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AIIM Market Intelligence

Delivering the priorities and opinions of AIIM’s 80,000 community

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SharePoint 2013 Clouding the issues

Underwritten in part by:

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About the Research

Our ability to deliver such high-quality research is partially made possible by our underwriting companies, without whom we would have to return to a paid subscription model. For that, we hope you will join us in thanking our underwriters, who are:

Buildingi 188 106th Avenue NE, Suite 610 Bellevue, WA 98004 USA Phone: +1 866.828.3404 Sales phone: +1 206.707.3493 Email: sales@buildingi.com Web: www.buildingi.com

EMC Corporation 176 South Street, Hopkinton, MA 01748 USA Phone: +1 800.222.3622 or +1 508.435/1000 Fax: +1 508.497.6904 Email: softwaresales@emc.com Web: www.emc.com

IBM 3565 Harbor Blvd. Costa Mesa, CA 92626 USA Phone: +1 800.345.3638 Web: www.ibm.com

K2 5150 Village Park Drive SE, Suite 200 Bellevue, WA 98006 USA Phone: +1 425.883.4200 Sales Phone: +1 877.822.5552 Email: K2NAevents@k2.com Web: www.k2.com

Kodak Alaris 2400 Mt. Read Blvd. Rochester, NY 14615 USA Phone: +1 800.944.6171 Web: www.kodak.com/go/docimaging

Repstor Ltd Wellington Buildings (3rd Floor) 2-4 Wellington Street Belfast BT1 6HT UK Phone: +44 (0)28.9099.6116 Sales Phone: +44 (0)28.9099.6116 Email: contact@repstor.com Web: www.repstor.com

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SharePoint 2013

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Clouding the issues

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As the non-profit association dedicated to nurturing, growing and supporting the Information Management community, AIIM is proud to provide this research at no charge. In this way, the entire community can leverage the education, thought leadership and direction provided by our work. We would like these research findings to be as widely distributed as possible. Feel free to use this research in presentations and publications with the attribution – “© AIIM 2013, www.aiim.org”

Process Used and Survey Demographics

While we appreciate the support of these sponsors, we also greatly value our objectivity and independence as a non-profit industry association. The results of the survey and the market commentary made in this report are independent of any bias from the vendor community. The survey was taken using a web-based tool by 620 individual members of the AIIM community between July 05, and July 31, 2013. Invitations to take the survey were sent via e-mail to a selection of the 80,000 AIIM community members. Survey demographics can be found in Appendix A. Graphs throughout the report exclude responses from organizations with less than 10 employees, and suppliers of ECM products or services, taking the number of respondents to 538. ©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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About AIIM

©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

SharePoint 2013

© 2013 AIIM - Find, Control, and Optimize Your Information 1100 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1100, Silver Spring, MD 20910 Phone: 301.587.8202 www.aiim.org

Clouding the issues

Doug Miles is head of the AIIM Market Intelligence Division. He has over 25 years’ experience of working with users and vendors across a broad spectrum of IT applications. He was an early pioneer of document management systems for business and engineering applications, and has produced many AIIM survey reports on issues and drivers for Capture, ECM, Records Management, SharePoint, Mobile, Cloud and Social Business. Doug has also worked closely with other enterprise-level IT systems such as ERP, BI and CRM. Doug has an MSc in Communications Engineering and is a member of the IET in the UK.

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About the Author

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AIIM has been an advocate and supporter of information professionals for 70 years. The association mission is to ensure that information professionals understand the current and future challenges of managing information assets in an era of social, mobile, cloud and Big Data. AIIM builds on a strong heritage of research and member service. Today, AIIM is a global, non-profit organization that provides independent research, education and certification programs to information professionals. AIIM represents the entire information management community: practitioners, technology suppliers, integrators and consultants.

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Table of Contents About the Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Process Used, Survey Demographics . . . . . . . . . 1 About AIIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 About the Author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Spend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Introduction: Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Key Findings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

SharePoint in the Enterprise:

Scope of Success and Ongoing Issues . . . . . 7 External Help and Advice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Degree of Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Driving Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Ongoing Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Versions and Plans: Versions and Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Upgrades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

2013 Features and Plans: 2013 Features and Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Requirements for Add-ons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Cloud Strategies: Cloud Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Appendix 1 - Survey Demographics: Survey Demographics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Survey Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Organizational Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Geography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Industry Sector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Job Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Appendix 2 - Selective Comments: Appendix 2 - Selective Comments . . . . . . . . . 26

Underwritten in part by:

SharePoint 2013

Scope of Success and Ongoing Issues:

Conclusion and Recommendations . . . . . . . 22 Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Clouding the issues

SharePoint in the Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Reach and Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Conclusion and Recommendations:

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Spend:

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About the Research:

AvePoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Bottomline Technologies Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Buildingi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 EMC Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 IBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 K2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Kodak Alaris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Rapstor Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 TITUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

About AIIM: About AIIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Cloud Issues: Cloud Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Governance: Governance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Third-Party Add-On Products: Third-Party Add-On Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Integration and Access: Integration and Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Š2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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Introduction

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SharePoint 2013 is the fourth major incarnation of SharePoint in the last 10 years, and as we will see, some organizations find themselves supporting live versions of all four. Although not really its original purpose, SharePoint has had a major impact on the overall reach of document management and ECM compared to the deployment of earlier systems. Certainly, adoption across the “enterprise” has been much stronger for SharePoint then for other products and usage across multiple “content”-types is broader than for many traditional imaging or document systems. It is in the area of “management” that most of the debate has taken place – to what extent can SharePoint solve all of the content management, records management, and social collaboration needs of the enterprise as a whole. The arrival of many additional features in the 2013 version has added a further twist to that debate, particularly regarding the ongoing need for customizations and the use of third-party add-on products. A major element of the 2013 release is the further alignment of the “365” family of cloud offerings from Microsoft, and yet this brings with it many strategic decisions of on-prem, cloud and hybrid options, and whether they are hosted by Microsoft, or in a private cloud. Integration with other enterprise systems and third party add-ons may also be disrupted by a move to cloud, but on the other hand, integration with Outlook, Exchange and Lync might be easier.

SharePoint 2013

Clouding the issues

In this report, we look at the adoption rates and roll-out status for SharePoint as an ECM/DM system, the ongoing issues of user adoption, and overall project success – or otherwise. We measure the adoption of SharePoint 2013 and the difficulties that users report with their upgrades and migrations. We study the impact of the new 2013 features, particularly on third party add-on products that have previously been used to fill in gaps in security, governance, search and social capability. We look at the take up of the 365 product family, and the issues that cloud presents for SharePoint users. Finally, we measure spending plans for licenses, services and add-on products.

Key Findings n 57% of responding organizations use SharePoint for ECM/DM, 31% consider it to be their main or only (10%) ECM/DM system. 28% only use SharePoint for collaboration sites and/or intranet. n 33% are struggling with their SharePoint implementation, and for a further 28%, progress has stalled. 40% are moving forward but only 6% describe it as a “great success”. n 22% sought no external advice or training. Only 28% took external training, and only 17% used specialist ECM consultants. Most relied on general IT consultants or channel resellers. n The biggest on-going issues are user adoption, extending the business scope, and governance. Achieving uniformity of classification and metadata is also a big issue. n 38% are supporting two or more live versions. 21% of large organizations are supporting three or more. Most respondents struggle with the upgrade process – generally considered more of a migration than an upgrade. n 45% plan to be on SharePoint 2013 by mid 2014. Improved search and navigation is deemed the most useful new feature. Also welcomed are closer integration with Outlook, Exchange and Lync, better mobile device support, and improved retention management. n Despite improvements in the standard feature set, 67% still see third-party products as important. There is still strong interest in third-party add-in products, particularly system monitoring, BPM, storage management, metadata management, and records management. n Migration tools, unified data interfaces, and scanning and capture, are the most popular auxiliary products. Auto-classification, content analytics and digital signatures are of growing interest. n In 49% of organizations, the current driving force is the IT Department. Only 34% are business-driven, including 14% with a multi-departmental steering committee. n Only 18% are using standard vanilla product. 30% are using somewhat customized versions. Most (53%) are using a standard version with limited customization and/or third-party add-ons.

©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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n 9% of smaller organizations plan to move all of their SharePoint content to the 365 cloud, compared to 2% of mid-sized and 3% of largest. 29% overall are looking to a hybrid cloud, but half of these will use a third-party or private cloud, not 365. 24% are not going to cloud, and 43% are undecided.

n 45% are prepared to use SharePoint for records management, although 16% of these still need customization or third-party add-ins. 11% of smaller organizations and 24% of large ones feel SharePoint still can’t meet their needs, as well as 21% who are already using dedicated RM systems (mostly not linked to SharePoint).

