Page 1

40+luxurious and inspiring smart spaces

AU G /S E P T 2018

AUSTRALIA

pages of

TRIPPING OFF

to Sri Lanka and Minneapolis

PL ATINUM PLUSH HANDSOME HOMES AT THE POINTY END

INTERIOR DESIGN

for retail spaces

ESSENTIAL PIECES

Our must-have cushions and coffee tables


inspiring.

‘‘

DEFINING YOUR DREAMS CAN BE

DIFFICULT,

BUT THE JOURNEY TO REACH THEM

Possessing a rare combination of technical virtuosity, artistry and an electrifying stage presence, Yuja Wang redefined what classical music can be. She debuted on the most prominent stages in the world before the age of 30. And despite her young age, she displays a repertoire beyond her years. Her talents seemingly know no bounds. Rolex is proud of its association with Yuja Wang, whose drive and artistic vision are inspiring a new generation of pianists around the world. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

IS REWARDING. IT DEPICTS

WHO WE ARE.’’

YUJA WANG WORLD-RENOWNED CONCERT PIANIST

Oyster Perpetual Datejust 36


SMA18843

UNRIVALLED TRIPLE-FAN FREESTANDING COOKER IN CHOICE OF 8 COLOURS


smeg.com.au

BRINGING THE RICH FLAVOURS OF THE ITALIAN COAST INTO YOUR HOME


Captain’s Choice A 17-Day Quest for Wellbeing

MAJESTY AND MYSTICISM IN NORTHERN INDIA

Departing 30 June and 25 August 2019. Enquire now. 1300 163 517 captainschoice.com.au


An immersive journey, where wellness meets luxury. This is an odyssey focused on the inward, the outward, on the magnificent as well as the meditative.

DELHI AGRA JAIPUR UDAIPUR HIMALAYAS


CONTENTS

AUGUST/ SEP TEMBER

P HOTO G R A P H S D E R E K SWA LW E L L ( TOM ROB E RT SON - S M A RT S PAC E S ) , TO M F E RG U S O N ( T E L LY T H EO D O R E H O U S E )

2018

18

LUXURY HOME BUILDING AWARDS

29

SPY Belle’s pick of the top design

39

R I G H T N OW Our round-up of who, what and where.

45 48

ART The state of the art.

52 54 56 60 62 71 72

Call for entries

trends from around the world.

ARC H I T EC T URE The MPavilion creator for 2018 Carme Pinós designs for the lie of the land. LU XE F I L ES Designer Tom Fereday goes

back to basics.

138

L I B R A RY Volumes to stack up. CRE AT I VE S PACE The Articolo lighting studio epitomises the ethos of its designs. ST YL E E T I Q U E T T E Melissa Penfold

B L O C K PA RT Y

accessorises the home.

W H O Edward Barber of BarberOsgerby

ARCHITECT TELLY THEODORE CELEBRATES THE HUMBLE BRICK IN HIS INSPIRED APPROACH TO THE EXTENSION OF THIS HOME IN A HERITAGE ENCL AVE.

elucidates the brand’s aesthetic. M AN Strutting his stuff.

WOM AN Put on your dancing shoes.

74

114

B U S I N E SS O F D E S I G N

120

CR E AT I VE H OM E Architect

79

S M ART S PACE S Stellar ideas

125

B E LL E LO VES Dylan Farrell

119

B A Z A AR Shopping heaven here and overseas.

129

C LOT H Sink into rich and

High-flying designers make the retail experience more alluring. for chic living in petite homes.

Paul Conrad overlays minimalism and classic design.

gets creative with coffee tables. sumptuous silks and velvets.

137 138

HOM ES

146

M E L B O U R N E Fearless choices in colour and idiosyncratic collections

154

R H O D E I S L A ND This classic red-brick house has unexpected decorative

162

M E L B O U R N E Timelessness and a sense of fun prevail in this renovated

SYD N EY Brick is the hero material in the extension to this home

in a heritage enclave.

create an impact in this revamped home.

flourishes thanks to Martyn Lawrence Bullard.

family home, where eras and styles clash happily.

168

S R I L AN K A A Geoffrey Bawa-designed home for textile artist Ena de Silva tells a story of two true artists.

176

SYDN E Y Raising the roof of this California bungalow made a world of

183

GARD E N The view’s not the only thing in this expansive harbourside garden.

difference for the family.

15


SMART BATHROOM SPACES.

Integrated touchless control panel selects LED lighting, mirror heating and dimmer function.

196 C OL D C OM FORT IT MAY BE CHILLY BUT MINNEAPOLIS IS BRAVING THE DEEP FREEZE TO FORGE A BOLD NEW IDENTITY AS A COOL CREATIVE HUB WITH FOOD, ART AND DESIGN AT THE FOREFRONT.

DuraCeram® material creates precise edges, producing an especially clear and fne design.

187 188

FOOD & TRAVEL

195 196

L O U N G E Cheers and beers.

T R AV E L Ivory House utilises the best of the

Sri Lankan design vernacular.

PASS E NG E R Minneapolis may be chilly

but it’s become a thriving culture hub.

201

P ASS P ORT A ticket to everything.

REGULARS

Sensowash® a pioneering innovation in the world of toilets, remote control operated for ultimate hygiene.

OUR COVE R

20 23 25 203 207

Contributors

210

The Office... Jeffrey Allan Marks

Editor’s Letter InBox On The Town Address Book & Privacy Notice

Bold Moves, p146. Photographed by Sharyn Cairns. Styling by Marsha Golemac

Subscribe or renew your subscription to Belle and receive a Molton Brown gift set of hand wash and lotion, valued at $81. For details see p192.


MINOTTI.COM JACQUES COLLECTION

|

RODOLFO DORDONI DESIGN

A U S T R A L I A

BY DEDECE 263 LIVERPOOL STREET - DARLINGHURST - SYDNEY NSW 2010 - T. 02 9360 2722 2 DALE STREET - CREMORNE - MELBOURNE 3121 - T. 03 9650 9600 INFO@DEDECE.COM

CUSTOMISED INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICE


E D I TO R I A L

Editor Creative director Art director Deputy editor Chief sub-editor Sub-editor Interior design editor Art production Editorial coordinator Contributing editors

Tanya Buchanan Joshua Morris Cathryn Zhang Harry Roberts Judy Pascoe Janice Hogg Lucy McCabe Matus Kundrat Rachael Thompson, (02) 8267 9572 Steve Cordony (Style director-at-large), Karen McCartney (Architecture), Carli Philips (Melbourne), Jean Wright (Senior design consultant)

CON T R I B UTO R S

words

photography

Are you Australia’s

BEST BOUTIQUE HOME BUILDER? We are looking for Australia’s top luxury residential home builders, often the unsung heroes of projects. We look forward to shining the spotlight on these master craftsmen. The awards cover new builds and alterations and additions. The winning work will be featured in Belle. Get your entry kit today! Entries close November 2. SPONSORED BY SUPPORTED BY

FO R F U RT H E R I N FO R M AT I O N G O TO H O M E STO LOVE . CO M . AU/ B E L L E A N D TO O BTA I N A N E N T RY K I T E M A I L : B E L L E AWA R D S @ B AU E R- M E D I A .C O M . AU OR P H O N E R AC H AE L T H O M P S O N O N (02) 8267 9572. Left to right Kent Court by Concept Build, with design by NTF Architecture. Landscaping by Jack Merlo. Bay House by Horizon. Design by Bruce Stafford Architects and Hare+Klein.

Nadine Bush, Emma Elizabeth, David Harrison, Annie Kelly, James McDonald, Chris Pearson, Georgina Reid, Stephen Todd Damian Bennett, Sharyn Cairns, Philip Castleton, Jem Cresswell, Sean Fennessy, Tom Ferguson, Felix Forest, Matt Lowden, Pablo Martin, Romello Pereira, Mark Roper, Prue Ruscoe, Anson Smart, Kristina Soljo, Tim Street-Porter, Derek Swalwell, Edward Urrutia, Nicholas Watt, Eve Wilson

E D I T O R I A L O F F I C E GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 1028 Tel (02) 8267 9572, fax (02) 9267 8037, email: belle@bauer-media.com.au

AD VE R T I S I N G

Group brand manager Brand manager - homes Head of Agency Sales, NSW Victoria, SA and WA sales director Victoria head of direct sales Queensland head of sales South Australia sales manager General manager media solutions Production controller Advertising production

Analise Gattellaro, (02) 9282 8935 Kimberly Anderson, (02) 9282 6103 Karen Holmes, (02) 9282 8733 Jaclyn Clements, (03) 9823 6341 Will Jamison, (03) 9823 6301 Judy Taylor, (07) 3101 6636 Ben Wiles, (03) 9823 6387 Jane Waterhouse Rachel Rae, (02) 8114 9451 Dominic Roy, (02) 9282 8691

MARKETI NG AND RESE A RCH

Senior research analyst General manager, subscriptions and e-commerce Subscriptions campaign manager

Ania Falenciak, (02) 9282 8817 Sean McLintock Lauren Flinn, (02) 9282 8583

B AU E R M E DI A

Chief executive officer General manager, fashion, luxury, food and home Commercial director Group brand & partnerships director Research director Business manager

Paul Dykzeul Fiorella Di Santo Paul Gardiner Brigitte Guerin Miriam Condon Marisa Spasich

S U B S C R I P T I O N S A L E S & E N Q U I R I E S Visit: magshop.com.au. Email: magshop@magshop.com.au. Tel: 136 116. Mail: Magshop, GPO Box 5252, Sydney NSW 2000. S Y N D I C AT I O N E N Q U I R I E S syndication@bauer-media.com.au

Published by Bauer Media Pty Limited (ACN 053 273 546) part of the Bauer Media Group, 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000, tel (02) 9282 8000, fax (02) 9267 8037. The trademark Belle is the property of Bauer Consumer Media Limited and is used under licence. © 2018. All rights reserved. Printed by PMP Print, 31 Heathcote Road, Moorebank, NSW 2170. ISSN 0310-1452. Contributors’ manuscripts should be typewritten, and all text, photographs and illustrations must be accompanied by a self-addressed envelope stamped to the appropriate value. Bauer Media does not accept responsibility for damage to, or loss of, material submitted for publication. Material contained in Belle is protected under the Commonwealth Copyright Act, 1968. No material may be reproduced in part or in whole without written consent from the copyright holders.


STAY U P -T O - DA T E with the latest in beautiful interior design, creatives on our radar, art and design pieces to buy, beautiful houses to covet, restaurants and bars to try, exciting places to visit and Belle events to book.

CO N T R I B U TOR S NAD INE BUSH

Nadine wrote the travel story in this issue, p188. Who/what have been enduring creative influences? My grandmother and mother, my childhood in Sri Lanka, nature, travel, and the arts and crafts of different cultures. Where is home and what do you love about it? A small, sunny apartment in Cammeray, Sydney, overlooking bushland on the top floor of an old duplex with a balcony that runs the length of one side. I love small space apartment living, being close to the city and having neighbours. Favourite local haunts? Charlie Parker’s, Paddington; Kindred Restaurant, Humming Puppy Yoga Studio and The Rabbit Hole Organic Tea Bar, all in Redfern; Marta Osteria, Rushcutters Bay. Ultimate travel escape in 2018/19? To explore Sri Lanka’s north and the Maldives. Design item you are coveting? Jewellery from Momoko Hatano’s new Shinju Collection. On your reading/viewing list? I just read The Untethered Soul by Michael Singer; the new Queer Eye TV series. M AT T L O W D E N

Matt shot the glamorous Thomas Hamel apartment for Smart Spaces, p110. Who/what have been some enduring creative influences? Classical artists, painters and sculptors: Jeremy Lipking, Ilya Repin and Raymond Ching to name a few. Where is home for you, and what do you love about it? Home is Rome, Italy. I love it as my daughter was born there and we have made so many memories. What are some of your favourite local haunts? Panella on via Merulana has the best pastries in Rome! What would be your ultimate travel escape in 2018/19? A week on Stewart Island with the family, penguins and crashing surf! What design item are you coveting right now? Handmade mongoose oil painting brushes from Rosemary & Co, England. What is on your reading/viewing list at the moment? I’m watching The Handmaid’s Tale, of course! What else is inspiring you right now? I’m reading Creativity and the Campfire by Marco Bucci. Inspiring thoughts on art and creativity. ULL A JAMESON

SIGN UP NOW AT NE WSLE T TER.BELLEMAG.COM.AU

Ulla made the beautiful cushions for Cloth, p129. Where is home for you, and what do you love about it? I’m a city girl, it’s where my heart is! Paddington for the eclectic colourful history, art, fashion, food and people. The city for its multiple surprises – hidden laneways, bars and the vibrancy of new precincts like Barangaroo and harbour walks. And the shopping. Favourite local haunts? The Paddington, Work in Progress and Emperor’s Garden. Your ultimate travel escape in 2018/19? A little French house in Vence. But first Tasmania, it’s on the agenda. What design item are you coveting right now? My taste is very eclectic but I am liking Australian furniture by Anthony Hurd Design. What else is inspiring you right now? I am inspired every day by so many talented people. The designers for their daring, colourfully bright concepts to the calming interior/exteriors that reflect another world. Jewellery, fashion and food, it’s a fusion of all!


TWENTY Collection parisi.com.au


EDITOR’S LET TER

P H OTO G R A P H S D ION RO B E SO N ( A J E P E RT H ) , N IC H O L A S WAT T ( S R I L A N K A ) , S E A N F E N N E S SY ( F IO N A LY NC H – S M A RT S PAC E S )

W

elcome to the August/September issue of Belle – the year is zooming by and by the time you read this we will be halfway through 2018. Time seems to move faster when you work in the deadline-driven publishing and design fields. And, as we are all aware, time is money and design is big business so we have introduced a new regular feature ‘Business of Design’ focusing on the entrepreneurial as well as creative pursuits of our talented design community. Architecture and design writer Stephen Todd brings his expertise and experience as design editor at The AFR to these pages based around creative commerce. In his first story he explores bespoke retail fit-outs and boutique fashion labels that are choosing smaller and sometimes more residentially focused design offices to create their store concepts. Speaking of creative entrepreneurship, Nicci Green has founded an incredible Australian lighting business called Articolo, based in Melbourne and now coveted worldwide – take a look inside her elegant studio, workshop and showroom on page 56. Another Australian designer going places is award-winning furniture creator Tom Fereday who is part of the Local Design gang that heads to Milan each year and is now producing some interesting original pieces for Australian retailers such as King Living. Read more about Tom and take a peek at the slick new desk that he has designed for King Living on page 52. You may have noticed that we can’t get enough of chic and cleverly conceived Smart Spaces and in this issue we feature 40 inspiring pages of beautiful apartments and terraces from our leading designers, including Thomas Hamel, Greg Natale and Fiona Lynch – see page 79. In the past couple of years we’ve run some outstanding interiors by designer Dylan Farrell and in this issue we asked him to choose his favourite coffee tables. He has come up with an extraordinary selection – there’s certainly nothing cookie cutter about them – see page 125. Our houses this issue are pretty gutsy in terms of colour and finishes – the David Flack house on our cover is not for the fainthearted and David admits he had a dream client on this project. Martyn Lawrence Bullard has created maximum Hollywood Regency impact in what was a conventional historic red-brick abode in Rhode Island. Martyn will be in Australia speaking at Decor and Design from July 19-22, decordesignshow.com.au. In Sri Lanka, the simplicity and grace of a beautiful Geoffrey Bawa house commissioned by batik purveyor Ena de Silva and elegantly captured by photographer Nicholas Watt provides contrast. I would not have thought to have Minneapolis on my travel hit list until I read Carli Philips’s story on the amazing art, food, bar scene and general upbeat vibe that the city has. It seems quite at odds with the fact that it’s one of the coldest cities in the US – but now I definitely want to go there. At the other end of the spectrum is beautiful, serene Ivory House in Sri Lanka – a place that invites you to take it easy and soak up the local landscape. Enjoy the issue and don’t forget to subscribe to our e-letters, newsletter.bellemag.com.au.

Tanya Buchanan, Editor

Follow us #BELLEMAGAZINE FACEBO OK BELLEMAGA ZINE AU INSTAGR AM @BELLEMAGA ZINE AU T WIT TER @BELLEMAGA ZINE AU

belle@bauer-media.com.au Belle is also available to buy as a digital magazine for iPhone and iPad, through Magshop, which is a free app to download from the App Store and from Google Play.

23


F O O D

I S

A R T.

E L E V A T E

I T.

In craftsmanship and technology, Wolf stands alone. Its professional performance helps you make the most of every meal.

subzero-wolf.com.au


1

INBOX

1 EAR GEMS A tribute to the stunning colours of a Kimberley sunrise, the new Paspaley Maxima collection combines rose gold, white opal, pearls and diamonds. paspaley.com

3 2

3 AFFORDABLE ART Gallerist Edwina Corlette has launched a new platform selling just 25 limited-edition prints from talented artists like Sally Anderson. theprintstudio.net.au

4 AROMATIC ALESSI Marcel Wanders has conceived five distinctive fragrances for Alessi including the fresh and flora ‘Ahhh’. The collection includes diffusers, candles and room sprays. davidjones.com.au

12 10

12 TAKE THE FLOOR The huge range of flooring and blinds at Choices Flooring delivers a broad aesthetic, from timbers and laminates to carpet and luxury vinyl. choicesflooring.com.au

10 GLAM MARBLE Stellar Australian interior designer Greg Natale has added seven luxe new designs to his successful ‘Marmo by Greg Natale’ tiles. teranova.com.au

4

2 BIRTHDAY BLUSH Madame Clicquot created the delicious blended rosé Champagne two centuries ago. You can pick up a bottle in a special commemorative birthday cake ice bucket tin. danmurphys.com.au

Pretty and sharp

11

Indulge with an edgy piece for yourself or home.

11 BLUE VELVET This ‘Kew’ cushion in classic navy will add a touch of warmth and sophistication to your boudoir or living room. domayne.com.au

9 CHAIRS OF NOTE This smart chunky tome features images of 500 iconic chair designs with details on when they were designed and the designer. phaidon.com

Edited by TANYA BUCHANAN

6 LUXE SPECS These glamorous ‘Rectangle’ spectacles boasting the signature Chanel quilted motif will add polish to your day-today look. chanel.com.au

9

8

5 HARE + KLEIN’S second collection for Designer Rugs includes the elegant ‘Palimpsest’ design by Belinda Chippindale. designerrugs.com.au

5

6

7 CUTTING EDGE Channel your inner chef with a stylish scalloped chef ’s knife from revered Japanese cutlery company Shun. shunaustralia.com.au

7

8 AWARD-WINNING SEAT Super-talented Australian designer Adam Cornish was the co-winner of Denfair’s 2018 Best Australian Product for his ‘Seam’ chair for Tait. madebytait.com.au

25


INBOX

14 LONDON SCENT Iconic fragrance house Penhaligon’s has bottled the ambience and elegance of three London suburbs with Marylebone Wood, Belgravia Chypre and Kensington Amber. libertineparfumerie. com.au

13

13 MONKEY BUSINESS ‘Procuratie con Vista’ is one of the whimsical designs in the collection from Fornasetti and Cole & Son. radfordfurnishings. com.au 23 ‘THE FIELD REVISITED’ at the National Gallery of Victoria takes a look at the artists who were exhibited in 1968 when the gallery first opened. ‘The Field’ was curated from the work of emerging painters such as Dick Watkins proving controversial at the time. Until August 18. ngv.vic.gov.au

22

23

22 TABLE LEVITATION The ‘Lago Air’ table in Wildwood appears to be floating in the room with its chic glass legs. misura.com.au

20

21

20 SIXTH SCENTS Cire Trudon, the world’s oldest candle maker, has unveiled a nostalgic floral infused new scent called ‘SIX’ in stylish white-tinted glass. libertineparfumerie. com.au

19 OCEAN PLASTIC recovered by Sea Shepherd is used to make these stylish cabinet handles. Retail profits are donated to the Great Barrier Reef Foundation. sparkandburnish.com.au

26

14

19

15

15 BASKET CASE The ‘Kukululu’ pendant is right on trend with all the wicker, rattan and cane spotted in Milan this year. nickscali.com.au

16 LUXE LEATHER Acclaimed Australian fashion designer Toni Maticevski has created a collection of four covetable bags including ‘The Clutch Me Fold’ pictured here. All are crafted from fine Italian leather and sport Maticevski’s signature folding and pleating methods. tonimaticevski.com

16 21 BARFLY The earthy and stylish ‘Flow’ bar stool has a woven rope seat and comes in natural and black, injecting a touch of tribal chic in the kitchen. contentsidcom.au

17 BEDSIDE MANNER Elevate your night table with a chic European pavé crystal ‘Bedside’ water carafe and tumbler. nolanandco.com.au

17 18 NEW VELVET These new ‘North’ cushions are made from pure cotton velvet in a handblocked geometric design in colourways Amber, Rosa, Silver and Storm. lmhome.com.au

18


FF0818b

info@fanuli.com.au

info@fanuli.com.au

SYDNEY 269 Military Road Cremorne 2090 Tel. 02 9908 2660

SYDNEY 269 Military Road Cremorne 2090 Tel. 02 9908 2660

MELBOURNE 681 Chapel Street South Yarra 3141 Tel. 03 9826 8777

MELBOURNE 681 Chapel Street South Yarra 3141 Tel. 03 9826 8777

PERTH Innerspace 08 Tel. 08 9322 6664

PERTH Innerspace 08 Tel. 08 9322 6664

ADDA SECTIONAL SOFA

ADDA SECTIONAL SOFA


FURNITURE AND HOMEWARES | INTERIOR DESIGN | PROPERTY STYLING | DESIGN SCHOOL WWW.COCOREPUBLIC.COM.AU


Photographs EDWARD URRUTIA Editing /styling STEVE CORDONY

S PY

ST Y L I ST A S S I STA N T S OLG A L E W I S , AU R E L I E TA M I N . H A N DW R I T I N G BY L E S L E Y W OR K M A N

Create a theatrical mood with velvet and gilt, or channel a hot Italian vibe.

This page, clockwise from left Zoffany ‘Quartz Velvet’ in red, POA, from Domestic Textile. Brass and iron occasional table, $2070, from Laura Kincade. Reflections Copenhagen ‘Dakota’ candleholder, from $517, from Fred International. ‘The Ostrich’ feather lamp with bronze dipped base, $8850, from Becker Minty. French Louis XV-style gilt salon chair, $1700, from Conley & Co. Louis Vuitton Epi leather jewellery case in Red, $7500, from Vintage Luggage Company. Italian brass and mirror two-level bar cart, $2500, from Stephen Conley. Lalique ‘Anemones’ rose decanter, $3400, and Lalique limited-edition ‘Oran’ vase with 24ct gold flowers, $19,800, both from Vintage Luggage Company. ‘Escape Velour’ carpet in Lotti from Supertuft. Flowers from Hermetica. For stockists see Address Book.

29


5

4

3

6

7

8 1

2

Theatre

9

S TAT E

Orchestrate a sparkling performance against a richly embellished backdrop. 10

13 14

17

11

15 16

12

1 ‘Calia’ draped chair, POA, enquiries to Kelly Wearstler. 2 Dante Goods and Bads ‘Bavaresk 05’ dining table, POA, from Domo. 3 Fornasetti ‘Teatro’ wallpaper, POA, from Radford Furnishings. 4 Brass drinks trolley, POA, from Contents International Design. 5 Sylvio Giardina perspex drop earings, $525, from Parlour X. 6 Fluted small vase in Russet, POA, enquiries to Becker Minty. 7 Trilogy ‘Fizi’ pendant, POA, from Articolo. 8 ‘Fringes’ sofa, $16,045, from James Said. 9 ‘U’ vase, $190, from Rhys Cooper. 10 Tacchini ’Soap’ table, POA, from StylecraftHOME. 11 Timothy Oulton ‘Nightrod’ table lamp, $1825, from Coco Republic. 12 Cuff, $2440, from Chanel. 13 Brusotti glass cocktail cabinet, POA, from Nicholas & Alistair. 14 ‘Anton’ wall light, POA, from Volker Haug. 15 ‘Capri’ bench, $895, from Coco Republic. 16 ‘Lotus’ floor lamp, $7700, from James Said. 17 Prabal Gurung F18.


Trends

SPY

Clockwise from top left Zoffany ‘Quartz Velvet’ in Red, POA, from Domestic Textile. Arflex ‘Jim’ deluxe armchair by Claesson Koivisto Rune, $4490, from Poliform. Carlo Giorgi ‘Rabarbaro’ floor lamp for Bottega Gadda, $14,000, from Stephen Conley. Tacchini ‘Nebula’ screen, POA, from StylecraftHOME. ‘Groove’ mahogany cabinet, $7480, from Laura Kincade. On cabinet ‘Cormorant in Flight’ sculpture, $3500, and French art deco-style crystal and gold champagne bucket, $1600, both from Stephen Conley. Flowers from Hermetica. Ligne Roset ‘Ilot’ footstool, POA, from Domo. Atelier De Troupe ‘OS’ coffee table, POA, from Spence & Lyda. On coffee table Baccarat Philippe Starck ‘Harcourt’ red candlestick, $2595, Legle De Limoges ‘Pharon’ tea pot, $1229, and breakfast cup and saucer, $420, all from Vintage Luggage Company. ‘Escape Velour’ carpet in Lotti from Supertuft.

31


SPY

Trends

Clockwise from top left Piero Fornasetti ‘Jerusalem’ folding screen, $9800, from The Vault. Italian armchair C1960, $4900, from Stephen Conley. Cushion covered in Rose Tarlow ‘Fiji’ ‘fabric, POA, from Tigger Hall Design. Paul Wells ‘Cog’ stool, $750, from Becker Minty. Dan Yeffet ‘Segment’ table lamp, $3440, from Ondene. Eight Beach Figures artwork by Ken Done, POA, from MCM House. Gubi ‘2.0 Round‘ table, POA, from Cult. Thonet GmbH ‘210 R Bentwood’ chairs, $2435, from Anibou. On table Reflections Copenhagen ‘Arizona’ bowl, from $1056, from Fred International. New Roman collection by Jaime Hayón for Paola C ‘Vaso Titus’ vessels in Anthracite, $675, and Black Gloss, $780, from Neil Bradford Design. Reflections Copenhagen ‘Texas’ candleholder, from $275, from Fred International. Gaetano Sciolari 18-light chandelier, $8500, from Stephen Conley. Chevron flooring in Penza, POA, from Tongue n Groove. Background painted in Porter’s Paints ‘French Blue’.

32


THE HOME OF LIGHTING FOR OVER 40 YEARS euroluce.com.au

1978 – 2018


TIMELESS Collection parisi.com.au


Trends

SPY

Clockwise from left Italian armchair C1960, $4900, from Stephen Conley. ‘Potence Pivotante’ mini wall light, $790, from Mondoluce. Nau ‘Bilgola‘ daybed, POA, and ‘Zanotta Square‘ cushion, POA, both from Cult. Cushion covered in ‘Houndstooth Black Oyster’ fabric, POA, from Tigger Hall Design. Piero Fornasetti ‘Jerusalem’ folding screen, $9800, from The Vault. Michael Verheyden ‘Tabou’ suede stool, $2795, from Ondene. Ten10 marble coffee table, POA, from Spence & Lyda. Michael Verheyden suede round box, $925, from Ondene. Flavio Poli green vase, $1200, from Stephen Conley. Barovier&Toso glass vase, $1200, from Stephen Conley. Chevron flooring in Penza, POA, from Tongue n Groove. Background painted in Porter’s Paints ‘French Blue’.

35


SPY

Trends

7

5

6

8

3

4 9

10 2 1

Ciao

11

B E L LO!

