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Vol. 9 No. 52

September 21, 2010

SUBMITTED BY AEROSPACE INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION PHOTOS COURTESY OF AEROSPACE INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION

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egistration for the 2011 edition of the world’s largest rocket competition is open now through November 30. The Team America Rocketry Challenge (TARC) will accept up to 750 student teams in grades 7-12 from any U.S. school, home school or nonprofit youth organization. The annual rocket contest, sponsored by the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA), challenges teams of three to 10 students to design and build a rocket that will climb to 750 feet with a raw egg payload and stay aloft for 40 to 45 seconds. The egg must then return to earth unbroken. The 2011 contest rules continued on page 21

Rodney Clark, SAVE Executive Director

Coastal Cleanup Day

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI

BY FINA MORA In 1985, California expanded an idea that began in Oregon the year before. The California Coastal Commission started the first California Coastal Cleanup Day, inviting volunteers to visit their local beach and help clean up the debris that had accumulated. 2,500 people showed up for that first cleanup, launching what has become an extensive statewide movement for cleaner beaches. Now in its 26th year, California Coastal Cleanup Day has become the largest and one of the most successful volunteer events in the state and the nation. According to the California Coastal Commission, “80,622 volunteers took part in the 25th Annual California Coastal Cleanup Day in 2009, representing an all-time high in volunteer participation and marking a 60 percent increase in volunteers over the past three years. Those participants removed close to 1.4 million continued on page 5

INDEX Auto Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TechKnow Talk. . . . . . . . . . . . 7

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etting up for breakfast just might be one of the best things you do this year. Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments (SAVE) is hosting their 8th Annual Breakfast Eye Opener on Friday, September 24 to raise awareness about the far reaching effects of domestic abuse. “Something like domestic violence, it’s often closer than you know,” says SAVE Development Officer Debra Watanuki. It could be happening to a friend, colleague, cousin, or parent of your child’s friend. People generally operate on the thought that bad things happen to other people, that domestic violence is a private matter and personal concern, none of your business. But the Eye Opener focuses on the “outside” individual, you, because directly or indirectly, domestic violence impacts and affects us all. For example, a child living with domestic abuse carries that with them to school, where it affects their performance, friendships, teachers, and the school. An abused employee might be arriving late, not attending to work properly, which in turn affects other employees and Continued on page 5

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 15

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 28

History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Life Cornerstones . . . . . . . . . 31

Library News. . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 19

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 25

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

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blood donation is the gift of life from one human being to another. On Monday, September 13, Washington Hospital invited the community to give blood to help support Fremont Police Officer Todd Young, who was wounded in August while in the line of duty. Blood donors have turned out in droves across the Bay Area to donate in Officer Young’s honor and the public support for the blood drive at Washington Hospital was equally enthusiastic according to Sara O’Brien, a Red Cross spokeswoman. “Since the blood drive at Washington Hospital was put together on short notice, we set a goal to collect 36 units of blood,” she said. “But we ended up collecting 46 units of blood, reaching 130 percent of the goal.” Each unit of blood can be separated into components – red blood cells, platelets and plasma – to possibly help three different people. The 46 units could help save the lives of nearly 150 people. “I heard about Officer Young’s story and it really motivated me to help in some small way,” said Bev Heijn, an executive assistant in Washington Hospital’s Engineering Department. “Knowing that there’s a need for blood year round, I’m definitely going to become a more regular blood donor in the future.” Donating blood is a simple process that saves more than four million Ameri-

Hospital and elsewhere in the Bay Area. Families will not lose a loved one due to a blood shortage.”

Donate locally The American Red Cross Newark/Fremont blood donation center in the Cedar Village Shopping Plaza is located at 39227 Cedar Blvd, Newark, CA 94560 (next to Newark High School). The blood center hours are:

Bev Heijn (above) was one of several people who gave blood at Washington Hospital last week to help support Fremont Police Officer Todd Young.The blood drive collected 46 units of blood which could help save the lives of nearly 150 people. If you would like to give blood, call (800) RED-CROSS or visit www.redcrossblood.org

can lives each year. The process of donating blood from registration to blood drawing takes about an hour. It’s quick, safe and painless. There is no substitute for blood to aid in recovery and healing of a sick or injured person. Blood is always needed for treatment of accident victims, cancer patients, hemophiliacs and surgery patients. According to the American Red Cross, donated blood is used for someone every three seconds. One out of 10 hospital patients needs a transfusion. To be a blood donor, you must be healthy, at least 17 years old, (16 with

written parental permission), weigh at least 110 pounds, and not have donated blood in the last 56 days. Being healthy means that you feel well and can perform normal activities. Those with a chronic condition such as diabetes or high blood pressure are considered “healthy” if they are being treated and the condition is under control. “The Red Cross thanks Washington Hospital for its quick action in setting up a blood drive to support Officer Young,” said O’Brien. “The blood collected will have a tremendous impact on the lives of patients at Washington

Tuesday: 12 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday: 11 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Thursday: 11:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday: 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Due to the overwhelming show of support and turnout to the blood drive, some people were unfortunately turned away. Washington Hospital appreciates everyone who came to give blood and recommends going to the Newark/Fremont blood donation center on the days and hours listed above. Washington Hospital’s employees’ association (WHEA) often coordinates with the American Red Cross to hold blood drives at the hospital. For more information about donating blood, visit your local American Red Cross, or call 1-800-RED CROSS or visit www.redcrossblood.org.

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

9/21/10

9/22/10

9/23/10

9/24/10

9/25/10

9/26/10

9/27/10

Management of Type 1and Type 2 Diabetes

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Do You Suffer from Stomach Problems?

Do You Suffer from Stomach Problems?

Maintaining Heart Health with Diabetes

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

Washington Women's Center: Arthritis Exercise Program

Washington Women's Center: Cancer Genetic Counseling Think Pink: MRI Screening for High Risk Patients Voices InHealth: Washington's Community Cancer Program

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

(Late Start) Osteoporosis

World Kidney Day

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting September 8, 2010

Men's Health Fair: Prostate Problem

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

How to Prevent a Heart Women's Health Conference: Attack & Healthy Nutrition Do You Suffer From Allergy or Asthma Conditions? for Your Heart Think Pink: Updates: Washington Women's Center Breast Health Program

Think Pink: Breast Health Awareness

Your Concerns InHealth Sun Protection Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting September 8, 2010

Caring for an Older Adult: Everything You Need to Know about Caregiving

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting September 8, 2010

Connecting the Dots Diabetes and Gum Disease

Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders Disaster Preparedness

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

Washington Women's Center: Cholesterol and Women

Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Women's Health Conference: Complimentary Therapy: Art,Yoga and Meditation

Inside Washington Hospital: Pediatric Care

New Surgical Techniques for Minimally Invasive Knee Replacement

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

(Late Start) Living with Heart Failure & Heart Irregularities Are You at Risk for Diabetes? - Learn the Signs

InHealth Special Report: InHealth Special Report: The Patient Protection and The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Affordable Care Act Part 2 InHealth Special Report: The Patient Protection and Part 1(New) (New) Affordable Care Act Part 3 (New) Voices InHealth: Nursing Excellence - Journey to Magnet Status

Inside Washington Hospital: Stroke Response Team

Skin Care and Prevention of Skin Cancer

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

InHealth Special Report: InHealth Special Report: The Patient Protection The Patient Protection and and Affordable Care Act Affordable Care Act Part 2 Part 1 (New) (New)

Men's Health Fair: Diabetes Risk In Men

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Planning Your California Advance Health Directive: Now is the Time Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting September 8, 2010

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

Peripheral Vascular Disease: Leg Weakness, Symptoms and Treatment Washington Township & Percutaneous (Under Health Care District the Skin) Treatment Board Meeting September 8, 2010

Men's Health Fair: Lung Cancer, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Influenza

Eating Out with Diabetes

Living Arrangements for Seniors: What Are Your Options?

Diabetes Health Fair 2009: Diabetes Health Fair 2009: Making the Most of Your Stop Diabetes Carbs

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

How Diabetes Affects People of Indian/South Asian Descent

Raising Awareness About Stroke

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

InHealth Special Report: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Part 3 (New)

Cough or Shortness of Breath, What to Do About It

Effects of Smoking: Stop Smoking Workshop

Latest Principles for Wound Care

Inside Washington Hospital: Wound Care Clinic

Most Common Cancers and How They are Treated

Alzheimer's Disease Research Update Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting September 8, 2010

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting September 8, 2010 Sleep Disturbances & Sleep Apnea

Minimally Invasive Hip Replacement

Have You Recently Lost Health Care Coverage?

(Late Start) Prostate Enlargements and Cancer

Inside Washington Hospital: The Green Team

Obstructive Sleep Apnea & Surgical Interventions for Sleep Apnea

Prepare for Your Doctor's Visit (Late Start) Learn About Infection in the Body

InHealth Special Report: Voices InHealth: The Patient Protection and Demystifying the Radiation Affordable Care Act Part 1 Oncology Center Arthritis: Do I Have One (New) of 100 Types? Surgical Treatment for Diabetes

Voices InHealth: Nursing Excellence - Journey to Magnet Status

Men's Health Fair: Sleep Disorders and How it Effects Your Overall Health

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

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Learn About Adult Immunizations at Washington Hospital Seminar

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ave you had your shots? Vaccinations aren’t just for kids. Healthy adults can protect themselves from the flu, shingles, whooping cough, and a number of other diseases thanks to a wide variety of vaccines available today. “Vaccines are relatively safe and effective in preventing disease,” said Dr. Barbara Kostick, MD, medical director of Washington Hospital Community Services. “Vaccines have changed medicine. For example, we don’t see as many ear infections or cases of meningitis.” She will talk about vaccines at an upcoming seminar titled, “Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults,” from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 29, at the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditoriums at Washington West, 2500 Mowry Avenue, in Fremont. To register online, please visit www.whhs.com or call (800) 963-7070. Kostick will provide an overview of some of the vaccinations available to healthy adults, including who should get them and how they work. She said a big concern for older adults is preventing shingles. “About 20 percent of people will get shingles at some point during their lifetime,” she said. “The vaccine is recommended for adults who are ages 60 to 80.” Shingles causes a rash that can become quite painful. It occurs when the virus that causes chickenpox becomes active again. Most people get chickenpox as children and when the sickness ends, the virus remains dormant in the body’s nerve roots. In some people, it stays dormant forever. But for others, it can become active again, especially if the immune system becomes weakened as a result of stress, other illnesses, and the aging process. Influenza (flu) is another disease that can be problematic as we age, according to Kostick. While the flu vaccine is recommended for all adults, it is particularly important for adults over age 65. “The elderly are at greater risk from dying from the flu,” she said. “A flu shot is a great way to prevent serious illness from the

Do you remember the last time you were vaccinated for shingles or hepatitis? At an upcoming Health and Wellness seminar at Washington Hospital, a primary care physician will provide an overview of some of the vaccinations available to healthy adults, including who should get them and how they work. The free seminar will take place on Wednesday, September 29 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Conrad E. Anderson M.D. Auditorium, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont.Visit www.whhs.com to register.