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n 23% still have big issues with governance and user-security in SharePoint (rising to 30% of large organizations). 35% feel that considerable improvements have now been made.

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n 20% are currently using Exchange 365, but only 8% are using SharePoint 365. 7% are using Office 365 (as web apps).

n There is no sign of reduced spending around SharePoint, with internal development, system integration, and training showing strong growth. Most third-party add-on products show a substantial net increase in spend over the next 12 months.

SharePoint 2013

Much debate has always surrounded the availability of SharePoint within the enterprise compared with its actual usage, and beyond that, how many are using it as a collaboration or intranet platform compared to those storing quantities of content and using it as an ECM or document management system. In the first question of our survey, we specifically asked how long SharePoint has been in use as an ECM or DM system. What we can see is that larger organizations were much earlier adopters, with many now having five or more years of experience invested in the product. Small and mid-sized organizations are now catching up. This probably reflects a growing acknowledgment of the general need for ECM in smaller businesses over the past few years. Ironically, as smaller organizations are moving to adopt SharePoint for ECM/DM, SharePoint itself has become more capable, but also much more complex.

Clouding the issues

SharePoint in the Enterprise

Figure 1: How long have you been using SharePoint as an ECM (Enterprise Content Management) or DM (Document Management) system in your organization? (N=535) 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

5 years or more 2 years or more 10-500 emps Less than 2 years We are s ll in implemen ng mode with SharePoint for ECM/DM

500-5,000 emps 5,000+ emps

We have plans to use SharePoint for ECM/DM but have not started yet We have no plans to use SharePoint for ECM/DM

As a further aspect of the adoption of ECM in general, larger and mid-sized organizations are much more likely to have pre-existing ECM systems, whereas smaller organizations are three times more likely to have SharePoint as their only ECM system. Having said that, 57% overall use SharePoint for ECM/DM (up from 0% SharePoint 10% to be their 20%main or 30% 40% (up 48% in our 2012 survey) and 31% overall consider only ECM system from 27% in 2012). It is our only ECM system It is our of main ECM system Š2013 AIIM - The Global Community Information Professionals We use SharePoint for ECM/DM but it

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10-500 emps


for ECM/DM 5 years or more years or more Figure 2: How would you2describe the use of SharePoint as an ECM/DM system across 10-500 emps your organization? (N=532) Less than 2 years0%

10%

20%

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We are s ll implemen ng mode It is in our only ECM system with SharePoint for ECM/DM

500-5,000 emps 30% 40% 5,000+ emps

We have It plans tomain use SharePoint for is our ECM system ECM/DM but have not started yet 10-500 emps

We use SharePoint for ECM/DM but it We have noisplans to use SharePoint not our main system for ECM/DM We have a number of unconnected SharePoint ECM/DM systems

500-5,000 emps 5,000+ emps

We use SharePoint for collabora on or intranet but not ECM/DM 20%

30%

40%

It isno our only ECM system We have ECM/DM systems

Reach and Usage

It is our main ECM system

Half of the organizations (51%) surveyed here have near universal access to SharePoint (90+% of their staff). 10-500 emps We use SharePoint for ECM/DM but it 70% have rolled out SharePoint to at least half of their staff. This is quite consistent across different sizes is not our main system 500-5,000 emps regions of organization, with just a slight lag for mid-sized businesses (44% universal access). Comparing have a number unconnected 0% America 10%and Europe. 20% 30% 40% 5,000+ 50% indicates no real We difference betweenofNorth emps SharePoint ECM/DM systems When it comes to active usage, 57% of organizations report that half or more of those with access are active Notatyet livecollabora on We use SharePoint for users, i.e., accessing content least once or twice a week, but there is a long tail of under-use, with 26% or intranet but ECM/DM reporting that only one in five of thosenot with access are active users. Even amongst those who have near Increasing rapidly universal roll out, only a third that or more of their staff are active users. This probably says as We have otherreport systems for80% ECM/DM much about adoption of ECM in not general as it does about SharePoint. In our recent “ECM at the Crossroads”1 and do use SharePoint report, file shares are still deemed the repository of choice for work-in-progress files in 61% of organizations. Increasing slowly We have no ECM/DM systems Another characteristic of SharePoint roll-outs (Fig 3) is that, despite being mostly longer term users, larger

SharePoint 2013

10%

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We have other systems for ECM/DM and do not use SharePoint 0%

organizations areStable still more likely 100% to be adding users at a pace. This needs to be compared with the success – reached of the overall deployment indicated in the next section, along with the fact that only 11% report a plateaued or 10-500 emps Stable –ofreached planned reducing number active our users,. limit 500-5,000 emps Figure 3: How is the proportion of office staff actively using SharePoint changing? (N=338) Stable – we have reached a 5,000+ emps plateau of adop on 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Reducing Not yet live Increasing rapidly Increasing slowly Stable – reached 100% Stable – reached our planned limit

10-500 emps

Stable – we have reached a plateau of adop on

5,000+ emps

500-5,000 emps

Reducing

©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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Scope of Success and Ongoing Issues

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It is an unfortunate characteristic of most enterprise system deployments that expectations start very high but it takes several years before the project can really be deemed a success. SharePoint is no exception. 68% of respondents feel that it is doing the job for them, but many are seeing a shortfall against original hopes. It is a very broad platform and given the somewhat unplanned nature of its adoption in most businesses, and the more limited experience of content management compared to transactional systems in most IT departments, it is not wholly surprising that 61% of our respondents reported that expectations have not been met or that progress has stalled. Perhaps more damning is that only 6% would consider their project to be a “great success”, and 7% feel it has been a failure. In bigger organizations, the success rate rises to 10% and failures to 4% - possibly reflecting a “too big to fail” element, but more likely indicating better planning, and certainly better external advice. A one-in-ten success rate is still a very low number. Figure 4: Thinking about the scope and development of your SharePoint ECM project, how would you describe progress? (N=426)

We have struggled to meet our original expectaons, 26%

Just about there as planned and moving forward, 34%

SharePoint 2013

We have achieved all we planned and it is a great success, 6%

Clouding the issues

The project has not been a success, 7%

It’s doing the job but progress has stalled somewhat, 28%

0%

10%

20%

A majority of SharePoint deployments (61%) are stalled, struggling or failing. Only 6% report an unqualified success.

30%

In house – internal experse (ONLY)

External training

External Help and Advice

General IT consultant(s)

Compared to traditional DM and ECM products, SharePoint sells through a channel network, and is likely to be considered part of mainstream IT rather than an area needing specific expertise. Figure 5 shows the Channel reseller/MicrosoŽ Partner potential sources of expertise available, but 24% report relying solely on their own in-house expertise, with a further 26% using general IT consultants - and this is most prevalent amongst the smaller organizations. Specialist ECM consultancy 28% put staff onto external training courses, although, of course, these may have been technical SharePoint courses rather than ECM best practice courses like those from AIIM. Only 17% report using a specialist Specialist industry sector supplier/ ECM consultancy (dropping to 10% of smaller organizations), although correlating Figure 4 and Figure 5 consultants suggests that this can increase the chance of a successful implementation by a factor of two. At 11%, use of “blue chip” externalofconsultants almostproducts exclusive to large organizations (over 5,000 employees). Vendor(s) third-partyisadd-on ©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals “Blue chip” external consultancy

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Just about there as planned and moving forward, 34%

meet our original It’s doing the job expectaons, but progress has 26% stalled somewhat, 28%

Figure 5: Where has the main help and advice come from for your SharePoint development and rollout? (Check all that are significant) (N=484, excl.50 N/A)

0%

10%

20%

30%

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In house – internal experse (ONLY)

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It’s doing the job External but progress hastraining stalled somewhat, 28% General IT consultant(s) Channel reseller/MicrosoŽ Partner 0% Specialist ECM consultancy

10%

20%

30%

SharePoint 2013

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In house – internal experse (ONLY) Specialist industry sector supplier/ consultants External training Vendor(s) of third-party add-on products General IT consultant(s) “Blue chip” external consultancy Channel reseller/MicrosoŽ Partner

Degree of Customization Specialist ECM consultancy

Only 18% of implementations are out-of-the-box or plain vanilla, although 40% have only “limited Specialist sector customization”. Nearly aindustry third (30%) aresupplier/ using customized versions equally between in-house 0% 10% split 20% 30% 40% 50% consultants development and external. Many users reported that they run different customizations for different groups within the business. is very little difference We useThere the standard vanilla productacross company sizes here, which is perhaps a little Vendor(s) third-party add-on products surprising. Larger of organizations are more likely to use in-house customization, but this is balanced by only less use of external development. As we will see later, managing the upgrade cycle when the system is Mainly standard product but with “Blue chip” external consultancy heavily customized can cause problems, and we would generally recommend use of add-on products or limited in-house customizaon productized customizations where possible, as the pressure will then be on the third-party supplier to keep in step with each new version of SharePoint as it comes out.