Enjoy a slice of la dolce vita with sophisticated pieces in manly neutrals. 12

17

14 16 13

15

1 ‘Saqqara‘ cushion in Tobacco, $153, from Walter G. 2 ‘Tati‘ sofa table, $4395, from Great Dane. 3 ‘Billy Keramik‘ wood coffee table, $3495/set of three, from Misura. 4 ‘Babylon‘ side table, $1695, from Dedon. 5 Atelier De Troupe ‘Lune‘ flush mount light, POA, from Spence & Lyda. 6 ‘Mae‘ pendant, $2923, from Jardan. 7 ‘Block‘ wallpaper in Limestone, POA, from These Walls. 8 Montana ‘Panton Wire’ side table, POA, from Cult. 9 New Volumes ‘Spomenik’ bowl by Marsha Golemac, POA, from Artedomus. 10 ‘Ace‘ side table, $1958, from Jardan. 11 Floor lamp, POA, from Nicholas Fuller. 12 PJohnson 2018. 13 De Sede ‘DS-600‘ sofa, POA, from Domo. 14 V-Zug electric built-in combi-steam oven, $7999, from Winning Appliances. 15 ‘Provence‘ bowl, $245, from Great Dane. 16 Meridiani Editions Shine ’Quincy‘ console, $11,338, from Studio Cavit. 17 De Sede ‘DS-80‘ daybed, POA, from Domo.

36


CELEBRATING 40 YEARS OF GREAT DESIGN SYDNEY SHOWROOM | 50 MCLACHLAN AVENUE, RUSHCUTTERS BAY, NSW 2011 | +61 2 9380 6605 JANUSETCIE.COM


READER DINNER

Join Greg Natale and Belle for dinner De De Ce and Belle are hosting a dinner and design talk to celebrate the launch of Greg Natale’s second book, The Patterned Interior. AU G U ST

30

BELLE READER BOOK DINNER

JOIN THE BELLE TEAM and design maestro Greg Natale as he launches his second book with a three-course dinner and design talk at De De Ce. Tickets are $250 and include three courses and matching wines plus a signed preview copy of The Patterned Interior and Belle Beautiful Australian Homes Volume II. Greg’s new book is the second he has published and follows on from the success of The Tailored Interior. This is your chance to enjoy a beautiful meal created by Marta Engelen and her team from Pica Pica Catering in the very stylish surrounds of De De Ce Sydney – be the first to see the new book before its worldwide launch!

» AUGUST 30, 6.30PM JOIN BELLE AND GREG NATALE FOR DINNER AT DE DE CE SYDNEY. BOOKINGS: GREGNATALE.COM


R IGHT NOW [ Carving a name ] ROMANCING THE STONE

Nick Rennie’s ‘Wyrie’ table in Elba marble stars in Collection 01 of the first New Volumes collection, a new range by Artedomus that seeks to explore a single material.

P H OTO G R A P H BY S E A N F E N N E S SY, C R E AT I V E DI R ECT IO N T H O M A S COWA R D, ST Y L I NG N ATA L I E T U R N B U L L . H A N DW R I T I NG BY L E S L E Y W O R K M A N

artedomus.com

39


Design News

RIGHT NOW

4_ STEELY LOOKS

Dowel Jones’s first upholstery collection, ‘Sister’ designed by Tom Hancocks, was launched in New York at Sight Unseen OFFSITE. It marries tactile upholstery with powder-coated steel. doweljones.com 2

1 4

1_ HOOKED ON RUGS

Patricia Urquiola’s recent collection of ‘Mirage’ rugs for Gan have a magic quality. Handknotted, the painterly works create a treasured colourful icon. gan-rugs.com 2_ SWITCHED ON

Shown at ICFF in New York, lighting designer Ross Gardam pushes the juxtaposition of light and glass to the next level with ripples, bubbles and lines. rossgardam.com.au 3_ SEAT OF FUN

Designer Nikolai Kotlarczyk has created an ode to Australia’s nature, colour and vibrancy with the playful ‘Wompoo’ chair. czyk.com.au 5_ WARP & WEFT

Vonnegut/Kraft have collaborated with Slow and Steady Wins the Race to create Depaysement, furniture upholstered in fabrics created using digital platform, Weft. vonnegutkraft.com

Edited by EMMA ELIZABETH

3

WHAT WE LOVE RIGHT NOW [ Chair women] ‘COLLECTION 01’ BY SARITA POSADA & SOPHIE LOU JACOBSEN

Designed in New York and handmade in Medellin, Colombia, Studio Sayso’s three chair styles are upholstered in colourful Kvadrat and Maharam textiles and reference the vivacious spirit of 1930s French and 1970s Italian design. studio-sayso.com 5

41


RIGHT NOW

Design News 6_ROMANCING THE STONE

Jon Goulder has referenced iconic Australian architecture and the landscape in his lighting collection for Rakumba. Stone and tile insets with powdercoat finishes make ‘Standley’ as diverse as the environment around it. rakumba.com

6

7_NICELY ROUNDED

Architect Giancarlo Valle launched his first furniture collection with Viso Project, with ‘Smile’ seats and ‘Divider Screens’ in blobpatterned textiles. visoproject.com 8_WACKY W

[ Bower Studios ]

7

TABLE CRAFT

Thermoformed Corian bases with tinted glass tops in peach and grey create a dynamic interplay of furniture shapes. The overlapping tones porvides the opportunity for personalised arrangements. bower-studios.com

Designer Nic Graham and graphic artist Fabio Ongarato referenced Brisbane’s history including its flood lines for the interiors of the new W Hotel. whotels.com 9_GETTING STONED

Creatives Thomas Coward, Ross Gardam, Marsha Golemac and Emma Elizabeth are among those celebrating the rich variety of Elba stone in the New Volumes collection. newvolumes.com 8

9

10_FRIENDS WITH BENEFITS

Friends & Associates – Dale Hardiman and Tom Skeehan – are championing Australian design with their Melbourne Meat Market showcase, with works by Elliot Bastion, Rhys Cooper, Andrew Simpson and Sarah King on display. friendsand.associates

42

10


Art

RIGHT NOW

SY D N E Y

OLD SOUL

‘I Am the Old and the New’ is a landmark survey of more than 160 works by master bark painter John Mawurndjul AM, including Ngalyod (right), a depiction of the female rainbow serpent. His work, which has won global acclaim, exhibits concepts and traditions pertinent to generations of Kuninjku artists, such as the raark (cross-hatching) and depictions of djang (a sacred site or totemic emblem). Until September 23. mca.com.au

P E RT H

GLOBAL ROAMING The work of Lebanese-born artist Khaled Sabsabi speaks to the complexities of place and identity specific to the migrant experience, spanning mediums and borders to promote a sense of cross-cultural understanding. Highly nuanced and layered in a way that might reflect the modulations of moving through different communities, A Self Portrait (detail, above) features in the artist’s largest survey to date. August 4-October 7. pica.org.au

M E L B O U R N E

GR APHIC FR AMES Emily Ferretti’s paintings appear almost microcosmic, presenting abstracted fragments of memories or landscapes as artfully arranged tableaux. ‘Windows’ seems a fitting title for her new series, with works such as Night bridge and Forecast (from right) that play with perspective and frame glimpses of worlds just beyond comprehension. July 10-28. sophiegannongallery.com.au

M E L B O U R N E Melbourne

BARKING MAD

Colour intelligence

A L L W OR K S CO U RT E SY A RT I ST S A N D G A L L E R I E S

Stephen Bush places his strange, diverse subjects amid a surrealist whirl of free-flowing, abstract forms in lurid, electric hues. Kemmelberg (left), a maniacal take on a pastoral hunting portrait, forms part of the artist’s series ‘Mule Skin’. September 8-October 6. suttongallery.com.au

TA R R AWA R R A

WHERE THERE’S A WILL Pivoting on the theme ‘From Will to Form’, the TarraWarra Biennial frames art-making not as a process of replication or invention but one of harnessing the wild, intrinsic forces that animate our behaviour. It posits artists such as Kusum Normoyle and Mette Rasmussen (above) as conduits and concealers for anarchic energies. August 3-November 6. twma.com.au

Spot the messages beyond the lines.

Edited by HARRY ROBERTS

M E L B O U R N E

CROSS HATCH MELBOURNE ART FAIR HAS RETURNED AS THE KEY PIECE OF MELBOURNE ART WEEK’S SPRAWLING 2018 PROGRAM, WHICH ALSO INCLUDES MAJOR EVENTS, EXHIBITIONS, TALKS AND AWARDS ACROSS THE CITY’S PREMIER CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS (JULY 30-AUGUST 5). ANDREW BAKER ART DEALER IS AMONG THE 40 NEW AND ESTABLISHED GALLERIES PARTICIPATING IN THE REVITALISED FAIR, AND PRESENTS A SERIES OF POWERFUL MIXED-MEDIA COMPOSITIONS (LEFT) BY WIRADJURI ARTIST KARLA DICKENS. AUGUST 2-5. MELBOURNEARTFAIR. COM.AU

45


RIGHT NOW

Art

SY D N E Y

SHAPE SHIFTER Elizabeth Newman’s practice is alive to intuition and spontaneity, avoiding mastery in favour of experimentation by constantly shifting mediums and modes. See the latest iteration of the artist and psychoanalyst’s work (above) at Darren Knight Gallery. September 29-October 27. darrenknightgallery.com

S Y D N E Y

SALT OF THE EARTH YASMIN SMITH INCORPORATES MATERIALS NATIVE TO THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENT TO CREATE HER CERAMIC INSTALLATIONS, MERGING ART, ARCHAEOLOGY AND SCIENCE SO THE CHEMICAL MAKEUP OF HER WORK MIGHT REVEAL THE HISTORY, ECOLOGY AND CULTURE OF ITS SITE. YASMIN’S NEW SERIES FOLLOWS HER MAJOR SYDNEY BIENNALE PIECE, DROWNED RIVER VALLEY (ABOVE), WHICH IDENTIFIED COCKATOO ISLAND AS THE JUNCTURE OF THE SALTY HARBOUR WITH THE LESS SALIENT PARRAMATTA RIVER, SPINNING OUT INTO AN INVESTIGATION OF SALT’S HARVESTING AND HISTORY. UNTIL JULY 28. THECOMMERCIALGALLERY.COM SY D N E Y

EYES RIGHT 2018 Archibald Prize-winner Yvette Coppersmith is among the artists in Home@735’s annual invitational show. See her striking Self-portrait, Yellow (right), with works from the collection of art consultant Kate Smith, and by invited artists such as Deborah Kelly and Jason Phu. July 11-August 5. homeat735.com.au

C A N B E R R A

A W O M A N ’ S TAL E

Curated by Sarah Engledow and Christine Clark, ‘So Fine’ centres on 10 women artists whose work offers perspectives on the events, people and places that inform Australia’s selfimage such as Wathaurong-Scottish artist Carol McGregor’s paintings on possum skin (above). Until October 1. portrait.gov.au

M E L B O U R N E

L A DY D A D A Against makeshift sets that meld German Expressionism, Dadaist theatre and a graffiti-clad, punk rock stage, Georgina Cue (right) casts herself as a siren teetering playfully and haphazardly between a cinematic fantasy and the more mundane reality suggested by the suburban family garage in which her opulent ecosystems exist. July 28-August 18. neonparc.com.au

46

M E L B O U R N E

FRONTIER Benjamin Armstrong’s ‘Invisible Stories’ linocut print series was inspired by colonists’ ill-fated attempts to build a Singaporestyle trading post in West Arnhem Land, imagining scenes from this chapter in works such as Embedded (above). July 14-August 18. tolarnogalleries.com


Originality, quality and craftsmanship. Discover the Porter’s difference. PAINT AND SPECIALITY FINISHES | LUXURY WALLPAPER | FRENCH OAK FLOORING Visit www.porterspaints.com to explore colours and finishes, find a store, find a painter, view ‘How To’ videos, or shop online. Featured: On wall Porter’s Interior Distemper in Ristretto, on skirting and window trim Aqua Satin Enamel in Irish Linen.


Carme Pinós was photographed exclusively for Belle at the MPavilion offices in Melbourne.

FIELD OF VISION The MPavilion creator for 2018, architect Carme Pinós designs for light and the lay of the landscape. Portrait SE AN FENNESSY Words K AREN McC ARTNE Y


P H OTO G R A P H S BY J OR D I B E R N A D Ó ( R ÍO B L A NCO H O U S E /CU B E TOW E R ) , J . A R E N A S ( C R E M ATOR I U M ) , D U CC IO M A L AG A M B A ( E S CO L A MASSANA)

Architecture I T DOE S N ’T TAK E LONG into a conversation with Spanish architect Carme Pinós to understand why she is the Naomi Milgrom Foundation’s choice to design the 2018 MPavilion in Melbourne’s Queen Victoria Gardens. She is much lauded in the architecture profession being both an Honorary Fellow of the American Institute of Architects (2011) and an RIBA International Fellow (2013) for her outstanding contribution to the profession. Coming after heavyhitters OMA – Rem Koolhaas and David Gianotten – whose 2017 pavilion has been permanently sited at Monash University, she is the fifth architect to be tapped on the shoulder for this commission. Her fit for the project is evident on so many levels. Firstly, is her ability to listen, really listen, and interpret what the client is asking for. “Yes, you need to be a psychologist to understand what they want, but also to understand what fits with you so that you can develop empathy and connection,” says Pinós. This is true for her practice, Estudio Carme Pinós, whether the project is a small economical crematorium in the foothills of Montserrat, north of Barcelona, an ambitious tightly constrained office tower in Guadalajara, Mexico, or a proposed hotel complex on virgin coastal land in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. Her concept for the water-access-only Pizota Hotel in Mexico was so rigorously considered in terms of its light impact on the landscape alongside maximum integration with nature, that the linear design, which echoed the topography, was chosen by the Pompidou Centre to add to their growing collection of architectural models. While the project didn’t eventually get the green light, Pinós is sanguine about the outcome. “One project brings ideas to another – everything is an investigation,” she says. Her modus operandi in terms of creative process is very clearly defined. Initially there are the sketches which Pinós uses as a means to crystallise an idea, to reduce it to its elemental form. Then small models prove the concept. “My buildings must work like machines; the program has to be clear and resolved, only then do we move to the computer,” she explains. While the building forms are often assertive from the exterior, inside they play with notions of movement, light and nature. The crematorium in Igualada, Spain, uses a subtle play of elevation (in Spain a 50cm platform doesn’t require a handrail), and a context of aromatic plants combined with a sense of floating above the landscape lifts the spirits of mourners. Her larger educational buildings open to internal courtyards, and corridors and passageways always lead towards light. A dead end is anathema to her as it denotes being trapped and she is very much tuned into a building offering up options and a sense of freedom. These concepts are often put to the test such as in the densely urban setting of her Cube II office tower in Guadalajara, Mexico, where she has sought sculptural value by inclining the facade towards the street in a “balancing gesture”. In the design of the MPavilion, all her experiences of projects large and small are brought to bear. While she acknowledges contemplating the project in the abstract before her visit to Australia, it was only when she experienced the site that she could see how it was being used, understand the impact of the climate, the sense of arrival and the openness to the park itself. Enchanted by the natural rolling banks in the park, and how people gravitated towards them, Pinós wanted to make the landscape, the rain, the sun and shadow an integral part of the sensory experience of the pavilion. As a result rainwater is harnessed in a channel, the earth is drawn up to meet the structure and the origami-style roof provides protection but still allows for exposure to the elements. “I never like buildings placed as if an object; I like a building to feel as if it has roots,” she says. cpinos.com; mpavilion.org

RIGHT NOW

This page, clockwise from top Enhanced landforms connect Carme Pinós’s MPavilion scheme to the earth. The Río Blanco summerhouse in Mexico is built in local stone. Cube I tower in Guadalajara, Mexico. Igualada crematorium in Spain. Escola Massana Art and Design centre, Barcelona. Río Blanco opens to the views.

“I never like buildings placed as if an object; I like a building to feel as if it has roots.”

49


RIGHT NOW

Architecture

TA S M A N I A

C O T TA G E P I E The Royal Institute of British Architects has a shortlist of 20 exceptional new buildings from 16 countries to consider for its International Prize 2018. Alongside the museums, metro lines and memorial halls is architect John Wardle’s Captain Kelly’s Cottage (above and right) – a remaking of an 1830s seafarer’s cottage on the coast of Tasmania’s Bruny Island. “... the cottage is a beautiful celebration of the process of construction and of making where the past and present are constantly celebrated”, said the jury report. architecture.com

SHI P P IN G NE W S

Melbourne architect Sean Godsell was among leading architects invited to be part of the 16th International Architecture Exhibition at the Venice Biennale. A project curated by Professor Francesco Dal Co granted the 10 architects freedom to design “without any reference to commonly recognised canons”. Godsell’s tall, steel-framed structure (left) is based on the proportions of a shipping container. seangodsell.com

V E N I C E

M E L B O U R N E

B R I G H TO N

DIGGING DEEP MARCH STUDIO HAS A REPUTATION FOR REINVENTING THE GENRE. WITH THE COMPOUND HOUSE (ABOVE) THEY APPLY THEIR THINKING TO DEFY THE NORM OF THE GATED HOUSE AS FORTRESS WITH A NATIVE GRASS BANK THAT EXTENDS TO THE STREET. CLAD IN A VEIL OF COPPER ECHOING THE IRREGULARITY OF BAMBOO, THE HOUSE APPEARS EMBEDDED IN ITS SITE, BOUND BY CONCRETE RETAINING WALLS ON THREE SIDES. MARCHSTUDIO.COM.AU

U N D E R T H E R A DA R

M E L B O U R N E

50

The melding of inside and out, the presence of sky and foliage, and light contrasted by pockets of shade make The Kite (left) – so named for its triangular forms both external and internal – a house with nuance and atmosphere. The quote from their Melbourne clients says it all: “Working with Architecture Architecture gave us access to creativity, ideas, knowledge and skills. The team delivered versatile, light and relaxed spaces that enhance the way we live.” architecturearchitecture.com.au

P H OTO G R A P H S BY P E T E R C L A R K E ( B R E AT H E , N IG H T I NG A L E ) , S E A N G ODS E L L ( V E N IC E B I E N N A L E ) , T R E V OR M E I N ( J O H N WA R DL E ) , P E T E R B E N N E T T S A N D TO M H U T TO N ( T H E K I T E )

A BIRD IN THE HAND Breathe Architecture is on a mission to “lead a housing revolution in our cities by constructing multi-residential buildings that are financially, socially and environmentally sustainable” through its Nightingale Housing model. Shown here is the first building, Nightingale 1 in Florence Street, Brunswick (above), which turns the concept into reality. By encouraging other architectural practices to take up the mantle there are five more projects underway, including Nightingale Village in Brunswick where seven fantastic Melbourne practices, including Kennedy Nolan, Clare Cousins, Austin Maynard and others, are collaborating in the design. breathe.com


RIGHT NOW

Luxe Files 9

11

10 8 7

12 I S TH ER E A N A RTI S T W H O H A S B EEN A N EN D U R I N G IN FLU EN CE?

Donald Judd [12].

13

CO NTEM P O R A RY A RT TH AT YOU M OS T AD MI R E?

I have collaborated with her a number of times.

Kate Banazi [2].

W H AT H AVE B EEN SOM E O F TH E KE Y CR E ATIVE I N FLU EN CE S TH AT

Basic instincts

H AV E I N F O R M E D YO U R D E S I G N P H I L O S O P H Y A N D A E S T H E T I C ?

Furniture and product designer Tom Fereday favours a simple aesthetic. 1

After a couple of years I needed a brief to justify why I was making furniture. By articulating a process of honest design I was able to not only justify my career but guide it with every future project. W H I CH D E S I G NE RS A N D ARCH ITECT S D O YO U AD M IR E A N D W H Y?

I have always been drawn to the work of Calatrava [11]. His architectural works have always impressed me with his impeccable attention to detail. D O YO U CO LLEC T ANY THIN G? Watches. A very worn and damaged 1940s Longines watch is my favourite [10]. W H AT A R E YOU R FAS H I O N M US T-H AVE S? Clothes that hide dirt. FR AG R A N CE O F CH O I CE? Soap [5]. M US I C – WH AT’S O N ROTATI O N AT O FFI CE A N D H O ME? 90s hiphop phase at the moment. FAVO U R ITE FLOW ER S? Australian natives [13]. BEST DOWNTIME (IF YOU HAVE ANY) PURSUIT? Red wine and movies. D O YOU ENTE RTA IN AT H O ME AND/O R WHAT IS YOUR RE STAUR ANT

Dinner cooked by friends. Red wine, beer, whisky [3]. FI LM S TH AT H AVE I NS PI R ED YOU? Brazil, Down by Law [8], Howl’s Moving Castle, Eraserhead, Blue Velvet. S H O P S A N D ON LI N E S TO R E S YO U FREQ U ENT ? Uber Eats. M AGA ZIN ES YOU R E AD R EG U L A R LY? Dezeen. D O E S YO U R LO VE O F D E S I G N E X TEN D TO C A R S? Bicycles – they’re the most efficient form of transport in the world [7]. O F CH O I CE?

W H AT I S YO U R PR EFER R ED TI PPLE?

2

This page, from top

3

Tom Fereday with his ‘Jeanette’ chair for SP01, available from Space. Tom Fereday ‘Bow’ chair for DesignByThem. Tom Fereday ‘Mito’ floor lamp for Rakumba.

TR AV EL – FAVO U R ITE R EG U L A R H AU NT A N D W H ER E I S O N YO U R M US T-S EE LI S T ?

Milan and Iceland [9].

LIST A FE W OB JEC TS OF DESIRE THAT YOU WOULD BUY RIGHT NOW?

New leather boots [6], a Moleskine notebook. W H AT WA S TH E CO N CEP T B EH I N D YO U R FU R N IT U R E CO LLEC TI O N F O R L O U I S V U I T T O N? Longevity. I wanted to create a unique collection centred around solid timber that spoke to Louis Vuitton yet was produced to last a lifetime, not simply be a retail piece [4].

4

W H AT P RO J EC T S A R E YO U CU R R E N T LY LO O K I N G FO RWA R D TO?

Local Design show at Parlour X.

5

52

6

TH E CO N CEP T B EH I N D YO U R D E S K D E S I G N? ‘ETO’ [1] is a desk designed to address how people work today. It offers interchangeable lighting and charging accessories, allowing it to be customised to individual needs. A slim integrated drawer unit offers storage for laptops and stationery. tomfereday.com; kingliving.com.au

G E T T Y I M AG E S

T ELL US A B O U T YO U R CO LL A B O R AT I O N W IT H KI N G LI V I N G A ND


Designed for life. Cutting edge urban designs for a lifetime of experiences. Uniquely yours. Discover the Metropolitan Collection | New Excava™ www.caesarstone.com.au


RIGHT NOW

Library

COASTAL BLUES

VOLUME ‘Interiorator’ blogger and author Patrick Kooiman corralled nine of his most style-savvy contacts (a curator, an art director, editor, interior designer, gallery owner, florist …) from Brussels to Barcelona and beyond to open their doors to his camera and sharp pen. His choice of all caps for the title was deliberate – he wanted VOLUME to be loud and proud. And these homes certainly speak volumes, and the interiors definitely turn it up with highly spiced colour choices, bold accessories and more than “a little craziness”. Patrick Kooiman, Lanoo, $62

It’s hard to go wrong with blue as a decorating shade, evoking the sky, the sea and the effortless charm of coastal living. From sea glass to indigo the combinations and permutations of this hue are endless, as author and decorator Phoebe Howard shows. This book eschews edginess for a soothing aesthetic that is infinitely easy to live with, whether by the sea or further inland. Phoebe Howard, Abrams, $50

Hardcover stacks Pile these glossy volumes on your coffee table. Words JUDY PASCOE and JAN ICE HOGG

SECRET GARDENS

HENRI SAMUEL – MASTER OF THE FRENCH INTERIOR Regarded as one of the pre-eminent French designers, Henri Samuel’s schemes look as fresh as when they were conceived between the 1920s and 80s. With his “perfect taste”, he designed for luminaries such as Doris Duke, the Aga Khan and numerous Rothschilds and Vanderbilts. His look is pure luxe and he mixed styles and periods with a sure hand. Inspiration for design buffs of all stripes. Emily Evans Eerdmans, Rizzoli, $130

54

Sydney landscaper Matthew Cantwell and his Secret Gardens team breathe new life into outdoor spaces for some of the city’s most stunning homes. Take inspiration from this collection of his favourite projects beautifully shot by Nicholas Watt with an accompanying text revealing his thinking behind the design and detailing and how he implemented the landscape plan, including the plants and materials he used. Matthew Cantwell; New Holland; $59.99

M A S S I M O L I S T R I: L I B R A R I E S Italian photographer Massimo Listri has shot astonishing libraries that house, as he says, the “memories of the world”. With the breathtaking shots of these gilded, marbled and frescoed monuments to knowledge are fascinating stories such as the Portuguese library where bats protect the books from insects and the Vatican library where one Pope issued borrowing slips for precious books. Georg Ruppelt, Elisabeth Sladek; Taschen; $300

P H OTO G R A PH Y SU E ST U B B S ( B E Y O N D T H E G A R DE N G AT E )

BEYOND THE GARDEN G ATE Offering a glimpse into the private world of 20 properties in the NSW Southern Highlands this book is not just a beautiful exposition of shrubs and hedges, sculptures, treehouses and lakes, it also details the personal stories behind the creation of each of these previously unphotographed gardens. Organised according to the seasons, it also reflects the keen sense of community that imbues the area. Jaqui Cameron, Thames & Hudson, $80


Culinary art starts with the first course. Culinary culture starts sooner than that.

The difference is Gaggenau. The ambitious kitchen is a place of exacting demands for equipment, ingredients and techniques. The Vario cooktops 400 series have been meeting these demands from the beginning, with appliances developed to meet any challenge. Energy efficient, our steel-framed induction cooktops direct heat quickly to the pan with the power to sear as well as the control for long, gentle simmering. These cooktops free the imagination; a tribute to boundless cuisine. Whatever combination you choose, you can look forward to exceptional freedom for decades to come. For more information, please visit www.gaggenau.com/au


BRILLIANT work

Founder and creative director of Articolo, Nicci Green has crafted a gallery-like studio in Melbourne to illuminate her range of artisanal lighting.

Photographs SHARYN CAIRNS


Creative Space

RIGHT NOW

This page, clockwise from left Articolo lights ready to be assembled in the workshop. Nicci Green, creative director of Articolo. ‘Lumi’ wall sconce. Armchair by Vincent Van Duysen for Molteni&C. ‘Eclipse’ wall sconce. Tree sculpture by unknown artist. ‘Fizi’ wall sconce. Opposite page Custom mirror by Nicci Green. ‘Lumi’ wall sconce.

W

HAT HAS INFORMED AND INSPIRED YOUR DESIGN

PHILOSOPHY AND AESTHETIC? I’ve never been formally trained in design, and I don’t come from a lighting background, so in that sense I’m not restricted by a traditional approach. Instead it’s an innate process, informed by the way I see the world and my life experiences. I have always been drawn to a European design sensibility that celebrates craftsmanship, timelessness and the artisanal. I started my career as a food stylist in Paris, which taught me the process of reduction and simplification. IS THERE A COMMON ELEMENT OR APPROACH THAT RUNS THROUGH

I love the artisanal nature and nuances of mouth-blown glass and solid metals. It’s important that each design reflects the many hands that have produced it. It’s the human element that in many ways we’re losing through mass production, but I strongly believe there’s no substitute for the handmade. ALL ASPECTS OF YOUR WORK?

WHAT INITIALLY APPE ALED TO YOU ABOUT THE SITE OF YOUR STUDIO

Initially it was the location on an unassuming side street in inner-city Richmond. I’ve always found the magic of cities like Milan or Paris is in the backstreets where showrooms and ateliers are stumbled upon. On an emotional level I was immediately taken by the Boston ivy on the facade, and the space just felt ‘right’. We wanted to showcase our lighting in a space more akin to a gallery than a traditional showroom. The result represents my vision for how Articolo pieces beautifully intersect with interior spaces. The floorplan was adapted by repositioning walls to create cohesive spaces that tell the varied stories of our lighting. I worked with architect David Goss of Studio Goss on the project. H O W W O U L D YO U D E S C R I B E T H E C O M P L E T E D S PA C E ? It is an exploration of texture and materiality, reflecting our design ethos. It comprises showroom, studio and workshop, so it’s the full Articolo experience. It’s an intimate and quiet space designed to inspire a sense of discovery with a series of design ‘moments’ anchored by the form and luminance of our collections. I work long hours and am often at my desk till late, with our lighting throwing superb shadows, music AND WHAT DID THE ALTER ATIONS ENTAIL?