influenza virus. Often flu and pneumonia go together , so we also recommend a pneumonia vaccination for those over 65.” This year’s flu vaccine protects against three influenza strains, she added. One is

Every six minutes in this country, another woman is diagnosed with gynecologic cancer, according to the Gynecologic Cancer Foundation. Gynecologic cancer refers to cancers of the reproductive organs, including the cervix, ovaries, uterus, fallopian tubes, vagina and vulva. “The most common of these is ovarian, uterine and cervical cancer,” said Dr. Elizabeth Kurkjian, a Washington Hospital obstetrician and gynecologist who is helping to raise awareness about these cancers during Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month. “It’s important to get regular gynecologic exams and screenings such as Pap tests, and pay attention to any changes in your menstrual cycle, irregular bleeding and other possible symptoms to catch precancerous or early stages of cancer when it is the most treatable.” Cervical cancer was once the leading cause of death for women in the United States, but today it is the only gynecologic cancer that can be prevented through regular screenings. Over the last 50 years, incidence and death rates have plummeted due to a common screening known as the Pap test. The most common gynecologic cancer today is uterine or endometrial cancer. Most cases of uterine cancer occur in women either during or after menopause. The vast majority of uterine cancers start in the uterus lining known as the endometrium. Symptoms include excess bleeding during perimenopause or continued bleeding after menopause as well as pain in the pelvic area or lower abdomen. The biggest risk factor for developing uterine cancer is too much exposure to the hormone estrogen. Current regimens of hormone therapy won’t increase your risk if taken correctly. Therefore, it is important to discuss any changes you make in your regimen with your doctor. “I always tell my patients who are over 40, if you have any irregular bleeding or post menopausal bleeding, come and see me,” Kurkjian said.

the H1N1 strain and two others that are expected to circulate this flu season. Younger Adults Also Need Protection Kostick will talk about vaccines that are recommended for younger adults as well.

For example, the HPV vaccine is recommended for women up to age 26. It protects against the human papillomavirus, which can cause cervical cancer and other less common genital cancers. “The HPV vaccine can be controversial because we recommend vaccinating girls at age 11 or 12, before they become sexually active,” Kostick said. “Some people think giving the vaccine is a green light for sexual activity, but it’s really a way to save lives.” The vaccine that protects against meningitis is also recommended for teens and young adults, particularly if they are in a communal living situation like a college dormitory, she said. Meningitis is an inflammation of the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord. It typically starts with a high fever, headache and stiff neck. “The Tdap vaccine is also important, especially right now,” Kostick said. “California has experienced a whooping cough epidemic this summer, and Tdap covers tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis or whooping cough.” She said the vaccine is especially important for new parents and others who live with or care for an infant because infants are most at risk for serious illness and even death. Whooping cough is a highly contagious disease that starts off like an ordinary cold. It can cause serious coughing fits that make it hard to breathe. Kostick will also talk about the hepatitis A and B vaccines. She recommends them for adults who are planning to travel to developing countries, where hepatitis is more prevalent. Hepatitis is a general term that means inflammation of the liver. While both hepatitis A and B are caused by a virus, they differ in how they are transmitted. Hepatitis A is spread predominantly through fecal matter. The virus can be ingested if food or water becomes contaminated with it. Hepatitis B is mostly spread through the transfer of infected blood or body fluids. “There are so many vaccines available today that can help you avoid serious illness,” Kostick said. “It’s important to know which ones are appropriate for you.”

Ovarian Cancer Called ‘Silent Killer’ The most deadly form of gynecologic cancer is ovarian cancer. It attacks the ovaries, which produce hormones and store the eggs. “Ovarian cancer is very hard to detect early,” Kurkjian said. “The ovaries are deep in the pelvis and it’s not clear if there is a precancerous state.” Like all cancers, cure rates are highest when the cancer is detected early. Ovarian cancer has historically been called the “silent killer” due to the common belief that there are no warning signs, meaning the cancer is most often discovered in the end stages, when there is little chance for a cure. However, recent studies have shown that there are common symptoms associated with ovarian cancer. All women over age 18 should have a yearly Pap test (also known as a Pap Smear) and pelvic exam to “Even though the symptoms establish a pattern of gynecologic health. Any unexpected bleeding or spotting should be brought to can be vague, there is now more the attention of a gynecologist. To find a gynecologist near you, visit www.whhs.com/physician or call Washington Hospital’s Health Connection line at (800) 963-7070 for a physician referral. focus on the symptoms because and/or number of these symptoms are key factors in the for many women, there are common warning signs,” diagnosis of ovarian cancer today. Kurkjian said. “If you feel these symptoms on a regular basis, you Bloating, pelvic or abdominal pain, difficulty eating or should see your physician,” Kurkjian said. “The first profeeling full quickly, and urinary symptoms, including urcedure I would do is a pelvic ultrasound. It is an excellent gency or frequency, are all symptoms of ovarian cancer. way to see the ovaries and uterus and has really become Women who have had ovarian cancer report that the first line in evaluation. If there is a tumor, we can symptoms were persistent and represented a big change often see it in the ultrasound.” from what was normal for their bodies. The frequency

Find a Local Gynecologist Online To find a gynecologist close to you, visit www.whhs.com/physician or call Washington Hospital’s Health Connection line (800) 963-7070 for a physician referral. To learn more about gynecologic cancer online, visit www.wcn.org or www.thegcf.org.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

Auto Review

Altima by Nissan BY DICK RYAN FREELANCE AUTOMOTIVE JOURNALIST

TIME TO CLEAR THE AIR!

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irst introduced in the 1970s (on the Rambler), cabin air filters have since become a fixture in the modern automobile. In the beginning, it was recommended that they be replaced every 2 years/30,000 miles. However, it is now widely recognized that cabin air filters should be replaced every year, or even sooner. Much of a filter’s useful life expectancy depends on where the vehicle is driven; dusty conditions, for example, necessitate earlier replacement. Replacing these filters can range in degree of difficulty from “easy” to “a real pain.” Some are readily accessible at the fresh-air intake under the hood, while others are placed between the blower motor and evaporator core. The latter positioning requires the services of an auto technician.

Of course, even if your filter is in an easy-to-reach location, you probably want to make sure that an expert does the installation. A poorly installed filter can have some smelly consequences! At BAY STAR AUTO CARE, our ASE-certified technicians will be happy to change your filter and provide the other preventative services that will extend the life of your car. Yearly maintenance will save you time and hassle (not to mention a stinky cabin) down the road. Call our office for an appointment today. HINT: There are two basic types of cabin air filters: the particle-trapping type, some with an electrostatically charged layer that attracts and holds smaller particles, and those with a charcoal layer that absorbs odors.

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he Altima was originally launched 17 years ago; 3.1 million Altimas have been produced since then. Nissan has introduced a fourth-generation design for 2010. Altimas are available in three basic models, a fourdoor sedan, similar to previous models, a coupe, and a hybrid. You have a choice of two power plants for your new Al-

time. The back seats were large and can accommodate full-sized adults with no problems. The combination of 270 HP and CVT was new to me. I was

engine and starts at a base price of $19,900; 2.5 S CVT starts at $21,840; base price of the V-6 3.5 SR CVT is $24,520. Our car came with the $2,370 Sport package that added Xenon headlights, fog lights, moonroof and a rear spoiler. It also included the premium package with leather seats, Bose sound system and other items that added $2,380 to the sticker price. The Altima is a cost effective choice in the mid-size category. If you want to stay on the green side of automobile technology, the Altima also comes in the Hybrid version. I can’t wait until I try that one.

wondering how it would perform. Well, that combination is great. As I pressed the throttle, the Altima moved smoothly forward. There was no sense of transmission shifting, just smooth acceleration. This system exhibited very little torque steer. The ride was smooth and handling was fine for an inexpensive car; controls were easy to understand and use. Altima Sedan is available in three trim levels: 2.5 CVT is the base model with the four-cylinder

Dick Ryan has been an automotive journalist for 15 years. He and his wife Connie have been racing sports cars for more than 35 years. His current mount is a vintage Formula Vee, a small, open-wheel car that looks like a one-quarter scale Indianapolis racecar. Dick is a member of the Western Automotive Journalists and the Motor Sports Press Association. For more information contact Dick at RRYAN@FRK.COM.

Gary Singh is the owner of Bay Star Auto Care at 1275 Atlantic St. near Western Ave., here in Union City. Phone: 489-3331

tima. The first is a 2.5-liter, double overhead cam, 16- valve, inline four cylinder unit rated at 175 HP and 180 pound feet of torque. This one delivered 23 mpg in city tests and 32 mpg on the highway. The other choice is the 3.5liter, V-6 unit used in many Nissan vehicles. This 24-valve engine is rated at 270 HP and 258 pound feet of torque. Its EPA testing delivered 20/27 mpg. Nissan’s advanced Xtronic CVT is standard on all Altima models. CVT stands for “Continuously Variable Transmission” that acts like an automatic without feeling the shift points. It is another improvement in technology and more efficient than a standard automatic transmission. The V-6 cars get a “Sport” transmission controller that allows the driver to “shift” the CVT as if it were a manual transmission. We had a four-door sedan with the premium 3.5-liter engine and sport package. It was quite nice with good outward vision and easy entry and exit. The front seats were not as comfortable as they could have been and provided very little support. It had a huge trunk, bigger than any trunk we have seen in a long

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

continued from page 1

business productivity. “It ripples out into the community,” says Watanuki. “It isn’t somebody else’s problem or somebody else’s hurt. It affects everyone.” Education is key. Watanuki says that people must learn what domestic violence is, and what the signs are. It does not always mean physical injuries, but comes in different forms, such as psychological and emotional. “It is much broader than you think,”

she says. “You don’t know you’re in it.” It is especially important for children to learn what a healthy relationship is; they need to know what is normal. And education leads to prevention. “The purpose of the breakfast is to raise awareness and educate the people who attend, and empower those working with us,” says Watanuki. Eye Opener attendees will learn how the impact of abuse extends beyond the victim, as well as hear from women guest speakers sharing their stories of personal triumph. The event also is an important fundraiser. Last

continued from page 1

Coastal Cleanup Day pounds of debris from hundreds of cleanup locations, creating an enormous one-day impact.” Coastal Cleanup Day, however, is more than gathering volunteers for cleaner beaches, but to also preserve marine wildlife. Common items that may seem harmless can harm and even be fatal to marine animals. Fishing line or nets, strapping bands, and six-pack rings can hamper mobility. Once entangled, animals have trouble eating, breathing or swimming, with fatal results. Animals may mistake these items for food, leading to starvation. California Coastal Cleanup Day is a major part of an International Coastal Cleanup, the world’s largest volunteer event dedicated to the marine environment; over 90 countries partici-

pate. Just like California is part of a broader coastal Cleanup, several smaller Cleanups take place locally throughout the state. Although preregistration is required for many local Cleanups, additional volunteer openings may be available. Local city and recreational websites are good references for cleanup day activities. Although Coastal Cleanup Day takes place once a year, doesn’t mean the other 364 days can be ignored. Do your part and remember to keep our coast clean.