Customized version using outside

experse Figure 6: How would best describe your current SharePoint implementation? (N=470 excl. 61 N/A) Customized version using in-house0% experse We usecustomized the standard vanilla but product Highly soluon, based only on SharePoint Mainly standard product but with Mainlylimited standard productcustomizaon with 3rd party in-house add-on applicaon(s) Customized version using outside Customized version with 3rd party experse add-on applicaon(s) Customized version using in-house experse Highly customized soluon, but based on SharePoint

10%

20% 10-500 30%emps 40% 500-5,000 emps

50%

5,000+ emps

10-500 emps 500-5,000 emps 5,000+ emps

Mainly standard product with 3rd party add-on applicaon(s) Customized version with 3rd party add-on applicaon(s)

©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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Driving Force

CEO, MD, COO, 5%

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Figure 7:Who would you say is the current driving force in your organization for moving SharePoint forward and extending its scope? (N=476, excl. 58 N/A)

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Given the earlier figure for stalled or incomplete deployments, we need to ask who in the organization is currently responsible for driving the system forward. 34% are business-driven, including 14% with a multidepartmental steering committee, but given the overall levels of maturity we saw earlier, it is disappointing that 49% are still driven largely by the IT Department. Correlating Figure 4 and Figure 7 shows a 30% higher chance of success for those organizations that have a multi-departmental steering committee, something we consider to be important.

Business consultant, 2%

Other Line of Business Manager, 13%

Head of Compliance or Records Management, 6%

SharePoint 2013

Mul -departmental steering commiÂ?ee, 14%

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Head of IT, CIO, CTO, 34%

Other IT, 15% Head of Informa on Management, 11% 0%

Ongoing Issues

20%

40%

60%

Persuading users to manage and share their To complete content this picture of the installed in SharePoint and notSharePoint elsewhere base, we can see that persuading users to make regular use of it is the number one issue, but that persuading business managers to make more use of Expanding the is usenumber of SharePoint for more it for business processes two. Then come the two long-running problems, governance and business processes classification consistency. Aligning governance, security and usage policies Even those organizations with that other set out with a firm strategy for SharePoint are now having to make further enterprise apps decisions on social, mobile and cloud, and we will see later that cloud does not necessarily mean Achieving uniformity of classifica on and SharePoint 365. metadata structures Strategic decisions on integra on with social, mobile and cloud The user interface is s ll difficult Maintaining and upgrading our customiza ons Managing rapidly increasing storage volumes Managing mul ple content types It’s too complex to manage and enhance Š2013 AIIM - The Global up Community Information Keeping to date of with version Professionals upgrades

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Head of Informa on Management, Figure 8: What are the biggest ongoing issues for SharePoint in your organization? 11% (Max FOUR) (N=492) 0%

20%

40%

60%

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Persuading users to manage and share their content in SharePoint and not elsewhere Expanding the use of SharePoint for more business processes Aligning governance, security and usage policies with other enterprise apps Achieving uniformity of classifica on and metadata structures Strategic decisions on integra on with social, mobile and cloud

SharePoint 2013

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The user interface is s ll difficult Maintaining and upgrading our customiza ons Managing rapidly increasing storage volumes Managing mul ple content types It’s too complex to manage and enhance Keeping up to date with version upgrades All of the above

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

120%

SharePoint 2003 In most organizations, SharePoint is still an IT-driven platform, and this is reflected in high levels of customization, reluctant user take-up, and a limited spread of business processes. SharePoint 2007 SharePoint 2010

Versions and2013 Plans SharePoint

SharePoint 2010 is the most popular primary live version, although there are still plenty of 2007 users, and more people are still rollingSuperceded out SharePoint 2010 (20%) thanLive, are but rolling out legacy SharePoint 2013 (17%). mostly content SharePoint 2013 was launched (somewhat gradually) at the start of the year, and is largely in evaluation Live, primary in have use some Live someassites or applica ons mode for most organizations, although 27%version already live on usage at the date of this survey (July 2013). There is little difference Rolling acrossout company sizes or regions.Evalua on Figure 9 illustrates the current usage for each version (reading horizontally along the individual bars, with some double-counting).

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It’s too complex to manage and enhance Keeping up to date with version upgrades

Figure 9: What is the status of the following SharePoint versions in your organization? All of the aboveanswers not exclusive) (N=510,

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

120%

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0% SharePoint 2003 SharePoint 2007 SharePoint 2010 SharePoint 2013

Live, primary version in use Rolling out

Live on some sites or applica ons Evalua on

Although a three-yearly upgrade cycle may seem perfectly reasonable, it has created support headaches in many organizations. As we will see later, each new version has added some major new functionality, frequently exposing cracks in original roll-outs, and necessitating a re-think, followed by more of a data migration than an upgrade. Much of this arises from the fact that SharePoint is both a platform and an application, and many of the application enhancements have disrupted the platform infrastructure – particularly in the BPM area. There is also the fact that many deployments started out as collaboration systems with little thought for content management, let alone records management.

SharePoint 2013

Live, but mostly legacy content

Clouding the issues

Superceded

As a result, in some organizations, earlier versions of SharePoint are relegated to specific applications or dedicated content repositories - but they still need to be supported. Figure 10: How many live versions of SharePoint are you supporting? (N=480, excl. 34 Don’t know) Four versions, Three 2% versions, 8%

None, 11%

Two versions, 28%

One version, 51%

Breaking it down, 25% of the smallest, 40% of mid-sized and 60% of the largest organizations are supporting two or more live versions, with 21% of those supporting three, even all105%120%135% four versions (3%). 0% 15% 30% 45% 60% or 75% 90% Each upgrade brings really useful feature improvements Microso should give more thought to

©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals upgrade issues

Each me it’s more of a migraon than

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Upgrades

Two versions, 28%

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0% 15% 30% 45% 60% 75% 90% 105%120%135%

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The message that our survey respondents would most like to send to Microsoft is that the feature improvements in each new version are much appreciated, but they would like more thought given to the upgrade process itself. Customizations create the most upgrade headaches compared to 3rd party addons, and perhaps surprisingly, re-implementing integrations seems to only be an issue for some – perhaps One version, indicating a poor initial design. 51% Figure 11: How do you feel about the following statements regarding SharePoint upgrades? (N=478)

Each upgrade brings really useful feature improvements Microso should give more thought to upgrade issues

SharePoint 2013

Clouding the issues

Each me it’s more of a migraon than an upgrade Careful planning is needed, but they generally go OK Customizaons are a huge headache come upgrade me Each new version causes us to re-think how we do ECM Geng 3rd party add-ons upgraded is tricky We’re sll struggling with the version we have We have to re-implement our integraons every me Lots of overlap between add-ons, custom and new stuff Strongly disagree

Disagree

Neither agree nor disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

Our first implementaon Although set 3 years apart, implementing SharePoint upgrades can be a challenge for many organizations, Don’t know, 17% will or be where SP 2013, especially those with high levels of in-house customization, initial planning for content governance 3% Weismay well skipheld view that Microsoft could do more to ease this situation. was lacking. There a strongly a version this Already have, 7% me, 2% We are unlikely to Next 6 months, migrate to 2013, 15% 3% Despite a slow start, 45% plan to migrate to SharePoint 2013 by mid next year (2014), led by smaller organizations (49%) compared to the largest (40%).

2013 Features and Plans We have no plans at the moment, 20% 2 years, 3%

©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

6- 12 months, 20% 12-18 months, 12% 12


Strongly disagree

Disagree

Neither agree nor disagree

Agree

Strongly agree

Figure 12: When do you plan to migrate to SP 2013? (N=514) Our first implementaon will be SP 2013, 3%

Don’t know, 17%

Industry

We may well skip a version this me, 2% We are unlikely to migrate to 2013, 3%

Watch

Already have, 7%

Next 6 months, 15%

We have no plans at the moment, 20%

6- 12 months, 20%

When it comes to the new features in SharePoint 2013, many respondents (44%) admitted they have yet to study them in detail. Improved search and metadata-based navigation seems to be the most popular feature, matching that available on many e-commerce websites these days. Evidence of loyalty to the “Microsoft stack” shows up in the popularity of the closer integration offered between Lync, Outlook, Exchange and SharePoint.