57


RIGHT NOW

Creative Space

This page, clockwise from left ‘Eclipse’ wall sconce by Articolo. Table and chairs from Poliform. ‘Fizi’ short and tall table lamps. Nicci Green in the workshop. Weave being applied by hand to the ‘Indi’ glass shade. Entrance to the Articolo shopwroom with ‘Lumi’ wall sconce and custom door handle by Nicci Green.

playing, a glass of wine, the doors to the upstairs courtyard open and light dancing off the ivy. It is the most creative space I can imagine. WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVOURITE DESIGN ELEMENTS? The space has so many subtle layers. Hard wax plaster, concrete render and a terrazzo floor. Pale wide floorboards bring a sense of calm, and inlaid fine brass panels speak to my love of contrasting materiality. I’m passionate about well-designed and engineered fittings; shadow lines, mouth-blown glass, natural and handcrafted finishes. Nothing in our design process is easy, and we don’t take any shortcuts. WHAT IS THE ETHOS BEHIND YOUR WORK AND HOW IS THIS REFLECTED IN THE DESIGN OF YOUR SPACE? Mixing mediums where there is a simpatico is an important part of our ethos, whether in the showroom design or our products themselves. Shadow play is fundamental. I want our lighting to provide a ‘moment’ that you happen upon. I treat lighting as an art piece. Functional, yes, but so much more. I S T H E R E A PA R T I C U L A R A R C H I T E C T U R A L E R A O R S T Y L E T H AT RE SONATE S WITH YOU? I draw inspiration from many styles: Palm Springs modernism for its low-rise style and integration of indoor/ outdoor and focus on natural light; Scandinavian minimalism; and my favourite, Belgian style. It seems to seamlessly marry materiality and restraint with the right amount of detailing and textured finishes. WHICH DESIGNERS AND ARTISTS DO YOU ADMIRE? Vincent Van Duysen has transcended architecture, interior design and product design and excelled in all. Christian Liaigre has had a similar trajectory. I also love the work of Australian artist Sally Ross. Alison Jackson, also Australian, is an extraordinary silversmith. Everywhere I travel I look for local artisans and craftspeople. It introduces me to new thinking, new techniques and new talent. WHAT PROJ EC T S AR E YO U LO O KIN G FO RWAR D TO IN THE CO MIN G YE A R? A R E TH ER E A NY N E W D IR EC TI O NS O R D E S I G N CH A LLEN G E S T H AT YO U WO U LD LI KE TO PU R S U E? We are working on a small capsule collection of furniture pieces, manufactured in Australia with our signature Articolo aesthetic. A longer term goal is to collaborate with an architect on a hotel or resort imbued with the Articolo sensibility. A dream I’d love to see come true. articololighting.com

58


Nero Continental

NATIVE Bianco Cimbro

Our latest collection by Stone Italiana QuartzStone combining luxurious veining of natural stones, available in Matt & Gloss surfaces.

Bianco Artico

Bianco Tasmania

Grigio Atlantic

Grigio Nordico

Our latest collection by Stone Italiana QuartzStone combining luxurious veining of natural stones, available in Matt & Gloss surfaces. Sydney Sales: 02 9906 5211 Warehouse: 02 9723 1033 Melbourne: 03 9826 0227 Visit: stoneitaliana.com.au First to Introduce Quartz Benchtops in Australia in1995


Style Etiquette

RIGHT NOW

1 2 3

5 6

4

Access all areas Melissa Penfold accents sofas, coffee tables and bedsides.

8

60

CHOOSING ACCESSORIES TO MATCH SOFAS AND COFFEE TAB LE S Keep accent shades to a minimum. One is more dramatic than two. Every new accent you add muddles the effect, from magazines to flowers, plants or candles. G O G L A M O RO US From baskets to bowls, we’re always on the lookout for pieces that can freshen an old room for far less than a complete overhaul. A beautiful bust or bronze can overcome any space. M A KEOVER YO U R OT TO M A N Pop a tray or low basket on top to create the perfect place to display everything. O RGANISE A TAB LE TO P A wicker tray breaks up a coffee table, and can also be used to serve food and drinks. ADD PL ANTS Greenery is a quick way to soften tabletops, add focal points and make a room look lived-in. FLOWERS Blooms in small flashes also have big impact. Stick to one or two hues for maximum effect. The vase is vital. Also, a vintage basket filled with a bromeliad, agave, cyclamen or orchid is a time-honoured look that graces the best houses everywhere. Try it.

B&B Italia ‘SAKé’ sofa, from $14,785, and B&B Italia ‘Up2’ armchair, $1585, spacefurniture.com.au 2. Kifu Paris cocktail shaker, $695, beckerminty.com 3 ‘Roche’ velvet cushion, $165/60x60cm, jamessaid.com.au 4. B&B Italia ‘Mirto’ dining table, $3980, and B&B Italia ‘Jens’ chairs, $3330, spacefurniture.com.au 5. ‘Bullion Confection’ side table, $5820, kifuparis.com 6. Naga roof piece, $270; Buddha head, $270; rice container, $95; Yorub beaded figure, $840; Schumacher ‘Osmand’ fabric in Aegean on wall, orienthouse.com.au 7 Living By Design ‘Concrete’ dining table, $1499, and ‘Dana’ chairs, $149, livingbydesign.net.au 8 Ikea ‘Almalie’ throw, $40, ikea.com.au 9 Ikea ‘Jofrid’ throw, $59, ikea.com.au 1

9

that with stacks of books, candles or a bronze. Pile glossy hardcovers or magazines in deep stacks to the edges. They will finish your table and reflect your style. DON'T GO OVERBOARD No need to be a total minimalist but curating your bits will keep you from looking like a hoarder. Keep surfaces clear and curated.

P O RT R A I T K R I ST I N A S O LJ O

7

A DD I NG A F E W great accessories to a coffee table or sofa are touches that make a room look like you’ve done a lot more than you have – and signal confidence, glamour and luxury, and are the first thing people notice. A C C E S S O R I E S Play with fashion and introduce personality. Work in fun pieces with a nod to the season, and have enough cushions, lamps and vases for variety. They are the sunglasses, handbags and heels of interiors. Accessories have to work as a team with your house. CR E ATE SY M M E TRY Go for a pair of matching lamps on side tables flanking a sofa for a polished look. Repeat cushions, colour. Repetition soothes and balances. C U S H I O N S Distil your sofa to two 60cm cushions properly made with ethical down filling. Try a bespoke cushion in a luxe velvet or embossed silk in the middle. TH ROWS A beautiful cashmere or wool throw folded on the centre of your sofa will add life, warmth and comfort. RU LE O F TH R EE Always work with uneven numbers on surfaces – think one, three or five. Start with a horizontal object – such as a book or tray – add something tall and vertical such as a vase or candlestick, then a low and bulky item like a paperweight or bowl. It’s foolproof. CH A N G E U P YO U R CO FFEE TA B LE Start with something large in the middle, like a huge basket filled with a plant, flower arrangement or hurricane shade. Build out from


Prado Sofa Designed by Christian Werner for Ligne Roset

Explore the Ligne Roset collection at one of DOMO’s seven showrooms across New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia and Victoria or at Contempo in Western Australia.

www.domo.com.au


Who

Task oriented BarberOsgerby’s ‘Pacific’ office chair is shaping up to be the perfect seat for every bottom line.

A S O N E OF T H E U K ’s best-known design studios, BarberOsgerby (comprising Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby) have designed everything from a coathanger for Levi’s to ceramic tiles for Stella McCartney and the torch for the 2012 London Olympic Games. Visiting Sydney last year to show their new ‘Pacific’ office chair for Vitra, Barber said designing it was not an easy task. “We wanted to create something elegant and stripped down. We’ve never done a furniture design as complex as this,” he says of the chair that has about 140 parts. Vitra was after an original approach when they commissioned BarberOsgerby about four years ago. “There are thousands of office chairs on the market and all of them have their own unique selling point. This special ‘thing’ is usually focused on a function so we decided to base ours on a unique aesthetic that creates visual calm in the workplace,” says Barber. The ‘Pacific’ chair has a longer back than usual which hides the controls and has a special sensor buried deep within the seat that automatically adjusts for height and weight variations. “In today’s office where co-working is the norm, most chairs are shared so flexibility for users is a must,” he says. “Vitra was very keen to get us onto this project because of the unique qualities we brought to bear in our ‘Tip Ton’ chair design from 2011. It really was an entirely new concept in a deeply saturated market and they hoped we could do the same with an office chair,” says the designer. The verdict is still out on whether the ‘Pacific’ chair is destined for classic status but early signs have been positive with the first large order going to the new Apple headquarters in Cupertino – 12,000 of them to be precise. The decision by the building’s architects, Foster + Partners, to specify the chair was very much driven by how its simplicity leads to a visually orderly work space while avoiding a corporate feeling. “When we did our research into existing task chairs the only ones we liked were from the 50s through to the 70s such as the ‘Kevi’ chair, the Eames Aluminium Group and the ‘Supporto’ chair by Frederick Scott. We kept asking, ‘why is that?’ The answer is probably down to the fact that they were all beautifully simple,” says Barber. While the ‘Pacific’ chair offers all the gadgets found in a high-spec office chair, the form gives away subtle hints of BarberOsgerby DNA such as the beautiful cast aluminium arms and base. Materials were chosen for longevity while upholstery choices were selected for their muted, calm palette. “After investing four years in a project like this you want to be really happy with the outcome and feel you have created something useful, comfortable and original,” says Barber. The Vitra ‘Pacific’ chair is available at Space and Living Edge. barberosgerby.com; spacefurniture.com.au; livingedge.com.au

FROM TOP LEFT DESIGN SKETCHES. EDWARD BARBER WITH THE ‘PACIFIC’ CHAIR AT THE VITRA SHOWROOM AT UNIFOR IN SYDNEY.

Words DAVID HARRISON

62

P O RT R A I T P H I L I P C A ST L E TON

RIGHT NOW


COLOUR PLAY Bring your rooms to life this winter with dramatic, vivid hues in accessories and statement pieces from Domayne.

V I S I T D O M AY N E . C O M . AU T O B R O W S E O U R F U L L R A N G E O F F U R N I T U R E , B E D D I N G A N D H O M E WA R E S .


Previous Page Cubby Dressing Table in Copper, $1599; On table L-R: Regency Brass Bowl Medium, $99; Robert Mark Sunti Leaf Green Vase Small, $19.95; Robert Mark Kalinda Ceramic Vase Large, $59; Robert Mark Kamana Ceramic Vase Large, $69; Kit Table Lamp in Gold, $99; Trentham Fabric Queen Bed Frame, $2249; Domayne Luxuries 300TC Queen Sheet Set† in Mist and White, $109.95; Gypsy Cushion in Forest, $39.95; Aura Ribbed Blanket in Denim, $179; Shannon Fricke ‘Whispering Sea’ Quilt Cover Set^, $279; Salt & Pepper Vestige Bottle Green, $79.95; Robert Mark Kalinda Ceramic Vase Large, $69; Matte Black Vase Large, $34.95; Luxe Rug in Blue (225x155cm), $999 ^Single and king single quilt cover sets each consist of 1x quilt cover and 1x standard pillowcase. Double, queen, king and super king quilt cover sets each consist of 1x quilt cover and 2x standard pillowcases.

Lynch Iron Bronze Trileg Planter, $119; Zena Frost Table Lamp, $149; Takoda Australian Made 2-Seater Fabric Sofa (150x86x90cm), $899 Upholstered in Warwick ‘Plush’ Fabric; Sentra Round Marble Coffee Table (D80xH46cm), $399; Comino Cushion in Sapphire, $59.95; Salt & Pepper Paradise Ceramic Vases in White and Gold Large, $79.95 and Small, $69.95; Luxe Rug in Navy (225x155cm), $999

Boston Floor Lamp, $279; Mira Australian Made 2.5-Seater Sofa (178x87x88cm), $999 Upholstered in Warwick ‘Plush’ Fabric; Simpatico White & Mustard Cushion, $79.95; Masai Black Cushion, $49.95; Velvet Cushion in Gold, $34.95: Shiva Wool Rug in Silver (225x155cm), $599

V I S I T D O M AY N E . C O M . AU T O B R O W S E O U R F U L L R A N G E O F F U R N I T U R E , B E D D I N G A N D H O M E WA R E S .


Dark nights and short days call for cosy rooms and thoughtful touches of comfort.

Moody Blues

Assemble varying degrees of blue with a contrasting colour to create a striking space with a thematic presence.

Heston 3-Seater Leather Sofa (214x76x84cm), $3499 Upholstered in Genuine Cowhide Leather; Aura Vintage Linen Cushion in Natural, $69.95; Greg Natale Snake Throw, $329.95; Delilah Cushion in Indigo, $49.95: Aura Vintage Linen Cushion in Flint, $69.95; Casia Coffee Table (D80xH40cm), $299; Salt & Pepper Totem Planter in Red Earth, $59.95; Carlos Wool Rug in Brown (225x155cm), $599


Beautiful winter light engulfs every space to inspire creative energy that transforms.

Warm Neutrals

Play it safe with neutrals accentuated with bold touches of metallics, fresh foliage and textured fabrics.


Left Kulu Dining Table (200x76x95cm), $1999; Duomo Swivel Dining Chair, $199ea; Kew Cushion in Navy, $39.95; Regency Brass Bowl Medium in Gold, $99; Abu Pendant Light, $179; Abi Pendant Light, $159; Above New Orleans Chair (78x86x78cm) available in Blue or Grey, $399; Velvet Cushion in Burnt Orange, $34.95; Mercer Side Table, $249; Salt & Pepper Tower Vase Tall in White, $59.95; Totem Planter in Red Earth, $59.95 Right Kulu 3-Door Buffet (150x80x50cm), $2299; Black Frost Vases Large, $69.95 and Small, $49.95; New Delta Chair (78x75x77cm), $459; Gypsy Cushion in Grey, $39.95; Aura Waff le Throw in Pebble, $169; Denver Floor Lamp in Natural, $449; Luxe Rug in Blue (225x155cm), $999

V I S I T D O M AY N E . C O M . AU T O B R O W S E O U R F U L L R A N G E O F F U R N I T U R E , B E D D I N G A N D H O M E WA R E S .


Left Sola Set of 2 Tables (1 Shown), $499; Audrey Table Lamp, $89.95; Peony Queen Bed Frame, $3499; Domayne Luxuries 300TC Queen Sheet Set† in White and Mint, $109.95; Aura Vintage Linen Cushion in Flint, $69.95; Kew Linen House Throw in Blush, $179.95; Below Totem Planter in Black, $59.95; Black Frost Vase Large, $69.95 Chester Fabric Chair (74x80x77cm) available in Pink or Grey, $399; Casia Lamp Table (D40xH50cm), $199; Aura Ribbed Blanket in Grey, $179; Right Richmond Queen Bed Frame with Leather Upholstery, $2999; Domayne Luxuries 300TC Queen Sheet Set† in Blush, $109.95; Noite Comforter, $349; Aura ‘Chambray Fringe’ Queen Quilt Cover Dove, $199; Aura ‘Chambray Fringe’ Standard Pillowcase, $29.95; Linen House Kew Cushions, $39.95ea; Aura Vintage Linen Cushion in Natural, $69.95; Domayne Luxuries Noite Comforter in Beige, $209.40; Cincinatti Set of 2 Marble Tables (1 Shown), $699; Matte Black Vase in Medium, $24.95 and in Large, $34.95; Mink Pendant Light, $199.95; Evelyn Vase in Pink, $79.95 †Single and king single sheet sets each consist of 1x fitted sheet, 1x flat sheet and 1x standard pillowcase. Double, queen, king and super king sheet sets each consist of 1x fitted sheet, 1x flat sheet and 2x standard pillowcases.

V I S I T D O M AY N E . C O M . AU T O B R O W S E O U R F U L L R A N G E O F F U R N I T U R E , B E D D I N G A N D H O M E WA R E S .


Envelope yourself with layers of texture and warmth that will invite rest and retreat.

Provoking Pastels

Pastels have a place in a winter space when layered against warm beige or deep, moody greys.


At Choices Flooring, we know that good interior decorating starts

from the floor up. With the latest designs in carpet, timber, bamboo, laminate, luxury vinyl, rugs and now window furnishings, we have the perfect decorating solution for every home and budget. only a vailable at

So find the floor you’ve been searching for at your local Choices Flooring store or go to choicesflooring.com.au

featured products Abode Prime Luxury Vinyl Plank - 1 Strip

Urban Rug - Wool & Viscose

Design Featured: Chambery

Colour Featured: Ivory

choicesflooring.com.au


Man

RIGHT NOW

8

9 5

7

John Travolta makes the moves in Saturday Night Fever (1977).

4

6 10 3

2

Stayin’ alive Catch a case of disco fever

1

11

and switch on the glitter. Edited by HARRY ROBERTS

12

13

16

15 14

1 Editions de Parfums by Frédéric Malle ‘Superstitious’ hair mist, $261, from Mecca. 2 Buly 1803 comb, approx. $32, from Mr Porter. 3 Lurex shirt, $1600, from Saint Laurent. 4 Versace ‘Medusa’ pendant, $940, from Farfetch. 5 Patek Philippe ‘Golden Ellipse’ watch in Rose Gold, $40,100, from Kennedy Star. 6 Tom Dixon ‘Mirror Ball’ pendant light, POA, from De De Ce. 7 Comme des Garçons ‘Andy Warhol’s You’re In’ EDT, $139/100ml, from Mecca. 8 JW Anderson neckband, $360, from Matchesfashion.com 9 Takahiromiyashita belt, approx. $2304, from Mr Porter. 10 Tacchini ‘Julep’ sofa by Jonas Wagell, POA, from StylecraftHOME. 11 Gucci F18 menswear. 12 Gucci sunglasses, approx. $373, from Mr Porter. 13 Valentino document holder, $1240, from Matchesfashion.com. 14 ‘Wyatt 40’ boot, $2015, from Saint Laurent. 15 Vintage ‘Catena/Hyaline’ chair, POA, from Nicholas & Alistair. 16 Glas Italia ‘Shimmer’ side table, $3410, from Space. For stockists see Address Book.

71


RIGHT NOW

Woman

Karen Lynn Gorney in Saturday Night Fever (1977).

3

1

2 5 4

6

Dancing queen Get your groove on in

7 8

70s hues and disco shoes. Edited by R ACHAEL THOMP SON

10

11

12

14 9 13

1 Zafferano ‘Veneziano’ carafe, $130, and tumblers, $234/6, from Jardan. 2 Kartell ‘FL/Y’ pendant light, $460, from Space. 3 ‘Expensive Pink’ eyeshadow, $33, from M.A.C. 4 ‘Ricky’ sunglasses, $610, from Chloé. 5 Helen Kontouris ‘101’ chair, $3340, from Schiavello. 6 ‘Lip Definer’, $40, in Garnet 03, from Burberry. 7 JW Anderson ‘Sphere’ drop earrings, $589, in silver, from Ssense. 8 Escubac liqueur, $78/700ml, from Magnum + Queens Wine. 9 Ligne Roset ‘ODA’ side table, $550, from Domo. 10 Rotganzen ‘After Party’ cabinet, POA, in Steel Blue, from Gufram. 11 Marni ‘Pannier’ suede bag, $2520, from Net-A-Porter. 12 ‘Eau Dynamisante’ splash bottle, $100, from Clarins. 13 Gucci ‘Sylvie’ glittered pumps, $1230, from Net-A-Porter. 14 ‘Attico’ sequinned tulle dress,$1521, from Net-A-Porter. For stockists see Address Book.

72


MARTYN LAWRENCE BULLARD To find your local stockist call 1300 692 393 or visit www.radfordfurnishings.com.au/stockists Cole & Son distributed by Radford Furnishings

www.coleandson-martynbullard.com


D R AW I N G a crowd

Words STEPHEN TODD

Flagship boutiques aligned with high design are reviving the fortunes of retailers as shoppers flock to glamorously made-over venues and revel in the memorable experience.


P H OTO G R A P H S BY S E A N F E N N E S SY ( V I KOR I A & W O O DS ) , D IO N RO B E SO N ( A J E P E RT H )

Business of Design

ON L I N E PU R C H A S I N G at home in pyjamas has its charm, but there’s nothing like a real-life shopping spree to get inspiration flowing. Increasingly, retailers are turning to interior architects and designers of renown to create unique boutique experiences which incarnate their brand. “Our clients are really wanting us to explore how we can extend their brand language through materials and client experience,” says Melbourne interior designer Fiona Lynch. “Whether at home or out shopping people want to experience design that is beautiful. Even if they’re in an office or a hospital or a store, they don’t want to feel like they’re in a commercial environment.” Lynch’s Emporium Melbourne store for women’s fashion label Viktoria & Woods is as rigorously sensuous as the interiors she devises for her private clients. A restrained material palette of pale terrazzo for the floors, dappled grey render walls and hewn timber fittings mean that texture and touch are primordial. Generous draping adds quiet drama; a monolithic Corian sales desk says ‘slick’; raw-edged buttery leather benches speak to the beauty in simplicity – all elements evocative of the Viktoria & Woods spirit. “We wanted to create a warm and inviting space for the customer, reflecting the brand’s clean and minimal aesthetic,” says Lynch. “There’s a subtle nod to Japanese design philosophy where there is a perfect balance of simplicity and the unexpected.” Sydney interior architect George Livissianis took a similar brandfocused approach when conceiving the first bricks-and-mortar store for successful online label Bec + Bridge. “We didn’t just sit down and start designing a store,” Livissianis explains. “We spent quite a bit of time with them, breaking down their brand to get a thorough understanding of their DNA and then built it back together as a physical space. “We looked at a lot of the references they use when shooting their campaigns and realised that so many of them are shot outside, beachside, in colonnades, on terraces.” And so the flagship Bec + Bridge boutique in Westfield Bondi Junction is paved in creamy bricks in a chunky herringbone formation, the ceiling has been dropped to create barrel vaulting, arced mirrors are suspended to extend a sense of perspective. These formal architectural elements are finished in gentle shell pink and offset by undulating drapes – the savvy mix of

RIGHT NOW

This page, from top left Aje boutique in Perth by We Are Triibe. Subtle lighting adds ambience. Fiona Lynch designed the Viktoria & Woods store at Emporium Melbourne. Simple but luxe details. The dappled render adds texture. Opposite page The pared-back beautiful interiors are as much about branding as Aje’s monogrammed clothing.

75


Business of Design

This page, clockwise from top left George Livissianis added a custom lucite console at Bec + Bridge. The vintage lucite chairs are covered in Icelandic sheepskin. The spacious interiors add to the air of luxury. The Westfield Bondi Junction store is paved in creamy herringbone pattern. The ceiling was dropped to create barrel vaulting.

76

structure and fluidity an apt interpretation of the brand’s allure. Livissianis is a maestro of mood, the man behind some of Sydney’s signature eateries – Cho Cho San, Apollo and Chin Chin among them – and understands that lighting is key to the feelgood factor. At Bec + Bridge he has concealed all light sources behind the rolling ceiling, allowing it to wash gentle shadows across the room, mimicking daylight in the depths of a shopping mall. Lighting is primordial, too, in the new Aje store in Perth’s upmarket Claremont Quarter shopping centre. Melbourne studio We Are Triibe created a floating ceiling from behind which lighting bathes the space in an ethereal glow. At the rear of the room three tall, slender archways draw in the eye, their arcs obliquely inclined to create an illusion of extra depth. Finished in textured concrete render, they are as dramatic as a de Chirico streetscape of Torino. “The store is a buffet of tactile materials,” says Christina Symes, one half of We Are Triibe. “Aje’s aesthetic is light, white and natural,” says the other half, Jessica D’Abadie. “And we interpreted those attributes by layering Japanese ceramics, natural stone, Italian travertine.” Deployed on the facade and floor and as display shelving, Triibe chose travertine in the truly appetising shade of creamed honey. “Don’t underestimate what you can do with your space,” urged Chris Sanderson of UK trend agency Future Laboratory at their Gottlieb Duttweiler Institute Retail Summit in September 2017. “For many consumers, the physical store is still a key place to provide a memorable experience and service.” Clever interior designers do that by integrity of concept and rigour of execution – but also by the addition of a little je ne sais quoi, a playful flaunting of their design savvy. At Viktoria & Woods, Lynch incorporates bespoke quartz crystal, brass and tubular LED wall sconces by Melbourne lighting maestro Christopher Boots to add a sculptural edge to the space. Livissianis installed rare 1970s lucite chairs by Charles Hollis Jones (re-upholstered in Icelandic sheepskin) to the Bec + Bridge store – and designed a one-off lucite console to match. We Are Triibe appropriated copper piping to create bespoke clothes racks for the Aje store, leaving it untreated to allow patination over time. Memorable brick-andmortar moments all. fionalynch.com.au; wearetriibe.com; georgelivissianis.com

P H OTO G R A P H S BY TOM F E RG U S ON ( B EC + B R I D G E )

RIGHT NOW


SOLAR TILE SOLAR TILE YEAR YEAR OUTPUT PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE OUTPUT PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE

SOLAR SOLAR ROOFING ROOFING THE POWER OF A THE POWER OF A GREAT GREAT LOOKING LOOKING ROOF ROOF SOLARtile SOLARtile

MADISON Soho Night MADISON Soho Night

InlineSOLAR InlineSOLAR

A home with great street appeal can significantly increase its value, however with the with risinggreat cost street of power many Australians areincrease wantingits solar, buthowever are A home appeal can significantly value, detracted by the bulky bolt on panels on their homes. with the rising cost of power many Australians are wanting solar, but are detracted by the bulky bolt onintegrated panels on design, their homes. Monier SOLARtile is a unique interlocking with Monier’s designer flat tile concrete range, so you won’t have to compromise the Monier SOLARtile is a unique integrated design, interlocking with Monier’s visual appearance of your home again. designer flat tile concrete range, so you won’t have to compromise the visual of integrates your homesolar again. Monierappearance InlineSOLAR panels into your roofline to achieve a streamlined look and giving you all the benefits of solar. Monier InlineSOLAR integrates solar panels into your roofline to achieve a streamlined look and giving you all the benefits of solar. Both solar roofing systems are compatible with battery, come with a 25 year

INTEGRATED DESIGN INTEGRATED DESIGN STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY AUSTRALIA’S GOLD STANDARD AUSTRALIA’S GOLD STANDARD COMPATIBLE WITH BATTERY COMPATIBLE WITH BATTERY

performance guarantee andare online monitoring you have peace Both solar roofing systems compatible withso battery, come withofa mind 25 year your system isguarantee performing. performance and online monitoring so you have peace of mind your system is performing.

For more information on Monier Solar Roofing visit monier.com.au or call 1800 666 437 For more information on Monier Solar Roofing visit monier.com.au or call 1800 666 437


S PACES

FEAST ON THIS

P H OTO G R A P H Y J E M C R E S SW E L L . H A N DW R I T I NG BY L E S L E Y W O R K M A N

A corner of this Sydney apartment is devoted to dining with a stylish setting, beautiful art and lighting. For more, see Detail Oriented, p92.

An elegantly pared-back approach to design and decoration is the key to these chic and compact homes. 79


A RC H I T EC T/ D E S I G N E R

Milieu + DKO + SLAB Architecture

S M A L L M AT T E R S [ Collingwood ]

Photographs DEREK SWALWELL


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from top The six-level building in inner-city Collingwood sits neatly within the confines of a 76sqm site. In the kitchen, MDF Italia chairs, Craighill ‘Jack’ puzzle on a Zanat ‘Touch’ tray and Moroso side table, all from Hub. Vases from Dinosaur Designs. Moroso sofa, Anta ‘Afra’ lamp and When Objects Work containers, all from Hub. Opposite page Landscape, New England artwork by Geoffrey Proud from Hub.

81


”ADA P TA B L E SPAC E S , C LE VE R S TO R AG E A ND I N B U I LT J O I N E RY WERE ALL E S S E N T I A L .”