In addition, Coastal Cleanup Day also serves as the kickoff to Coast Weeks, a three-week celebration of the coastal and water resources Saturday, September 25- Sunday, October 17. During those three weeks, Californians come together to keep our coasts free of debris and preserve marine wildlife. Various events take place across the state and are posted at www.coastal.ca.gov/publiced/coastweeks/coastweeks.html. International Coastal Cleanup Day Saturday, September 25 www.coastal.ca.gov Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge Dumbarton Fishing Pier, Fremont 8:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. 510/792-0222 ext. 362 http://www.fws.gov/desfbay/Coast_Cleanup. htm Reservations are NOT required 9 a.m. - Noon Meek Estate Park 240 Hampton Road, Hayward 1-800-COAST-4U East Bay Regional Park District 8:30 a.m.- Noon www.ebparks.org 1-888-327-2757

year’s breakfast brought out around 230 people and raised between $35,000 to $38,000. This year SAVE has high aspirations and hopes to double that amount, reaching their goal of $75,000. All proceeds go directly to SAVE, benefiting their many services, which include an emergency shelter, teen dating violence prevention program, individual counseling, employment and housing assistance, support groups, children’s program, and outreach and community education. They also have a 24hour crisis hotline that can be reached at (510) 794-6055. SAVE is a non-profit, commu-

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nity-based organization that has helped over 200,000 victims of domestic violence since their founding in 1976. Their mission is “to promote alternatives to domestic violence through support services, advocacy, and education; to assist domestic violence victims and their families to end the cycle of violence.” Says Watanuki, “We need people to know… you’re not in a bubble, you’re not protected from this.” Attending the Breakfast Eye Opener will move, educate, and enlighten attendees as individuals and as part of a community. It might be the best way you’ve ever started your day.

Tickets cost $75 for an individual seat, or $750 for a reserved table of 10. Tickets can be purchased at www.save-dv.org, or call the SAVE Community Office at (510) 5742250 for more information. SAVE 8th Annual Breakfast Eye Opener Open Your Eyes to: YOU Friday, September 24 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. Fremont Marriott Hotel 46100 Landing Parkway, Fremont (510) 574-2250 www.save-dv.org Tickets: $75 individual, $750 table of 10

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Breast Cancer Awareness The POWER of Pink Tuesday October 12th 3:30 - 4:30 pm

For more information : Carlton Plaza of Fremont 3800 Walnut Avenue Fremont, CA. 94538 510.505.0555

Bring your loved ones to our educational seminar and help support the cause. All proceeds will be donated to Washington Hospital in support of on-going research for a cure of this disease.

September 21, 2010

September 21, 2010

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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TechKnow Talk

Knights in shining armor: then and now

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efore storming the building, the leader of the SWAT team kissed the pendant his wife had given him for luck and tucked it back under his shirt. First through the door, he saw the gun for only an instant before he felt the bullet punch him hard in the chest. He heard more gunfire as he fell back, the room spinning around him. Thanks to his ballistic vest, he was up and talking with fellow officers five minutes later. Though he would feel some soreness from the impact for several days, he had survived a direct hit from a handgun fired at close range. Before examining modern body armor, let’s consider its history and evolution. The origin of armor is prehistoric, likely dating to the time when humans began using weapons against one another in an organized fashion. The earliest armor was probably animal skins, particularly from animals with especially tough hides. There is evidence that rhinoceros skin was used as armor thousands of years ago. Animal hides were succeeded by coverings made from other natural materials, such as bone and wood. Such armor would have been at least partially effective in stopping primitive stone hand weapons and arrowheads. But the evolution of armor has been driven throughout history by increasingly lethal weaponry. When the Bronze Age began about 5000 years ago, bronze weapons demanded bronze armor. Similarly, when iron weapons appeared a couple thousand years later, so did crude iron armor. Heavy plates of iron to cover the front (breast plate) and back (back plate) of the torso were the most common. The next major leap in the evolution of armor was the development of mail (sometimes called chainmail). Mail armor was constructed of tiny rings of iron interlocked together by welding or riveting to form a continuous latticework. Both round and flat rings were used to produce mail, the former being more effective against swords, the latter preferable against arrowheads. More complete body suits were possible with mail. However, such a suit might require tens of thousands of iron rings, making it very labor intensive and expensive to produce. Nonetheless, by 1000 A.D. mail was the armor of choice for those who could afford it. Over time, small iron plates were devised to supplement mail and protect vulnerable areas such as the knee and groin. By the fifteenth century this had evolved into the full plate body armor that is likely to leap to mind when one thinks of medieval knights. Early plate armor was iron, but in response to the introduction of firearms onto the battlefield in the sixteenth century, manufacturers began to harden the iron by the addition of alloying elements and employing heat treatments to create a carburized layer, essentially an early form of steel. Steel plate was relatively easy to form into various shapes, resulting in the medieval knight covered head to toe in armor. Mail continued to be used alone but also in conjunction with plate armor to protect joints such as knees and elbows where steel plates were joined. While armor was bulky and cumbersome, it was perhaps not as heavy as myth would have it. A full suit of plate armor weighed 50–70 pounds, no more than the weight carried by a well-provisioned modern soldier. Plate armor, though not as labor intensive to produce as mail, was also beyond the means of most. Only the nobility, wealthy landowners, and professional soldiers could have afforded such an investment. The continued development of firearms eventually spelled the end of plate armor. Early firearms were not capable of penetrating steel plate, and knights retained their immunity from attack for some time. But by the 1700s, muskets of sufficient power to penetrate plate armor rendered it obsolete for battle. Nobility continued to employ ornate armor for ceremonial purposes. However, the story of body armor does not end there. Technology has provided effective armor for police and security person-

LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style.

nel as well as for the military. Modern body armor may be divided into two broad categories: soft and hard. Soft armor is relatively lightweight and comfortable. It is typically constructed of Kevlar, very strong synthetic fibers wound tightly like a rope. Kevlar fibers are then woven together into a dense net or mesh. The resultant material is glued between plastic sheets and sewn onto a cloth vest. The vest must protect the wearer against both the penetration of a bullet and the impact or “punch” it delivers. It does this by “catching” the bullet in the Kevlar net, stopping it and causing it to deform or spread out on impact rather than penetrate. Simultaneously, the impact pulls on the mesh structure, distributing the force over the entire torso. There is no such thing as a bullet-proof vest; the ultimate effectiveness of body armor depends on its construction and the caliber and velocity of the bullet. Kevlar vests are less effective against knife attacks than bullets, as they are not designed to arrest the penetration of a sharp point. Kevlar vests are properly called “ballistic vests” to emphasize this distinction. But soft armor such as Kevlar does strike a perfect balance between protection and mobility for police. It is sufficiently light and nonconstraining to allow an officer to chase a suspect or grapple hand-to-hand, while providing pretty good defense against bullets. Warfare, however, often requires more robust protection. Soft armor cannot reliably stop shrapnel from fragmentation grenades, artillery shells, and similar threats faced by modern soldiers. These projectiles are small, sharp, and may travel at high velocity. They are also hard metal, such as steel, and will not deform on impact like a soft lead bullet. Thus military personnel often resort to hard body armor, constructed of overlapping steel, plastic, or ceramic plates encased in a cloth vest. In fact, it is reminiscent of medieval plate armor, but updated with spaceage materials. The best hard armor utilizes disks of ceramic materials such as aluminum oxide or silicon carbide, overlapped like the scales of a fish. Hard armor works on the same principle as that worn by the knights of old; it makes no effort to absorb or deform the projectile. Instead, it is hard enough to simply deflect it. There are also soft armor vests on the market built with large pockets into which steel or ceramic plates can be slid to quickly upgrade to hard armor. While hard body armor offers outstanding protection, it is heavy, cumbersome, and hot. The added discomfort and loss of mobility is tolerable only for those at very high risk of attack. In addition to soldiers in a war zone, SWAT teams, elite bodyguards, and similar operatives may utilize hard armor as the occasion warrants.

The TechKnow Guy lives in Fremont and has worked in aerospace and high tech in the Bay Area for more than 30 years. Assisted by his crack team of researchers (two black cats: Hercules and Jaws), he explores topics in the fields of technology and natural science. Send email to tricityvoice@aol.com Att TechKnow Guy

Expires 9/30/10

Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

BY MEENU GUPTA A 57-year-old Union City resident died after suffering multiple gunshot wounds last Tuesday. Police responded to a call of shots fired on 657 Whipple Road shortly after 4:30 p.m. and found the victim outside in the driveway of his home. The victim, a Hispanic male, has been identified as Humberto Diaz. According to Corporal Victor Derting, Union City PD, the suspect used a small caliber handgun and shot the victim twice on his upper torso. After

Officer Todd Young recovering SUBMITTED BY DETECTIVE BILL VETERAN Todd Young, a Fremont police officer shot while attempting to serve an arrest warrant on a gang member, continues to recover; he is slowly emerging from a chemically-induced coma. Young and his partner Officer Eric Tang were fired on by the suspect last month. Officer Young was hit twice in the pelvic region. Currently Officer Todd Young remains in Intensive Care at Highland Hospital Trauma Center with no further operations scheduled. Doctors are optimistic that he will fully recover.

rendering emergency first aid, the victim was transported to Eden Hospital in Castro Valley where he succumbed to his injuries. Diaz’ Stepson, Luis Rick Sanchez was arrested at the scene. The 55-year-old who lived at the same address, was booked into jail on suspicion of murder. According to Lt. Kelly Musgrove, the fatal shooting was a result of a family disturbance. The suspect confessed to committing the crime while videotaped by an officer worn video camera. Anyone with information related to this case is encouraged to call (510) 675-5207 or write to tips@unioncity.org.