SharePoint 2013

12-18 months, 12%

Clouding the issues

2 years, 3%

Then comes mobile device support. An “official” mobile client for SharePoint has always been an important missing element and even now the offering is more of an enhanced browser than a true mobile app. This leaves considerable scope for third-party applications, either as SharePoint-specific access products, or more capable ECM-interface and content-creation products. Security is, of course, an important consideration here. Figure 13: Which SharePoint 2013 features are likely to be the most useful to your organization? (Max THREE) (N=495) 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

Improved search/metadata-based navigaon Closer integraon between Lync, Outlook, Exchange and SharePoint Mobile device support Improved applicaon of retenon policies Integraon of retenon and e-discovery between SharePoint and Exchange Community sites, micro-blogging and tagging Specific e-discovery and hold funconality BPM changes and InfoPath Hybrid cloud and synchronizaon None of these are important as yet Not ever

©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals needed by us,

Not needed

3%

13


0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

SharePoint 2013

Not needed now, 12%

Clouding the issues

Not ever needed by us, 3%

Watch

Records management in SharePoint per se has always been the subject of debate, and we will return to this Improved applicaon of retenon policies later. Integraon of retenon and e-discovery Requirements for add-ons between SharePoint and Exchange Microsoft has always considered SharePoint to be a platform rather than an application, and has Community sites, micro-blogging and tagging encouraged a community of developers to extend and enhance the capabilities. Those joining the SharePoint community as third-party developers have always run the risk that their niche set of add-on Specific e-discovery and hold funconality features will at some point be absorbed into the standard product set. This fourth incarnation of the host product was always likely to create the biggest threat. However, 67% of our end-user respondents consider BPM changes and InfoPath that 3rd party add-ons still offer important capabilities, either to enhance standard functionalities or (by their perception) to fix shortcomings. Hybrid cloud and synchronizaon Figure 14: As SharePoint continues to expand its feature set, what are your views on the use of 3rd None of these are important as yetadd-ons? (N=504) party

Industry

The next most popular group of applications are in the records management realm. Better application of Improved search/metadata-based navigaon retention policies is welcome, and is the only way that some organizations are going to limit their explosive server growth. Exchange have always existed in different divisions of Microsoft, and as CloserSharePoint integraon and between Lync, Outlook, Exchange and SharePoint a result, there has never been a practical solution to the thorny issues of email management, archive, retention and e-discovery. E-discovery has been given an increased focus in the 2013 version, and in Mobile device support particular, the way legal holds are managed.

They connue to greatly enhance standard funconality, 26%

Required less and diminishing over me, 18%

Sll required to fix shortcomings, 41%

Cloud Strategies

0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

As weMove hintedeverything in the titletoofMicroso’’s this report, SharePoint 2013 has always been projected as the first release under Microsoft’s all-out cloud strategy using the “Office 365” branding. However, the range of product and platform offerings is somewhat confusing, and can easily create misleading research results. The first Majority hosted on 365, some point to note is that a significant 43% have no plans for storing SharePoint content in the cloud as yet, or retained on-prem are undecided about their cloud strategy, and 24% have an agreed plan to retain everything on-premise. This leaves a third (33%)onwith Somejust content hosted 365,positive plans for cloud, of whom almost all (29%) are planning a hybrid 10-500 emps cloud for their content is solution. The majority only significant interest in a wholesale move to a Microsoft-hosted on-prem 500-5,000 for 9% of the smallest organizations. However, the most popular platforms foremps hybrid solutions is to use a 5,000+ emps Private cloud/hybrid, all provided private corporate cloud (11%) or a third party private cloud (4%) rather than a hybrid Microsoft 365 cloud thirdwhere party (not (14%).by Even the Microso’) 365 cloud is used, it is much more likely to be a “thin hybrid” with the majority of contentHybrid retained on-premise. of private cloud and onprem, all administered by us

Retain everything on-prem for the

©2013 AIIM - foreseeable The Global Community future of Information Professionals

14


Sll required to fix shortcomings, 41% Figure 15: What are your plans for SharePoint in the cloud? (N=501, inc. 215 “Undecided/No Plans”) 0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

Watch

Industry

Move everything to Microso’’s Majority hosted on 365, some retained on-prem Some content hosted on 365, majority on-prem

10-500 emps 500-5,000 emps 5,000+ emps

Private cloud/hybrid, all provided by third party (not Microso’) Hybrid of private cloud and onprem, all administered by us

SharePoint 2013

When it comes to the wider offerings of the 365 family (plus Yammer and Skype), 62% of our responding organizations are currently using at least one cloud-based Microsoft product, although it is most likely to be Lync (39%) or Exchange 365 web mail (20%) rather than SharePoint 365 (8%). Only 7% are using Office 365 as a fully SaaS application, as opposed to web-delivery/on-demand.

Clouding the issues

Retain everything on-prem for the foreseeable future

Figure 16: Which of the following applications has your organization adopted? (N=493) 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

Exchange 365/Outlook Web (email) SkyDrive Pro (With cloud file sync. from SharePoint) Office 365/Online/Web Apps (SaaS/browser Office applica‡ons) Office 2013 (Web delivery/Office-onDemand, local client) SharePoint 365/SharePoint Online (Cloudbased SharePoint) Lync (Messaging and comms) Yammer (Social/micro-blog) Skype (Messaging and comms) None of these

We did ask if the experience of using a cloud-based influenced as a 0% Microsoft 20% product 40% has60% 80%the organization 100% whole regarding cloud-based services. Whilst there was some re-assurance to be found on availability and mobile access (40%), speed of response Security was ambivalent (22% OK, 27% disappointed), and 33% felt they are not seeing any cost benefit or reduction in IT support. Managing what is allowed into the cloud Integra‡on of cloud SharePoint to on-prem

©2013 AIIM - The Global Community ofenterprise Information systems Professionals

Geographical loca‡on of cloud data servers

15


based SharePoint) Lync (Messaging and comms) 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Yammer (Social/micro-blog) Exchange 365/Outlook Web (email) Inevitably, security is the biggest issue for cloud even amongst those who plan to use it, and when using Skype (Messaging and comms) a hybrid solution, is thecloud issue howfrom to manage what content is allowed into the cloud. Integrating SkyDrivethere Pro (With fileofsync. a cloud SharePoint system to on-prem enterprise or transactional systems is also an issue for many BPM SharePoint) None of theseis also a concern, particularly outside of the US. applications. Geographical location of servers Office 365/Online/Web Apps (SaaS/browser Office applica‡ons) Figure 17: How significant will/are the following issues for you with using a cloud or hybrid solution Office 2013 (Web delivery/Office-onfor SharePoint? (N=170 planning or using cloud) Demand, local client)

Cloud Issues

40%

60%

80%

100%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

Security Lync (Messaging and comms)

Industry

20%

Watch

SharePoint 365/SharePoint Online (Cloud- 0% based SharePoint)

Managing what is allowed into the cloud Yammer (Social/micro-blog) Integra‡on of cloud SharePoint to on-prem Skype (Messaging and comms) enterprise systems

U‡lizing third-party apps from cloud Different features/upgrade schedules between cloud and on-prem versions Security

0%

Major concern Managing what is allowed into the cloud

Some concerns

SharePoint 2013

Escala‡ng data volumes and costs

Clouding the issues

Geographical loca‡on of cloud data None ofservers these

Not a problem

One keyIntegra‡on issue withofSharePoint 365 istothat upgrades will be continuous in the cloud version, and to an extent cloud SharePoint on-prem enterprise systems unavoidable, whereas the timing of updates to the on-premise version is more of a user choice. This, along with customization issues, is likely to be driving the popularity of SharePoint hosted in a private cloud. Geographical loca‡on straightforward of cloud data servers Technically, this is relatively to do0% as it is10% an inherently solution, compared to 20% browser-based 30% 40% 50% 60% some more traditional content management products. Escala‡ng data volumes and costs Yes, stand-alone An alternative mechanism for a hybrid cloud solution, with easy access for those outside the firewall, is a cloud-based file-sharing or collaboration application with synchronization back to an on-premise SharePoint Yes, content synchronized tofrom SharePoint U‡lizingisthird-party apps cloud installation. We can see in Figure 18 thaton-prem stand-alone file-sharing applications are popular, although they are as likely be in unofficial use ason-prem officially sanctioned. Microsoft have moved to address this need with Yes,to integrated to SharePoint for Different features/upgrade schedules cloud and versions SkyDrive Pro,between butcontent, somewhat tooon-prem late given the search, permissions, etc.popularity of Box, and to an extent, Dropbox. However, only 5% of organizations using cloud-share products like these have any degree of synchronization or integration No, but plenty of unofficial use concern Major Some concerns a problem back to on-premise SharePoint. It is, of course, early days here, firstly to adopt aNot product for corporate use, and then to link it back to on-premise ECM of whatever flavor. No Figure 18: Do you currently have any “official” cloud-based file-sharing or collaboration applications outside of SharePoint? (N=499) 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

Yes, stand-alone Yes, content is synchronized to SharePoint on-prem Yes, integrated to SharePoint on-prem for content, search, permissions, etc. No, but plenty of unofficial use No

©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

16


The majority of SharePoint user-organizations are still very cautious about cloud, and a hybrid model is the most popular compromise to overcome security and integration concerns. Even then, most prefer to use their own private cloud rather than Microsoft’s 365 platform when it comes to SharePoint – compared to using the more popular email or social applications on 365.