This page, clockwise from top left SCP ‘Lansdowne’ sofa, a Moroso rug, coffee table and ‘Mark’ side table, all from Hub. Moroso ‘Take A Line For A Walk’ armchair and Landscape, New England artwork by Geoffrey Proud, both from Hub. Lowe Furniture desk, Overgaard & Dyrman ‘Wire’ chair and artwork by William Mathewson, all from Hub. Henry Wilson accessories. Gandia Blasco outdoor furniture from Hub on the rooftop terrace, which enjoys views to the CBD. Opposite page, clockwise from top left The bathrooms feature timber joinery with natural stone surfaces. In the bedroom, Topos ‘Line’ floor lamp. Timber joinery lends a note of warmth to the bedroom’s sleek, utilitarian shades of grey.

82


S M A RT S PAC E S

A C O L L A B O R AT I O N between Michael McCormack, director of Milieu, and Jesse Linardi, DKO Architecture design director, resulted in an innovative, space-saving home. How did you become involved with this project and what was the client’s brief? Jesse is a great friend and he was looking to design a home for himself. When we saw this site we knew it was ideal for a collaboration. The project is in Collingwood, quite near the Milieu office, so we know the neighbourhood well and wanted to contribute positively to the area. What were the challenges and how did you resolve them? We acquired what was an old garage, and converted the small footprint into two vertical homes. The biggest challenge was working within the 76sqm site. We came up with a scheme that extends to all boundaries – a challenge in itself for council approval – and rises six levels, including a basement lounge, ground-level garage, and roof-top terrace. How would you describe the completed interior? It was driven by a need to maximise space. SLAB Architecture, run by Jesse’s wife Seada, devised an interior scheme that

marries the exterior materials with steel and raw concrete, softened by natural finishes. Adaptable spaces, clever storage, and inbuilt joinery were all essential. What are some of your favourite design elements? Were there any devices used to maximise the sense of space? The exterior is cocooned in pressed and perforated metal cladding, creating a jewellery box-like form. Operable screens open to the street, so the building changes in appearance as well as adapts to interior needs. The kitchen and living areas have multifunctional elements such as a movable timber slab on the table which acts as a chopping block and extended bench but, when removed, increases the dining capacity. What informed the selection of furniture, art, fittings and finishes? We worked with Hub to select key pieces. Due to the lofty ceilings and full-height glazing, the spaces feel open and generous even when furnished. Were the owners happy with the execution? With the owners also acting as architects, they are thrilled, and we plan more collaborations in future. milieuproperty. com.au; dko.com.au; slabarchitecture.com


Photographs MARK ROPER

A RC H I T EC T/ D E S I G N E R

Jolson + Edwina Glenn

TOP OF T HE WO R L D [ Toorak ]

84


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from top left Poliform ’Dune’ sofa, ‘Santa Monica’ chair and Arflex ‘Capilano’ small table. Outside is the Arflex ‘Cloud’ armchair and a table from Poliform. Exterior of One Wellington Street. Sleek kitchen fittings. Chocolate travertine benchtop. Opposite page Poliform ‘ICS’ stools in Spessart Oak, Poliform ‘Opera’ dining table and ‘Grace’ chairs.


This page, clockwise from left Poliform ‘Flute’ coffee table beside the bath. In the study, an Arflex ‘Vela’ screen, ‘Ponti’ writing desk and ‘Botolo’ chair. Poliform ‘Rever’ bed, ‘Gio’ bedside table and Cassina ‘Lady’ armchair in the bedroom. Untitled #1 by Robert Hunter from Artbank. Opposite page Poliform ‘Mad Queen’ armchair, ‘Mad’ dining table and chairs. ‘Gio’ console table. Wombat and Watermelon artwork by Marian Drew. ‘Gold Top Euphorbia Pot’ by Glenn Barkley. Scottie – A Convenient Pet by Bev Hogg. Arflex ‘Elettra’ armchair.

86


S M A RT S PAC E S

”C L E V E R PL A N N I N G A LLOW E D A CC E S S TO T HE DR A M AT I C C I T Y V I E W S W I T H OU T T HE NE E D FOR PR I VAC Y S C R E E N S .”

T H I S P E N T H O U S E in Melbourne’s Toorak is one of six stylish new apartments offering quality, amenity and flexibility in a desirable location. How did you become involved with this project? Lu k e Mc K i e /O rc h a r d P i pe r : T he Washington St reet apa r t ment wa s a collaboration between property developer Orchard Piper, architecture firm Jolson, and Poliform for joinery and soft furnishings to deliver refined luxury with a focus on detail. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? Stephen Jolson: A key consideration, as with many inner-cit y properties, was privacy. This was achieved with elevated garden beds and clever planning that allowed access to the dramatic city views without the need for privacy screens. How would you describe the interior? SJ: The project aimed to redefine luxury, with a refined, layered palette that focuses on texture, quality, space and elegance. The result is a

light-filled interior, with natural materials and sophisticated detailing that is seamlessly connected to the garden and views. What are some of your favourite elements? Were there any devices used to maximise the sense of space? SJ: The con nect iv it y to t he gardens and borrowed skyscapes is a successful integration of inside/outside zones. What informed the selection of furniture, fittings and finishes? Edwina Glenn: Clients could customise their Poliform robes to ensure they perfectly met their needs. The Poliform and Arflex pieces provide a unified, elegant and cohesive interior story, with all elements connecting visually and functionally. Poliform’s core values of refined luxury and detail aligned with the vision for the penthouse. Was the client happy with the execution? How do they use the space? LMcK: The penthouse has already seen a lot of entertaining, but it also functions beautifully as a calm retreat. washingtonstreet. com.au; poliform.com.au


S M A RT S PAC E S

I N T E R I O R

D E S I G N E R

Greg Natale Design

COLO U R W H E E L [ Darlinghurst ]

88


These pages Jonathan Adler sofa and armchair. Patterned cushions and coffee table by Greg Natale. Vintage Romeo Rega table lamp. Arcahorn nesting tables. ’Boule’ brass bowl by Greg Natale. Painting by Waldemar Kolbusz. ‘Yves’ carpet by Greg Natale for Designer Rugs.

Photographs ANSON SMART


This page, clockwise from left Custom kitchen joinery and ‘Palladiano’ flooring by Greg Natale. Vintage Romeo Rega bed. Cushions by Diane Von Furstenberg. Artwork by Retna. Custom cerused bathroom joinery, green marble floor tiles and ‘Ponti’ marble mosaics, all by Greg Natale.

G R E G N ATA LE’S signature patterninfused interiors are the hallmark of his own sumptuous apartment in Sydney’s inner city. What was the starting point for the interiors and how did you develop your design concept? Designing for yourself is trickier than you’d think and this home came together more organically than previous ones. We wanted the apartment to be visually lighter than our last one and I was keen to include a Studio 54 club vibe. Pattern is always a non-negotiable and that was expressed in carpets, cushions and wallpaper. Brass was also used for warmth and elegance. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? I’m a big fan of Harry Seidler so when we decided to move, I was thrilled to be able to stay in The Horizon! This apartment is on a different floor, and larger than the previous one. However, I still faced the same challenge of the exposed load-bearing beams. So I lowered all the ceilings to conceal the beams and punched coffers back up into the ceiling to create a sense of space and accommodate the decorative lighting. How would you describe the completed interior? It’s certainly rippling with 70s character. The kitchen floor and the living areas enjoy hints of Studio 54, and

90

there’s an explosion of colour in prints, paintings and sculptures, plus the varied styles in furnishings add personality. What are some of your favourite design elements? Were there any devices used to maximise the sense of space? I introduced a mirrored wall to enhance the sense of space and to reflect the view of the Harbour Bridge and the Opera House. Lintels were removed and doors were taken to full height to link spaces seamlessly and create cohesion. What informed the selection of furniture, art, fittings and finishes? The furniture is all low, robust and solid. The art palette steered a lot of the upholstery selections. I took my love of pattern to another level with the gold and white wallpaper. I also introduced my patterned carpet, and the bathrooms have a wonderful green stone flooring with my ‘Ponti’ marble mosaics on the walls. What do you enjoy about living in your apartment? I love the brightness and the natural light. The open-plan lounge room works well for entertaining and this spills out seamlessly to the outdoor terrace. The artworks create a gallery-like space, and all the colour collides and creates a dynamic atmosphere. The Patterned Interior by Greg Natale (Rizzoli). gregnatale.com


S M A RT S PAC E S

“ THERE’S AN E XPLOSION OF CO LO UR IN PRINTS, PAINTIN GS AND SCULPTURE S, PLUS THE VARIED ST YLES IN FURNISHINGS ADD PERSONALIT Y.”

This page Minotti table and chairs from De De Ce. Buffet and ‘Ziggurat’ brass bowl by Greg Natale. Artwork by Sydney Ball. Ceiling light by Kelly Wearstler for Visual Comfort.


I N T E R I O R

D E S I G N E R

Hayden Crawford

DE TA I L OR IE N T E D [ Elizabeth Bay ]

These pages Minotti ‘Powell’ sofa, KnollStudio ‘Platner’ chair, ‘Barcelona’ coffee table, and Cherner chair, all from De De Ce. Flos lamps from Euroluce. Gaetano Sciolari chandelier. Decorative objects on coffee table from Becker Minty.


S M A RT S PAC E S

Photographs JEM CRESSWELL

93


This page KnollStudio ‘Saarinen’ dining table and ‘Bertoia’ chairs from De De Ce. Painting by Lee Meskin. Opposite page, top left and below right In the study, a ‘Max’ desk from Camerich and a KnollStudio ‘Brno’ chair from De De Ce. Flos ‘Spun’ lamp from De De Ce. Artwork by Aaron Kinnane. KnollStudio ‘Platner’ stool from De De Ce. Top right and below left In the bedroom, an ‘Alison’ bed from Camerich. ‘Tab’ floor lamp from Euroluce. Artwork by Antonia Mrljak. Vintage Knoll ‘MR’ lounge chair and ‘Saarinen’ stool. Oluce ‘Atollo’ lamp from Euroluce. Vintage C Jeré sculpture. ‘Max’ mirror from Camerich.

94


S M A RT S PAC E S

” B E S P OK E LUXURY ME E TS A R T DE CO G R A N DE UR ; A L AY E R E D A N D D E TA I L E D S PAC E TO SHOW C A S E A R T WO R K , L I G H T I N G A ND F UR N I T U R E .”


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, from top ‘Alison’ bed from Camerich. Cushions from Pond. ‘Tab’ floor lamp from Euroluce. Painting by Antonia Mrljak. Wall sculpture by Dion Horstmans. Chandelier by Gaetano Sciolari. Joinery in the living room is custom. Cherner chair from De De Ce. Sculpture by Dion Horstmans.

A N A PA RTM E N T I N A C1917 building in Sydney’s Elizabeth Bay was expertly made over by interior designer Hayden Crawford. What was the starting point for the interiors and how did you develop your design concept? I wanted to ref lect on the period of the apartment, the elaborate detailing and grandeur of what the spaces would have looked like originally. Over the years it had been stripped of any heritage details, panelled ceilings were covered and decorative mouldings removed. I wanted to reinstate these plus 300mm skirting boards to bring back grandeur and glamour. Solid timber herringbone floors were used for a feeling of luxe and pattern. The intent then was for the joinery to be a contemporary insertion and contrast with the heritage detail. This was the blank canvas for art works, classic furniture and vintage lighting. The palette was ‘winter beach’ – shades of blue, grey, black and white with touches of gold and tan. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? It needed to be gutted and restored to its former glory, openings in walls created for an open-plan kitchen/living area to maximise light, and doorways lifted to celebrate the 3.2m ceiling height. How

96

would you describe the completed interior? Bespoke luxury meets art deco grandeur; a layered and detailed space to showcase artwork, lighting and furniture. What are some of your favourite design elements? Were there any devices used to maximise the sense of space? The joinery was designed to conceal and reveal technolog y and storage. A veneered study desk is concealed behind f ull-height bi-fold doors, t he T V/AV equipment is concealed behind an ebonised veneer cantilevered cabinet so the living room isn’t focused around the TV screen. What informed the selection of furniture, art, fittings and finishes? Everything has been collected over a number of years, both locally and from travel. I started collecting Knoll furniture when I was 21. There are also objects from secondhand stores in Palm Springs, pieces from Becker Mint y in Sydney; the large vintage Gaetano Sciolari chandelier was a find in Milan. Local artists give a sense of place – Dion Horstmans, Antonia Mrljak and Aaron Kinanne. What do you enjoy about living in your apartment and how do you use the space? I love the flexibility, great for entertaining but equally nice to relax and unwind. haydencrawford.com.au


Pictured > Glamour Kashan > Midnight

The Greatest Floor Show In Town Direct from the USA, Prestige Carpets brings you hundreds of the latest designs and patterns from Nourison and Stanton, including stripes, florals, animal prints and geometrics. This floor show is like nothing you’ve seen before. Now showing at these Prestige Carpets retailers: Don Currie Carpets 24 Wellington St St Kilda VIC 03 9510 1888

Andersens 80 Webster Rd Stafford QLD 07 3856 0500

Carpeteria 15-17 Newland St Bondi Junction NSW 02 9389 4389

Expect to be surprised and excited. Prestige Carpets, bringing your home to life. www.prestigecarpets.com.au (03) 9708 6913

Carpet Force 2/251 Stirling Hwy Claremont WA 08 9383 2100


Photographs SEAN FENNESSY

I N T E R I O R

D E S I G N E R

Fiona Lynch

L IG H T MI NDE D [ Surry Hills ]


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from top left Thonet ‘No 13’ dining chairs custom finished in Dulux ‘Noble Knight’ with Carl Hansen & Søn oak table from Cult. Kitchen benchtop and splashback in honed Elba marble from Artedomus. Joinery in Dulux ‘Baltica’ two-pack finish with brass detailing. Opposite page ‘Joe’ sofa from MCM House. Arflex ‘Cross High’ armchair from Poliform, Hay ‘Slit’ hexagonal side table from Cult, Fogia ‘Tabula’ terrazzo and leather coffee table from Fred International, and E15 ‘Backenzahn’ stool on a rug from Supertuft.

T H E U S E O F Australian materials to create a Scandinavian aesthetic helped to transform this narrow Victorian terrace in Sydney’s Surry Hills. How did you become involved with this project and what was the client’s brief? Our client was referred from another residential client in Sydney. They briefed us to rework the interiors of this Victorian terrace. Our c l ient s a re p a s s ion at e ab out l ight Scandinavian interiors and loved our Park Street project [in Melbourne]. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? Bringing light into the space is always a challenge for narrow Victorian terraces. The storage had to make the most of the narrow space. How would you describe the interiors? It’s relaxed and light, and a great place to entertain. The planning of the spaces has made them work hard to make the most of the floorplan. On the ground floor there is a living space, dining area and

a large kitchen that opens to a courtyard, and has a laundry incorporated under the stairs. On the first floor are two bedrooms and two bathrooms. A mezzanine floor holds a study and guest room. What are some of your favourite elements? How did you maximise the sense of space? Good planning and zoning ensured that each area is working hard. The kitchen is almost oversized for a terrace house, however it makes the space feel bigger. What informed the selection of furniture, fittings and finishes? We used a minimal palette of Elba stone and high-gloss navy joinery with brass details in the kitchen. Our clients love Scandinavian design so in a way we were channelling this with an Australian approach to materials. Were the owners happy with the finished project? How do they use the space? The owners are very happy with the result. We enjoyed every moment of this project, assisting them to make the most of their narrow terrace. fionalynch.com.au

99


S M A RT S PAC E S

”O U R C L I E N T S L OVE SC A N D I N AV I A N DE S I G N SO IN A WAY W E W E R E CH A N N E L L IN G T H I S .” This page Jean-Marie Massaud ‘Jacqueline’ bed from Poliform. ‘Tab T’ lamp from Euroluce on a ‘Leo’ bedside table from Grazia & Co.

100


Photographs DA MIAN BENNETT

I N T E R I O R

D E S I G N E R

Tom Mark Henry

N E W WAV E [ Bondi ]


S M A RT S PAC E S This page, clockwise from left Curtains by Simple Studio in James Dunlop ‘Sandor’. Floors from Precision Flooring. Floc Studio ‘Nakkia’ sofa, Oluce ‘Superluna’ lamp from Euroluce and MRD Home ‘Elanda’ side table. Outside, Tribù side table from Cosh Living, Robert Plumb ‘Bondi’ pots, Tait ‘Trace’ armchair and ‘Tri-cut’ vase from Vela. In the kitchen, limestone flooring from Eco Outdoor, custom veneer joinery. Splashback in Calacatta Oro marble. Muuto ‘Cover’ chairs and ‘Global’ dining table, all from MCM House. Opposite page Paulistano armchair from Hub, ‘Alfred’ sofa from Jardan, coffee table from MCM House, side table from Fred International, table lamp from Great Dane, Floc Studio ‘Nakkia’ chair with cushion from Hay, on an Armadillo & Co. rug. Blue Grass artwork by Colin Passmore.

103


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from left Phillip Jeffries wallpaper. ‘Ici’ wall sconce from Articolo. Custom bedhead in Pedroso&Osório fabric from Boyac. Side table from MCM House, throw from Hay. Shower by Brooklyn Copper Co. ‘Beamy’ wall lights from Parterre. Custom bedhead in Cherbourg linen from Westbury Textiles, Hay bed throw and accessories. ‘Eclipse’ wall sconce from Articolo.

D E S I G N ST UDI O Tom Mark Henry was charged with creating a laid-back vibe for this Bondi Beach apartment that resonates with its views and location. What was the client’s brief? Jade Nottage: The brief was to create an apartment that felt intrinsically Bondi, reflecting the relaxed coastal lifestyle. As the client lives overseas for much of the year, he wanted to be able to immerse himself in a space that immediately felt like home when he returned to Sydney. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? Emma Say: The apartment had an internal ceiling height of 2.4m so we had to be clever when selecting the floor and ceiling finishes as well as the lights and airconditioning. Another challenge was that almost every wall was on an angle, making the space feel small and closed in. We needed to ensure that the sightlines from the front to the views of the beach were maximised. We chose a white set render for the internal walls to improve the set-out and offer a soft illuminating light. How would you describe the interior? ES: As soon as you step inside you

104

are overtaken by the views of the beach. The materials reflect the physical environment, blurring the line between indoors and out. This apartment is the epitome of luxurious, relaxed living, perfect for the barefoot lifestyle our client was seeking. What are some of your favourite elements? ES: The joinery detailing and raw-edge marble are our favourites. The raised feet of the joinery in the kitchen create a sense of lightness and the raw edge on the marble splashback references the Bondi waves. What informed the selection of furniture, fittings and finishes? ES: It was a natural response to the proximity to the beach. Tumbled limestone, handmade tiles and woven wallpaper contrast with the custom aged rangehood, aged bronze hardware and black accents. Was the owner happy with the execution? How does he use the space? JN: The owner is thrilled, it surpassed his expectations in design and execution. When he’s not in Sydney, his country-based family uses the apartment. It’s great that the space is loved and being used even in the client’s absence. tommarkhenry.studio


80% OF ZIP HYDROTAP OWNERS DRINK MORE WATER*

We are all aware of the benefits associated with drinking enough water, but despite this, many of us go about our daily lives dehydrated to some degree. As world leaders in instant drinking water systems, Zip invented the innovative HydroTap, the smart and essential addition for every kitchen. Our integrated Australian-made system combines patented PowerPulse™ boiling and Direct DryChilling with MicroPurity filtration technologies to create pure-tasting boiling, chilled and sparkling water you will love in an instant. When water is this convenient and irresistible you’ll love drinking more of it. To improve your hydration and your family’s well-being, discover more at zipwater.com Zip HydroTap. Now available in 8 new premium finishes. *Statistic based on a survey of 354 owners of residential-installed Zip HydroTaps.

ZIP HYDROTAP | PURE TASTING | INSTANT | BOILING | CHILLED | SPARKLING

T H E W O R L D ’ S M O S T A D VA N C E D D R I N K I N G WAT E R S Y S T E M


A RC H I T EC T/ D E S I G N E R

Matt Gibson Architecture + Design

R E V I VA L STO RY [ North Melbourne ]

Photographs DEREK SWALWELL

106


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from above The exterior celebrates the building’s original materials. Toss B ‘Sphere’ pendant lights by Alain Monnens from Hub above Conde House ‘Challenge’ table by Peter Maly and ‘Kamuy’ dining chairs, all from Apato. In the hallway, Quiver artwork by Marisa Purcell from Olsen Gallery, floor sculpture from Meizai and wall sculpture by Kevin Maritz. Opposite page Room painted in Dulux ‘Trespass’. Muuto ‘Under the Bell’ pendant light from Living Edge. &tradition ‘Mayor’ sofa by Arne Jacobsen and Flemming Lassen, and Fredericia ‘Spanish’ armchairs by Børge Mogensen, all from Great Dane, on a CC-Tapis rug from Loom. Artwork by Kerry Armstrong.


This page, from top Walter Knoll sofa from Living Edge, coffee table from Jardan and B&B Italia ‘Husk’ armchair by Patricia Urquiola from Space, all on a Halcyon Lake rug. In the courtyard, ‘Jak and Jil’ outdoor table and chairs from Tait. DesignByThem ‘Partridge’ kitchen stools. Opposite page, from top An artwork by Hannah Fox above the custom headboard in fabric from Instyle. Bedside lamp by David Chipperfield from Euroluce on a Diesel by Moroso ‘Hexxed’ table from Hub. ‘Moller’ bench and reindeer hide, both from Great Dane. B&B Italia ‘Husk’ armchair by Patricia Urquiola from Space. Cushions from Cult on a Walter Knoll sofa from Living Edge. Topos ‘FL’ floor lamp from Hub.

108


S M A RT S PAC E S

A N HI S TO R I C T E R R AC E was given a new lease of life by Matt Gibson and Karen Batchelor of Matt Gibson Architecture + Design, which maintains its heritage ethos. How did you become involved with this project and what was the client’s brief? The client ran a competition between shortlisted architects and designers which we won! The brief was to adapt a Victorian terrace house for a family of five. It had previously been used as a commercial space, and the client wished to repair, restore and celebrate its heritage, and bring it into the current day. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? As with all terraces there was a lack of light and connection with the exterior. We wanted to create an ‘open living platform’ at ground level, allowing interaction with internal light courts and side gardens which extend the sense of space. The sloping site from front to rear was utilised to delineate floor levels and provide definition. A narrow double-height void over the dining area brings light into the ground f loor and connects with the children’s bedrooms above. How would you describe the completed interior? The strategy was one of restoration

and sensitive upgrading. Opening up the ground level enables a visual exhaling and a sense of light, air and space. The renovation revealed the building’s history, celebrating the original materials. What are some of your favourite design elements? Were there any devices used to maximise the sense of space? There is an element of storytelling in the house. You can read the layers of history and the narrative of the building as you move through it. There is a warmth and texture while the renovation opens the interior to light and the landscape. Internal courtyards, double-height voids, concealed glazed sliding panels offer the flexibility to open up or close down living spaces. What informed the selection of furniture, art, fittings and finishes? The front rooms were re stored, w it h a for ma l but rela xed composition of pieces. At the rear a similar theme, though with lighter timber furniture, provides consistency. What do the owners love about the space? They love that it is very much a family home and call it their ‘oasis in the city’. It is incredibly tranquil, blending comfort with the historic context. They love the connectivity between the levels and from interior to exterior. mattgibson.com.au


I N T E R I O R

D E S I G N E R

Thomas Hamel & Associates

H I G H N OT E [ Sydney ]

110


S M A RT S PAC E S These pages Custom sofa in ‘Hollywood Sandstone’ from Mokum. Antique French chair from Conley & Co upholstered in Jim Thompson ‘Prasat’ from Milgate. Custom coffee tables in bleached walnut veneer with black iron, and a sculpture by Clement Meadmore. Custom side table in hammered metal with a glass top. Artwork by Marion Borgelt. Flowers from Mandalay Flowers.

Photographs MATT LOWDEN


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from top left Andreu World ‘Carlotta’ stools from Ke-Zu. Caesarstone benchtop with nickel detailing. Iron basket from Formations, LA. Custom sofa in ‘Hollywood Sandstone’ from Mokum. Antique French chair from Conley & Co. Alabaster pendant light from Charles Edwards, London. Ruth Levine ‘Phoenix Crater’ bowl from Fanuli. Artwork by Tim Maguire. Koonam amethyst pieces from Conley & Co. Rug from Behruz Studio. In the main bedroom, custom bed and bedlinen. Custom chair upholstered in Holly Hunt ‘Great Outdoors’ fabric. Glass stool from Ondene. Artwork by Fiona Omeenyo.

” T HE APART ME N T PRE SE N T S A S A CL E A N L INE D, INNE R- C I T Y HOME FOR WE L L-T R AVE L L E D GLO B A L C I T I Z E N S.”

112


A TH R E E-STAG E R E N OVAT I O N and upgrade by Thomas Hamel & Associates combining two apartments into one has resulted in a generously sized, luxuriously appointed home. How did you become involved with this project and what was the client’s brief? This project has been a progression over the past 10 years. Originally, we were asked to assist with a renovation of the apartment that the owners felt was a bit ‘austere and white’. We selected a deeper wall colour, and introduced handwoven roman blinds to give some richness to the interiors. To add personality we sourced special art, antiques and furnishings. Around five years later, the clients were on the ‘look out’ for a new apartment with additional space. After an exhaustive search they realised they already had the best apartment. Instead, they were able to purchase the apartment next door to add the extra rooms required. A full renovation ensued and with the expansion, a new television room/ library and a guest bedroom suite were added. The clients loved the new spaces and the flow of the apartment. Just over a year ago they wanted an upgrade so we replaced carpets, the wall panelling and added fresh layers of art and furnishings to make the home current though still classic. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? The

original floorplan had many obstacles, but we were able to strip it back to the bones to open up rooms and create options for living spaces rather than many bedrooms. The building was originally a commercial space and has quite high ceilings which made the large format rooms feel appropriate. Describe the completed interior? The apartment presents as a clean lined inner-city home for welltravelled global citizens. The couple can feel comfortable in the spaces by themselves, or with visitors or when the extended family of 20 or so come to visit. What are some of your favourite design elements? Were there any devices used to maximise the sense of space? One of my favourite spaces is the banquette breakfast nook in the kitchen, created in an existing bay window. The view of Sydney Harbour and the city is the biggest feature of the apartment, but the drama needs to extend to the interiors, hence the dramatic black piano. What informed the selection of furniture, fittings and finishes? We have a long history with these clients and a trusting bond. We knew that each selection mattered; we did not want excess. Comfort played a huge part in our design and many bespoke pieces were chosen. Were the owners happy with the execution? The clients are extremely happy, and say their home is perfect and they don’t ever want to change anything again! thomashamel.com

This page, from top The media room has a B&B Italia sofa from Space, glass stools from Ondene. Custom armchair in Glant ‘Trieste’ from Ascraft. Rug from Behruz Studio. Artwork by Frank Bauer. In the library is a custom sofa, coffee table and side table. Bronze table lamps from Laura Kincade. Diptych by Cate Maddy from Artbank.

113


A RC H I T EC T/ D E S I G N E R

Tom Robertson Architects + Vanda F U R N I T U R E

&

ST Y L I N G

Bec van der Sluys + Simone Haag

PE R SON A L I T Y PLU S [ Brighton ]

Photographs DEREK SWALWELL


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from top left A Hannah Carrick artwork pops on the dark surface. &tradition ‘Palette’ side table and custom banquette by Simone Haag. A Dion Horstmans wall sculpture points the way in the living space. Opposite page Tacchini ‘Sesann’ sofa from Stylecraft. De La Espada ‘Laurel’ side table for Nichetto from Criteria. ‘Ivy’ coffee tables from Grazia & Co. Photograph by Slim Aarons.

115


This page, clockwise from top left Simone Haag created the custom dining table which is ringed by GamFratesi ‘Beetle’ chairs for Gubi from Criteria. ‘Nimbus’ handmade glass and satin brass chandelier by CTO Lighting. An outdoor furniture setting by Kettal graces the deck. The ‘Geometric II’ wallpaper in Miami from Cole & Son delivers a dose of South Beach colour and pizzazz to the bathroom.