Suspect arrested in vehicle vandalism spree By Meenu Gupta Photo Courtesy of Milpitas PD A woman was arrested last week for a series of vehicle vandalism incidents stretching back to June of last year. The suspect, identified as Nancy Chi Ni, was observed walking in a local shopping center on Barber Lane, Milpitas and acting “suspicious” near a parked Mercedes Benz. According to Sgt. Daryl Sequeira, Milpitas PD a Milpitas Officer noted Ni scratching the sides of the ve-

Blood drive location changed SUBMITTED BY JAN GIOVANNINI-HILL In response to a request from the Red Cross, the location of Fremont Police Department’s C.A.R.E. (Connect, Assist, Respond, Engage) unit’s third annual blood drive on Saturday, October 2 has been moved to the Saddle Rack. Due to the extreme need for more donors in the Bay Area, a location that could accommodate a large turnout was necessary. This Blood Drive is being dedicated to the recovery of Officer Todd Young, shot in the line of duty on Friday, August 27 while serving a search warrant in Oakland. Donate blood and give the gift of life. Donors with Type O blood are especially needed. All presenting donors will be entered in a drawing for locally donated raffle prizes. Those who are interested but unable to donate on this date, can go to any Alameda County Blood Bank event and ask that credit go to the Fremont Police Department. Identification is required. To schedule your appointment, please sign up online now at www.redcrossblood.org or www.helpsavealife.org; the Sponsor Code is POLICE. Donations of food and raffle items are still being sought, please call (510) 790-6756 for pick-up of any donations. Fremont Police Department C.A.R.E. Unit Blood Drive Saturday, October 2 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saddle Rack 42011 Boscell Road, Fremont (510) 790-6756 www.helpsavealife.org

Nancy Chi Ni was booked into the Santa Clara County jail for multiple counts of felony vandalism

hicle with a metal object in her hand. The 30-year-old San Jose resident was taken into custody for felony vandalism. Another parked Mercedes Benz vehicle had been vandalized in a similar manner. Ni was on bail for multiple counts of similar vehicle vandalism. She has been linked to cases in the cities of Pleasanton, Sunnyvale and Santa Clara. In other known cases involving Ni, BMW and Mercedes Benz vehicles have been vandalized. Ni was booked into the Santa Clara County jail for multiple counts of felony vandalism and committing a crime while released on bail. Anyone with any information regarding this case or other similar incidents is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400 or the law enforcement jurisdiction where the incident occurred. Information can be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500 or online at www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov.

September 21, 2010

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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New Haven District’s API scores climb SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE For the second time in three years, students at Hillview Crest Elementary School recorded eye-opening gains, according to standardized-test results released today for the New Haven Unified School District, while Eastin Elementary continued its climb toward the top of the list of the state’s highest-scoring schools. Emanuele Elementary and Alvarado Middle also made double-digit gains on the state’s Academic Performance Index (API), and the District as a whole continued its steady ascent. But in an example of the disconnect between the state’s API standards and the federal Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) standards – and “a pretty good demonstration of one of the problems with the No Child Left Behind Act,” in the words of Superintendent Kari McVeigh – New Haven has been labeled a Program Improvement district by the feds. New Haven is one of 45 districts across the state designated Program Improvement for the first time this year. A total of 341 California districts are now in Program Improvement, about onethird of the districts in the state. Eight of the other 18 districts in Alameda County have been in Program Improvement for at least two years, and another is pending. “Our improvement over the past few years has been extraordinary, that’s clear in the state results,” McVeigh said. “But the federal requirements simply are accelerating each year at an unrealistic rate. That’s why so many districts are being labeled Program Improvement. Unless something changes, it’s a mathematical certainty that every district is going to be in Program Improvement at some point in the next couple of years.” The annual API results, released today by the California Department of Education, are scores of between 200 and 1,000 assigned to all schools and districts in the state, based on the results of standardized tests taken each spring. A minimum score of 680 is required to meet federal accountability guidelines, and the state’s goal is 800. The District’s API score went up five points, to 777, well above the federal minimum, and now has risen 47 points over the past six years. AYP also continues to rise; the percentage of students scoring proficient and above increased to 57.8 percent (from 56.4 percent) in English/language arts, and to 56.4 percent (from 55.4 percent) in mathematics. “That’s the kind of steady progress that indicates our District-wide focus on literacy is the right strategy, that our teachers are doing the right work and that our classified employees and administrators are providing the right support,” McVeigh said. But scores for some sub-groups fell short of AYP cut points, McVeigh explained, “which is why the District has been labeled Program Improvement.” “The fact that our African-American and Hispanic students don’t score as high as our Asian and white students isn’t news to us, or that English learners and children

from socio-economically disadvantaged families or with disabilities don’t score as well,” she said. “That’s precisely why our Instructional Leadership Teams are working on issues of equity this year – both districtwide and at each of our schools. It’s why we’re working with Enid Lee (an internationally recognized expert on multi-cultural education) to identify our shortcomings and commit to making changes.” Improvement is already evident. Scores for the African-American and socio-economically disadvantaged sub-groups improved by 23 and 16 points, respectively, compared to the District’s overall improvement of 5 points. Among the individual schools, Hillview Crest, which two years ago recorded a remarkable 71-point increase in API, made another big jump, gaining 41 points, to 794. Ironically, Hillview Crest remains in “program improvement” under AYP criteria, even though it is very close to joining the elite “800 Club” of schools surpassing the state API goal. Eastin, meanwhile, gained 32 points, up to 911, and continues to rank among the state’s highest-scoring schools. Alvarado Middle improved 13 points, to 830, and Emanuele improved 10 points, to 781. Alvarado Elementary improved 9 points, to 835. The “800 Club” also includes Pioneer (849) and Kitayama (828). In another example of the disparity between state and federal standards, however, Alvarado Elementary also will go into Program Improvement. “I don’t believe that label is indicative at all of the work going on at that school,” McVeigh said, noting the reason Alvarado Elementary is in Program Improvement is that, for a second consecutive year, one subgroup missed the cutpoint in English/language arts. “What people might find interesting – and some folks have argued that this is another problem with NCLB – is that it wasn’t the same sub-group,” the Superintendent said. “Socio-economically disadvantaged students at Alvarado, who missed the cutpoint last year, made it this year, but our Hispanic students didn’t.” Alvarado Elementary and Hillview Crest are among 3,197 California schools now labeled as Program Improvement. “Given the stigma that comes with the Program Improvement label, I think it’s important to point out that the District as a whole is scoring quite well and that our schools as a whole are scoring quite well. We need to do some very specific work in some very specific areas, and we’re doing it. But our teachers are doing an extraordinary job and our students are making tremendous progress, and that should be celebrated.” API scores by site: Alvarado Elementary 835, Eastin Elementary 911, Emanuele Elementary 781, Hillview Crest Elementary 794, Kitayama Elementary 828, Pioneer Elementary 849, Searles Elementary 761, Alvarado Middle 830, Cesar Chavez Middle 743, James Logan High 734, and ConleyCaraballo High 579.

With over 30 years of experience, Kidango, a private, not-for-profit child development agency is a Northern California Bay Area leader in early education and support services for children and families. Since inception in 1979, Kidango has been firmly committed to the success and well being of each child and the family as a whole. In addition to center-based infant, toddler, preschool and school age programs, Kidango also offers Family Child Care Home Education, Early Intervention Services to children with special needs, Mental Health Services, Head Start programs and Family Support Services to meet the diverse needs of the communities we serve. The philosophy of Kidango is based on the belief that each child deserves an opportunity for total development. Each child comes to our program with certain strengths that are expanded upon and reinforced. These strengths are based on the learning and teaching styles of their home, which are influenced by the structure and cultural background of the child's family. Our staff are responsible for creating a multi-lingual, cross cultural environment, which fosters the cognitive, emotional, physical and social development of all children.

Free and low cost care for eligible • families

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

History

BY MYRLA RAYMUNDO Socieda Hispana De Decoto The Socieda Hispana De Decoto was founded on September 24, 1932. This club was formed to raise money during the Depression to help Spanish families pay funeral expenses. Charter Members were: Antonio Ramos, Juan Roderigues, Roman Cortez, Alcadio Santiago, Lawrence Delgado, Basilio Pacheco, Emilio Paniagua, Esteban Paniagua, Philip Hernandez, Jose Arichas, and Genaro Arenas. By 1995, all members were financially able to pay for their funeral expenses so the group decided to dissolve the club. The group voted to give some of the money to members, attorney fees and income taxes. After everything was taken care of, the group decided to donate half of the remaining money to the Days Club of San Leandro and the other half to the organization, Prevent Blindness of Northern California. Decoto Discussion Group The Decoto Discussion Group was organized for Library Study September 16, 1938 at the Decoto Branch of the Alameda County Library and has met monthly for 22 years. The group’s objective was to

was a long time member of the Decoto Discussion Group. During the war years, 19421944, Leontine Costa was involved with the USO. She was named chairman of the scrap-

Leontine Costa

book program sponsored by USO headquarters under the direction of Mrs. Walter Kalosa. More than 100 scrapbooks were made and sent to USO headquarters. She found the names of all the men

Elvamae Borghi

bring women of the community closer together, broadening their lives intellectually and socially. It was organized by Mrs. Elsa Walker, librarian and Miss Mary Barnby, Librarian for Alameda County. Mrs. Walker was chairman of the group until her retirement in l946 when she left the community. Miss Ellen Cornish became the chairman and Mrs. Gail David, secretary-treasurer. There were six charter members and by 1948, the number had doubled. In 1960, the group had 18 members. Shortly after the group was organized, a year’s program was drawn up. The program covered all sorts of subjects from music to history. A different leader was chosen for each month and also a different hostess. At first meetings were held at the Library but as membership increased, meetings were held in members’ homes. Club activities included studying operas and trips to San Francisco to attend them. Being close to a great metropolitan center, the group took advantage of opportunities to host guest appearances of authors, actresses, representatives of the main library and civic leaders. Some of these guests became so enthused with the group that they took their turn at entertaining and taking part in the program. Mrs. Leontine (Tina) Costa

ships to bridge the gap of loneliness new residents often encounter. The club helped newcomers familiarize themselves with Union City and its facilities, promoting community pride

from Decoto who were at war. They were sent scrapbooks containing comics and newspaper articles from the neighborhood. She made sure they received holiday packages as well. Members were Mrs. George Harckleroad of Hillview Crest, Mrs. Florence Wallace, Mrs. A. L. Costa, Mrs. Gail David, Mrs. Edward Goulart and Mrs. Frank Garcia of Union City, Mrs. C. F. Giles, Mrs. John R. Sutton, Mrs. Leonard McVicar of Irvington, Mrs. Mary Mattox, Mrs. Roland Bendel, Miss Ellen Cornish and Mrs. Hallenbeck of Niles, Mrs. George Azeveda and Mrs. Stewart McCormack of Fremont, Mrs. Howard Reese, Mrs. Thomas Bunting and Mrs. S. F. Kauffman of Mission San Jose. Welcome Wagon Club A Welcome Wagon Club, a non-profit organization, was established in Union City on May 27, 1971. The idea began with Mary Lucido and Cleis Jordon. There were 14 original members. The club was open to all newcomers with a residency requirement of no more than three years in the area. Welcome Wagon International sponsored it. Founders felt there was a need for such a club to help newcomers in Union City acquaint themselves with others in their community and promote friend-

through work on civic and community projects. Hobby, craft and sport groups were formed, based on the individual member’s interests and skills. A bowling league, gourmet cooking group, interior decorating, sewing, and tours were on the club’s agenda. Women’s Club The first women’s club officers were installed on July 13, 1971, at Lyon’s Restaurant in the Fremont Hub Shopping Center in Fremont. Mrs. James F. Gallagher was the President, Mrs. Robert N. Garautte, Jr. first vice president, and Mrs. George G. A. Olmedo second vice president. Mrs. Robert F. Cordano was recording secretary, Mrs. Paul G. Lucido, corresponding secretary, Mrs. John I. Petersen, treasurer, and Mrs. Frank Chie, historian. Their guest speaker was Mr. Bill May, superintendent of the Union City Department of Recreation, who informed club members of the operation and facilities of his department. The club operated from l971 through 1992. Other officers of the club were Rita Price, Margaret Shepard, Elvamae Borghi and Ruth Orozco. In 1977, two $200 scholarships were presented to Sherry Berbel and Elvira Espinoza of James Logan High School. They published monthly newsletters about their activities.