Industry

Ever since the early days of unfettered team-sites and unrestricted metadata, SharePoint has had a poor reputation for its security and information governance. In particular its records management functions have in the past been criticized as inadequate for most organizations. However, each new release has added additional security, governance and RM functionality, and the SharePoint 2013 release has extended that to cover improved retention management and more comprehensive e-discovery.

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

SharePoint 2013

Figure 19: To what extent do you feel that the governance and user-security issues of early SharePoint versions have gone away? (N=355, excl. 140 don’t know)

Clouding the issues

Generally, 49% appreciate the improvements that have been made in this area, but 32% still have big issues with governance and security. It should be noted that 28% of respondents posted a Don’t Know, and there were numerous comments that technology alone cannot secure good governance in the absence of suitable policies and a strong corporate will.

Watch

Governance

We never really had those issues The improvements have been welcome It was a nightmare but is much beer now We sll have big issues with governance and security

Taking the discussion further, we asked how users0% feel about using 2013 for their records 10%SharePoint 20% 30% management requirements, and the responses once again paint a more complex picture than many We don’t differenate between records and commentators imply. other content Firstly, 21% overall do not differentiate between records and other content. This rises to 29% for smaller User acceptance is more important than rigor organizations, but a surprising 18% of mid-sized and largest companies do not designate any of their for us, so it’s OK electronic content as records. 29% overall are prepared to accept SharePoint as it is, including 23% of the With carefuland set up, it can comply with our overall still need customization or third party add-ins in largest organizations 33% of mid-sized. 16% needs order to meet their needs. We sll need some specialist customizaon This leaves a total of 36% who either feel that SharePoint cannot meet all of their compliance requirements services (15% overall, rising to 24% of largest), or they already have a robust and compliant RM system that they prefer to use instead (21%). In this the RM system is most likely to be stand-alone and not We sll need add-in 3rdlatter partycase, products linked to SharePoint. It sll can’t really meet all of our compliance regulaons We already have a robust and compliant RM system – linked to SharePoint We already have a robust and compliant RM system – stand-alone ©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

17


now We sll have big issues with governance and security Figure 20: How do you feel about using SharePoint 2013 for your records management requirements? (N=461) 0%

10%

20%

30%

Industry

Watch

We don’t differenate between records and other content User acceptance is more important than rigor for us, so it’s OK With careful set up, it can comply with our needs We sll need some specialist customizaon services We sll need add-in 3rd party products

SharePoint 2013

Clouding the issues

It sll can’t really meet all of our compliance regulaons We already have a robust and compliant RM system – linked to SharePoint We already have a robust and compliant RM system – stand-alone

Of those concerned with records keeping, just over half feel that SharePoint can meet their needs, although many of these look to specialist customizations-10% or add-in the rest 0%products 10%to make 20% it work. 30%Around 40%half of 50% (21% overall) already have stand-alone RM systems. System management/health monitoring Workflow and BPM Storage/archive management Search enhancements management We saw earlier that 67% Metadata still see third-party add-on applications as being important. In Figure 21 we focus Outlook integraon on products that overlap or supplement native SharePoint functionality, and also measure how many users feel they are no longer needed with the 2013 version. In Figure 22 we look at auxiliary or companion Records management products that boost the overall capability of SharePoint. Security enhancements

Third-Party Add-On Products

Looking at the add-on products, key 2013access features such as search enhancement and cloud collaboration Mobile are seen as making third party E-discovery additions slightly tools less necessary, but they are still in very strong demand. Other popular areas are system management and health monitoring, BPM, storage management and Social applicaons metadata tools. Outlook integration is featured in the new release, but our users seem to prefer third-party Collaboraon tools/cloud sharesmature and function-rich. products – perhaps they are likely to be more Cloud content shares No longer needed

©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

Sll using

Essenal for now

Sll planned

18


system – stand-alone

Figure 21: How have the last two versions of SharePoint affected your use of third-party add-on products in the following areas? (N=461) -10%

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

Watch

Industry

System management/health monitoring Workflow and BPM Storage/archive management Search enhancements Metadata management Outlook integraon Records management Security enhancements Mobile access E-discovery tools Social applicaons Collaboraon tools/cloud shares Cloud content shares Essenal for now

Sll planned

SharePoint 2013

Sll using

Clouding the issues

No longer needed

When it comes to products that do not compete with the native functionality, migration tools are widely used now (20%), with the same number planning to acquire them. Unified data interfaces also feature highly, along with the already popular scanning and capture front-ends. When it comes to growth, autoclassification, content analytics and digital signatures are all set to become more widespread, with adoption growing from under 10% to around 30%. Figure 22: Which of the following auxiliary products for SharePoint have you implemented/plan to implement? (N=465, line length indicates N/A) 0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

Migraon tools Unified data interfaces to other systems Scanning and capture Auto-classificaon Data clean-up/content analycs Digital signatures Compound docs/prescribed formats Invoice automaon (AP) Output management Using now

Firm plans in next 12-18 months

SharePoint can fully manage content in other systems (manage-inŠ2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals place), 5%

No plans as yet

19


Scanning and capture Auto-classificaon Dataand clean-up/content analycs Integration Access

Users can search and view content in one or more other systems, 29%

SharePoint is not connected to any other systems, 63%

SharePoint 2013

Users can view, share, edit and update content in other systems, 17%

Clouding the issues

SharePoint can fully manage content in other systems (manage-inplace), 5%

Industry

Figure 23: To what extent can your SharePoint users access content stored within other enterprise systems? (N=422)

Watch

Digital signatures Picking up on the integration element, SharePoint is frequently considered to be the focus of consolidation of content systems, providing an access portal into other content repositories – whether they are other ECM Compound docs/prescribed formats systems, or enterprise systems such as ERP and CRM. This can simply be at the basic level of search and Invoice automaon (AP) view, or extended to include more of the standard content management functions, and all the way up to full records management. The concept of manage-in-place was extended in the 2010 version to better include Output management other systems, although only 5% have taken this up. SharePoint operates in isolation in 63% of organizations – a missed opportunity to provide a common pointplans of access all types of corporate information. Using now Firm in nextfor 12-18 months No plans as yet

One of the drivers for utilizing cloud versions of SharePoint is to improve access both across and outside of the corporation, and also onto mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones. We can see in Figure 23 that access is anything but universal in most organizations. Desktop access within the firewall is fairly well covered, including VPN access from home, access from other enterprise systems, and also the popular 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% connection via the Outlook mail client. However, when it comes to mobile struggling with the standard browser screen is the norm, and From the Outlookdevices, email client even that is only made available to users in 30% of organizations. SharePoint 2013 does have a mobilesensitive browser mode,other but requires the whole organization to be running this version. Only 9% provide a Whilst within enterprise systems dedicated mobile app, although 13% do allow copies of content to be synchronized for off-line use. The big issue here is creating a secure environment on the mobile device, and Microsoft seems to be leaving it to From home using VPN access third parties to implement or incorporate Mobile Data Management alongside SharePoint access. When it comes to connecting third-parties, VPN (19%) On mobile devices – browser accessis still much more prevalent than hybrid cloud shares (7%), despite its potential risks and support headaches. On mobile devices – dedicated app Remote/mobile – offline using synchronized copies Partners/customers/suppliers via VPN login Partners/customers/suppliers via hybrid cloud/cloud-share

©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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Figure 24: To what extent can your SharePoint users access content stored within other enterprise systems? (N=422) 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

Watch

Industry

From the Outlook email client Whilst within other enterprise systems From home using VPN access On mobile devices – browser access On mobile devices – dedicated app Remote/mobile – offline using synchronized copies

Given its day-one philosophy of browser-only clients, and content-type independence, SharePoint is in something of a bind when it comes to mobile apps for access to content, and even more so for off-line interaction and editing – much to the frustration of many users.