A POTE N T I N F US I O N of art, furniture, and objects creates character in a luxurious penthouse development in Brighton. How did you become involved with this project and what was the brief ? This penthouse was a four-year project by Vanda and Tom Robertson Architects that began with the purchase of an old office building. Bec van der Sluys called on Simone Haag to collaborate with her on styling the interiors. Together, the team created a sense of warmth and homeliness, and maximised the stunning views. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? As an existing structure we were locked into a footprint, so the layout was important. We aimed to create a ‘home in the sky’ for a family who likes to entertain. High ceilings, an expansive hallway and large windows created space, while materials such as velvet, leather, wood, black veneer and brass add warmth. Shelving and an open fireplace break up the dining and lounge area and create intimacy. How would you describe the interiors? Mature, sophisticated and timeless. The injection of

bold furniture brings the spaces to life. It’s a celebration of texture, natural materials and colour with a play f ul personalit y in a minimalist environment. What are your favourite elements and how did you maximise the sense of space? A striking timber ceiling runs along the central corridor and elongates the home’s perceived length. The vast expanse of marble was an indulgent addition as well as the hallway that spans the entire top floor and allows you to see from one end of the penthouse to the other. Large windows let in natural light and a dramatic glass chandelier adds dazzle. Subtle 70s references can be seen with the re-released ‘Sesann’ sofa, the geometric rug and a Slim Aarons print. What informed the selection of furniture, fittings and finishes? Many pieces are unique and were selected to enhance t he architect ure. A refined sense of playfulness and some bold choices determined the furniture. Knowing a family would be growing up here was key while maintaining sophistication. tomrobertson.com.au; vandaprojects.com.au; simonehaag.com.au


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from top ‘Thule’ stools from Great Dane line up at the extra-long island bench under the ‘Triple Kick’ pendant light by Volker Haug. Grotto Azzurro photograph by James Geer. The black veneer cabinetry adds warmth to the interior scheme under the timber ceiling that runs along the central corridor.

“ W E A I M E D TO C R E AT E A ‘ H O M E IN T HE SK Y ’ FOR A FA M I LY W H O L I KE S TO E N T E RTA I N.”

117


Beatrix Lounge Chair & Footstool by Shinsaku Miyamoto for Ritzwell

stylecraftHOME.com.au Sydney 100 William Street, Woolloomooloo

Melbourne 145 Flinders Lane, Melbourne CBD

Mon - Fri: 8:30am - 5:00pm, Sat: 10:00am - 4:00pm info@stylecraftHOME.com.au


Bazaar N E W

RIGHT NOW

YO R K

I TA L I A N A R R I VA L

Spread across an impressive 1160sqm, the Molteni Group’s newly opened Madison Avenue flagship features an assemblage of elegant furniture from the group’s three brands, including Patricia Urquiola’s ‘Codex’ table (below, left). molteni.it; hubfurniture.com.au P E RT H

WESTERN FRONT Renowned furniture designer and manufacturer Jardan has taken flight to Perth with the opening of its latest chic showroom (above) that resides in the former historic Skinner Gallery space, not far from Kings Park. jardan.com.au

Brand royalty Inspiring stores at home and abroad.

SY D N E Y

HIDDEN GEMS Sarah & Sebastian’s light-filled flagship store (above) secretes the contemporary jewellery, including the ‘Dimension’ earrings (above right), in mirrored cabinets.

B R I S B A N E

LUXE LIVING LUXURY HAS A NEW DESTINATION AT THE W HOTEL IN BRISBANE WITH THE OPENING OF THE SECOND BECKER MINTY STORE (CENTRE LEFT). AN ECLECTIC RANGE OF FASHION AND HOME DECOR ITEMS ARE ON OFFER INCLUDING THE KELLY WEARSTLER ‘CLEO’ TABLE LAMP (LEFT). BECKERMINTY.COM; WBRISBANE.COM

sarahandsebastian.com

SY D N E Y LO N DON

FRENCH CONNECTION Maison Alaïa has opened its first flagship store outside of Paris on London’s Bond Street. Designed by the late Azzedine Alaïa alongside long-time friend Carla Sozzani, the modern space has been filled with pieces from the luminary’s favourite artists. alaia.fr

H A R DWA R E H E RO

Spark & Burnish is bringing artisanal contemporary hardware products from boutique brands across the globe to its Surry Hills showroom. sparkandburnish.com.au

Edited by R ACHAEL THOMP SON

119


RIGHT NOW

Creative Home

Design portrait The richness of classical principles overlayed with a minimalist aesthetic is the signature style of Melbourne architect Paul Conrad’s home. Photographs DEREK SWALWELL Styling SIMONE HA AG

This page Paul Conrad on a Poliform ‘Santa Monica Home’ chair. Ligne Roset ‘Stump’ side table from Domo.


This page, clockwise from top left

W

H AT H A S I N F O R M E D A N D I N S P I R E D Y O U R INTERIORS STYLE? HAS THIS EVOLVED OVER TIME?

The strongest influence came during the early years of my career, working in London alongside a particularly strong mentor. He demonstrated the possibility of overlaying a minimalist aesthetic with the richness of classical design, and opened my eyes to the power of combining architecture and interior design. My style has evolved, but I can trace the roots back to this formative time.

Artwork by Shannon McGrath and Marcus Piper from Hub. Flos ‘Snoopy’ table lamp from Euroluce. Brass candleholder by Simon Lloyd. Table sculpture by Anna Varendorff from Hub. In the living room, custom Carrara marble coffee table by Paul Conrad. Ligne Roset ‘Cupidon’ side table from Domo. ‘Soho’ rug from Whitecliffe Imports. Artwork by Judith Wright from Sophie Gannon Gallery. Minotti ‘Hamilton Island’ sofa and ‘Leger’ side table from De De Ce.

IS YOUR HOME A SANCTUARY OR DOES IT DOUBLE AS A WORKSPACE?

Our house was definitely designed to provide a sense of sanctuary, but running a business that is also a passion means that work never stops and so I have a work space that was designed to facilitate the creative side of the business; books and objects from admired creatives line shelves and are often used to spark ideas. WHAT INITIALLY APPE ALED TO YOU ABOUT THE SPACE? This project was a completely new build, and I was both architect and client, which was an amazing opportunity to deliver on my vision without too much compromise. Ultimately I’d like to build more buildings where I’m the client and I can really execute the vision and explore new ideas. W H AT A R E S O M E O F YO U R FAVO U R ITE PIECE S? They tend to be those with an artisan quality. I love the ‘CH24 Wishbone’ chair for its merging of Danish and Asian design. While being an icon of Danish design, Hans J. Wegner’s inspiration originally came from the Chinese Ming Dynasty. The dining room tends to be the heart of our home and so the simplicity and solidity of the ‘Heta’ table by Lowe Furniture is perfect for this space. WHERE DO YOU SPEND THE MOST TIME IN YOUR HOME? In our main living room. It is especially lovely late in the afternoon as the room fills with warm western light filtered through the linden trees in the front yard. The structure of the room, the furniture layout and even the alignment of the trees outside were all designed together so there is a real sense of harmony and calm. IS THERE A PARTICUL AR PERIOD OR ST YLE THAT APPE AL S TO YOU?

My design approach is contemporary in style, but it is influenced by a broad spectrum of historical styles. Designers have been dealing with the same challenges for thousands of years – space,

121


This page, clockwise from top left In the study is a ‘CH24 Wishbone’ chair from Cult. David Umemoto cast-concrete sculpture from Hub. Lowe Furniture ‘Heta’ table with Bedont ‘Kalea’ chairs, all from Hub. On kitchen bench, When Objects Work ‘HH’ bowl from Hub. Poliform ‘Bristol’ sofa. ‘Atollo’ table tamp from Euroluce.

form, rhythm, proportion, light, materiality, beauty, meaning – and so history is a rich resource. Our work typically has a contemporary expression but it may have a classical sense of rhythm, a Georgian sense of proportion, a minimalist expression of detail, and a European layering of texture and material. WHAT COULDN’T YOU LIVE WITHOUT? I couldn’t live without natural light. It’s essential to wellbeing, and is something we think about throughout the design process. Access to daylight is the difference between a sense of harmony and unease. And, come nightfall, a variety of light sources is integral to maintaining a sense of comfort. IF YOU DIDN’T LIVE IN MELBOURNE, WHERE EL SE WOULD YOU LIVE?

I would return to London. The history and depth of design is amazing – interiors, architecture, fashion, music, photography, art. WHICH DE SIGNERS, ARCHITEC TS OR INTERIOR DE SIGNERS D O YOU ADMIRE AND WHY? John Pawson for his ability to distil the essence of any space; Carlo Scarpa for his focus on detail; Tadao Ando for his mastery of light and engagement with nature; Peter Zumthor for his use of materials and craft; Kerry Hill for his ability to reflect local culture in his work. Joseph Dirand and Vincent Van Duysen for a restrained timeless aesthetic. WHO ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVOURITE ARTISTS AND DO YOU COLLECT ANYONE IN PARTICUL AR? My last purchase was a Frédéric Forest drawing for our ensuite – the calm minimal aesthetic perfectly complements the space. Otherwise, artwork in our house tends to take the form of furniture or objects. WHAT PROJEC TS ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON? A couple of particularly exciting projects are the contemporary renovation of a Georgian townhouse and a very special private house. We are also developing a number of custom furniture and lighting pieces. WHAT IS THE PHILOSOPHY BEHIND YOUR WORK? It centres on the enduring principles of design, space, material, light, proportion and form. We are committed to delivering distinctive and timeless design solutions that respond to contemporary living and enhance our lives and our cities. conradarchitects.com

122


Creative Home

This page, clockwise from top left Clean lines in the ensuite. In the master bedroom, a Cassina ‘Utrecht’ armchair from Space and a Knoll ‘Platner’ side table from De De Ce. Michael Anastassiades floor lamp from Euroluce. Artwork by Rebekah Stuart from Otomys. Ligne Roset valet from Domo. Artwork by Judith Wright from Sophie Gannon Gallery. In the ensuite, artwork by Frédéric Forest. Vase from Domo. Stool from Safari Living.

“I couldn’t live without natural light – it is the di≠erence between harmony and unease.”

RIGHT NOW


FSA/TWD0238/01

SET YOUR OWN TREND WITH BOTANICA. Your home is the ultimate reflection of who you are. The design decisions you make and the materials you choose will determine your lifestyle. With timber windows and doors, your possible palette is almost unlimited, whether you want a traditional feel or are looking to add an organic touch to a sleek modern design. So set your own trend. Explore the Botanica range at trendwindows.com.au

BOTANICA Timber series


Belle Loves

1_BOLD AS BR ASS

Combining elegantly shaped brass legs with an onyx top, this French vintage coffee table, $9800, from Conley & Co, is a glamorous statement piece. (02) 8065 9411 2_SWEET TRE AT

Inspired by chocolates and their centres, Dylan Farrell’s ‘Module’ tables for Jean de Merry, POA, combine aged and polished brass and can be staggered to suit the room layout. jeandemerry.com

RIGHT NOW

DY L AN FA R R ELL of Dylan Farrell Design says coffee tables are his favourite functional design element. “Most often, I would first select the floor finish, then the rug and then the coffee table. Where flooring sets the ‘stage’ for a room, a coffee table sets the narrative. It predicts if not predetermines the mood of a space. Second only to art, a coffee table can be the most flexible decorative element. Flowers on a coffee table are not my preference, as the low height makes them feel misplaced and meek. I would instead use moss or other low plants. I prefer books and boxes, as the clean geometry does not distract. My ultimate preference is to have a table interesting enough to stand alone or to partner with a single artistic or organic ‘friend’, so the two can have a dynamic dialogue.” dylanfarrell.com LUCY WEARS REBECCA VALLANCE BLAZER AND ‘MATIN’ PANTS FROM GEORGIA ALICE.

3_WATER WISE

Custom designed for a neoclassical pool house, the ‘Discus’ outdoor coffee table, POA, by Dylan Farrell Design is seriously stylish and weather friendly. dylanfarrell.com 4_CIRCLE OF TRUST

De La Espada’s ‘Laurel’ coffee table, POA, cleverly combines a cone and cylinder, intersecting to create two functional surfaces. spenceandlyda.com.au

3 2

P H OTO G R A P H BY K R IST I N A SO L J O

1

Lying low

Though close to the ground, coffee tables should make their presence felt in a design scheme.

4

Edited by LUCY McCABE

125


RIGHT NOW

Belle Loves

6

5_PRIVATE LIVES

6_MARBLE ART

Karl Springer was known for his simple yet robust furniture and this coffee table (c1980), is a fine example, acquired by Dylan Farrell at Rago Auctions in the US for a client. dylanfarrell.com

Made entirely of solid Marquina marble in a unique angular shape, Christophe Delcourt’s ‘Jaz’ low table, $19,500, celebrates the purity of a beautiful material. ondene.com.au 7_THE DRUM

Serbian furniture designer Ana Kras’s minimalist ‘Slon’ coffee table for MatterMade, $6050, was inspired by drum shells. criteriacollection.com.au

7

5

9_OPPOSITES ATTRACT

8_STONE LOVE

8

12_ART PIECE

Renowned for his craftsmanship using opulent materials from the natural world, Belgian artist and designer Ado Chale’s ‘Josephine’ bronze table, POA, doubles as an exquisite sculpture. 1stdibs.com

12

Japanese art and culture aficionados, Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby’s ‘Tobi-Ishi’ outdoor table for B&B Italia, $7232, is inspired by the stones in Zen gardens. spacefurniture.com.au

Resembling fire and ice, Timothy Oulton’s ‘Glacier’ coffee table, $19,995, is composed of charred, rugged timber encased in contrasting crystalline acrylic. cocorepublic.com.au 10_PAPER CUTS

9

10

Evoking the traditional Japanese paper folding art form, Donghia’s ‘Origami’ cocktail table, POA, features a bold geometric design. southpacificfabrics.com.au

11_NATURE STUDY

With a hand-sculpted bronze base topped with stainless steel inlaid with chestnut wood, Maria Pergay’s ‘Table Marronnier’ coffee table, POA, is a natural beauty. demischdanant.com 11

126


Make it yours ! Stylish media storage and shelving for every room in your home.

www.usm.com Available at Anibou – www.anibou.com.au Sydney 726 Bourke St. Redfern NSW 2016, 02 9319 0655 Melbourne 32 Glasgow St. Collingwood VIC 3066, 03 9416 3671 info@anibou.com.au


VICTORIA

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

WHEN SELECTING YOUR WINDOW FURNISHINGS,

WE USE OUR EARS AS MUCH AS OUR EYES.

Victory Curtains and Blinds installation in

BOOK YOUR FREE MEASURE & QUOTE STYLE CONSULTATION WITH FREE INSTALLATION AND INTEREST FREE PAYMENT OPTIONS TODAY! Others measure and quote, but we also listen. Our décor consultants are trained to work with you to learn exactly what you need from your window furnishings. Not just in terms of style, but also finding a solution that’s ideal for your family and the security, heating and cooling needs of your home. With Australia’s largest indoor and outdoor windows furnishings range, we are your one-stop shop for all your window treatment requirements.

QUEENSLAND


CLOTH Photographs PABLO MARTIN Styling LUCY McCABE Cushion production ULL A JAMESON

POP

culture

ST Y L I NG A S S I STA N T E V I E B R I D G E R

Amp up the volume: switch on interiors with hits of liquid silk and lustrous velvet in electrifying hues and sizzling patterns.

Cushions, from left Lelièvre ‘Mimosa’ linen/polyester in Poudre with Samuel & Sons ‘Inca’ polyester/dralon fringe in Vermillion from South Pacific Fabrics. House of Hackney ‘Saber’ velvet cushion in Gold from Radford Furnishings. Fabricut ‘Bellagio’ rayon velvet in Sapphire with Trend ‘04268’ border in Navy from The Textile Company. The Design Archives ‘Tiffany 1014’ cotton velvet in Onyx with Trend ‘04261’ piping in Citrine from The Textile Company. Accessories, from left (all throughout) Greg Natale ‘Marmo II’ mosaic floor tiles in Milano from Teranova. ‘Velvet Pillow’ sofa from James Said. Cole & Son ‘Leopard Walk’ wallpaper from Radford Furnishings. 19th-century Italian rococo giltwood mirror and ‘Pulegoso’ Murano lamp, both from The Vault. Curtain by Victory Blinds in ‘Brugge’ velvet in Cornflower with Brunschwig & Fils bullion fringe in Aqua, both from Elliott Clarke. For stockists see Address Book.

129


CLOTH

Cushions, from bottom left Brunschwig & Fils ‘Digby S Tent’ linen/cotton in Coral with Kravet ‘Nushi’ trim in Natural, both from Elliott Clarke. Pierre Frey India Mahdavi ‘Stripes’ cotton/polyester velvet in Night Dream from Milgate. Michael S Smith ‘Jasper Malmaison’ linen/cotton in Fontaine with Kravet paired tassels in Mist, both from Elliott Clarke. Rose Cumming ‘Sabu’ cotton in Red/Rose with Sandboy linen tape in col. T35.12, both from Tigger Hall Design. House of Hackney ‘Zeus’ velvet cushion in Tobacco from Radford Furnishings.


Hit the refresh button on your inner world and plump up a glamorous square or two.

Cushions, from left Donghia ‘Block Party’ cotton/rayon/polyester in Blue from South Pacific Fabrics. GP & J Baker ‘Hydrangea Bird’ linen in Ochre with ‘Oxford’ velvet flange in Coral Red from Elliott Clarke. House of Hackney ‘Mey Meh’ fringed velvet cushion in Blush from Radford Furnishings. Accessories, clockwise from bottom left ‘Naturalistic Modern’ jade stone coffee table from The Vault. Moser Crystal ‘Lotus Blossom’ bowl in Rosalin from Conley & Co. Curtain by Victory Blinds in Pierre Frey India Mahdavi ‘Fine’ velvet in Papaye (top) and In Love (bottom) from Milgate. 18th-century Italian carved and gilded finial from The Vault.

131


CLOTH

Cushions, clockwise from bottom left Suzanne Tucker ‘Marrakech’ polyester/silk in Persimmon from Tigger Hall Design. Lelièvre Jean Paul Gaultier ‘Kyoto’ polyester/polyamide/cotton in Grenat from South Pacific Fabrics. House of Hackney ‘Zanjan’ velvet cushion in Sapphire from Radford Furnishings. Boussac ‘Panthere’ cotton velvet in Brun from Milgate. Accessories Victorian Chinoiserie tray side table from The Vault. Vintage ‘Alabaster Fruit Collection’ and Kelly Wearstler ‘Rarity’ torso from Becker Minty.

132


At Choices Flooring, we know that good interior decorating starts

from the floor up. With the latest designs in carpet, timber, bamboo, laminate, luxury vinyl, rugs and now window furnishings, we have the perfect decorating solution for every home and budget. only a vailable at

So find the floor you’ve been searching for at your local Choices Flooring store or go to choicesflooring.com.au

featured product Temuka - Totera Wool Berber Colour Featured: Hickory

choicesflooring.com.au


Just how you imagined. Victory Curtains and Blinds understand design and help you achieve your vision of tribal infused decor to contemporary chic living.

Free measure and quote style consultation, free installation, interest free payment options. At Victory, our free in-home measure and quote style consultation with a décor consultant, is where we learn exactly what you want from your indoor and outdoor window furnishings. With a significant indoor and outdoor range in window furnishings, we can find the perfect solution to suit your home and décor. We help bring décor visions to life.

13 13 99 | VICTORYBLINDS.COM.AU


*PHOTOS PROVIDED BY BLUESTAR LIVING


B E L L E P R O M O T IO N

L I G H T FA N TA S T I C

Melding functionality with glittering good looks, the Zip HydroTap Celsius All-In-One Arc serves up serious culinary cachet in this stylish kitchen scheme.

LU CY M c C A B E , I NTE R I O R D E S I G N E D ITO R , B E LLE “ The Zip HydroTap ‘Celsius’ All-In-One Arc is the ultimate kitchen appliance for epicureans and aesthetes alike. Delivering instant filtered boiling, chilled and sparkling water, as well as unfiltered hot and cold water, it offers unmatched functionality wrapped in a fabulous, sinuous form. The radiant Bright Chrome finish lets the tap take centre-stage in this light-filled, marble-clad space. The look is finished with splashes of glassware and accessories in jewel tones that add a contemporary twist.”

“The curvaceous form and glistening Bright Chrome finish of the Zip HydroTap ‘Celsius’ All-In-One Arc make for a dramatic, sculptural statement.”

FROM LEFT: Zip HydroTap ‘Celsius’ All-In-One Arc in Bright Chrome. Background in ‘Diamond’ Carrara marble tiles from Academy Tiles and ‘Statuario Nuvo’ surface from Caesarstone. Tiles on bench from Fibonacci Stone. Iittala ‘Kastehelmi’ tumbler. Alessi ‘Pulcina’ espresso coffee maker by Michele de Lucchi. Vase from Dinosaur Designs.

WIN A ZIP ‘CELSIUS’ ALL-IN-ONE ARC plus installation, valued at over $6000 (includes Zip HydroTap Celsius All-In-One Arc and Zip Premium Installation). ENTER AT HOMESTOLOVE.COM.AU/ZIP

F O R M O R E I N F O R M A T I O N , V I S I T z i p w a t e r. c o m


HOM ES S AT U R AT I O N P O I N T

P H OTO G R A P H S H A RY N C A I R N S . H A N DW R I T I NG BY L E S L E Y W O R K M A N

Owner and designer were on the same page, embracing an audacious aesthetic for this home in Melbourne. For more, see Bold Moves, p146.

Personality is on display in all the following homes, where owners and designers have stayed true to their own style. 137


BLOCK PARTY

Architect Telly Theodore celebrates the humble brick in his inspired approach to the extension of this home in a heritage enclave. Photographs TOM FERGUSON Words K AREN McCARTNEY


Sydney

HOME

This page The restricted material palette celebrates the textural qualities of stone and brick and the warmth of timber while light plays animate the space. Linen sofa from MCM House. ‘Ardona’ stone floor by Eco Outdoor. Opposite page The awe-inspiring entrance links the original house with the new space via a staircase and material continuity. Custom mirror by Telly Theodore. Gubi ‘Multi Lite’ pendant from Cult.

139


A

ll successful architectural projects find relevant points of connection to site and context and for architect Telly Theodore the unpicking of the history of a heritage enclave in the southern Sydney suburb of Penshurst uncovered some unexpected sources of inspiration. His longstanding clients had purchased a handsome, if modest, 1920s brick house in a wide avenue lined with mature palm trees that had once formed the driveway to the most significant mansion in the suburb. Kintail is a Victorian-era Italianate villa built in 1888 by entrepreneurial businessman and one-time politician Myles McRae, and is set on the highest point in the area, giving a sense of gravitas to its immediate surrounds. The clients had a long personal history with the area with family recollections of the times when paddocks surrounded Kintail and newly built streets such as Daisy and Edna Avenues were named after McRae’s cows. But for Telly it was something grittier that he tuned into as a point of reference. “Locally, there is an electrical distribution building constructed in clinker brick in a way that is both formal and rigorous and it began to inform my thinking around materiality, as much as the brick of the existing house,” he says. The generous site with its dramatic drop of 8.5 metres from street to gully offered great scope but in order to maximise the opportunity it required a high degree of trust and a steely nerve to handle the nature of the two-year construction process. “As my client is a builder he was well versed in the vicissitudes of the process but nevertheless the six metres of excavation into thick clay soil, the hundred or so concrete piles and the massive retaining wall did present moments when we were all required to hold on tight,” explains Telly. Due to the heritage nature of the area this large extension required careful navigation through the local council but ultimately its materiality and discreet street presence won through and now it is held up by council as an example of good development practice. The treatment of old and new is deft in the way it finds common threads on the one hand and points of distinction on the other. Brick is clearly the defining element of the new part of the house and as such was the subject of much research – from the bricks used by artist Ai Weiwei in his design for Galerie Urs Meile in Beijing to the handcrafted bricks by Danish firm Petersen Tegl that were the final selection. “We had a mantra that ran through the project that ‘nothing similar is quite the same’ and this was the case with the bricks,” says Telly. Indeed the slim, narrow bricks have a beautiful deep tone and textural interest when combined with the deeply recessed grout. They have a majestic 4.5-metre run from the stone floor to the warmtoned recycled oregon timber rafters and are complemented by Swedish steel-framed doors. “Of the client couple, he favoured a gutsy industrialstyle interior whereas she was keen to draw on more heritage references. I set out to find ways to bring these two aesthetics together while not letting go of the bigger overriding vision – so you could say the ceiling is for him and the marble kitchen island is for her,” he says. One concept that Telly exploits with logic and ease is the architectural notions of the ‘cave’ and the ‘nest’ and how the planning transitions between the two. To access the


Sydney

HOME

These pages The warm-toned recycled oregon timber rafters are complemented by the black Swedish steel-framed doors. ‘Line’ pendant light from Douglas & Bec. Linen sofa and dining table, both from MCM House, with chairs by Fenton & Fenton. ‘Lampadaire Droit’ floor lamp by Serge Mouille from Cult.

141


HOME

Sydney

This page The kitchen features pickled and limed oak joinery. Waxed steel and glass overhead cupboard joinery by Winchester Interiors. Carrara marble benchtop from Eco Outdoor. Opposite page, from top Under the shade from Sydney Sailmakers is an outdoor setting from Eco Outdoor. Knoll ‘MR 20’ chair from De De Ce. Brass and Moroccan tile coffee table by Telly Theodore.

142


house you pass alongside the original brick building on your right and enter a voluminous foyer with a skylight in the upward curve of the ceiling. Looking up the stairs to the right is the original living room – the nest – which has been opened up to create a sitting room as part of a parents’ retreat. The wide stone stairway leads down to the cave. The rooms of the existing house have retained their footprint which Telly considers ‘good manners’ by taking a considered approach to what still works in the original iteration. It is notoriously difficult to blend old with new without compromising one or the other but, while different in character, these two distinct zones are unified by the architect’s overriding aesthetic. The surety of Telly’s touch is evident everywhere from the painted walls in nuanced custom colours of his own devising and the marble sinks referencing old Europe to the feel of the beeswaxed metal bannister, the weight of the oak doors and the fall of the heavy drapes made in Belgian linen – all a product of his understanding of timelessness and quality. The architect has not only sourced much of the art and furniture but he also designed many of the key pieces to fit the space perfectly – from mirrors, consoles and bedside tables to the wall-hung dressing table and the beautifully detailed patinated brass sideboard and Moroccan tile and brass coffee table. “I like to find ways to give clients what they want, to be flexible and put my ego aside but always with my eye firmly on the original vision – let go of that and you are lost,” Telly says. # For more, go to @telly_theodore.


SPEED READ » Clients with a long personal history in a heritage enclave in the southern Sydney suburb of Penshurst approached architect Telly Theodore to design an ambitious extension to a modest 1920s brick house. » Careful navigation through the local council and steely nerves were necessary to tackle the dramatic drop of 8.5 metres from street to gully, with excavation, more than 100 concrete piles and huge retaining walls required to make the design viable. » Danish Petersen Tegl handcrafted slim, deep-toned bricks define the project and add textural interest when combined with the deeply recessed grout. » The extension is 4.5 metres in height, from the stone floor to the warm-toned recycled oregon rafters, complemented by Swedish steel-framed doors. » While old and new are different in character, the two distinct zones are unified by Telly’s overriding aesthetic.

144


Sydney

HOME

This page, clockwise from top Thonet armchair from Anibou. Moroso ‘Redondo’ lounge chairs from Hub. Michael Anastassiades pendant light from Flos. Rug from Armadillo & Co. Custom marble and brass basin trough by Telly Theodore. Astra Walker patinated brass taps and outdoor shower. ‘Alabaster’ wall light from Laura Kincade. Opposite page Bed from MCM House. Custom bedside console by Telly Theodore. Verner Panton table light from Great Dane. Flos ‘Glo-ball’ pendant by Jasper Morrison from Living Edge. Rug by Armadillo & Co. Artwork by Adrian Hobbs.