MYRLA RAYMUNDO, MBA Myrla Raymundo is the founder of the Union City Historical Museum in Union City. For the past 16 years, Myrla has served as President of the Friends of the Union City Library. She is the author of the book “Union City Through the Years..”

September 21, 2010

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Alameda County Library News

SUBMITTED BY PAT LANNUCCI, ADULT SERVICES LIBRARIAN, UNION CITY LIBRARY Summer has ended and school has started once again. People who have study and time management skills and who know how to find the resources they need have a much easier time in school. The Alameda County Library is here to help. A good idea is to start by getting a library card. Having a library card gives you access to computers for research, and typing up and printing out reports and papers. And if you can’t make it in to the library and you have access to the Internet, you can visit the Alameda County Library online at www.aclibrary.org, where you can find a wealth of resources. On our website you will find information about all the branch libraries in the Alameda County system, locations, hours, and all the programs we have planned. The catalog lists the materials owned, and you can request items be held for you. If you don’t find what you’re looking for, you can make a purchase suggestion or you might be able to borrow it through Link+, a cooperative agreement we have with other library systems. Looking for tutoring? During the regular school year, Tri-City library branches offer free after-school homework centers. Most students tell us their grades have improved. The centers help students to stay focused to get their homework done quickly and correctly. Union City’s Homework Center begins on September 13 and is open Monday Thursday, 3:30 p.m. -5:30 p.m. Newark’s Homework Express begins on September 14 and is open Tuesday – Thursday, 3:30 p.m. 5:30 p.m. The Fremont Library’s Homework Center begins October 3 and is open 3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Monday - Thursday for Kindergarten through grade 6.

Can’t come to the library? Homework help is also available through the Alameda County Library website. Find the Homework Help Now icon on the left side of the home page, click on it, and you can get oneon-one help from skilled, screened, tutors by grade level and subject, 1 p.m. - 10 p.m. PST, year-round - and it’s FREE! Often the information you need is available through databases. Databases are trusted sources of information that are often only available through the Library website because we subscribe to them for you. Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia includes the Grolier Encyclopedia, America the Beautiful, and New Book of Knowledge. Student Resource Center Gold is an amazing resource that includes access to journals, history, commentary, criticism, multimedia, and can be searched by keyword and level of information wanted. The library subscribes to more than two dozen databases covering many topics. In fact, the list of information resources available California history and missions, biographies, science fair projects, suggested reading, just to name a few - is too long to include everything here. Check out the Literature Resource Center if you need critical analyses. Go to the library website, www.aclibrary.org, then click on the Kids or Teens link at the top of the page. You’ll be amazed at what you can find to help with assignments! Here are some books you might also find useful: “How to Study for Success, School Smarts” by Nancy Golden, “Studying and Tests” by Barbara A. Somervill, “School Power: Study Skill Strategies for Succeeding in School” by Jeanne Shay Schumm, “Where’s My Stuff: Ultimate Teen Organizing Guide” by Samantha Moss, “Life Lists for Teens: Tips, Steps, Hints and How-Tos For Growing Up, Getting Along, Learning and Having Fun” by Pamela Espeland.

Theater Review

BY VIDYA PRADHAN Say Dial M for Murder and, for a certain generation of viewers, images that instantly leap to mind will be those of the 1954 Hitchcock classic, starring the lovely Grace Kelly as a wealthy socialite and the urbane Ray Milland as her scheming husband. Fremont theater group Broadway West bravely takes on the challenge of performing a play that is not only indelibly etched in the minds of film noir fans, but one that is a murder mystery whose denouement is well known to most audiences around the world. For those unfamiliar with the plot, the thriller deals with Margot Wendice, whose

husband Tony is dependent on her financially. When an old lover reappears on the scene, Tony is desperate enough to plan his wife’s murder to protect his privileged life. Despite Tony’s meticulous planning, the elaborate scheme unravels unpredictably, and he has to think quickly to keep the game going. Director Angie Higgins, who is a regular in Broadway West’s cast of players, chooses to create a distinction between the famous movie and her own production by cleverly changing the characterization of the leads. Where Grace Kelly played Margot as a vulnerable innocent, whose implication in the murder of a blackmailer is almost incredible, Lucy Littlewood as Margot has a streak of

hardness in her, which makes her guilt a touch more convincing. Jeff Clarke’s Tony is on the other end of the spectrum from Ray Milland’s portrayal of the character. Milland is a sophisticated Tony, with a streak of cruelty in him that brings the shivers, but Clarke’s Tony is an exaggerated fop, mincing and prancing his way around stage, delivering laughs when he should be making the audience hate him. It is a rather strange interpretation, but it certainly works to differentiate this production from the movie. And the audience at opening night loved every moment of it. Credit also goes to the phenomenal set design. In a nod to the black and white movie and the film noir genre, designer Mike Price creates a set entirely in shades of black, white and grey, and costume designer Leslie Newport matches the character’s costumes to the set. It is a lovely touch and serves to elevate the local production by several degrees. Can fans of the movie enjoy this play? Absolutely. I knew exactly what would happen when the would-be murderer appeared from behind the French door curtains to strangle Margot, but still could not prevent a squeak of alarm. And the comeuppance of the bad guy is doubly satisfying now that we know that it all ends well. Dial M for Murder, originally a stage play by Englishman Frederick Knott, was ranked the 9th best film in the mystery genre by the American Film Institute in 2008. It lives up to that ranking in every avatar, be it as a sinister Hitchcock classic or the local production at our very own Broadway West. Dial M for Murder September 17 – October 16, 2010 Broadway West Theater Company 4000-B Bay Street, Fremont

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

Asian stock markets rise amid growth confidence BY ALEX KENNEDY ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER SINGAPORE (AP), Sep 17 Asian stock markets were mostly higher Friday amid confidence the region’s growth will be sustained despite slow economic recoveries in the U.S. and Europe. Some moderation in Asia’s expansion is expected next year but growth rates are likely to remain well above those in the advanced economies, analysts say. China, now the world’s second-biggest economy after three decades of blistering growth, will likely expand 10.1 percent this year and 9 percent next year, according to Rabobank. “Asia equities will continue to be well supported, underpinned by attractive valuations and resilient domestic and regional growth,” Singapore’s DBS bank said in a report. Unless U.S economic conditions “deteriorate to an outright recession, we don’t see much downside for equities.” In Japan, the benchmark Nikkei 225 stock average was up 113.84 points, or 1.2 percent, at 9,622.40. Japanese exporter stocks have moved higher since Tokyo in-

tervened in currency markets to cap the yen’s rise against the dollar earlier this week. South Korea’s Kospi rose 0.8 percent to 1,826.49, Hong Kong’s Hang Seng added 1.1 percent to 21,925.67 and Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 advanced 0.9 percent to 4,645.30. Shares in Singapore, India and Indonesia also floated higher while the Shanghai Composite Index inched up by 0.1 percent to 2,605.94. Markets in Thailand and the Philippines fell. The gains in Asia came despite mixed trade in New York on Thursday as investors sold shares after the recent rally. News that FedEx, which is seen as a bellwether for the U.S. economy, would cut 1,700 jobs to try to fix its domestic trucking business, also weighed on Wall Street. Figures showing that the number of newly laid-off workers seeking U.S. unemployment benefits dropped by 3,000 last week to 450,000 - its lowest level in two months - failed to drive stock markets, though it may be a sign that labor market conditions are improving.

Another option to avoid foreclosure SUBMITTED BY BLAISON SAMUEL, PRUDENTIAL CALIFORNIA REALTY The Obama administration has launched enhancements to the Making Home Affordable Program and Federal Housing Administration (FHA) refinance program called “Short refinance” which will help responsible

homeowners whose mortgages exceed the value of their homes. This program could help borrowers, who are current on their mortgage, avoid strategic default and remain in their homes; such homeowners might otherwise abandon the property because they are “under-water,” or have negative equity, and are on the verge of finding it difficult to maintain mortgage payments.

And though the monthly survey of manufacturing conditions in the mid-Atlantic from the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia improved, it still points to a decline in output. The so-called Philly Fed index improved to minus 0.7 in September from August’s minus 7.7. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 22.10, or 0.2 percent, to close at 10,594.83. The Dow has now risen in 10 of the last 12 days, but it’s still 5.5 percent below its 2010 closing high level reached on April 26. Broader indexes were mixed. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 0.4, or 0.04 percent, to 1,124.66. The Nasdaq composite edged up 1.93, or 0.08 percent, to 2,303.25. In currencies, the dollar slipped to 85.71 yen from 85.78 yen late Thursday. The euro gained to $1.3145 from $1.3068. Benchmark crude for October delivery was up 24 cents at $74.81 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract lost $1.45 to settle at $74.57 a barrel on Thursday. Borrowers current on their mortgages can qualify for an FHA refinancing loan if the senior lender agrees to write off at least 10 percent of the unpaid principal balance of the existing loan. This short payoff serves as payment in full for any debt extinguished. Homeowners must obtain the consent of their lenders whose participation in this program is voluntarily. Borrowers in arrears on the existing mortgage to be refinanced do not qualify for the program. The property must be the homeowner’s primary residence (1-4 units). Investment properties do not qualify. Standard FHA eligibility criteria apply to the refinancing loan which will take the place of the existing senior loan and is limited to a maximum loan-to-value ratio of 97.75 percent. There will also be monthly mortgage insurance with this FHA product. Applicants must have a minimum FICO score of 500. The existing loan must not be a FHA-insured loan. Existing junior loans still attached to the property must be re-subordinated. Their total must not exceed 115 percent of the property’s value. If such a situation arises, either the senior or junior lender(s) or both must agree to reduce their principal amounts further. How many lenders will participate in this program to allow at least a 10 percent reduction in principle to homeowners remains to be seen. According to the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the enhancements could help around 500,000 or more homeowners. Not everyone who is current with their mortgage repayments will qualify but the program’s first focus is homeowners who have not missed any payments, have negative equity and are at risk of default. Anyone interested in this program should contact their lender directly and ask about eligibility for the FHA Short Refinance program and ascertain if the lender is a participant. Realtors, government and homeowners hope this program works and will avoid foreclosure to aid recovery of the housing market. For more information, visit www.hud.gov

September 21, 2010

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

FUDENNA BROS., INC. Leader In Small To Medium Size Office Space Perfect for New Businesses Or Easily Transition Your Company to a Larger Or Smaller Office

1. SKS Building 39767-39887 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 2. Tri-City Voice Building 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 3. Executive I Office Building 2450 Peralta Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536 4. Executive II Office Building 2140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536 5. Blacow Office Building 39830-39870 Blacow Road, Fremont, CA 94536 6. Parkway Professional Building 40000 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538 7. Parkway Towers 3909 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538

FUDENNA BROS., INC.