SharePoint 2013

Partners/customers/suppliers via hybrid cloud/cloud-share

Clouding the issues

Partners/customers/suppliers via VPN login

Spend

Spend in all SharePoint-related product and service areas remains strong, with particular increases in internal development, integration and training – the latter also being reflected in the expansion of AIIM training topics in this area. External professional services and third-party products also show positive net growth. Perhaps surprisingly, our survey respondents are posting a still-increasing net spend on SharePoint licenses for on-premise systems as well as the new 365 services. Figure 25: How do you think your organization’s SharePoint-related spend in the following areas and applications in the next 12 months will compare with what was actually spent in the last 12 months? (N=461, shorter lines indicate more “we don’t spend anything on this” responses)

Internal SharePoint development/configura on Integra on of SharePoint to other repositories SharePoint training Third-party add-on products External professional services SharePoint on-prem licenses SharePoint/Office 365 cloud licenses Less ©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

About the same

More 21


External professional services SharePoint on-prem licenses

0%

5%

10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40%

Unified data interfaces to other systems

Industry

-10% -5%

Watch

Much as we saw earlier, when we break down the third-party product spend, data interfaces, content SharePoint/Office 365 cloud licenses candidates for more investment, along with auto-classification, analytics and migration tools are popular digital signatures and BPM products. Cloud collaboration and sharing applications figure highly for growth, suggesting once again that SharePoint 2013 has not provided a full answer here. Less About the same More Figure 26: How do you think your organization’s spend on the following products in the next 12 months will compare with what was actually spent in the last 12 months? (N=454, “Same” and “We don’t spend anything on this” excluded)

Data clean-up/content analy cs Migra on tools Auto-classifica on

SharePoint 2013

Clouding the issues

Cloud collabora on/share Digital signatures Other BPM applica ons Scanning and capture Invoice automa on (AP) Output management Less

More

Spending intentions on licenses, services and third-party products are all set for considerable growth, indicating that the SharePoint engine is still firing on all cylinders, and that the SharePoint community is continuing to enhance both the capabilities of the platform, and the sophistication of its deployment.

Conclusion and Recommendations

SharePoint 2013 is headlined for better search, improved linkage to email and social tools, enhanced records management functions, improved mobile capabilities, and full membership of the 365 cloud services family. While all of these improvements are welcomed by our survey respondents, they are much more enthusiastic about search, email integration and better records management than they are about the others, and even then, they are loath to give up the third party add-on products that specialize in these areas. When it comes to cloud, a third of responding organizations plan to make the move, but mostly as a hybrid cloud, and more likely on a private cloud platform rather than using SharePoint 365. Mobile support and enhanced social capabilities are underplayed, with best-of-breed products being preferred, particularly for building cloud-based content-sharing environments. As a records management tool, Microsoft have never claimed to cover all requirements across all organizations, and there is evidence here that the threshold has moved on with 2013, with some useful additions for retention management and e-discovery. However, for many organizations, a dedicated RM system is still the safest and possibly easiest route, either keeping an existing system, or implementing a new one. Also coming through strongly is that each new version of SharePoint creates upgrade problems, frequently highlighting data inconsistencies created by the lax information governance policies within the earlier versions. This has further implications for 365 cloud services where users will be more closely tied to Microsoft’s own upgrade schedules. Each upgrade also brings more sophisticated services such that external advice and training are even more important for these later versions than they were for the earlier ones.

©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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Although enterprise-wide SharePoint roll-out is now the norm, user take up can be a struggle, and success can be elusive, with many deployments struggling to achieve their original intentions. However, organizations seem prepared to continue investing in core licenses, professional services, and additional add-on products as they pursue the goal of building a capable and comprehensive content and records management system, with SharePoint as the underlying platform.

n Endeavor to re-kindle progress before moving on to the new version. Consider calling in external help: this may be in the form of external consultants, external training, or third-party add-on suppliers.

Industry

n If your existing SharePoint deployment is struggling or stalled, do not assume that upgrading to 2013 will fix it. Consider whether the drive to go forward resides just in the IT department or is more of a business project.

Watch

Recommendations

n Above all, look at user acceptance of information governance as a concept, and how it is embodied in SharePoint specifically. You may need to re-address policies, and carry out re-training. Consider making it easier for users to comply with policy by using third party products for metadata automation, and providing access through familiar UI’s like Outlook.

n Using SharePoint 365 as a cloud service, fully integrated with Lync and Exchange 365, and more widely available outside the firewall, is an attractive proposition, but be aware that this may also limit your ability to port your custom applications, and to integrate with other on-premise systems. You may also be locked into the Microsoft upgrade schedule and be compromised on customization compatibility.

SharePoint 2013

n If your current deployment of SharePoint has metadata deficiencies or security inconsistencies, consider using a migration tool to align and fix the data into a “clean” 2013 system. This will give you the best opportunity to correct long-standing issues.

Clouding the issues

n Investigate the new features and functions of SharePoint 2013. Take as objective a view as possible. Talk to others in the SharePoint community about their experience. If you don’t understand the implications of some of the features call in external help.

n Do not rely on SharePoint 2013 to kick-start your mobile access, content-sharing and social business initiatives. It may suffice, but compare and contrast the offerings from best-of-breed products or integrations. Chances are you could get started now without upgrading to 2013 first. n The same is true of records management. Don’t settle on SharePoint simply because you have it. Consider your needs for secure access, compliance and e-discovery across the business, and include paper records and electronic. Then evaluate SharePoint’s capabilities in this area. n Do not assume an either/or scenario for records management. Your existing system(s), existing suppliers, or your outsource may be able to provide a win-win integration with SharePoint.

References

1. AIIM Industry Watch, “ECM at the Crossroads – key strategy choices for universal content access”. April 2013, www.aiim.org/research

©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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Appendix 1 - Survey Demographics Survey Background

Survey respondents represent organizations of all sizes. Larger organizations over 5,000 employees represent 31%, with mid-sized organizations of 500 to 5,000 employees at 40%. Small-to-mid sized organizations with 10 to 500 employees constitute 29%. Respondents from organizations with less than 10 employees or from suppliers of ECM products and services have been eliminated from the results.

Industry

Organizational Size

Watch

620 individual members of the AIIM community took the survey between July 05, and July 31, 2013, using a Web-based tool. Invitations to take the survey were sent via email to a selection of the 65,000 AIIM community members.

11-100 emps, 10%

10,000+ emps, 21%

SharePoint 2013

Clouding the issues

11-100 101-500 emps, 10% emps, 20%

10,000+ emps, 21% 5,00110,000 emps, 10%

101-500 emps, 20%

5,00110,000 emps, 10% 1,001-5,000 emps, 26%

501-1,000 emps, 14% 501-1,000 emps, 14%

1,001-5,000 emps, 26%

Geography

Asia, Far East, 2% Middle East, 70% of the participants are based in North America, with most of Central/S. the remainder (21%) from Europe. Africa, S. Africa, America, 1% 2% Middle East, Australia, New Africa, 5% S. Africa, Zealand, 2%

Asia, Far East, 2%

Central/S. America, 1%

Other Europe, Australia, New 9% Zealand, 5% Other UK and Europe, Ireland, 9% 12% US, 57% UK and Ireland, 12% US, 57% Canada, 13%

Canada, 13%

Life Science, Pharmaceucal, 2%

Media, Entertainment, Publishing, 1%

Bureau/Outsource, 1% Other, 4%

Bureau/Outsource, Š2013 AIIM - The Global Community Legal andof Information Professionals Professional Services, Life Science,2%

Media, Entertainment, Publishing, 1%

1%

Other, 4%

Government & Public Services Local/State, 14% Government &

24


12% US, 57%

Industry Sector

Canada, 13%

Local and National Government together make up 22%, Finance, Banking and Insurance represent 12%. The remaining sectors are fairly evenly split. To avoid bias, suppliers of ECM products and services have Canada, 13% been eliminated from all of the results.