B O L D MOVES

Idiosyncratic details are the key to the vibrant personality of this home where colour and curated collections pack a punch. Photographs SHARYN CAIRNS Words C ARLI PHILIP S Styling MARSHA GOLEMAC


Melbourne

HOME

This page Custom joinery unit by David Flack is backed in olive green leather panels and filled with an assortment of vintage objects collected by the owner, including artworks by Rebecca Cool (top shelf), Sean Bailey and Marie Hobbs (middle shelf) and a rare Dutch Modernist vase on the bottom shelf at the left. Crema Violet Onyx stone from CDK Stone on the mantelpiece. by Lassen ‘The Tired Man’ chair from Fred International. Gubi ‘TS 40’ side table. Opposite page The house presents a demure heritage facade to the street.

147


HOME

Melbourne

“ W HE N YO U E X E C U T E A P RO J E C T L I K E T H I S YO U N E E D TO UN D E R S TA N D T HE W E I G H T OF C OLOU R A N D H O W TO US E I T PR OP E R LY.”

These pages Against a backdrop of Resene ‘Lonestar’ are vintage Minotti sofas re-upholstered in Kvadrat ‘Sonar 3-173’, a Baxter ‘Loren’ low table in burnished brass, a ‘Callimaco’ light from Artemide, and by Lassen ‘The Tired Man’ chair from Fred International all on a custom Halcyon Lake rug. Rosewood cocktail table from Nicholas & Alistair. She Does Tell Tales artwork (left) by Todd Hunter from Scott Livesey Galleries. Alice Wormald’s Rock Stack (right). ‘Saints’ hand by Kelly Wearstler on coffee table. Opposite page Custom joinery is backed in olive green leather panels. Vintage objects include a Dane Lovett artwork and a rare Italian artisan bull from Smith Street Bazaar.

148


P

olished Chinese oxblood-red and lacquered Yves Klein blue are the arresting two colours saturating the formal sitting and dining rooms of this refurbished Edwardian home in the inner Melbourne suburb of Malvern, situated opposite a nature reserve and with views to the Dandenongs on a clear day. It’s a risky colour scheme and an all-ornothing palette that runs up the walls and across the ceilings to create a complete cocoon. “The brief was to go hard or go home,” says designer David Flack. The owners had a joie de vivre about the fit-out, granting David considerable leeway when it came to big gestures. The tables turned when homeowner Nicole told David to put in his wish list. “I said, ‘Do whatever you need to make this right’. I didn’t want to sway him one way or another because I thought that way he could be more creative. If I were placing limitations, I wouldn’t have used a professional. I just had to trust him.” Such freedom was liberating for David who says it was a bonus that Nicole already had impeccable art and great taste. “That’s what I loved about this project. It’s her house with her belongings, but she came to us because we have such a strong look. At some point you have to let go and enjoy the ride.” The scheme for the ‘red room’ evolved from the commanding onyx fireplace, now flanked by a bespoke joinery unit cut from American oak and finished in the same hue as the walls. The highly detailed shelving features a stone inlay benchtop, aged brass recessed finger pulls and olive-green Verona leather panels. The truism ‘one man’s trash is another man’s treasure’ was applied liberally here, as pieces stored at the back of cupboards were revived, and styled in a new and contemporary context. “Nicole couldn’t believe we were


rummaging around, pulling out old teapots and African tribal masks, but there was just so much personality there,” says David of the object curation. While the front two rooms are rich and punchy, the open-plan back of the house is a “pared-back pause”, says David, “a pocket of relief amid blocks of colour”. It’s certainly more subdued, with the exception of a glamorous wet bar carved from what was formerly the broom cupboard. With glass-backed mirrored shelves, sleek marble countertops and mustard walls, “it was designed to be a little jewel that you discover on your journey through the home … a gold nugget that glow[s] from morning to evening”. On display across the elegant unit that sweeps across the entire back wall of the living space is a curated combination of “the new, the old and the unexpected”, says Nicole who has peppered the house with an assortment of art, antiques and collectables including family heirlooms and dinnerware sourced on family travels. Ettore Sottsass’ colourful miniature ‘Carlton’ bookcase reflects Nicole and David’s love of the Memphis era, while glossy books are stacked beside old vases, acrylic artwork and antique medical books. “There are some questionable objects, but it just works,” says David. “Every time I go there Nicole has moved things around, which is how it should be. Sometimes we become too obsessed with picture-perfect interiors, and people lose sight of the fact that the intricate layers of a home are developed over time. It certainly shows in this house.”

“ I ’M N O T PR E C I OUS . R ID E YOUR R O L L E R-S K AT E S A ROUND HE RE , I DON ’ T C A R E . I ’ M N O T I N T E R E S T E D I N H AV I N G A HO ME TO L O OK AT BU T N O T TOU C H.” Despite the beauty of these pieces, Nicole was adamant that it be a house to be lived in and enjoyed. “I’m not precious, so if you want to ride your roller-skates around here, I don’t care. Ride them! I want to be able to sit and eat on the couch, for the kids to put their feet up, to have friends over. Of course, I don’t want anything to break, but I’m not interested in having a home to look at but not touch.” The orange Mirka Mora artwork in the dining room inspired the complementary blue walls, and it hangs in pride of place above the fireplace, behind a shelf of old teapots and beside a vintage French armoire. Resurrected from storage, these classics are juxtaposed against Gufram’s oversized green cactus, midnight navy dining chairs and a plum-tinted silk rug. “When you execute a project like this you need to understand the weight of colour and how to use it properly. We share the same philosophy, they just got it,” David says of the homeowners who now leave a seat for him at their table. “I feel like I’ve become one of the family. We so enjoyed working together that they plan to keep creating renovation stages. It’s just going to be one of those beautiful projects that never ends.” # For more go to davidflack.com.au. This page, from top Artwork by Alesandro Ljubicic from Scott Livesey Galleries. ‘Shogun Tavolo’ table lamp from Artemide, and Ettore Sottsass ‘Carlton’ miniature bookcase for Memphis Milano on custom joinery. Vintage Eero Aarnio ‘Parabel’ side table beside the bar which is finished in Manhattan marble from CDK Stone, and Cassina ‘Wink’ chair from Space. Opposite page Vintage leather ottoman from Tarlo & Graham, and vintage side table from Smith Street Bazaar. Custom shelving holds a vintage Martinelli lamp from Mode 707, and an acrylic sculpture by Kate Rhodes.

150


Melbourne

HOME


SPEED READ » Melbourne homeowner Nicole gave interior designer David Flack free rein to effect a new look for her Malvern house, telling David he could do whatever he liked to get it right. » David decided the only option was to ‘go hard or go home’, creating an arresting oxblood coloured living room and an Yves Klein blue dining room, among other flourishes. » He utilised Nicole’s eclectic collections, displaying them in a new way, mixing up family heirlooms with pieces sourced from travel, artworks, antique medical books and old teapots, resulting in a powerful design statement. » The home is well-loved with nothing being too precious to use.

152


Melbourne

This page, from top Dulux ‘Assault’ makes a statement in the dining room. Vintage Parker table, with Baxter ‘Colette’ chairs from Criteria. Cactus by Gufram. Artwork (right), Ritual by Lily Mae Martin from Scott Livesey Galleries. In the kitchen is a vintage lamp from Castorina & Co. American oak joinery with Manhattan marble bench from CDK Stone. Opposite page Mirka Mora artwork beside a vintage French armoire. Anna Charlesworth ‘Circle’ pendant light. Custom rug from Halcyon Lake.

HOME


GREEN LIGHT

Glamorous jade accents and polished appointments create a cool ch Photographs TIM STREET-P ORTER Words ANNIE KELLY


Rhode Island

HOME

These pages, from left Channing’s well-proportioned and traditional 1910 neo-Georgian facade. The entry hall floor is paved in a black-and-white marble design by Martyn Lawrence Bullard and inspired by the Pantheon in Rome. Lamps by Craig Van Den Brulle next to Italian lucite chairs from the 1970s.

hange inside an all-American red-brick home. 155


C

hanning, an elegant red-brick neo-Georgian townhouse built in 1910 faces a wide tree-lined street and one of the small rivers that run through the town of Providence. The well-proportioned, traditional exterior belies its elegant, unexpectedly modern and assured interior. Step inside, and this chic family house appears to be quite a contrast to the rest of conservative Rhode Island and was transformed by Martyn Lawrence Bullard, one of the best-known decorators working in the US, to reflect the owners’ urbane family life. Martyn says his clients “love having the ‘cool’ house” and are quite happy their six-bedroom home is such a bold design statement. The owners spotted Martyn on TV’s Million Dollar Decorators and approached him. “They had several properties in varying styles and saw I could handle many different vibes, so this became the first of several houses I have done for them,” he explains. And, while he’s famous for his adventurous and dramatic designs, and “honoured the history of the house by not removing original details”, he admits the family might not have quite been ready for such a bold interior. “I was inspired by the Hollywood Regency period, and added a 70s Italian influence as the house has great classical proportions.” Martyn used lots of white trim and neo-classical accents which, combined with vintage Italian-style chrome and plexiglass, give this otherwise quite staid house plenty of pizzazz. His attention to detail shows. The entry is paved in black and white marble, inspired by the floors in Rome’s Pantheon, which links in with the white walls and glossy black doors. Here, dramatic silver lamps by Craig Van Den Brulle and 70s lucite chairs create a glamorous first impression. On the right as you enter is an equally fearless main living room, its ceiling papered with a David Hicks pattern from the 70s and a dazzling faux zebra-skin rug called ‘Zanzibar’ designed by Martyn for The Rug Company. The monochrome palette of blacks, whites and greys is punctuated by deep jade-green walls with shine added thanks to the mirrored coffee table by Paul Evans. A large semicircular Milo Baughman sofa upholstered in a grey silk-velvet anchors the room. “I was inspired by Italian palazzos that were redecorated in the 70s,” says Martyn, who enjoys helping clients pick out art, preferring iconic, bold photographs such as a pair from the famed Melvin Sokolsky ‘Bubble Series’ from 1963. Truly a cosmopolitan house, the furniture was sourced from all over. The owners shopped with Martyn in New York and LA, while other pieces were found on trips to Paris. In the family room, Martyn designed a generous green sectional sofa and added a pair of upholstered Milo Baughman armchairs on another bold geometric patterned stone floor. The highlight of this room is a striking work by Picasso hung above a shiny chrome console table. The family owns a local restaurant but does plenty of entertaining at home. Martyn painted the dining room walls black, and continued the same monochromatic combination, enlivened by the deep green. He designed a geometric cowhide rug especially for this room, and brought in a hard-to-find long burl walnut table by Paul Evans, designing the white patent leather dining chairs to match. The Venini Murano glass chandelier takes centre stage, hanging from the ceiling papered in an adventurous green malachite wallpaper from Fornasetti, because, as Martyn says, “the ceiling is the most underestimated area; I love decorating it with wallpaper”. The powder room is equally dramatic. The decorator designed the mirrored vanity in 1970s-style chevron patterns, and mirrored the existing antique panelling. The kitchen and pantry were gutted,

156


Rhode Island

“ I WA S I N S P I R E D BY T HE HO L LY WO OD R EG E N C Y PE R I O D, A ND A DD E D A 70S I TA L I A N INF LUE NC E A S T HE H O US E H A S G R E AT C L A S S I C A L PRO P ORT I O N S .�

These pages In the family room Martyn designed a generous sectional sofa in jade green and added a pair of upholstered Milo Baughman armchairs on another bold geometric patterned stone floor. A striking work by Picasso above a vintage chrome console is the highlight of this room.

HOME


HOME

Rhode Island

These pages, from left In the dining room the decorator hung a large Venini Murano glass chandelier. ‘Rive Gauche’ chairs from Atelier Martyn Lawrence Bullard surround wallpaper from the 1970s for the ceiling. A large Milo Baughman sofa in grey silk-velvet anchors the room. Both the mirrored coffee table and the upholstered footstool are


the Paul Evans burl walnut table. The dining room rug was custom designed by Martyn as was the living room’s ‘Zanzibar’ faux-zebra rug. He used David Hicks by Paul Evans. On the walls are a pair of framed artworks from the Melvin Sokolsky ‘Bubble Series’ (1963) and a photograph of Andy Warhol by Christopher Makos.

159


HOME

Rhode Island

These pages, from left Martyn designed the bed for the cosy main bedroom, which is dressed with silk-velvet pillows made from his fabric range available at Schumacher, and the bedding sourced from Frette. The wallpaper is from Dedar, the fireplace mirror is by Paul Evans and the chaise was designed by Milo Baughman. In the dramatic, ultra-luxe powder room, Martyn designed the mirrored vanity in 1970s-style chevron patterns and mirrored the existing antique panelling.


and replaced by Italian-designed Aran Cucine cabinets in white with a graphic black and white striped Caesarstone kitchen island and a black stone countertop with a matching floor. An orange leather banquette adds a burst of colour at the far end of the room. The master bedroom is designed for cosy winter nights, with a working fireplace and a matching faux-fur throw and rug. An antiqued mirror screen acts as a headboard. Silk curtains add sheen and polish to the room, while a daughter’s bedroom seems set into a forest, with a tree-like bed and wallpaper to match. Downstairs, Martyn created a panelled game and screening room, with customdesigned lucite bar stools, and space left for a billiard table. # Martyn Lawrence Bullard’s wallpaper collection for Cole & Son is available in Australia from Radford Furnishings. martynlawrencebullard. com; radfordfurnishings.com.au SPEED READ » Martyn Lawrence Bullard’s TV profile on Million Dollar Decorators attracted the owners of this Rhode Island property, who asked him to refresh the interiors. » The staid, classic red-brick exteriors belie the luxury found within as the celebrity designer gutted much of the home, adding pizzazz with Hollywood Regency styling and lashings of glamorous 70s Italian and bespoke furniture. » Bold black and white marble floors were inspired by the Pantheon in Rome and a sophisticated palette of neutrals was enlivened with dramatic dashes of jade green.

161


Photographs EVE WIL SON Words CARLI PHILIPS

SURPRISE PACKAGE

A wildly eclectic array of furnishings and finishes seem to serendipitously work in this house, which has a sense of fun as well as serious design cred.


Melbourne

HOME

This page Ligne Roset ‘Ploum’ small sofa from Domo and Muuto ‘Raw’ side table on a ‘Flagstaff’ rug from Behruz Studio. Through the doorway is the craft room painted in Resene ‘Jive’. Opposite page A gold leaf sunburst mirror from Cromwell hangs above a custom sideboard from Graham Geddes Antiques and beside a Porcelain Bear wall sconce.

163


“They wanted something more individual that spoke to their aesthetic.�


Melbourne

HOME

This page, from left A French pink stone console from Franque in the hall. Michael Anastassiades pendant light and ‘Ball’ light on the floor. Ligne Roset ‘Ploum’ sofa from Domo and Muuto ‘Raw’ side table. Gubi ‘Bestlite BL7’ wall lamp from Euroluce. Opposite page A custom table from Graham Geddes Antiques is paired with Thonet ‘No.811 Hoffmann’ chairs, and a bench from Temperature Design. Zuster sideboard. ‘Eiffel’ rug from Behruz Studio. Ingo Maurer ‘Zettel’z 5’ pendant light. Black+White #2 artwork by Zoë Croggon from Daine Singer.

S

ecured onto the front fence of this Edwardian home in Melbourne’s leafy Glen Iris is an honestypolicy ‘street library’. Not long ago, a local dropped off the ABC of Design, a compact book running the gamut of the most iconic tables and chairs throughout history. It’s a fitting addition to the colourful glass-walled cubby decorated by the owners’ children and an apt reflection of their home’s interiors: whimsical, kid-friendly and diverse, with some classics thrown in. “Hard and soft, colourful and neutral, patterned and plain,” says interior designer Chelsea Hing of the refined ‘dance’ between furniture, fixtures and fittings. “They wanted something more individual that spoke to their aesthetic. The balance for us was to bring in a sense of timelessness but also a sense of fun. There are lots of elements of surprise.” The family lived with the 1980s floral walls and a green lino kitchen for three years before work began on an extension by architect Michael Jan Studio. Shortly thereafter, they engaged Chelsea to give the interiors a much-needed decorative lift. The initial brief was confined to renovating the rear, but it wasn’t long before the scope expanded and works inched into the corridor and eventually, the whole ground floor. “[Originally] we were just going to square off the kitchen, the living room and the butler’s pantry but then we looked at the nook behind the living room and started to look at the finishes and how that worked with the existing. So we ended up creeping into the hallway, then the dining room and the guest powder room. It grew and grew, but it made sense to do as much as possible while everyone was on the job,” she says. The den to the left of the entry remained untouched, while an unnecessary opening to the right was closed off to redefine the foyer. Chelsea wrapped antique-style panelling around the corner and into the corridor, embracing – rather than competing with – the dim, west-facing orientation by painting the walls a dark forest green. “In period houses, with their cornices and archways, downlights simply don’t work so we had to be more inventive as to how to get light into these spaces,” she says. “Because the hallway was [already] dark, we just went with it, but it meant we had to triple up the lights. That’s why we have wall

165


This page A Bonacina 1889 ‘Serve’ table from De De Ce beside the bed. Dash 2016 by Kate Tucker from Daine Singer. Opposite page Moroso ‘Capitello’ table sits beside a family heirloom cupboard. Catellani & Smith ‘Stchu-Moon 06’ hangs above the fireplace.

sconces, chandeliers and pendants. They are little design ploys to amp it up.” Peppered throughout is a litany of fixtures, both decorative and functional. There are showstoppers like Catellani & Smith’s gold moon-shaped disc above the dining room fireplace and Ingo Maurer’s 12-bulb ‘Birdie’ pendant complemented by the more restrained handmade works of local designers Porcelain Bear and Anna Charlesworth. A formal dining room and powder room hinge off the new passageway where carpet has been replaced by a vintage kilim rug and “worn-looking patchwork tiles that now run the full length of the house, knit[ting] the old and new together in a sensitive way”, says Chelsea. The open-plan communal space was reconfigured, allowing for a huge feature wall of mismatched Moroccan tiles above the cooktop and a thick, generously sized honeycomb marble kitchen island with barley-twist legs evoking a countrified vibe that proffers a “classic feel without being too contemporary”. A similar sensibility was adopted for the meals area, where a hearty, custom-designed table from Graham Geddes Antiques with knotted, Spanish-style legs is bookended by benches. “It’s a bespoke piece that looks like it has been in the family for generations,” says Chelsea. Hanging overhead is Ingo Maurer’s ‘Zettel’z 5’ pendant, and underfoot is a geometric-patterned wool rug from Behruz Studio. The eclectic shared space is kitted out with Ligne Roset’s small ‘Ploum’ settee and Jardan’s ‘Nook’ sofa upholstered in digitally printed green and blue fabric. A tower of shelving lined with books screens the stairs and, in the corner, a small door leads to a coral ‘colour bombed’ craft room that overlooks the Paul Bangay-designed garden. The client admits she was concerned about everything clashing. “I approved everything individually but wasn’t sure how such completely different pieces would go together. That’s Chelsea’s gift. This project was just meant to be the back room, but it ended up being the whole downstairs! The scale exploded, but it’s a house I love and want to be in for a long time.” # For more go to chelseahing.com.au.

166


Melbourne

SPEED READ » A minor renovation turned into a full-blown re-fit for this Edwardian home in Melbourne’s Glen Iris. » After architect Michael Jan designed the extension, interior designer Chelsea Hing was called upon to provide an individual look for the home that spoke to the owners’ aesthetic. » The result is a multi-layered space with plenty of surprises both in colour and selection of eclectic pieces, marrying timelessness with a sense of fun. » Chelsea embraced the heritage features of the house and introduced inventive lighting solutions to counteract the otherwise dark interior. » The clash of eras and styles is now the dominant feature of the home, pleasing to both owners and visitors.

HOME


PURE TALENT Created by one champion of Sri Lankan design for another, this home was crafted by a local hero whose rare genius is now enshrined in the culture. Photographs NICHOL A S WAT T Words STEPHEN TODD


Sri Lanka

HOME

This page The courtyard is paved with weathered river stones; the batik is by Ena de Silva. Opposite page Deep, slanted eaves in the central courtyard are supported by satinwood (Chloroxylon sweitenia) columns capped with granite. The couch is a 19th-century colonial design.

169


This page The layered terracotta tiles, terraced roof line and trellised bay windows create visual complexity. Opposite page Exposed beams and roof tiles are of traditional construction technique. The batiks are by Ena de Silva.


Sri Lanka

HOME

171


“This is the house that changed the way we think about architecture in Sri Lanka – and how we think about ourselves.”


Sri Lanka

HOME

A

ll houses tell a story, some more lyrically than others. The Colombo home that fabled architect Geoffrey Bawa designed for batik artist Ena de Silva in 1960 reads as an ode to international modernism but told with a distinct Sri Lankan lilt. Composed as a series of pavilions and courtyards enclosed within a high compound wall, the house was an oasis of calm in a capital transitioning from leafy garden city to tropical metropolis. Bawa’s earlier buildings had been inspired by Le Corbusier and the tropical modernism of Maxwell Fry and Jane Drew. Flat-roofed concrete volumes in gleaming white grids, these sat stoically in the landscape. But the de Silva houses marked a shift in Bawa’s thinking, marking his desire to draw upon vernacular style to evoke a unique sense of place. Sri Lanka, previously Ceylon, had been a trading post since Roman times and would be colonised from the 16th century on, first by the Portuguese, then the Dutch and finally the British. Each foreign power left marks on the culture that Bawa would mix with regional aesthetics and local techniques to create a new idiom of Sri Lankan architecture. Arrayed around a main central courtyard, five smaller yards interlink the open-plan volumes of the de Silva house. Pitched timber roof beams are extended to create deep verandah overhangs which allow a seamless flow between inside and out. River stones pave the courtyards, and porch areas are demarcated by granite. The massive timber columns supporting the generous eaves are hewn from local satinwood trees. “Bawa used typically Sri Lankan materials to build this house, but it’s the way he combined them that is unprecedented,” says Channa Daswatte, a former assistant to Bawa and now a renowned architect in his own right. “This is the house that changed the way we think about architecture in Sri Lanka – and how we think about ourselves.” So significant is the de Silva house to Sri Lankan culture it was recently moved piece by piece from its original site in the Colombo suburb of Cinnamon Hills to an allotment next to Lunuganga, Bawa’s country estate 90 kilometres south. Now under the aegis of the Bawa Foundation, of which Daswatte is a director, it will eventually be made available for guest stays. Geoffrey Bawa was born into a wealthy Anglo-Sri Lankan family in Ceylon in 1919 and educated at Royal College, Colombo, then at Cambridge, England, becoming a licensed barrister in 1944. He practised law for a short time before deciding to travel, thinking to settle in Italy. But by age 29, having spent a third of his life outside his own country, he returned to Sri Lanka where he bought a rubber plantation on the south-west coast in which he planned to create an Italian-style garden from the tropical wilderness. Conceived as “an extension of the surroundings, a garden within a larger garden” as Bawa put it, the Lunuganga property would be his lifelong passion, absorbing all his free time and much of his funds until his death in 2003. This page from top The sitting room has a large built-in sofa covered with a fabric seat and hand-embroidered Kandyan cushions in a technique which owes much to Ena de Silva for its contemporary revival. Oblique angles and unexpected material combinations create a sense of surprise in the central courtyard. Opposite page The casual dining space features a 16-seat table made from a single 7.5cm-thick plank of rain tree (Samanea saman) with 19th-century colonial chairs in jackwood (Artocarpus heterophyllus). The niches conceal lighting which bathes the room in a warm glow at night.

173


It was Bawa’s desire to build a personal paradise that led him to architecture. To gain the necessary skills, in 1951 he apprenticed to an established Sri Lankan practice, then moved back to England to study at the Architectural Association in London, becoming an Associate of the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1957. The following year he returned to Sri Lanka and set about building homes, schools and private houses adhering to the modernist canon. For Ena de Silva, the woman responsible for relaunching Sri Lanka’s batik industry, commissioning Bawa meant expressing her commitment to tradition filtered through a modern lens. The courtyard structure echoes the elegance of the homes in which she was raised, daughter of a Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire. But its rational open planning and rigorous spatial organisation are offset by a slanting roof in the Kandyan tradition, Moorish trellised archways and half-round terracotta roof tiles in the Portuguese style which Bawa arranged in layers to create a fluttering, almost whimsical effect. Bawa once said, “I prefer to consider all past good architecture in Ceylon as just that – as good Ceylon architecture, for that is what it is, not Dutch or Portuguese or Indian, or early Sinhalese or Kandyan or British colonial, for all examples of these periods have taken Ceylon into first account.” Like all Bawa’s buildings, the de Silva house was designed to settle within its surroundings, to eventually segue into the landscape itself. That it has been moved from its original site to the Bawa estate is something of a spiritual homecoming for a very unique dwelling. “All Bawa’s houses have a very particular personality, to the point where they defy an overall style,” explains Daswatte. And therein lies their intrigue. # For more, go to geoffreybawa.com.


Sri Lanka

HOME

SPEED READ » Architect Geoffrey Bawa was famed for mixing colonial influences with regional aesthetics and techniques to create a new idiom of Sri Lankan architecture. » His house design for batik artist Ena de Silva in 1960 marked the shift in his thinking to draw on the vernacular style to evoke a unique sense of place. » Arranged around a courtyard, five smaller yards link the house’s open-plan volumes. » The home features Kandyan-influenced pitched beams that form deep overhangs to create a seamless flow between inside and out, Moorish trellised archways and Portuguese-style terracotta roof tiles.

This page Polished native timber floors and 19th-century colonial period furniture in the bedroom in which a latticed bay window alcove serves to capture cross breezes. Opposite page, clockwise from top left The house is designed as a perfect equilibrium between inside and out. An open skylight invites the outdoors in. Water lilies and antique vessels in the bathroom.

175


NEXT LEVEL

Raising the roof of this Californian bungalow provided the additional space required and provided a platform for a glamorous assortment of jewel-toned furnishings. Photographs ANSON SMART Words CHRIS PE ARSON


Sydney

HOME

This page ClassiCon ‘Roattino’ floor light by Eileen Gray from Anibou. Moroso ‘Redondo’ armchairs in pink velvet and Moroso ‘Phoenix’ coffee table all by Patricia Urquiola from Hub. Christophe Delcourt ‘Ouk’ side table from Ondene. B&B Italia ‘Frank’ sofa by Antonio Citterio from Space. Hay ‘Crinkle’ throws from Cult. Custom Bamboo silk rug from Robyn Cosgrove. Opposite page In the hallway, Decus console custom made by JP Finsbury. Custom mirror from Spectrum Glass. ‘Cloche’ desk lamp from Hay. Walls in Porter’s Paints low-sheen ‘Plaster of Paris’. Reflected artwork by Deborah Paauwe.

177


This page In the dining area, Lowe Furniture ‘Atticus’ oval table in American oak and bar stools from Hub. Gubi ‘Beetle’ chairs from Cult. B&B Italia ‘Frank’ sofa by Antonio Citterio from Space. Christophe Delcourt ‘Ouk’ side table. Society Limonta ‘Rem’ cushions from Ondene. Custom bamboo silk rug from Robyn Cosgrove. Timber bowls on bench from Orient House. Opposite page, from top ‘Lariat 5’ pendant in bronze from Apparatus Studio hangs over the Lowe Furniture ‘Atticus’ table from Hub. Gubi ‘Beetle’ chairs from Cult. Rina Menardi ‘Lagoon’ ceramic platters from Ondene. Curtains by Simple Studio. In the kitchen, ClassiCon ‘Pli’ side table from Anibou. Tekna ‘Nautic’ ceiling tube lights from Tigger Hall Design. Custom-made fluted glass and steel doors. Franke ‘Verona’ tap from Winning Appliances. ‘Super White Dolomite’ honed marble from CDK Stone.