(510) 657-6200

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SUBMITTED BY MICHAEL MCNEVIN After the success of the Summer Concert Series, Niles Town Plaza has more concerts scheduled for early fall. On Sunday afternoon, September 26, three diverse acts come to

town — The Stairwell Sisters, Hugh & The Hefners, and special guest Dana Hubbard. San Francisco’s all-gal old-time teardown, The Stairwell Sisters, play a deep and rowdy repertoire of timeless tunes plus a solid standing of smart, original material that is winning praise on a national level. Featured on “A Prairie Home Companion,” The Stairwell Sisters lay down concerts and square dances for counter-culturalists everywhere, infusing the old music with intoxicating energy and soul. The Stairwell has never sounded better. When Hugh & The Hefners first got together to play some music at the Bistro in Hayward, they didn’t have a name. So, Victor, the owner of the renowned music pub decided it for them. When the monthly calendar went out, they all blushed a little, but the name stuck. They don’t wear robes; they are just four gentlemen in regular clothes playing fine old jazz tunes. Dana Hubbard is a warm and engaging personality on stage, singing, telling stories, and playing both guitar and harmonica at an exceptional level. He is a recent winner of the 2009 Telluride Blues and Brews Festival Acoustic Blues Competition, and Winner of the 2009 Indie Inter-

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

national Songwriting Contest for Folk/Acoustic. The beautiful new plaza sits in the center of the old train town of Niles, against the hills of Fremont. The lawn amphitheater is in front of the restored 1900s train station museum, and has a perfect view of both the musicians and the hills. Bring low lawn chairs, enjoy the sunshine, and spend some time in this old silent film mecca. For those who just show up without a plan, not a problem — large shade canopies are provided by the Niles Main Street Association, plenty of park benches, and a long semi-

circle bench surrounds the grass facing the concert stage. Niles Town Plaza Fall Concert Series Sunday, September 26 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Niles Town Plaza Lawn Amphitheater 37592 Niles Blvd., Fremont www.niles.org

September 21, 2010

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

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Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

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Down 1 ______ Roulette (7) 2 Publicity endorsments (14) 3 ______ pressure (11) 4 Directions (12) 5 Not elementary (9) 6 Completed development (4-5) 8 Arose (6)

Your Weekly Horoscope (09/19 - 09/25) BY MINERVA (AP) ARIES: MARCH 21 - APRIL 20 You're going nuts wondering what to do about this. Your discomfort is natural; anyone would be crazy after what you've been through. Settle down. Don't make any decisions until you can be philosophical about them. TAURUS: APRIL 21 - MAY 20 You keep saying this isn't about money. It's getting harder to tell where you're coming from when it comes down to that. Would you be doing this for the love of it if it hadn't turned out to be so profitable? GEMINI: MAY 21 - JUNE 20 Getting angry isn't going to make things better. You have every right to be upset but you won't be able to turn this around if you let your temper override the fact that you happen to be the grown up in this situation. CANCER: JUNE 21 - JULY 20 Torn between your commitments and the chance to go off on your own it's hard to tell what you should do. Instead of going back and forth over this ask someone older and wiser for their advice and be sure to heed it.

LEO: JULY 21 - AUGUST 20 Breaking someone's heart wasn't on your to do list, but it's too late now. You could have turned off the charm instead of leading them on. Why does your thirst for attention always come at someone else's expense? VIRGO: AUGUST 21 - SEPTEMBER 20 You don't know how to tell people what you want. Part of you is upset at the thought of having to ask. Calm down enough to see that you can't force a loving response from people; it's either there or it isn't. LIBRA: SEPTEMBER 21 - OCTOBER 20 Circumstances seem to be aggravating your relationship. Tough times have a way of bringing out the best or the beast in people. This isn't about either one of you; it's about what happens when things fall apart. SCORPIO: OCTOBER 21 NOVEMBER 20 Don't project too much of the past onto this. You don't seem to understand that it isn't the same old story. And if you keep expecting to be betrayed you'll miss the chance to have things go right for a change.

9 Marsh growth (5) 10 Marina sight (5) 15 Snapper (6) 17 Used to (10) 21 More upscale (5) 23 Ding dong ditch (8) 24 Get (7) 26 To use (7) 28 One side in baseball negotiations (6) 29 English exam finale, often (5)

SAGITTARIUS: NOVEMBER 21 - DECEMBER 20 Things don't have to bottom out for you to know that the hour is late and it's time to shift your focus. Take a look around. Larger issues speak to the need to switch over to a much simpler, more honest approach to everything. CAPRICORN: DECEMBER 21 - JANUARY 20 You can stop worrying about how

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Across 3 Litmus reddeners (5) 7 Covets (7) 11 High School _____ (7) 12 Deserved (6) 13 Finding a 4 leaf clover (7) 14 Foul (5) 16 Sympathetic, kind (13) 18 "Come in!" (5) 19 Prego! (7) 20 Kind of block (6) 22 Legal concept in connection with contracts (13) 25 To leave (5)

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other influences will pop in to make your time on the treadmill more than worth it. PISCES: FEBRUARY 21 MARCH 20 More than one sacred cow has gone down the tubes. Robbed of your illusions here you sit wondering if there's a purpose to it all. Take heart; these moments of doubt come around in cycles just to keep our faith alive.

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library Tell A Friend Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480.

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096. For more information about the Bookmobile call (510) 745-1477. Tuesday, Sept. 21 2:30 p.m. - 3:25 p.m. Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., Fremont 3:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., Fremont 5:25 p.m. - 6:10 p.m. Booster Park, Gable Dr. and McDuff Ave., Fremont 6:25 p.m. - 6:55 p.m. Camellia Dr. and Camellia Court, Fremont Wednesday, Sept. 22 1:00 p.m. - 1:45 p.m. Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., San Lorenzo 4:30 p.m. - 5:10 p.m. Palomares Hills HOA Clubhouse, 6811 Villareal Dr., Castro Valley 5:25 p.m. - 5:50 p.m. Lomond Way and Greenridge Rd., Castro Valley Thursday, Sept. 23 2:45 p.m. - 3:40 p.m. Bay School, 2001 Bockman Rd., San Lorenzo 4:05 p.m. - 4:40 p.m. Falcon Dr. and Merganser Dr., Fremont 5:20 p.m. - 5:50 p.m. Los Robles Apts., 32300 Almaden Blvd., Union City 6:05 p.m. - 6:35 p.m. Mission Gateway Apts., 33215 Mission Blvd., Union City Monday, Sept. 27 2:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. Pioneer School, Blythe St. and Jean Dr., Union City 3:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Alvarado Elementary, Fredi St. and Smith St., Union City 4:15 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Greenhaven Apts., Alvarado Blvd. and Fair Ranch Rd., Union City 5:15 p.m. - 6:45 p.m. Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. and Maybird Cir. Fremont

Tuesday, Sept. 28 2:15 p.m. - 3:15 p.m. Schilling School, 36901 Spruce St., Newark 3:25 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Ash St. and Wells Ave., Newark 4:50 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. and Dorado Dr., Union City 5:40 p.m. - 6:20 p.m. Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. and Carmel Way, Union City Wednesday, Sept. 29 2:15 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 9th St., Union City 3:45 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., Fremont 5:15 p.m. - 5:50 p.m. Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., Fremont 6:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St., Fremont

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991. For more information about the Bookmobile call (408) 293-2326 x3060. Wednesday, Sept. 22 2:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m. Pioneer Park, 60 Wilson Way, Milpitas 2:30 p.m. - 2:55 p.m. Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., Milpitas 3:20 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Foothill School, 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas Wednesday, Sept. 29 No Service

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SUBMITTED BY KAREN JACKSON COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR/ HERS BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION

September 21, 2010

he 11th Annual KEEP ABREAST 5K WALK/ 5K/10K RUN is just around the corner. The annual event will take place at Quarry Lakes Park in Fremont, on Saturday, September 25, 2010. This year’s 5k/10k run will be a chip timed event and winners in each category will receive awards. All who register will receive a participant ribbon.

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as we have moved to a professionally- run, timed race. Relax with music and enjoy a free BBQ lunch, barbecued hot dogs, veggie burgers, bagels and refreshments. A health, fitness and business expo, as well as corporate sponsorship booths will also be part of the event. A massage tent will be available for people to enjoy an invigorating massage or back treatment. “Non-profits such as ABODE, LIFE ElderCare, hospitals including Washington Hospital and St. Rose Hospital, health services including Stanford Blood Center and Palo Alto Medical Foundation, and KOIT radio station among others will have booths giving out information and litera-

support the cause, you can donate online or set up your own personal fundraising page to solicit donations from friends, family, teammates and co-workers. Proceeds from the fundraiser will empower women affected by breast cancer, and support them with post-surgical products and education regardless of their financial status.

Doves will be released in memory of, and in honor of breast cancer survivors. “Before we release the doves, all the breast cancer survivors are asked to come to the front of the stage,” said HERS Development Director, Karen Jackson. The KEEP ABREAST scenic 5K walk, 5k/10K run supports friends and family facing breast cancer. “5K/10K run and the 5K walk will begin at nine o’clock sharp, the runners will go first, the 10 K runners will go twice around the Quarry Lake and the 5 K runners will go once around the lake and the walkers will follow,” said Jackson. “The largest percentage of applicants for this year’s event is walkers, but we are excited that the ranks of runners are growing,

ture,” said Jackson. All participants will have lots of information regarding their business or organization. The majority of vendors will have a giveaway for booth visitors who fill out a ticket and at the end of the event, the winners will be announced.” We have a prize for the team captain who pulls together the largest team, a gift in honor of the longest survivor and also in honor of the woman who has been most recently diagnosed,” said Jackson. Those interested may participate alone or as part of a team, but each member of the team needs to fill out a registration form. If you do not wish to participate in the event but want to

to be included in the chip timing system. Registration for adults is $35.00. For ages 11 to 17, admission is $20 and children under the ages of 11 accompanied by a registered adult are free. Parking is free.

Register online at www.herskeepabreast.org or download and submit a form provided online. Deadline for online registrations is September 22nd by noon. After that date, you will need to arrive early for on-site registration. Runners must register by September 22nd

KEEP ABREAST 5K Walk and 5K/10K Run Saturday, September 25 Registration: 7 a.m. - 8 a.m. Opening ceremony: 8:15 a.m. Event starts, runners followed by walkers: 9 a.m. Quarry Lakes East Bay Regional Park 2100 Isherwood Way, Fremont (510) 790-1911 www.herskeepabreast.org

Community Service Day SUBMITTED BY TOM CREE Due to the loss of some of our work force at the City of Newark, The Lake Area and Rosemont Residents Association (LARA) is hosting our second annual Clean-Up Day at The Lake. Please join us on Saturday, September 25th starting at 8 a.m. Come for an hour or come for the whole day. It doesn’t matter. Just Come. In May, this event drew over 100 eager members of the community, ready, willing and able to make a

difference at our local Lakeshore Park! In just six hours, the helpers gathered enough trimmings and hedges to fill two large dumpsters. Bring your work gloves and garden tools to the boathouse located on Chelsea Dr. in Newark. Coffee, doughnuts, snacks and water will be provided to all that participate. Working together, we can make a difference! For more information: tomcree@sbcglobal.net or (510) 853-5737.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

Fall Fiesta for the Arts

The Sun Gallery Board of Directors invites the public to their annual Fall Fiesta for the Arts – a benefit for Sun Gallery’s Children’s Art Education Programs.

