintains that ‘you’re only as good as your last job’ TEXT MILA CREWE-BROWN PHOTOGRAPHS ELSA YOUNG

Few interior images are as enduring as that of the Tonga basketclad wall at the Saxon Hotel in Johannesburg. Having outlasted the trends – first in print, and later in social-media spheres – it’s a scene that epitomises the term ‘having legs’. The installation, completed 20 years ago by Falcke, has unintentionally become a calling card of his work as an interior designer. It was a masterful stroke, where one basket would have looked like 100 others, but 100 together transformed that symbol of African craft into a dramatic and artistic expression, conjuring a sense of magic that today’s Instagrammers and Pinners can’t resist. ‘Two decades later, people still phone and write letters about it,’ Falcke muses. For his work at the hotel, he won the 1999 Andrew Martin Interior Designer of the Year award and was fêted for having reinterpreted an African aesthetic, using texture, pattern, colour (grading it from brown through to beige) and repetition to bring cohesion to a formerly awkward space. It’s Falcke who Andrew Martin founder Martin Waller credits as having made the biggest impression of all in the brand’s 22-year award history. Irresistible as it may be to try to define his style, Falcke exercises great freedom with the language of his interiors. Looking at his anthology of work, the diversity in his aesthetic is vast, ranging from a grand listed heritage home in London

to a minimalist South African bush lodge and a Moroccan-inspired London abode alive with vivid colour. The nuances, however, are consistent. No matter the chosen style or context, Falcke’s interiors are soulful, generous and detailed… they’re convincing. Rather than a varnish that gets applied, he creates spaces from their very DNA to their outer shell. He speaks of his love for making and breaking rules, and describes himself as a purist who enjoys a twist. ‘Maybe I’m part of the old school of decorating, but rooms need to breathe,’ he says. ‘I’m a fan of lived-in rooms with dogs on the sofas.’ Nowhere is this penchant more apparent than in his own Johannesburg home, where Falcke’s gift for layering is evident in the stylishly undone interior. Here he teams handsome polished antiques with retro moulded pieces, zebra skins and Asian and African artefacts with modern art, resulting in a space that’s unaffected and as individual as a fingerprint. It’s calculated chaos – and it works. ‘A lot of my interiors are made up of the history of things. In my own home, everything has a story,’ he explains. Eclecticism is a constant throughout Falcke’s body of work and he cites famed London designer and his first employer, David Hicks, as the man who schooled him in the art of mixing high with low, large with small – and how to employ colour with aplomb.


ICON

this spread (clockwise, from top left) Interior designer Stephen Falcke; in this glamorous London abode, Falcke referenced the design-savvy owners’ love of Middle Eastern and Moroccan styling; a bold 20m-long bench seat amplifies the home’s sense of scale; vibrant pink was paired with an all-white backdrop and contemporary furniture; A World of Design by Stephen Falcke; bright, woven Shadowy chairs by Tord Boontje for Moroso animate the courtyard.

But make no mistake, it’s a studied balancing act: close attention is paid to scale, symmetry, proportion, geometry and, not least, context. Falcke was plucked from London’s Chelsea School of Art & Design as a finalyear student in the late ’70s to work for Hicks. There he learnt about the parallels of architecture, and interior and garden design. ‘David, and later Lionel Levin, had a huge impact on my early career,’ he muses. Back in Johannesburg, working for Levin, Falcke embarked on the monumental task of doing the decorating for Sun City. Projects of that scale soon became manageable for Falcke, who’s since designed the 200-room Da Vinci Hotel in Sandton. With the recent launch of his book, A World of Design, to a gathering of 600 fans, friends, industry leaders and media, it’s apparent that Falcke’s influence is enduring. Leafing through the impressive tome of 500 pages and 40 design projects, it’s that same iconic image of the baskets that opens the book. ‘I didn’t want to compromise,’ he says of it, with a shade of the meticulousness for which he’s famous. In the case of A World of Design, seeking perfection meant compiling the pages over many years and self-publishing it, using a local designer, writer and photographer to shoot every single interior. The latter, Elsa Young, has been capturing his work for decades and is without doubt SA’s foremost interior photographer and someone who Falcke humbly attests has as much right to the book as he. ‘It’s been a wonderful journey,’ Falcke reflects upon his decades in the design industry. ‘One thinks that as a designer, you’ll get involved with curtains or cushions. While that’s a facet of it, my career’s taken me to wondrous places. I’ve learnt a tremendous amount and am still learning today.’ Qstephenfalcke.co.za

THE COLOUR ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 127


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E N DA N G E R E D by Porky Hefer, courtesy of the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, SFA Advisory and Southern Guild Renowned for his larger-than-life sculptural seating pods, artist Hefer presented Endangered at Design Miami/Basel 2018 in conjunction with the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, SFA Advisory and Southern Guild. The project consists of five giant, tactile designs of endangered species – an orangutan, polar bear, sloth, blue whale and great white shark – all produced using eco-friendly materials that have been crocheted, felted, stitched and embroidered by artisans in Cape Town, namely textile artist Ronel Jordaan and craft collectives Heart Works and Mielie. ‘It’s the future of the next generation that I’m concerned about and the state of the world they inherit,’ says Hefer. ‘Looking after our animals and earth is one thing, but also the preservation of human skills, crafts and traditions.’ southernguild.co.za, animal-farm.co.za, designmiami.com

PHOTOGRAPH ANTONIA STEYN COURTESY OF SOUTHERN GUILD AND SFA ADVISORY

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