178


Sydney

W

ith its rich, lustrous colours of ruby, emerald and sapphire, sheen and luscious textures, this elegant home in Sydney’s eastern suburbs is like a jewellery box, packed with surprises and treats to tease the eye. But it has two personalities. Glamorous spaces for grown-up entertaining by night give way to simple practicality by day, perfect for a family with four teenagers. When the owners bought the 1920s Californian bungalow, it was a bland warren of rooms that shunned the daylight. After renting it out for a few years, in 2012, they decided to make it their family home and approached architect Luigi Rosselli to, yes, raise the roof. “Its vast empty roof space begged for an attic conversion,” says Luigi. Accordingly, he used it to create a parents’ retreat, with a generous main bedroom, ensuite bathroom, dual walk-in robes, a separate sitting area and a sizable balcony. But, as the house expanded, so did the scope of the project. The owners asked Luigi and interior designer Alexandra Donohoe Church of Decus Interiors to turn their attention to the downstairs area, to bring in the light and create more space for the family. “We needed to rationalise the living space. It was all broken up and needed a flow to the pool,” says Luigi. In a “neat nip and tuck”, he transformed separate living and dining rooms and a poky kitchen into one large open plan, with the dining area now able to accommodate the owners’ massive 3.5m table. Four bedrooms at one end of the ground floor in effect became the children’s wing. And Luigi opened the windows to the garden. “Before, you couldn’t see the sky because the windows were so low, despite the high ceilings,” he says. The brief from the owners was for an industrial look, with hardwearing surfaces, “an industrial New York-style space prevailed, but not in an overpowering way. It had to pay homage to the original era without being a pastiche,” says Alexandra. “It’s a timeless intervention that could span over the past century. It’s hard to pin down its age, but you feel it’s been there for a while,” adds Luigi. He added skirtings and architraves as a nod to the house’s era (the originals were casualties of earlier renovations), as well as coffered ceilings and cornices in the living areas. They are “a bit of theatre, adding texture and character”, says Luigi. Each space had to be individual, but share a common language: dark floors and steel-framed doors and screens, the latter being Luigi’s signature. Because this is an active and busy household, the home had to be robust, with heavy-duty finishes. “We used bold materials, such as steel-framed doors, panelled ceilings and terrazzo in the bathrooms, to bring a rich dimension to these high-traffic rooms,” says Alexandra. “The terrazzo finish in the bathrooms is not super-fancy. It’s a raw, pragmatic look.” “Steel-framed windows are a part of the Milanese landscape I grew up in, a nostalgic reminder of an industrial past,” says Luigi. “And they are finer and so much stronger than timber or aluminium.” They let in light and views, and their greater strength allows broader expanses of glass. Such practical asceticism is overlaid with the rich hues and textures of the Orient. Freshly returned from a long stint in Hong Kong, the owners brought back such pieces as a huge antique apothecary chest, birdcages, hats, swords and artworks, which became the starting points for Alexandra’s handiwork. “They wanted to include these artworks, which are dramatic and strong, with dark colours and plenty of contrast, but still tactile,” she says. “The chest is old, worn and tactile and not super-perfect.” For the palette, she started with the owners’ favourite blue, green and grey tones “and built it from there, with pink, aubergine, plum

HOME


HOME

Sydney

and lilac to infuse it with something different. They were circuit breakers to create a tension between the base colours.” The philosophy of the home is neatly encapsulated by a sitting area within the open plan, which features a ruby-red velvet settee under a painting of pearls placed next to the giant apothecary chest, Alexandra’s favourite space. “It’s such an intimate, rich, dramatic little corner,” she says. “Within that open plan, this is one of many zones where the family can do their own thing, not being on top of each other, while also being together.” The sense of privacy yet togetherness under the one – raised – roof is part of the genius of this house. Luigi has used his renowned steel windows internally, too, to create separation and airiness at the same time. “The house has been opened up,” he says, “but still has demarcated zones, thanks to the ceiling beams, steel screens and doors – you enter the living area through double-height steel doors that reach to the ceiling.” Both Luigi and Alexandra are especially beguiled by the secluded master suite, the genesis of the project, its printed grasscloth wallpaper acting as an artwork and concealing a walk-in robe behind. With its “separate lounge to admire the sunsets and fireworks, and a balcony large enough to step out onto and enjoy a martini in the evening, it’s the perfect parents’ retreat,” says Luigi. # For more go to luigirosselli.com; decus.com.au. This page, clockwise from top left In the sitting area, ClassiCon ‘Odin’ sofa, ‘Bell’ coffee tables, and ‘Pli‘ side table, all from Anibou. Antique cabinet bought in Hong Kong. Fallen Series #5 and #8 artworks by Sharon Green. In the powder room, ‘Heart’ mirror from Nicholas & Alistair. ‘Fizi’ sconces from Articolo. Brodware ‘Yokato’ tap from Cass Brothers. TeknoForm ‘Pittella Rapolano 35’ basin in Anthracite travertine from Sydney Tap and Bathroomware. Fibonacci Stone ‘Idol’ benchtop from Onsite. In a bathroom, ‘Eclipse’ sconces from Articolo. Fibonacci Stone ‘Nougat’ terrazzo benchtop and wall tiles from Onsite. Brodware ‘Yokato’ tap from Cass Brothers. Opposite page In the main bedroom, bedhead in American Silk Mills ‘Hemp’ and Spinneybeck ‘Velluto Pelle’ from Tigger Hall Design. Society Limonta ‘Nid’ blanket, and ‘Rem’ bedlinen from Ondene. ‘Clasp’ wall light from Allied Maker (NY). Tribal Moroccan wool rug from Robyn Cosgrove. Curtains by Simple Studio. Gervasoni ‘InOut’ side tables on balcony from Anibou.


SPEED READ » When a couple with four now teenage children bought this 1920s Californian bungalow in 2009, it was bland and shunned natural light. » After renting it out for a couple of years, they decided to make it their family home, and commissioned architect Luigi Rosselli to raise the roof and create a new upstairs area for a parents’ retreat. » The project expanded when the owners requested him to open up the downstairs, creating a better flow of spaces that made the most of the light. » While boasting tough industrial-strength materials such as Luigi’s signature steel-framed windows and terrazzo finishes, ideal for a boisterous family, Alexandra Donohoe Church of Decus Interiors has imbued the home with glamour, with a rich, jewel-like palette and luscious textures, taking her cues from antiques and artworks that the owners brought back from a long stint living in Hong Kong.

181


GARDEN

CLEVER PLOT Two different garden areas are seamlessly woven together to create a unified narrative. Photographs NICHOL A S WAT T Words GEORGINA REID

183


GARDEN

I This page, from top The rear garden frames views out over Sydney’s Balmoral Beach. Clipped spheres of coastal rosemary (Westringia fruticosa) contrast with the spiky form of Mauritius hemp (Furcraea foetida). Bean bags by Paola Lenti from De De Ce in the internal courtyard echo the form of the clipped box (Buxus microphylla).

184

don’t divide architecture, landscape and gardening; to me they are one,” wrote famed Mexican architect Luis Barragán. Strong connections between built and living forms contribute greatly to the aesthetic success of a space, transforming a building from a series of walls and a roof into a home – a place of retreat, shelter and beauty. This garden in the northern Sydney suburb of Balmoral is an example of such dialogue. The property has two distinctly separate outdoor spaces – an enclosed central courtyard and a north-facing backyard with sweeping ocean views. Landscape designer Richard Unsworth of Garden Life was engaged by the client to create gardens within each of the spaces that were welcoming, playful and elegant. First up was the courtyard garden. “The space is on view the minute you enter the front door of the property,” Richard says. “It’s really important that it’s both striking and inviting.” Richard’s design connects seamlessly with the interior renovations of the property by Tina Engelen of Co-Ap. “Tina’s renovation of the home is very high end and slick. We reflected this in the garden,” he says. Richard and his team undertook a complete overhaul of the space, removing all existing landscape elements and building a three-metre-high wall as a backdrop. Painted charcoal grey and softened by Boston ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata) the wall, rather than feeling imposing, creates a simple yet bold sense of enclosure. Even bolder than the wall are the three huge (1.8m tall!) ceramic planters placed in front of it. “The major element we used for impact in the space were the three enormous planters from Atelier Vierkant,” Richard says. “We needed to do something with a lot of impact there. The space needed a ‘wow’ factor.” Filled with cardboard palm (Zamia furfuraceae) the planters certainly fulfil their role as a striking focal point within the design.


“Scale is really important in small spaces,” Richard says. He should know, he’s spent the best part of two decades designing them. “The most common mistake is that people use lots of small things in them. This makes the area feel cluttered and even smaller.” There’s nothing cluttered about this space, and nothing cold either. It’s a perfectly balanced combination of strong and simple design elements, and abundant and soft greenery. “I felt the courtyard needed to be really green. There is a lot of wall space internally and I wanted the courtyard to balance this, yet still feel sophisticated and contemporary.” The restrained plant palette consists of box (Buxus microphylla) clipped into spheres, the sculptural form of foxtail fern (Asparagus densiflorus ‘Meyeri’) and a soft carpet of native violet (Viola hederaceae). While the courtyard garden speaks directly to the interiors of the home, the rear garden is all about grand sweeping views, and kids. “The client wanted the biggest level lawn they could possibly have!” says Richard. “Their kids are young and they wanted a space for them to play cricket and kick balls.” Simple, sparrow-pecked sandstone retaining walls frame the generous lawn, while helping address level issues and providing a sense of structure. The planting in the rear garden is simple, hardy and sculptural. Clipped mounds of coastal rosemary (Westringia fruticosa) contrast with a low carpet of sedum (Sedum rubrotinctum) while the bold forms of Mauritius hemp (Furcraea foetida) and a clump of advanced dwarf date palms (Phoenix roebelenii) provide a striking frame for district views. “The date palms shelter the seating area as well as framing the view towards Balmoral Beach,” says Richard. Richard Unsworth is a master of scale and here, he’s created a garden that seamlessly connects the building to the earth in a bold, yet refined manner. For more go to gardenlife.com.au; theplanthunter.com.au.

“The space is on view the minute you enter the front door of the property.”

This page, from top Advanced dwarf Canary Island date palms (Phoenix roebelenii) provide enclosure to a timber seating area. Paola Lenti bean bags from De De Ce. The planting in the rear garden is deliberately simple and sculptural. An elegant space with beautiful views.


NEW O N LY $59.99

FOLLOWING ON FROM THE SUCCESS of Belle Beautiful Australian Homes we are pleased to present Belle Beautiful Australian Homes Volume II which showcases 40 more incredible abodes from Australia’s leading architects and interior designers, from William Smart, Kerry Phelan and Nick Tobias to Arent & Pyke, Hannah Tribe and many more.

AVAIL A BLE W HER E A LL GOOD BOOKS A R E SOLD A ND W W W.M AGSHOP.COM.AU


P H OTO G R A P H J A M E S M c D O N A LD

food travel

NIGHTCLUBBING The reinvented Annabel’s in London is a mind-blowing cornucopia of exotic patterns and prints, silks and velvets, chandeliers and flowers, guaranteed to excite. See Lounge, p195.

Enter a world where imagination takes flight, whether in tropical Sri Lanka, frosty Minneapolis or beyond. 187


Photographs ROMELLO PEREIR A Words NADINE BUSH

Cinema

SCOPE

Dreaming of a palm-fringed paradise of the movies, this couple spliced comfort and luxury to edit a  serene Sri Lankan retreat with star quality. 188


T R AV E L

This page, clockwise from top left

T

he young English bride of a rich tea plantation owner who comes to live at his property in Ceylon battles nature and isolation. So goes the story line of Elephant Walk, a 1954 Paramount Pictures film set in the lush jungles of what is now known as Sri Lanka. With beautiful cinematography and the heady presence of stars Elizabeth Taylor and Peter Finch, the film was impressive in its day. Young Englishman Tony Bannister was utterly intrigued by the film when he first viewed it as a teenager and it ignited in him a passion for all things colonial: the tea plantations, the way of life in Ceylon at that time, the lush landscape and an appreciation of size and perspective of the design and aspect of space in houses from that era. His fascination with the teardrop-shaped island has been present ever since. Many years later Tony’s partner, hotelier Paul Walters, was working in Bali as general manager of two Ubud resorts (The Serai, now Alila, and The Chedi Club), both conceived by the visionary behind Aman Resorts, Adrian Zecha. The resort group was developing a number of properties in Sri Lanka at the time and Paul also had a growing interest in the country. In August 2005, while the island nation was still struggling in the aftermath of the tsunami of the year before, Tony and Paul decided to visit. While there they met long-time resident of Galle Fort, Charles Hulse, a keen advocate of Sri Lanka who acted as a matchmaker for people looking to buy there. Charles took Tony and Paul for a drive to view a one-hectare property in Angulugaha, not far from Galle. “I got goosebumps when we arrived,” says Tony. The small house on the property was built in traditional Sinhalese style with good bones and it was owned by a Sri Lankan family who wanted to move to the capital city, Colombo.

The barred window in the living room now opens onto the dining room. The chair is one of the ebony-stained custom pieces. Orchids abound in the garden. Works by local artists are found around the house. The typical deep column-lined verandah. Opposite page The tranquil pool.


T R AV E L

This page, from top Rooms open out to the quintessential Sri Lankan-style wraparound verandah, which is set with colonial plantation furniture and ceiling fans. The pool in the coconut grove looks out over rice paddies. Polished cement floors and minimal interiors help keep the spaces cool.

Three months after their return to Sydney, where they were living, the pair received a call from Charles saying that he could get the property for them at a good price if they were still interested. Having first thought the idea was a folly, the couple had a re-think and decided to take the plunge. They embarked on making their dream a reality firstly by planning the renovations for Ivory House. Tony is head of Scout, a global trend forecasting business for fashion, colour and interiors so, with his expertise and Paul’s resort experience, they were sure they had all bases covered for this project. Both men knew what they wanted to do with the design and engaged an English father and son team who were local developers and project managers to translate their ideas through the construction process. First, they hired a local builder but after a year of little progress and experiencing some frustrating setbacks, they met a more experienced Sri Lankan builder who said, “I can see the pain in your eyes and I’ll prove that we can make this right”. They swapped builders and proceeded to make headway. The low ceilings of the original house were raised by 1.5 metres around the perimeter of the building and up to three metres at the highest point to create the airy interiors. Then the house was extended on two sides to accommodate four generous bedrooms, each with an ensuite, and three with private stone-walled outdoor showers as well. A  deep U-shaped verandah, designed in the local style with stately timber columns, was constructed to wrap around the front facade of the house and the area is defined by paving in roughhewn granite tiles. The external walls were painted in Dulux ‘Prism White’, the doors and shutters in high-gloss ‘Old Monterey Grey’ and the external columns in matt ‘Minerva Grey’. Inside, the floors are in a concrete and white cement mix that was finished in both wax and polish. As the floors have aged and weathered an enchanting eggshell crackle has appeared, giving it the look of an ancient ceramic glaze.


Aiming for a simple, pared-back colonial style, Tony and Paul set about sourcing vintage and antique furniture and decorative items for the house, such as the ebony wood and woven cane plantation chairs. Many other items were custom made locally, such as the brushed stainless-steel wall lights, pendant lanterns and even the new bolts that fitted onto the original timber window shutters. New cane outdoor settings made in Colombo, and antique reproduction furniture in jackwood were stained in an ebony finish. Soft furnishings were custom-made by Souk 58 Interior Design, hand-embroidered floral bed coverlets were sourced from Jaipur, and Afghan goat-hair rugs in geometric patterns were unearthed locally, all adding to the layers of simple luxury, enhanced by a collection of works by Sri Lankan artists. Paul took charge of the lighting scheme, creating a dreamy, resort-style sensory experience as the lights from the interior, exterior and landscape work in tandem to create a warm and relaxing atmosphere, perfect for the tropical location. “Ivory House presented Tony and I with the opportunity to create our own piece of paradise, to build a place with a unique serenity and character where we had the freedom to bring together all the inspirations and ideas we had collected and collated over the years on our travels to many wonderful exotic destinations,” says Paul. The property makes the perfect halfway point between their lives in London and the Scout forecasting headquarters in Sydney. “Ivory House is our downtime and the transition zone between two busy worlds, being exactly halfway between the cities. It’s why we’re able to visit as often as we do,” explains Tony. The pair lease Ivory House to visitors when they are not in town. “We like people to treat the house as if it’s their own home. We’ve both put so much into it and hope that it’s our point of difference that really stands out,” says Tony. It’s certainly a relaxing and serene property, nestled in a little village on the island’s south coast, located among tranquil paddy fields. The sounds of village life, children playing, local music or monks chanting at a nearby temple are a comforting soundtrack to days spent recharging at Ivory House. For holiday bookings, visit evinsl.com.

These pages, clockwise from top Filigree windows in the airy bathroom. Tropical modernity with carved timber pieces in the bedroom. Throw from In The Sac and artwork by JC Rathnayake. House manager and master chef of local cuisine Mr Sunil. Breakfast egg hoppers. The sun-dappled

191


SUBSCRIBE & RECEIVE A FREE GIFT SET JUN E /JULY 2018

4+11:00 2018-03-29T12:41:3

Interior Design Awards winners revealed

M AY 2018

50+ Hot kitchens & cool bathrooms

aled Awards finalists reve

A P R I L 2018

AUSTRALIA

Alessi Design Award announced

Country Chic our refined

Dream looks in the

DRESS CIRCLE

rural escapes MIL AN MAE STROS

RU U LUrock

Lindsey Adelman STUDIOPEPE Michael Anastassiades RAW EDGES Bethan Laura Wood CECILIE MANZ David Lopez Quincoces ELISA OSSINO Mae Engelgeer

a top

CALIFORNIA DREAM

Malibu’s new wave STITCHED UP

stylish seating upholstery

Best of Ba Private Londonli

MILAN REPORT 2018

F IRST CL A SS

FIRST CLASS LA DOLCE VITA

s ld of inspiring interior Your ticket to a wor

APR I L 2018

pages of

AUSTRALIA

Our Interior Design

AUSTRALIA

18_Cover_CMYK

Beautiful homes from TUSCANY to SYDNEY

The Pursuit of Perfection

Platinum interiors from

Australia’s top designe rs

YOUR SUBSCRIPTION INCLUDES » A FREE MOLTON BROWN GIFT SET, VALUED AT $81 » 8 ISSUES FOR $74.99 RECURRING » SAVE 15% OFF THE RETAIL PRICE » FREE DELIVERY EVERY ISSUE

Already a subscriber? SIMPLY EXTEND YOUR SUBSCRIPTION WITH THIS OFFER TO RECEIVE YOUR FREE GIFT SET.

HURRY, OFFER ENDS AUGUST 19, 2018

MAGSHOP.COM.AU/BELLE88 For Terms and Conditions, visit www.magshop.com.au/belle88. Savings are based on cover price of $10.99. Please see contents page for location of our Privacy Notice. If you do not want your information provided to any organisation not associated with this offer, please indicate this clearly at time of order or notify the Promoter in writing. Offer valid from 9/07/2018 until 19/08/2018 to Australian residents only.


The Orange & Bergamot collection is lively, zesty and unmistakably Molton Brown, inspired by the bitter orange trees that perfume the vibrant streets of Seville. Bursting with Andalusian sundrenched notes of mandarin and neroli, experience the liveliness of the original luxury hand wash and lotion while gently cleansing and nourishing the hands. Discover more at moltonbrown.com.au

VALUED AT

$81

136 116 AND QUOTE M188BEL The offer includes a Molton Brown gift set, valued at $81. Offer valid while stocks last. One gift set per subscription. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery of free gift. Free gift is sent to purchaser of the subscription. Automatic renewal: After the first 8 issues, the subscription will automatically renew and be billed as $74.99 every 8 issues (yearly). Subscription renews unless cancelled.


B E L L E P R OM O T ION

BUYERS’ MARKET When it comes to updating your home and lifestyle, only the best will do – so here’s a roundup of the latest and greatest products out there

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 CONTENTS ID The Danish-designed ‘Mattia’ rug is hand loomed in pure wool and art silk, with fringing and an overscale herringbone pattern. Exclusive to Contents ID, the ‘Mattia’ is available in 2000 x 3000 size; RRP $1110. contentsid.com 2 CSR MONIER Monier’s latest innovation InlineSOLAR integrates solar panels into your roofline to achieve a streamlined look, giving you all the powerful benefits without compromising your home’s street appeal. monier.com.au  3 CROMWELL A feature item from the new Runway collection, the ‘Capri’ sling chair is a comfortable design solution to enhance any contemporary interior. Now in stock at Cromwell, call (03) 9510 5294 or visit cromwellaustralia.com.au 4 DI LORENZO The Stone 2.0 is a contemporary porcelain tile collection that has been manufactured using the latest digital technology, ensuring a natural variation between each piece. They are a true inspiration of the beauty of the original stone. dilorenzo.com.au 5 MISURA With adjustable backrest and upholstered seat, the iconic Lago ‘Lift’ chair features clean and geometric lines that makes its design unique. RRP $1595. misura.com.au 6 PORTER’S PAINTS Natural beauty lovers take note: Porter’s has expanded their collection of premium engineered flooring with Rustic Oak in Heritage Natural. Unstained French oak boards with a rustic edge are hand-brushed to accentuate the unmistakable grain and finished with a durable matt sealer in the perfect mix of style and substance. porterspaints.com 7 RIEDEL An extension to Riedel’s Fatto a Mano range, the pink champagne wine glass combines the sophistication of handmade glass in the style of the ancient Venetian tradition with the very latest in glass-making technology. RRP $129.95 per piece. riedel.com 8 VBO ‘HTSB101’ is a solid timber dining chair handmade in Italy by famed minimalist designer Henry Timi and is available in ash, wenge or black walnut from VBO Australia. vboaustralia.com; henrytimi.com 9 VOLA The sleek Vola ‘T39’ built-in modular heated towel rail is a flexible system of bars that is perfect for individual design solutions and is available in 18 glamorous colours and finishes. vola.com/en


LOUNGE

S E CON D C O M I N G

A QUICK BITE

with

JORDAN WALKER TOFT

{ Executive chef, Merivale – Coogee Pavilion, Bert’s at The Newport, The Collaroy }

Stuart Krelle created a tropical jungle vibe for the re-launch of Social at Verandah (below). Executive chef Brad Sloane’s menu favours locally sourced native Australian ingredients with hints of English and Italian flavours. verandah.com.au SY D N E Y

Favourite food experience?

An all-night drive into rural France to visit the iconic restaurant Michel Bras where I dined on the things I’d only ever read about. Favourite restaurant? Asador Etxebarri in Basque Spain is a simple restaurant that has become one of the best in the world. Recent projects? Bert’s Brasserie & Bar and The Collaroy. What are you looking forward to in 2018? The

Coogee Pavilion middle floor is deep in the design stage, creating what will be an iconic coastal restaurant. merivale.com

S Y D N E Y

STRAWBERRY FIELDS PLANTED AMONG FRAGRANT HERBS, CITRUS TREES AND STRAWBERRY BUSHES, THE BOTANICA VAUCLUSE SOURCES ITS PRODUCE FROM ITS OWN KITCHEN GARDEN AND JAMBEROO VALLEY FARM. BORDERING THE EATERY IS THE SOL SPA WHICH HAS THE SAME NATURAL THINKING. THEBOTANICAVAUCLUSE.COM.AU

VALE CHEF In memory of culinary ‘rock star’ Anthony Bourdain, view re-runs of his Parts Unknown TV series or read his bestseller (right).

Tasting places Indulge your senses at a new venue. Edited by C ARLI PHILIPS

L O N D O N

PLANTED

Martin Brudnizki’s maximalist rethinking of the legendary Annabel’s is a mash-up of chandeliers, animal print, copper leaf, velvet chaises and silk walls. The basement bar, nightclub, restaurant and lounge is tucked within a Georgian townhouse. annabels.co.uk

abc.net.au

L O N D O N

GEM THERAPY

P HOTO G R A P H BY J A M E S MC D O N A L D ( A N N A B E L’ S )

Curtain Hotel’s Green Room lobby bar (left) is a jewel-toned treat with accents inspired by its East End surrounds. The industrial framework is layered with an emerald-tiled bar, marine-blue velvet stools and draped greenery. thecurtain.com

S O U T H

TALKING POINTS

YAR R A

ALL FIRED UP A smoker box, wood-fired oven, rotisserie and fire pits are at the heart of chef Scott Pickett’s new Matilda restaurant where produce is cooked using live flames, warm coals and smoke.matilda159.com

S I N G L E C AS K

H A P PY R E T U R NS

SEVEN UP

This rich, complex drop has a balanced elegance. sullivanscove.com

Curly Flat limited-edition pinot marks 10 years of Cumulus Inc. cumulusinc.com.au

Make a stack of Arita’s smart ceramic vessels. livingedge.com.au

<< NOR D IC BY N ATU R E ENJOY A CULINARY TOUR IN 304 PAGES OF SCANDINAVIAN DESTINATIONS WHERE THE LINK BETWEEN FOOD AND NATURE IS RESTORED WITH A NEW VISION FOR HUMBLE INGREDIENTS. SHOP.GESTALTEN.COM

195


COLD c o m fo r t

It may be chilly but Minneapolis is braving the deep freeze to forge a bold new identity as a cool creative hub with food, art and design at the forefront. Words C ARLI PHILIP S


T R AV E L

P H OTO G R A P H S PAU L WA RC HO L ( J A M E S T U R R E L L ) , J I L L E M M E ( A RT S H A N T Y ) , M I K E K R I V I T ( G O L D M E D A L F LO U R M I L L ), G E N E P I T T M A N ( F R I T SC H ), W E I S M A N A RT M U S EU M – CO U RT E S Y O F M E E T M I N N E A P O L I S . P H OTO CO U RT E SY O F PA I S L E Y PA R K- N P G R ECO R DS A N D M E E T M I N N E A P OL I S

M

inneapolis may well be one of the coldest places in the US but it is also one of the most beautiful. Together with its twin city St. Paul it’s well equipped to deal with the frost (above-ground ‘skyway’ footbridges are enclosed and connect city blocks) and grassroots movements are advocating for, rather than enduring, the freeze. Spearheading the movement is Eric Dayton – or King of the Cold as he has come to be known – whose ‘Keep the North Cold’ charity campaigns for an end to climate change. The 37-year-old also co-founded the Great Northern Festival, an outdoorsy celebration of all things winter with fine dining street feasts, loppet racing and the US Pond Hockey Championships. There’s lively events even during the chilliest and most isolating months, like the popular Art Shanty where temporary cabins are transformed into an interactive creative hub. Twenty-two of Minnesota’s 10,000 lakes are in Minneapolis and the interconnectedness of its pristine boulevards, gardens, trails, creeks and riverbanks have earned it the title of Best Park System in America. Its most scenic route, the Grand Rounds, is a mob scene during winter and, when the lakes freeze over, skiers, ice-surfers and snowmobilers come out to play. The state by and large has been overlooked, its claim to fame being as Prince’s hometown (his Paisley Park compound is now open to the public) and the site of this year’s Super Bowl. “For as long as I can remember, Minnesota has been lumped in with the Midwest and written off as flyover country. Over the past several years we’ve started to take control of our own identity and narrative and I think ‘The North’ better defines not just where we are, but who we are,” says Eric, the son of Minnesota’s governor (his family also founded the Minneapolis-born Target). While it has long been regarded as progressive, with top-tier liberal colleges, strong support of the arts and a vibrant cultural scene, Minneapolis is entering a new phase. The city’s early adoption of the minimum wage ordinance has millennials f locking, bringing entrepreneurship, culinary innovation and a flourishing Made in America movement, as new creative communities adopt time-honoured traditions, handcrafting everything from small-batch beer to leathergoods, glass-blown lighting (check out Hennepin Made) and, at Solid Manufacturing Co., kids’ handmade toys from sustainably harvested timber. Think vegetable tanned leather slingshots, northern pine scout swords and hunter shields. The state is home to 19 Fortune 500 companies, but the open-minded and largely affluent citizenry hasn’t lost its famously unpretentious Midwestern friendliness. Modest millionaires drive dusty FWDs and hipsters give service with a smile. Hailed as America’s hottest new foodie destination, gutsy young chefs are taking risks and winning critical acclaim with 12 James Beard semifinalist nominations this year. Together with brother Andrew, Eric

This page, clockwise from top left The 1960s Guthrie Theatre sits in front of the Gold Medal Flour Mill. Roy Lichtenstein’s Salute to Painting at the Walker Art Center. Ready for loppet racing. Prince’s Paisley Park compound. Katharina Fritsch’s Hahn/Cock at the Walker Art Center. Art Shanty. Opposite page James Turrell’s Sky Pesher at the Walker Art Center.