Legal and Media, Professional Entertainment, Services, 2% Life Science, Publishing, 1% Pharmaceucal, 2% Healthcare, 4% Legal and Professional Retail, Transport, 2% Real Estate,Services, 4%

Other, 4% Bureau/Outsource, 1% Other, 4%

Government & Public Services Local/State, 14% Government & PublicGovernment Services - & Public Services Local/State, 14% Naonal, 8%

Consulng Services, Engineering & 6% Construcon, 5% Telecoms, Water, Ulies, 6% Consulng Services, 6%

Job Roles

Insurance, 5% Finance/Banking, 7% IT & High Tech — not ECM, 7% Insurance, 5% Energy, Oil & Gas, Mining, 7%

Telecoms, Water, Ulies, 6%

Energy, Oil & Gas, Mining, 7%

Manufacturing, Aerospace, Food, Process, 7%

SharePoint 2013

Non-Profit, Charity, 4% & Engineering Construcon, 5% Educaon, 5%

Clouding the issues

Government & Public Services Naonal, 8% Finance/Banking, 7%

Healthcare, Non-Profit, Charity, 4% 4% Retail, Transport, Educaon, 5% 4% Real Estate,

Industry

Bureau/Outsource, 1%

Watch

Life Science, Pharmaceucal, 2%

Media, Entertainment, Publishing, 1%

IT & High Tech — not ECM, 7%

Manufacturing, Aerospace, Food, Process, 7%

54% of respondents are from IT, 30% have a records management or information management role and President, CEO, 18% are line-of-business managers. Managing Business Director, 1% Consultant, 7% Other, 1% President, CEO, IT staff, 19% Managing Line-of-business Business Director, 1% execuve, Consultant, 7% Other, 1% department head or process owner, IT staff, 19% 9% Line-of-business execuve, department head or process owner, Head of 9% records/informaon CIO, Head of IT, IT management, Manager/Director, 15% 17% Head of records/informaon CIO, Head of IT, IT management, Manager/Director, 15% 17% Records or document management staff, IT Consultant or 15% Project Manager, 18% Records or document management staff, IT Consultant or 15% Project Manager, 18% ©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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Appendix 2 - Selective Comments

Do you have any general comments to make about your SharePoint deployments? (Selective) Industry

n Biggest challenge at my org is that our SharePoint plan is an IT driven initiative. Not much buy-in from other depts, because they don’t know enough about what is going on and what you can do with SharePoint.

Watch

n On-going user adoption is usually the main challenge we experience with our deployments - engaging line managers to put on more of their systems and services would support our drive to increase organization-wide usage.

n SharePoint is seen within our organization as a jack of all trades but master of none. n In general, our 2007 deployment was a train wreck, we are only now starting a 2010 deployment.

n As a DoD contractor, my organization has a long way to go to identify the strengths and weaknesses of a cloud-based document repository. There are multiple regulations we have to comply with that we haven’t yet been able to see if SP 2013 will meet. n Microsoft is pushing new version of SP too quickly. We can hardly get used to one before the next version is out. We have decided to stick with 2010 and will likely bypass 2013.

SharePoint 2013

n Decision: can it fully meet all of our ECM and RM needs - allowing us to drop our other legacy ECM/RM software?

Clouding the issues

n Deployment of new functionality on SP always seems to take longer than hoped.

n The deployments are normally a breeze, it’s migrations that are a horror........ n I love 2013! n By taking away SharePoint Designer, our in-house expertise is being drained away which inevitably increases our costs. n SharePoint upgrades continue to be disastrous, including Office 365 service upgrades. Always migrate; never upgrade, unless you have no choice. n Microsoft does a less than ideal job with their OOTB features. The dependence of 3rd party requirements to make Sharepoint work is extremely frustrating and limiting. n SharePoint: still difficult to have a seamless experience, still difficult to govern, still hidden costs or dependencies especially for big companies. SharePoint is NOT a multilingual platform. n Microsoft still doesn’t do proper Records Management out of the box - consultants who try to make it ‘fit’ are misleading their clients. We’ve struggled with this for a long time and are now implementing a thirdparty application to do records management for us as it is much less complicated. n We’re using the migration from 2007 to 2013 as an opportunity to redesign based on new capabilities and architecture. An extended feature set in 2013 allows us to reduce the level of external customization considerably. n We’ve just implemented 2010 - MUCH better than 2007!

©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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Underwritten in part by:

AvePoint helps more than 10,000 customers – including many Fortune 500 companies and government agencies – meet their specific business objectives by enabling collaboration with confidence. AvePoint, Inc. is headquartered and maintains its principal operational center in Jersey City, NJ, with wholly owned operational centers in the USA, Canada, Australia, South Africa, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Netherlands, Switzerland, Japan, Singapore, and China.

Industry

AvePoint is a global technology company and proven software leader. Since its founding in 2001, AvePoint has become the world’s largest provider of enterprise-class governance, compliance, and management solutions for social enterprise collaboration platforms.

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AvePoint

AvePoint is a Depth Managed Microsoft Gold Certified Application Development Partner and Gold Certified Collaboration and Content Partner as well as a US Government GSA provider via strategic partnerships.

SharePoint 2013

Clouding the issues

www.avepoint.com

Bottomline Technologies Ltd Content volumes that businesses manage are growing exponentially every year with the proliferation of multiple communication channels and multiple formats. The impact; spiralling costs and an ever increasing risk of non-compliance. This is why some organisations look to ECM solutions like Microsoft SharePoint®. But SharePoint® alone can only partly solve these challenges. Users are often frustrated by slow or manual storage, search and retrieval, and are forced to call in IT for support. And many are unaware of correct document destinations and indexing rules – or simply don’t index at all. The result - users are not sharing content or only have a limited adoption of SharePoint. Bottomline’s content integration solution enables organisations to maximise their existing SharePoint® investment by empowering users to store and retrieve documents and information directly in SharePoint® without ever leaving their main business application. Users can map document output to defined destination libraries and index key data values for any number of unique document types and formats. The result is a fully auditable repository that supports easy access to your most important documents, and ensures compliance

with both internal and external mandates for document retention and recall. Users can access information faster, upload items more quickly, eliminate duplications and become more focused and productive. The time saving achieved is significant end user productivity increases by up to 30%, equivalent to an extra 2½ hours in the office per employee per day. With Bottomline underpinning your business, you can overcome the content management challenges that inhibit business agility. Bottomline is a global provider of cloud-based payment, document and invoice automation solutions, We have over 20 years’ experience in delivering solutions to more than 10,000 corporations, financial institutions and healthcare organisations around the globe – including 75 of Fortune 100, 75 of the FTSE 100 and 15 of the top 25 global banks. Our customers trust us to help drive their business performance. Experience SharePoint without Limits. For more information go to: www.bottomline.co.uk/transformfiler, call +44 (0) 118 982 2348 or email emea-info@bottomline.com

www.bottomline.co.uk ©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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Underwritten in part by:

• Web Sites and Portals for public, permissioned and internal audiences

Industry

As SharePoint specialists, Buildingi delivers high quality SharePoint implementations that support our clients’ daily work and yearly objectives. With hundreds of migrations, website deployments and technology implementations under our belts, our developers and consultants bring expertise in eDiscovery, Enterprise Content Management, and other high-value uses of the SharePoint platform.

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Bulldingi

• Content Management with social capabilities and powerful search • Global Collaboration in a secure, well-managed environment • Information Governance and compliance for risk mitigation

• Custom Applications for streamlined practices We understand the power of enterprise-wide data integration and how it empowers companies and government entities to make smart decisions, respond to the dynamic needs of their business with flexibility, and strengthen their processes using real and immediate information. Buildingi clients are Fortune 1000 enterprises and government organizations at the local, state and federal levels. Buildingi is a General Services Administration-approved vendor (GSA # GS-00F-0019X).

SharePoint 2013

• Search Effectiveness using relevance, refinement, and social cues

Clouding the issues

• Business Intelligence for data-backed decision-making

www.buildingi.com

EMC Corporation EMC Corporation is the world’s leading developer and provider of information infrastructure technologies. We provide organizations of all sizes and across all industries with the products, services, and solutions they need to manage data growth and get the greatest value from information. EMC cloud solutions are helping millions to realize the benefits of managing, delivering, and consuming IT services via public, private, and hybrid cloud infrastructures. Fully virtualized EMC architectures provide secure control over cloud-based data and applications, while reducing costs and expanding the ways people access, manage, and interact with information. It’s a new era for enterprise content and the role of information and its usage is under constant change. Traditional enterprise content management needs have also transformed and organizations are looking for innovative ways to capitalize on this new information experience. The EMC Documentum family of advanced enterprise content management solutions provides a comprehensive, fully unified software platform that allows organizations to manage and leverage content in a cost-effective, controlled manner while providing secured access and re-use across the enterprise. Critical to this new shift is a focus on enterprise compliance and an emphasis on content security, strong authentication and advanced rights management for information both at rest and in motion. The family of advanced enterprise content management solutions leverage and extend Microsoft SharePoint capabilities that allow customers to use the familiar SharePoint interfaces to access business processes, workflows and content. In addition, organizations can scale SharePoint to accommodate information governance, mitigate risk associated with content within the enterprise, and reduce administrative and infrastructure costs while enabling SharePoint to improve content visibility. To meet these new information challenges and to support everyday business needs, EMC’s unified ECM platform includes mobile and social collaboration, case management, business process management, web content management, document capture, customer communications management, compliance, and archiving.

www.emc.com ©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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Underwritten in part by: Industry

IBM Enterprise Content Management solutions enable the world’s top companies to make better decisions, faster. As a market leader in content, process and compliance software, IBM ECM delivers a broad set of mission-critical solutions that help solve today’s most difficult business challenges: managing unstructured content optimizing business processes and helping satisfy complex compliance requirements through an integrated information infrastructure.