Happy Fish Run 4 Education SUBMITTED BY LIZ ELLIOTT The 6th Annual Happy Fish Run 4 Education takes place on October 10 at Lake Elizabeth. The day includes a 5k walk/run, a 10k run, and 1/4 and 1/2 mile kids runs. The goal of the event is a fun day for family fitness for our community, while raising money and awareness for the Fremont Education Foundation’s Guy Emanuele Sports Fund. It is also a wonderful opportunity for small businesses to gain exposure in the Fremont community and schools. There are affordable booth opportunities at Lake Elizabeth, and we expect over 400 families and participants in Central Park on the morning of the event. Register now at www.HappyFishRun4Education.com. Fees go up after October 1. Costs: 5K Run/Walk and 10K Run: $20, $30 after October 1; 1/4 and 1/2 Mile Kids’ Runs: $10, $20 after October 1. Participants receive refreshments, awards, t-shirt, and goodie bags. Happy Fish Run for Education Sunday, October 10 Check in/packet pick up: 7:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. 5K Run/Walk and 10K Run: 9 a.m. 1/4 and 1/2 Mile Kids’ Runs: 10:30 a.m. Lake Elizabeth at Central Park in Fremont www.HappyFishRun4Education.com Fees: 5K Run/Walk and 10K Run: $20 or $30 after October 1; 1/4 and 1/2 Mile Kids’ Runs: $10 or $20 after October 1

Money for arts SUBMITTED BY MARGARET THORNBERRY In its efforts to support art programs for students in our public schools, Fremont Art Association recently donated $350 to the Cultural Arts in The Schools (CATS) program offered by the Fremont Cultural Arts Council. To raise this money, seven artists from Fremont Art Association painted large indoor/outdoor banners with different subjects, which were sold by silent auction at the

two-day Art in The Garden event at Regan’s Nursery. The CATS program helps schools bring quality art education assemblies to local grade schools by subsidizing the costs associated with student participation in the presentation at the assembly. Interested schools can contact www.FremontCulturalArtsCouncil.org for further information. CATS also accepts tax-deductible donations from community members who share our concern about the lack of funding for art education in our public schools.

Entertainment provided by Ballet Folklorico Tlapalli. Fall Fiesta for the Arts Friday, September 24

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5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Hayward City Hall Rotunda 777 B Street, Hayward (510) 581-4050 sungallery.org

Prepay by check or credit card: $35 Tickets at the door: $40

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September 21, 2010

September 21, 2010

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Tuesday, Sep 21

Carnival, food, music, bingo and raffle

Sports Center open house

St. John the Baptist Catholic Church 279 South Abel St., Milpitas (408) 234-1294

10 a.m. - 2 p.m. See what the center has to offer

Union City Sports Center 31224 Union City Blvd., Union City (510) 675-5805

Bring a hat, sturdy shoes, water, gloves and sunscreen

Dumbarton Fishing Pier Parking Lot End of Marshalnds Rd., Fremont (510) 792-0222 x 362

Saturday, Sep 25

Tri-City Mother’s of Mulitples Spring Sale

Saturday, Sep 25

International Coastal Clean Up Day

Thursday, Sep 23

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Best Practices in E-mail Marketing R

Children’s gear, furniture, equipment and more

8:30 a.m. - Noon

Holy Redeemer Church 3560 Cedar Blvd., Newark www.tricitymoms.org

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

10 a.m. - Noon Effective e-mail marketing with Stu Carly

Newark Branch Library 6300 Civic Terrace Ave., Newark (510) 795-2627

Saturday, Sep 25

Concert $

Saturday, Sep 25

7 - 9 p.m.

Fremont Area Writer Club Meeting

Thursday, Sep 23

Gypsy Soul in concert

Senior Center Celebration

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 623-6920

4 - 6 p.m. Video, seniors share their talent

Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 790-6600

Saturday, Sep 25

Basic Land Navigation $R

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Basics of map and compass reading

Friday, Sep 24

SAVE Breakfast Eye Opener $R

7:30 - 9 a.m. Breaking free of the past

Fremont Marriott 46100 Landing Pkwy., Fremont (510) 7941-3428 Friday, Sep 24

Fall Fiesta for the Arts $

8:30 - 8:30 p.m. A benefit for Sun Gallery’s Children’s Art Education Programs

Hayward City Hall Rotunda 777 B St., Hayward (510) 581 4050 Friday, Sep 24

Senior Resources Fair

1:30 - 5:30 p.m. Housing and supportive services

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1401 Friday - Sunday, Sep 24 - 26

Autumn Festival

5 - 10 p.m. (Fri.) 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. (Sat) 11 a.m. 6 p.m. (Sun.)

Volunteer to clean the bay

Sunol Regional Wilderness 1895 Geary Rd., Sunol (888) 327-2757 Saturday, Sep 25

Coastal Cleanup R

8:30 a.m. - Noon

2 - 4 p.m. Clarify points of uncertainty: Who or whom? Which or That

DeVry University Room 204 6600 Dumbarton Cir. Fremont (510) 791-8639 Saturday, Sep 25

Movie Night $

7:30 p.m. Chicago and The Scarecrow

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 494-1411

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Saturday, Sep 25

Saturday, Sep 25

Discover Your Inner Viking $R

Luau $

6 p.m.

5 p.m.

Hosted by Sons of Norway Snorre Lodge 6-061

Authentic Hawaiian Luau

Hill and Valley Clubhouse 1808 B St., Hayward (510) 784-0989

Pruma Center 616 E Street , Union City (510) 489-0513 Saturday, Sep 25

Saturday, Sep 25

Pancake Breakfast $

Triumph of the Spirit $

8 a.m. - Noon

8 p.m.

Proceeds go toward purchasing new band uniforms

Two 19th century masterworks and a composition by Bay Area composer Henry Mollicone

Gary Soren Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031

Mission San Jose High School’s Little Theatre 41717 Palm Ave., Fremont (510) 657-3600

Apple Sampling $

Noon - 1 p.m.

19806 Wisteria Ave., Castro Valley (510) 659-0498 Sunday, Sep 26

Fall Concert

1 - 4 p.m. The Stairwell Sisters, Dana Hubbard and Hugh & the Hefners

Niles Town Plaza 37592 Niles Blvd., Fremont http://www.fremonttheatre.org/TownPlaza-Aug08.jpg Sunday, Sep 26

Acorn Processing $R

10 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Sep 25

Saturday, Sep 25

September 21, 2010

Fall Brunch $

11:30 a.m.

Apple sampling and origins of this fruit

Hosted by American Association of University Women

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 791-0914

Gather acorn to produce a nutritional meal

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 Sunday, Sep 26

Cool Crisp Kites $

Saturday, Sep 25

1 - 2:30 p.m.

NorCal Pancreatic Cancer Walk $R

Learn to make your own

Fun Fabric Frames $

2 - 3 p.m.

9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Make a personalized handmade picture frame

Proceeds go to the Lustgarten Foundation

Saturday, Sep 25

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 Saturday, Sep 25

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month

1:30 - 3 p.m. Traditional dances from El Ballet Folklorico de James Logan High School

Lake Elizabeth Central Park 1100 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (866) 789-1000

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 Sunday, Sep 26

Fall Bird Survey $

Saturday, September 25 $R

8 - 9 a.m.

Rib-Eye Steak and King Crab Leg Dinner

Explore and record your observations

6 p.m. Dinner, raffle, Scandinavian Butikkene, kids’ activities and entertainment

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1401

Hill & Valley Clubhouse 1808 B Street, Hayward (510) 784-8473 (650) 245-8473 ijordahl@yahoo.com

Saturday, Sep 25

Sunday, Sep 26

Monument Festival

Leopard Shark Feeding

11 am. - 4 p.m.

2 - 3 p.m.

Sponsored by The Irvington Business Association

Help feed marine animals

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 Monday, Sep 27

Information for the Fall Election

6 - 8 p.m. Presented by League of Women Voters

Irvington District Bay St. at Five Corners, Fremont www.irvingtonbusiness.com

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Saturday, Sep 25

Sunday, Sep 26

New Exhibits

2 - 4 p.m.

Fiddler’s Jam Session and Pot Luck $

New features and program expansion

1:30 - 5 p.m.

Math Science Nucleus 4075 Eggers Dr., Fremont (510) 790-6284

Acoustic instruments: Old time country, classic country and folk music

United Methodist Church Social Hall

Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7980 Monday, Sep 27

Fremont Bank and Ohlone College Golf Tournament $R

11 a.m. - 7:30 p.m. Proceeds benefit Ohlone College Student Athletics

The Course at Wente Vineyards 5050 Arroyo Rd., Livermore (510) 659-6053

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

Tuesday, Sep 28

Tuesday, Sep 28

Exploring Argentina

Book Discussion

7 - 8:30 p.m.

6:30 - 7:30 p.m.

Digital presentation with Wayne Bernhardson

Hot, Flat and Crowded by Thomas Friedman

REI Fremont 43962 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-0305

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 651 1411

Tuesday, Sep 28

Wednesday, Sep 29

One Child Golf Tournament $R

Landscaping for Fire Safety

1 - 4 p.m. Poppy Ridge Golf Course 4280 Greenville Rd., Livermore (510) 912-2981

6:30 p.m.

Continuing Exhibits and Events Mondays - Fridays, thru Oct. 1

Hayward City Employee’s Art Show

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Oils, pastels, photography, sculpture, and mixed media

John O’Lague Galleria 777 B Street, Hayward (510) 538-2787

Ways to achieve a fire safe yard

Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7975

Wednesdays, thru Oct. 27

Reducing Stress for Caregivers $R

10 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Fremont Family Resource Center

39155 Liberty St., Fremont (510) 574-2026 continued from page 1

and registration information are available at www.rocketcontest.org. “The Team America Rocketry Challenge is a vital part of our industry’s outreach to young people,” said Marion C. Blakey, AIA president and CEO. “TARC provides a great opportunity for students to work with scientists and engineers and learn in an exciting and fun environment.” The top 100 TARC team finalists will be notified April 8 that they have earned a spot in

the May 14 competition just outside of Washington, DC. Student participants compete for $60,000 in prizes, scholarships and a trip to the 2011 international air show in Paris for an international “Fly-Off” with student teams from France and the UK. AIA sponsors TARC with the National Association of Rocketry, NASA, the Defense Department, the American Association of Physics Teachers and AIA member companies. The contest is in its ninth year and is proving to be a catalyst for generating student interest in math and science. The aerospace industry is actively looking for young people to join its ranks. The industry is

facing a future workforce shortage, as many employees will reach retirement age in the next decade. A recent Aviation Week and Space Technology survey found that almost 40 percent of the workforce is over the age of 50. For more information on careers in aerospace, visit www.LaunchIntoAerospace.org. Editor’s Note: The Newark Memorial High School Rocketry Team placed first in a national competition in The Plains, Virginia on May 19, 2007. As United States champions, they competed in international competition in Paris, France later that year.