197


This page, clockwise from top left Winter at the Lake of Isles. Remarkable architecture at the Voya Financial 20 Washington building. Trendy menswear store Askov Finlayson. Ice sculpting. Japanese dining at Kado No Mise. Faribault Woolen Mill Co. blankets. Claes Oldenburg’s Spoonbridge and Cherry.

co-founded the Bachelor Farmer, a ‘New Nordic’ cafe with original exposed bricks and pipes. It’s a crime not to order their warm baked popovers with honey butter, but the menu is largely Scandi-inspired. There’s an organic rooftop garden and all ingredients are from small local farmers following the cycle of the seasons. Their speakeasy bar Marvel is in the basement where bearded and tattooed bartenders serve the best cocktails in town. Classics are top notch, but mixologists are given free rein so expect inventions like the ‘Sundial’, a blend of Rujero, yellow Chartreuse, phosphoric acid and cardamom. Basically, it’s “whatever’s in bartender Stephen’s head”. Also in the building is the boys’ trendy store Askov Finlayson stocking outdoor apparel – field jackets, decorative canoe paddles, brass compasses and their cult ‘North’ beanies. It’s all about the North Loop neighbourhood where stylish stores are repurposing the gritty industrial milling warehouses that made Minneapolis rich back in the 1800s as the largest producer of flour in the world (it’s still one of the best places to get artisan bread). Adaptive re-use projects include shared artists’ studios, the Mill City Museum, Russell+Hazel (nirvana for stationery addicts), and the magnificently curated MartinPatrick3, an apothecary, barbershop, tailor and lots of shop-in-shops serviced by true gentlemen. Nearby Grethen House is a sartorial stalwart for women, showcasing edgy brands such as Isabel Marant and Golden Goose. In the shell of an old farm-equipment warehouse, the Hewing Hotel has a hunting-lodge atmosphere replete with cosy fireplaces, pine forest beams and plaid rugs from 19th-century company Faribault Woolen Mill Co. (the factory tours are an hour away but the beloved brand is available at retail stores in town). Their Tullibee restaurant is hearty and heavy – pork sausages, sauerkraut and all manner of fish and fowl. Don’t miss Spoon and Stable (yes, it’s housed in old horse stables), modern American-cum-French food from self-confessed “emotional chef” Gavin Kaysen. The menu must-have (if you can get in) is Dorothy’s Pot Roast, sentimentally named after his grandmother. At the other end of the spectrum is Kado No Mise, a triple threat of delicate Japanese dining, with three floors spanning an intimate eatery, authentic Kaiseki and secret eight-seat whisky bar. Dishes are classic and delicate. What the West Village is to New York, Linden Hills is to Minneapolis. Yuppies stroll the charming, lampost-lit, tree-lined boutique shopping strips, stopping at Penny’s for artisanal coffee, fresh juices and hearty

P H OTO G R A P H S E L I E S A J OH N SO N ( M A RT I N A ) , B R A N D ON ST E NG E L ( H E W I N G H OT E L ) , N IC K L E I F E R M A N ( V OYA WA S H I NGTO N SQ UA R E B U I L D I N G ) , K E N N Y T H O M A S ( FA R I B AU LT B L A N K E T S ) , G E N E P I T T M A N ( S P O ON B R I D G E )

T R AV E L


sandwiches from premium butcher Lowry Hill Meats. Close by is Rose Street Patisserie, a heavenly bakery owned by the first American to be accepted into the prestigious Relais Desserts, a small secret society of the best French pastry chefs. There’s millefeuilles and baguettes, but the humble American choc-chip has not been forgotten. The hottest new addition to the area is Martina, its high-low interior reminiscent of a South American estancia ranch. Rustic, wood-fired Argentinian-Italian cuisine is a curious combo, but chef Daniel del Prado knows what he’s doing, especially with the empanada hand pies with gorgonzola and leeks. Relaxed local ‘Brasserie Americana’ Tilia has earned rock ‘n’ roll veteran chef Steven Brown a James Beard 2018 nomination for Best Chef in the Midwest. Queues are inevitable, plates are shared (but keep the butterscotch pot de crème to yourself), there’s 21 craft beers on tap and This page, clockwise from top wine is mostly biodynamic. Hewing Hotel is in the shell of Minneapolis boasts the second most theatre seats per capita in the US an old farm-equipment and its 1960s Guthrie Theatre is worth visiting, even just for an warehouse. Hot new dining venue, Martina. Weisman Art architectural tour. Re-imagined by Jean Nouvel, its huge cantilevered Museum was designed by Frank observation platform has a magnificent vista over the city and Saint Gehry. The MartinPatrick3 store Anthony Falls by the Mississippi. The city’s biggest drawcard, however, combines barbershop, tailor, apothecary and more. is the cutting-edge Walker Art Center. Herzog & de Meuron was responsible for its expansion in 2003 and the vast complex hosts multidisciplinary exhibitions, educational programs and festivals. Its famous sculpture park is breathtaking, with T H E N O RT H giant works by Alexander Calder, James Turrell, and H OT L I S T Claes Oldenburg’s iconic Spoonbridge and Cherry. HAI HAI Punchy The ‘new’ Minnesota wears its frost with pride but is South-East Asian street food in a fun, pseudoequally as generous in spring when the sky splits and the tropical environment. sun begins to bloom. As the ice melts, sleighs, sledders YOUNG JONI Koreanand snowmen are replaced by fishermen, sailors and inspired pizzas with a swimmers as the land of The Great Lakes turns over a wood-fired twist. Bar’s new leaf. It’s year-round fun. open if the red alley light is on. GRAND CAFE Rolling marble carts with cognac and devilled eggs. Nostalgic, Frenchy fun. THE MONTE CARLO Old-school stalwart famous for its fried chicken wings. WEISMAN ART MUSEUM Designed by Frank Gehry, the exhibits are engaging and fascinating. MILLE Best womenswear boutique in town stocking A.P.C., Ulla Johnson and Apiece Apart. HOTEL ALMA Seven naturally decorated rooms with a cosy-chic restaurant and coffeehouse. D.NOLO Funky co-op of women’s retailers under one big industrial roof. THE FOUNDRY Honest homewares. Natural linens, porcelain, votives and wooden tools. BLU DOT Founded in Minneapolis, visit its furniture outlet.

199


B E L L E P R OM O T ION

BUYERS’ MARKET When it comes to updating your home and lifestyle, only the best will do – so here’s a roundup of the latest and greatest products out there

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 BLUM Whether used in a large or small kitchen, Blum’s Space Tower is the ideal pantry solution, now taken to new dimensions from 300mm to 1200mm wide. It provides easy access from all three sides and even more visibility can be achieved with Legrabox Free. blum.com/au/en 2 MINOTTI Minotti’s brand-new Tape collection comprises curvy seats with a strong personality, designed to create dynamic arrangements in residential or hospitality contexts. POA. minotti.com 3 NICK SCALI The Guadiana range’s classic look has a modern edge thanks to the beautiful natural colour of the solid American oak. The full range of matching console, coffee and lamp tables, buffet and TV cabinet will be half price in the June sale; exclusively at Nick Scali. nickscali.com.au 4 DESIGNER RUGS The ‘Bilby’ rug is handknotted in wool and shimmering art silk in copper and silver tones, perfect to pair with luxurious metallic finishes. An elegant addition to any space! RRP from $4250/240x300cm. designerrugs.com.au 5 WINNING APPLIANCES The integrated Liebherr refrigerator’s innovative BioFresh technology helps produce stay fresh for longer and the DuoCooling system prevents food from drying out. RRP $15,228. winningappliances.com.au 6 PARISI The striking yet delicate styling of the Cameo collection, designed by Prospero Rasulo, is distinguished by the perimeter of the basin tops – a visual element that will frame both tapware and toiletries. RRP from $695. parisi.com.au 7 BELLE PROPERTY Whether you are looking at off-market as a buying or selling option, Belle Property Private is the preferred choice. Via this premium service we provide access to property listings from our network that have not been advertised, as well as a national database of subscribed buyers exclusive to Belle Property. belleproperty.com.au 8 CHOICES Find your style, with Choices Flooring’s Inspiring Choices 2018 magazine. Get your FREE copy today at choicesflooring.com.au 9 TREND Trend’s new Botanica Timber series of windows and doors complements a range of styles, from traditional to modern. Choose from 13 different products in the Botanica range, each available in cedar and meranti. trendwindows.com.au


PA S S P O RT

S H A N G H A I

HOME + AWAY

H E L S I N K I

ACCLAIMED MILANESE DESIGNER PIERO LISSONI HAS TAKEN MINIMALISM TO CHINA FOR THE MIDDLE HOUSE, THE FOURTH HOTEL UNDER SWIRE’S HOUSE BRAND. AN “ITALIAN VISION WITH A LOCAL TWIST”, IT’S AN INTIMATE OASIS IN SHANGHAI’S HISTORIC DAZHONGLI AREA. THEMIDDLEHOUSE HOTEL.COM

WINTER GARDEN Characterised by inner harmony and privacy, this historic building has been transformed into The George. Guests can enjoy a glass-roofed garden and a giant dragon sculpture by Ai Weiwei. stgeorgehelsinki.com

A S H O RT STAY

with

PAU L BA N GAY

{ Garden designer, OAM }

PA R I S

NOVEL HAUNT They say the friendly ghost of author Alexandre Dumas roams Hotel Monte Cristo in Paris where modern-day comforts are coupled with an Oriental aesthetic, lacquered chinoiserie and exotic plants. More than 200 period items also lend their inimitable patina. hotelmontecristoparis.com

Where’s your favourite hotel? Gravetye Manor, a West Sussex hotel once home to great landscape designer William Robinson. His garden is modernised but its bones remain. Favourite design piece found abroad? An 18thcentury marble frieze from Rose Uniacke in London. Does travel influence your work? I am always seeking new gardens, especially by contemporary designers like Piet Oudolf or Tom StuartSmith. I’ve been researching how Middle East gardens are created in hot, dry areas. Ultimate destination for 2018? The Himalayas, to see daphne and magnolias in their native habitat. Latest project? An outdoor rug range for Cadrys. cadrys. com.au; paulbangay.com

Pass it on Visit-worthy venues to share. Edited by C ARLI PHILIP S T E L

AV I V

WHITE CITY London-based John Pawson has restored a 19th-century hospital as The Jaffa to seamlessly connect with Yafo, Tel Aviv’s vibrant 4000-yearold port area. thejaffatelaviv.com

FREE KICK For each Park Social Soccer Co. ball sold globally, one is also given to a needy kid. Former Apple creative director Sam Davy designed the balls: “The one-for-one model blends art and streetwear with soccer culture in a positive way.” parkssc.com TALKING POINTS

L A K E

C O M O

RO O M W I T H A V I E W

The first five-star hotel in Como city, Vista Palazzo is set in a 19th-century Venetianstyle palazzo. Resplendent in hand-hewn marquetry and Italian marble, the 18 suites boast lake views. vistalagodicomo.com H AP PY H O LID AYS

F U N N Y FAC E

S OA P B OX

Monocle’s manual suits vacationers and hoteliers. shop.gestalten.com

Joyous bags are on offer from Australian brand A-ESQUE. a-esque.com

Rennie Ellis’s 60s snaps wrap cleansing bars. kleinsperfumery.com.au

<< A I R P ORT R US H MAISON MARGIELA’S IRREVERENT LEATHER LUGGAGE TAGS UP THE ANTE IN PRINTED CALFSKIN WITH CHEEKY PRINTS SUCH AS THIS ‘PRIORITY’ LEASH SO YOU CAN FLY FIRST CLASS – EVEN WHEN YOU’RE NOT. FARFETCH.COM

201


FURNITURE AND HOMEWARES SYDNEY

MELBOURNE

BRISBANE

GOLD COAST

WWW.MAXSPARROW.COM.AU


AWA R D S

1 Frank Paino, Richard Misso, Craig Madgwick 2 Brendan Wong, Georgia Hawkins 3 Sophie Anna Thomas, Skye Healey Ward 4 Jennifer Burke 5 Bernd Winter, Terri Winter 6 Michele Di Blasio, Pamela Dimos 7 Jeremy Bull 8 Christina Symes, Jessica D’Abadie 9 Kirsten Stanisich, Jonathan Richards, Georgia Hickey 10 Fiona Biondi, Peter Hanscomb 11 Anthony Spon-Smith, Emma SponSmith 12 Paul Dykzeul, Harry Roberts, Tanya Buchanan 13 Chris Hawkins, Peter Fitzgibbon, Clint Hogan 14 Yasmine Ghoniem

1 3

2

4

5

6

13 7 12 8

11

10

9

Design sensations

P H OTO G R A P H Y B E L I N D A ROL A N D A N D C H LO E PAU L

Australia’s up-and-coming and established design aficionados shared the limelight at the 2018 Belle Coco Republic Interior Design Awards.

16

20

14

17

15

18

19

15 Rachael Thompson, Evie Bridger 16 Bob Cadry, Julianne Henry 17 Paul Hugh-Jones, Justine HughJones 18 Franco Parisi, Vince Ciolino, 19 Rachel Castle, Rob Mills 20 Nathan Rhodes, Ricardo Da Silva

203


22

21 Cameron Kimber, Robyn Holt 22 Felicity Slattery, Sarah Cosentino, 23 Lucy McCabe, Sam Montgomery 24 Jason Minty, Ally Wilson, Michelle Macarounas, Adam Khoury 25 Claire Cassey, Cintia Nilsson 26 William Kipping, Siegfried Bacani 27 Andrew Algar 28 Alex Sillato, Ann Kidd, Olivia Anderson, Tim Armytage 29 David Signorino 30 Max Soans-Burne, Harry Roberts 31 Carlo Fanuli, Sandro Fanuli, Ciaran Steele 32 Kate Nixon 33 Lucy McCabe, Melanie Stevenson 34 Bruce Cranston, Anita Savoldi, Manisha Ediriwira

24

21 23

25

26

27

29

30

28

31

32

33

34

37 36

35

AT T H E E IG H T H A N N UA L BE L L E C O C O R E PUB L IC Interior Design Awards Sydney-based interior design firm Alexander & Co. scooped the pool with a trio of wins for their work on Palm Beach House and restaurant Sean Connolly at Dubai Opera. To top off a fabulous night the biggest accolade of the evening, Belle Coco Republic Interior Designer of the Year, was also taken out by founder of Alexander &Co. Jeremy Bull. Kate Nixon’s interior design studio, Studio Kate (Busatti) won the award for Best Commercial Interior for their work on bookstore Hordern House. Claiming the prize for best bathroom design was Woollahra House Bathroom Two by Decus. The recipients of the Emerging Design Star Award were Felicity Slattery and Sarah Cosentino of Studio Esteta. Last year’s Emerging Design Star winner Amber Road won Best Residential Kitchen Design for their project 1906. The award for Best Work with Colour went to the team at Arent & Pyke. And the Best Residential Interior – Readers’ Choice was awarded to Greg Natale Design for Hamilton Island House. The design crowd enjoyed a glam evening with tasty morsels from Plated, Regal Rogue cocktails dispensed from a Zip tap and Preece wines.

38 39 40

41 42

204


AWA R D S 43

35 Genevieve Hromas, Thea RobertsThomson, Erin Depledge 36 Lucy Madden, Samantha Lowe 37 Eliza O’Hare, Adrian Goss 38 Charlotte Dub, Rachael Tambree, Nicola Byrne 39 Alexandra Donohoe Church 40 Jeremy Bull, Tess Glasson 41 James Treble, Emma Elizabeth, Terri Winter

44

48

46 47

45

52 51

55

54

49 50

53

57 56

58

59 42 Irena Kupkovic, Sacha Leagh-Murray 43 Adele Bates, Tom Fisher 44 Steve Cordony 45 Tom Ferguson, Nick Willox 46 David Flack, Mark Robinson, Gaelan Walker 47 Nicole Kinivan, Stephanie Sanders 48 Kristen Hawes, Sarah Johnson 49 Kat Vidovic, Andrew Hornery, Eliza O'Hare 50 Lisa Dingelmaier, Greg Natale, Kathryn Borglund, Maria Papantoniou 51 Judy Pascoe, Matus Kundrat 52 Sonia Warner, Erica Anderson 53 Deb Coffey, Madeleine Coffey 54 Vince Ciolino, Melissa Ciolino 55 Jo Byrne, Jeremy Byrne 56 Nicolette Farrell, Dylan Farrell 57 Greg Natale 58 Dean Bialek, Celine Bialek 59 Sophie Byrne, Zoe Holland 60 Alex Kin, Irnan Khan 61 Christie Blaylock, Stacy McCall

61

60


ON THE TOWN

3

2 6

1

1 Andrew Mumford 2 Nicole Hall, Harry Roberts 3 Lachlan McArdle, Cherise Northfield, Phil Burns 4 Lauren Mastoropoulos, Luke Stokes 5 David Hicks, Tanya Buchanan 6 Annabelle Moylan, Nick Moylan 7 Jack Merlo, Chelsea Hing 8 Laura Tuohey, Bianca Sciuto 9 Bryan Yen, Adele Bates, Frances Lynch 10 Tanya Buchanan, Chelsea Hing, Andrew Mumford 11 James Buddle

13

14 15

5

4

18

16

19

17

7

DINE & DESIGN Sub-Zero Wolf, Melbourne

D E S I G N E R RU G S X M E RY L H A R E

8

Coma Gallery, Sydney

9

Talking heads Stylistas enjoyed myriad design talks and launches. 10

11

12 Lisa Albert, Kym Vanderplight 13 Harry Roberts, Meryl Hare, Rachael Thompson 14 Meryl Hare, Louise Walsh, Niccii Kugler 15 Madeline Briggs, Belinda Aucott 16 Heleena Trahanas, Alex Lewis 17 Belinda Chippindale, Eloise Fotheringham 18 Yosi Tal, Meryl Hare, Johnathon Murray 19 Sally Manning, Mark Tuckey 20 Sandro Fanuli, Leo Terrando, Tanya Buchanan, Jack Milenkovic, Chelsea Hing, Fabio Fanuli 21 Fabio Fanuli, Monica Del Rosario, Shannon Batson, Alicia Merrick, Sandro Fanuli, Lisa McDiarmid 22 Felix Filbert, Fei Chau, Luke Stokes, Andrew Frost 23 Petrina Turner, Felicia Bonacci, Dara Shashoura 24 Barbara Hermon 25 James Casey, Jess Cohen, Kim Hallis 26 Seymour Cohen, Jodie Kras, Sam Fricker 27 Ben Aitken 28 Matthew Johnson, Simon Crean 29 Michael Wasley 30 Seymour Cohen, Maggie Roberts 30 Simon Hayman, Jane Hayman

20

21 22 24

26

23 25 28 27

FA N U L I M I L A N TA L K

30

29 31

Fanuli, Melbourne

A RT W I T H H E A RT

Eleven40 Studio Gallery, Melbourne

P H OTO G R A P H Y T I M O ’ CON NO R ( A RT W I T H H E A RT )

T H E FL AG S H I P S U B -Z E R O WOL F showroom in Melbourne hosted a Dine & Design evening with a kitchen trends talk by Chelsea Hing, Andrew Mumford and Belle. Stellar interior designer Meryl Hare revealed her second collection of rugs for Designer Rugs. Seymour Cohen raised $100,000 for the Very Special Kids charity with his Art With Heart initiative in Melbourne. Works were gifted by the likes of leading artists Julian Meagher and Matthew Johnson. Belle collaborated with Fanuli on a series of Milan design talks in Melbourne, Sydney and Perth.

12


ADDRESS BOOK

D

David Jones davidjones.com De De Ce dedece.com Dedon dedon.de Domayne domayneonline.com.au Domestic Textile domestictextile.com.au Domo domo.com.au

E

Elliott Clarke elliottclarke.com.au Euroluce euroluce.com.au

K

Kennedy Star kennedy.com.au Ke-Zu kezu.com.au King Living kingliving.com.au

M F

Fanuli fanuli.com.au Farfetch farfetch.com

A

Anibou anibou.com.au Artedomus artedomus.com Articolo articololighting.com

B

Bathe bathe.net.au Becker Minty beckerminty.com Behruz Studio behruzstudio.com Belle Property belleproperty.com Blum blum.com Boca Do Lobo bocadolobo.com Burberry burberry.com

C

PH OTO G R A P H PA B LO M ART I N

Caesarstone caesarstone.com.au Captain’s Choice captainschoice.com.au Chanel chanel.com Chloé chloe.com Choices Flooring choicesflooring.com.au Clarins clarins.com.au Coco Republic cocorepublic.com.au Conley & Co. (02) 8065 9411 Contents ID contentsid.com Cromwell cromwell.com.au Cult cultdesign.com.au

G

Gaggenau gaggenau.com.au Great Dane greatdanefurniture.com Gufram gufram.it

H

House of Hackney houseofhackney.com

I

International Floorcoverings interfloors.com.au

M.A.C maccosmetics.com.au ManiaMania themaniamania.com Matches Matchesfashion.com MCM House mcmhouse.com Mecca mecca.com.au Melbourne Gift Fair agha.com.au Milgate milgate.com.au Milieu milieuproperty.com.au Minotti minotti.com Misura misura.com.au Modern Times moderntimes.com.au

N

Neil Bradford Design neilbradforddesign.com Net-A-Porter net-a-porter.com Nicholas & Alistair nicholasandalistair.com Nicholas Fuller nicholasfuller.com.au

JO P

James Said jamessaid.com.au Janus et Cie janusetcie.com Jardan jardan.com.au

Ondene ondene.com.au

Parisi parisi.com.au Parlour X parlourx.com Pittella pittella.com.au Poliform poliformaustralia.com.au Porter’s Paints porterspaints.com Prestige Carpets prestigecarpets.com.au

SPLASH OUT ON GLOWING VELVETS AND SILKS. SEE CLOTH, P129.

RT

Radford Furnishings radfordfurnishings.com.au Rhys Cooper rhyscooper.com.au Rolex rolex.com Royal Oak Floors royaloakfloors.com.au

S

Saint Laurent ysl.com Schiavello schiavello.com Seneca seneca.co.nz Smeg smeg.com.au South Pacific Fabrics southpacificfabrics.com Space spacefurniture.com.au Ssense ssense.com Stone Italiana stoneitaliana.com.au Studio Cavit studiocavit.com Stylecraft stylecraft.com.au Sub-Zero Wolf subzero-wolf. com SuperTuft supertuft.com.au

TeraNova teranova.com.au The Vault thevaultsydney.com These Walls thesewalls.com.au Tigger Hall Design tiggerhall.com.au Tongue n Groove tngflooring.com.au Trend Windows trendwindows.com.au

W

Walter G walter-g.com.au Warwick Fabrics warwick.com.au Winning Appliances winningappliances.com.au

Z

Zip zipwater.com Zuster zuster.com.au

V

Victory Blinds & Curtains victoryblinds.com.au Volker Haug volkerhaug.com

PRIVACY NOTICE This issue of Belle is published by Bauer Media Pty Ltd (Bauer). Bauer may use and disclose your information in accordance with our Privacy Policy, including to provide you with your requested products or services and to keep you informed of other Bauer publications, products, services and events. Our Privacy Policy is located at www.bauer-media. com.au/privacy/ It also sets out how you can access or correct your personal information and lodge a complaint. Bauer may disclose your personal information offshore to its owners, joint venture partners, service providers and agents located throughout the world, including in New Zealand, USA, the Philippines and the European Union. In addition, this issue may contain Reader Offers, being offers, competitions or surveys. Reader Offers may require you to provide personal information to enter or to take part. Personal information collected for Reader Offers may be disclosed by us to service providers assisting Bauer in the conduct of the Reader Offer and to other organisations providing special prizes or offers that are part of the Reader Offer. An opt-out choice is provided with a Reader Offer. Unless you exercise that opt-out choice, personal information collected for Reader Offers may also be disclosed by us to other organisations for use by them to inform you about other products, services or events or to give to other organisations that may use this information for this purpose. If you require further information, please contact Bauer’s Privacy Officer either by email at privacyofficer@bauer-media.com.au or mail at Privacy Officer Bauer Media Pty Ltd, 54 Park Street, Sydney NSW 2000.

207


Art•Rugs•Decor•Furniture

united-interiors.com.au

For advertising enquires please contact Account Manager Kintae Teen 02 9282 8256 I KTeen@bauer-media.com.au

253 Wickham Rd, Moorabbin 3189 • 1800 880 877

AGED OAK WIDE FLOORS

SHOWROOM MELBOURNE 03 9690 2822 I 263 Park St, South Melbourne SHOWROOM SYDNEY 02 9363 0808 I 85 New South Head Rd, Rushcut ters Bay

agedoakfloors.com.au

To advertise, please call 02 9282 8256


Newport

Bailey

EDEN

The beauty of classic simplicity.. we craft the pieces you want to come home to..

w w w. r o s e a n d h e a t h e r. c o m. a u Sydney | Auckland

mondoluce.com

The home of premium designer Italian lighting.

Melbourne 272 Toorak Road, South Yarra | 03 9826 2232 Sydney 439 Crown Street, Surry Hills | 02 9690 2667

Veneto

FUTURA

New from Mr. Brown London www.mrbrownhome.com

80 Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Riordan Street, Alexandria P: 02 9667 4415 Open Monday to Saturday 10am to 5pm

Website: laurakincade.com E: sales@laurakincade.com

To advertise, please call 02 9282 8256


THE OFFICE

HOW WOULD YOU DE SCRIBE YOUR STUDIO?

It’s an open-plan studio by the beach in Malibu. We are all hands-on with every project and work very closely. W H AT I N I T I A L LY A P P E A L E D T O YO U A B O U T T H E

The light coming in and the glow coming off the water. I am a water baby and often have a break during the day to take a paddleboard in the ocean. WH AT A R E YO U R D E S K E S S ENTI A L S? A great leather blotter, the newest iMac and fresh flowers. W H AT S PACE?

better creating outside. DE SCRIBE THE VIE W F R O M YO U R O F F I C E ? Right out over the ocean. I need that to feel free! I love my drive to work down the Pacific Coast H ighway. D E S C R I B E A T Y P I C A L D AY ? Morning hike, job site, construction meetings, staff meeting at office, product meeting, always a quick lunch by myself to re-group, hopefully get in a standup paddleboard and back to the office ... we never stay past 5pm. We need a life too. D O

IS UNIQUE ABOUT YOUR WORKSPACE? HOW

YO U U S E YO U R O F F I C E T O E N T E R TA I N

D O E S IT R EFLEC T TH E WO R K TH AT YO U D O?

Sometimes – depends if I like the clients! I don’t like bad energy in my space.

My work is very fresh and inspired by the land and sea. I start each day with a walk and think about what I want to get accomplished. I find unless I do that I honestly don’t think best in an ‘office’. I’m

CLIENT S?

W H AT I S A D R E A M D E S K PI ECE YO U WO U LD BUY RIGHT NOW?

Hermès desk accessories.

IF YOUR STUDIO WERE LO C ATED ANY WHERE E L S E , W H E R E W O U L D T H AT B E ?

I’m just

opening a new office in Aspen. So excited as I love to spend time there. TELL US ABOUT YO U R CO LL A B O R ATI O N W ITH KIN G LIVIN G AND THE INSPIR ATION BEHIND THE TE XTILES C O L L E C T I O N? I feel incredibly lucky to work with King Living and I am very proud of our design collaboration. The fabric collection was inspired by imagining the sea under the shining moonlight. I always aim to surround myself with nature and so the collection takes a considered approach to the natural elements that have inspired me. Playing with relaxed blue hues and patterns, I also wanted to add a modern twist to the timeless sofas at King Living. I think the collection is a reflection of the Australian coastline, and the relaxed Australian way of living. jam-design.com

Photograph FELIX FOREST

Jeffrey Alan Marks

Alfresco action

A morning walk prepares this designer for a day of creativity.

210


Timeless style SYDNEY | MELBOURNE | BRISBANE | PERTH 1800 339 379

www.interï¬&#x201A;oors.com.au

sddfccggfd  
sddfccggfd  
Advertisement