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IBM

More than 13,000 global companies, organizations and governments rely on IBM ECM to improve performance and remain competitive through innovation. To learn more, visit: www.ibm.com/software/ecm

SharePoint 2013

Clouding the issues

www.ibm.com

K2 K2 — We provide software that makes your people more effective. K2 quickly allocates work to the right people along with all the information they need to make great decisions. With K2, you get: • Higher service levels by giving people the right information, at the right time and with the authority to act. • Increased responsiveness by eliminating indecision and bottlenecks. • Full visibility into trends and activities across your business, everywhere K2 is used. • Flexibility to change your business software as quickly as your business needs. Use K2 to build and run business applications including forms, workflow, data and reports. Across enterprises and within departments, K2 customers are rapidly transforming their companies with applications that connect people to information and work, anywhere and at any time. With K2’s visual tools, creating, launching and using the first K2 application is a snap. Reusable components ensure the next application delivers faster than ever before, and when the business needs change, it’s easy to update your K2 apps to fit. • Faster forms. More control. K2 provides a faster, easier way to create forms for business applications. With

our drag-and-drop tools, code isn’t necessary, and a powerful rules framework allows you to stay in control. • Deliver outcomes. Intuitively design workflows that connect people to information and work — from basic task routing to complex enterprise-wide solutions. • One truth. Multiple sources. Use visual tools, not code, to build reusable objects that use line-of-business and web-based data, regardless of where it lives. • Visibility matters. Get real-time insight into process status and track the progress and performance of your applications. Easily create reports that combine business and workflow data. Business applications with SharePoint Use K2 to build powerful business applications that span people, processes, enterprise systems, customers and cloud. With K2 you can leverage your existing investment in SharePoint to surface K2 applications, foster collaboration and manage documents. And you don’t have to stop there — you can surface those apps on any device, anywhere, with or without SharePoint

www.k2.com ©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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Underwritten in part by:

Our offerings include award-winning scanners, capture and information management software, an expanding range of professional services and industry-leading service and support. From small offices to global operations, Kodak Alaris delivers systems and solutions that automate business processes, enhance customer interactions and enable better business decisions.

Watch

Kodak Alaris Document Imaging Solutions enable customers to capture and consolidate data from digital and paper sources, automatically understand and extract valuable insight from the contents, and deliver the right information to the right people at the right time.

Industry

Kodak Alaris

Kodak Alaris’ software offerings address the explosive growth of information that an organization collects during its normal operation, turning virtually any communication into a powerful, actionable stream of information and knowledge.

SharePoint 2013

Kodak Alaris also enables a wide variety of businesses and government agencies to address the growing demands of unstructured information, automate business transactions and enhance customer communication workflows, allows the reduction of transaction costs while improving processes and customer loyalty.

Clouding the issues

Our software platforms allow businesses to quickly and efficiently convert documents into critical data for business transactions. Whether you’re looking for an information capture solution in a production environment or a one-click solution for knowledge workers, Kodak Alaris offers solutions that integrate with ECM and SharePoint systems and business applications.

www.kodak.com/go/docimaging

Repstor Ltd

Repstor was created to inspire ECM (Enterprise Content Management) adoption. We enable our customers to deploy ECM systems successfully. We create products that users will adopt by making them intuitive and familiar and are dedicated to developing products that enable collaboration and compliance for enterprises using the Microsoft® platform and products.   

The Repstor flagship products, affinityTM and assistTM provide uninterrupted access to content from SharePoint®, File Shares and other content systems through the familiar, intuitive interface of Microsoft Outlook®. By making access to the content system easy and intuitive for users, we help ensure ECM projects are successful by increasing user adoption. Repstor affinityTM – successful ECM adoption through Outlook affinity encourages user adoption of content systems by providing a natural, familiar and intuitive way of working. Repositories like Microsoft SharePoint and File Shares can be accessed by users seamlessly from within Outlook for viewing, adding and editing content whether connected to a network or not. affinity

automatically synchronizes any changes back to the content repository meaning users no longer have to wait for slow downloads and uploads to SharePoint and other content stores. Repstor assistTM – facilitated FILING for enterprises assistTM provides the user with full offline filing capability that keeps the filed content fully available while on or offline. It also provides assisted filing to users by taking best practice filing and using this to suggest the most suitable location for new content. Our products are ideal for mobile, remote and semidisconnected users especially in industries like Professional Services, Legal, Oil and Gas, Public Sector and in other regulated industries. They significantly reduce change management costs when rolling out ECM systems, improve ROI for existing systems, as well as fully supporting Microsoft Office365. For more information please visit www.repstor.com or register for a free trial at http://www.repstor.com/ try-repstor-free-for-60-days/.

www.repstor.com ©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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Underwritten in part by:

Products include the TITUS Security Suite for Microsoft SharePoint, and TITUS Classification, the leading message, document and file classification and labeling solutions that involves end users in identifying sensitive information.

Industry

TITUS solutions enable organizations to classify, protect and confidently share their information. With over 2 million users worldwide, our solutions enable enterprises, military and government organizations to classify information and meet regulatory compliance by securing unstructured information.

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TITUS

TITUS solutions are deployed within over 500 organizations around the world, including the Office of the Prime Minister of Turkey, B.F. Saul, The Moray Council, Dow Corning, United States Air Force, NATO, Canadian Department of National Defence, Australian Department of Defence, and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

SharePoint 2013

Clouding the issues

www.titus.com

Š2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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Course Benefits and Objectives 70% of organizations currently use SharePoint – but nearly 50% of them have reservations about its ability to meet their compliance requirements. With the introduction of SharePoint 2013 and Office 365, Microsoft has made significant functionality changes. To optimize their investment in the platform, organizations must now determine the impact that these changes will have on their compliance and eDiscovery strategy.

The Managing Records & eDiscovery with SharePoint 2013 course is comprised of 10 modules that may be purchased individually or as a complete package leading to the AIIM Managing Records & eDiscovery with SharePoint 2013 Practitioner designation that is earned upon successful passing of the exam. Once purchased, the course module(s), supporting materials, and exam are accessible online and on demand from AIIM’s training portal for up to 6 months. Upon occasion, this course is also offered in a live, instructor-led virtual classroom format.

Our enrollment page at www.aiim.org/ training will indicate when/if such a class has been scheduled.

n Better manage records to ensure legal and regulatory compliance

SharePoint 2013

Your Learning Options

n Design a pragmatic framework for managing information assets

Clouding the issues

AIIM’s Managing Records & eDiscovery with SharePoint 2013 is founded on these considerations and best practices to provide you with a systematic approach for designing an effective SharePoint 2013 environment for managing records and eDiscovery. The course reflects the changes inherent in SharePoint 2013, and is applicable across all industries. (SharePoint is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation).

IT, records managers, compliance officers, site owners, business unit managers, and other information management professionals who use SharePoint 2013. While the focus is on managing records and eDiscovery activities, the techniques imparted can be used to manage any information in the SharePoint environment. You’ll acquire the necessary skills to:

Watch

Manage records, ensure compliance, and prepare for civil litigation requests.

This course is ideal for... Industry

Managing Records & eDiscovery with SharePoint 2013

n Improve eDiscovery preparedness while reducing legal costs n Leverage existing investments in the SharePoint platform

AIIM (www.aiim.org) has been an advocate and supporter of information professionals for 70 years. The association mission is to ensure that information professionals understand the current and future challenges of managing information assets in an era of social, mobile, cloud and big data. Founded in 1943, AIIM builds on a strong heritage of research and member service. Today, AIIM is a global, non-profit organization that provides independent research, education and certification programs to information professionals. AIIM represents the entire information management community, with programs and content for practitioners, technology suppliers, integrators and consultants. © 2013 AIIM 1100 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1100 Silver Spring, MD 20910 +1 301.587.8202 www.aiim.org

AIIM Europe The IT Centre, Lowesmoor Wharf Worcester, WR1 2RR, UK +44 (0)1905 727600 www.aiim.eu

©2013 AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

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