Expires 9/30/10

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Tri-City Voice has even more local recreational, high school, college and professional sports coverage on the Web. Check out www.tricityvoice.com/sports for daily updates on scores, schedules of events, photos slide shows, and much more. Follow TCV Sports on Twitter at twitter.com/TCVSports

Cougars lose another thriller BY JEFF WEISINGER Newark Memorial’s chances of a strong start going into Mission Valley Athletic League play took a turn for the worst against Milpitas High on Friday, Sept. 17, as a chance at a 2-1 start slipped in one final pass, as quarterback Nick Pohndorf’s pass was intercepted on the game’s final play as the Cougars fell to the Trojans 21-19, dropping Newark’s record to 1-2 on the season. Both Pohndorf and Trojans’ quarterback Tony Sauceda tossed three touchdowns each on the night. Sauceda finished his night 12 of 22 for 149 yards passing, hitting Jordan Lockett, Sammy Fanua and Dela Harley for touchdowns. Pohndorf tossed two of his touchdowns on the night to wingback Samson Tai and another one to wide receiver Jacob Rael with about six minutes remaining to bring the Cougars within two, 21-19. Another star on the night was Milpitas sophomore linebacker Vita Vea, who made two huge plays to push the Trojans to victory. He blocked the point-after attempt after the Cougars’ first touchdown in the first quarter

lead and their secondary was torched for just shy of 600 yards in the air. Logan took a 20-0 lead after the first quarter over the No. 6-ranked Falcons, but Foothill quarterback David Camarena led the Falcons offense to 31 unanswered points in Foothill’s 38-28 win over the previously unbeaten Colts. Camarena led the comeback with 204 yards through the air along with a pair of touchdown passes. Logan will look to get things back on track when they host

Milpitas defense came up big when they needed it in a win over Newark Memorial (William Mancebo).

Brentwood’s Heritage High School on Friday, Sept. 24, at 7 p.m. The Colts begin conference play at Tak Fudenna Memorial Stadium when they take on American High School on Oct. 2. American 16, Liberty 22 The Eagles dropped their second consecutive game, losing at Liberty High 22-16 on Friday night. The loss puts the Eagles at 1-2 with the dangerous Concord High coming into Fremont this coming Friday night and with their MVAL opener against Logan just two weeks away on Oct. 2. Irvington 7, San Rafael 34 The Vikings fell to 0-3 on the season on Thursday, Sept. 16, as they lost to San Rafael 34-7. Irvington has struggled offensively,

California School for the Deaf improved to 3-0 with a convincing 55-9 win at Indiana School for the Deaf on Saturday, Sept. 18. Next up for the Eagles is a home battle against Texas School for the Deaf on Saturday, Sept. 25. Kickoff is at 2 p.m. Moreau Catholic went to 2-0 on the season with a 48-14 win over Galileo High on Saturday, Sept. 18. The Mariners next play on Friday, Sept. 24, at home against San Lorenzo. Kickoff is 7 p.m. Hayward High School evened its record to 1-1 on the season with a 46-0 home victory over Mt. Diablo High School on Friday, Sept. 17. Next up for the Farmers is a Friday, Sept. 24, road tilt at Monte Vista High in Danville. Kickoff is 7 p.m. Kennedy went to Heritage High on Friday, Sept. 17, and was handed a 61-7 loss to drop to 1-2 on the season. The Titans will look to even its record on Friday, Sept. 24, when they head to De Anza High in Richmond for a 7 p.m. showdown. And Washington High dropped to 0-3 on the campaign with a 31-15 loss at the hands of Amador Valley High on Friday, Sept. 17. The Huskies will look to get one win in preseason play before the start of MVAL action when they head to Danville on Friday, Sept. 24, for a 7 p.m. tilt with San Ramon Valley High.

over Bishop O’Dowd and Encinal high schools. In their opening match against O’Dowd, the Cowboys were able to run away with a 16-5 win courtesy of a 7-0 rout in the fourth quarter. And against Encinal, another 7-0, fourth-quarter rout gave Livermore a 20-9 win. While the Cowboys were making easy work of their opponents to its eventual title, Mission San Jose had two very different games. First, the Warriors trounced Dougherty Valley High School 18-3, racing out to a 5-0 lead after one; 9-1 at half. Then, to advance to the final, Mission held on to beat Granada High of Livermore, 8-5. Granada outscored Mission 3-1 in the final quarter, but it wasn’t enough.

In the championship, it was an extremely even contest. Livermore opened up with a 5-2 lead after one quarter, and that was the difference. Livermore won the second quarter 4-2; Mission won the third 4-2; and the two sides were even, 4-4, in the fourth to finish at the 15-12 final. Newark Memorial did not get on the winning side of a result in its three games over the two-day tourney (Friday, Sept. 17, and Saturday, Sept. 18). To open, Newark fell to Encinal, 11-4; then in its second match, the Cougars were dropped by Bishop O’Dowd, 16-4; and in the 7th/8th game, Newark was upended by Piedmont High School, 8-7, in overtime.

James Logan put up 28, but Foothill stymied them when push came to shove (Mike Heightchew).

and sacked Pohndorf on third down late in the fourth quarter with the Cougars driving inside the Milpitas 30 yard line. The Cougars 1-2 record doesn’t tell their entire story. Both of Newark’s losses have come by a combined total of three points, and their only win of the season so far, against Castro Valley on Sept. 10, was by two points. The Cougars play their final non-conference game on Friday, Sept. 24, at Newark against Arroyo, then begin MVAL play against John F. Kennedy High at home on Oct. 1, with both games beginning at 7 p.m. Logan 28, Foothill 38 The last time Logan played the Falcons of Foothill High school, the Colts never saw the

MSJ boys water polo falls in tourney finals BY GIOVANNI ALBANESE JR. A week after Newark Memorial High School hosted a girls water polo tournament, the school hosted a polo tourney for the boys with Livermore High School coming away with the title after a 15-12 win over Mission San Jose High on Saturday, Sept. 18. Livermore coasted to the championship match with wins

scoring just 13 points in three games so far. The Vikes take on Washington High School of San Francisco on Saturday, Sept. 25. Mission San Jose 0, Miramonte 62 After defeating De Anza High last week, the Warriors newest losing streak began last Saturday, Sept. 18, as Mission San Jose fell to Miramonte 62-0 at Tak. The Warriors (1-2) will travel to Hercules to take on Hercules High on Sept. 24. Other Scores Elsewhere in prep football,

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Mission Valley United puts up valiant effort BY SANJNA SHUKLA On Saturday, Sept. 18, the Mission Valley United under 16 girls fell to the San Francisco Valkyries, 3-2. MVU put up a fight and the win was not an easy one for the Valkyries. In the eighth minute, Mission Valley was awarded a free kick right outside the 18. Anita Kavalan took the kick and hit the ball low to the far post. But before the team could start celebrating, the referee annulled the goal. Due to the positioning of the kick, it was unclear from the referee’s standpoint whether the ball entered the goal through a hole on the outer side of the net, or if it crossed the front post. The sideline referee claimed that the ball did indeed go through the hole, and after a few protests from the players and coaches, the Valkyries were given a goal kick. The Valkyries retaliated hard and were able to get a goal in the

15th minute of play. The pressure was on MVU as they were down on their home field. United didn’t trail for long. Forward Tania Nag dribbled hard at the defense and was able to get past the whole back line. As the San Francisco goalie came off her line, Tania slipped a no-look pass to Cassidy Scott. Scott finished with a strong goal, and the game was tied at halftime. In the second half, the Valkyries came out strong. They had the first goal of the half, and MVU was trailing again. MVU made hard attacks at goal, and unfortunately one resulted in an injury. As Cassidy Scott was dribbling to goal, one of San Francisco’s defenders attempted to get the ball from behind. At that same time, Scott turned and the two players ended up banging their knees. The team had a scare as Scott was writhing on the floor in pain. Scott was carried off the field and taken to the emergency room.

A couple plays after the injury, MVU was awarded another free kick from outside the 18 box. Once again, Anita Kavalan lined up to take the kick. Fortunately, this one went right to the back of the net and left no room for discussion. The two teams were tied yet again, and the game became more physical than ever. San Francisco was called for plenty of fouls throughout the game, but the number doubled at the end of the second half. MVU held up well, and the majority of the game was being played in the middle of the field. On one play, a San Francisco forward was able to get the ball and dribbled through the defense. She had an open shot, and scored the game winner. Although the game was almost over, MVU didn’t give up, but unfortunately were not able to respond by the time the game ended. The eventful game ended at 3-2, with San Francisco as the winner.

Community college soccer, volleyball update BY GARY VAN DEN HEUVEL The Ohlone College men’s soccer team continued its hot streak, extending their winning streak to four games with two wins last week over Monterey Peninsula and Gavilan College, respectively. The Renegades had their hands full against visiting Monterey Peninsula, who led twice in the game before Ohlone caught fire in the second half. The Lobos kept Ohlone on their toes with their adventurous play, mixing sharp passes and creating scoring opportunities against Renegade keeper Eric Underwood. Monterey was able to withstand an early Ohlone assault on goal and drew first blood when a defensive breakdown allowed Zach Ostarello to find the net. Ohlone was able to absorb a lot of offensive pressure from the Lobos, until Danny Ulloa leveled the match when he capitalized on a Monterey mis-kick and scored from the right wing. The Renegades were forced to fight back again in the second half after Monterey’s Galen Knobbe was able to get by Ohlone’s back line and deposit the ball into the net for a 2-1 lead. But from that point, Ohlone’s defense tightened up,

BY BIFF JONES PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW High school girls volleyball wrapped up most of the preseason last week with nonconference and tournament play. They will start league play this week. Local teams in the Bay Counties League, California School for the Deaf Eagles and Fremont Christian High School Warriors, saw CSD go 1-1 last week while Fremont went 0-2. On Tuesday, Sept. 14, the Warriors lost at San Leandro High School, 3-0, and Thursday, Sept. 16, they lost at Irvington High School, also 3-0. Next week they play Millennium High School of Tracy at home on Tuesday, Sept. 21, at 6 p.m. Fri-

and George Mayer converted two crosses into Renegades goals to give the Renegades the 3-2 win. “We are pleased that we can come back from a deficit,” said Ohlone coach Jan Nordmo. “We now know that this is within our ability. Going forward, this certainly helps our confidence as a team.” Mayer’s campaign as Ohlone’s top gun continued in the Renegades’ next game, a 2-1 win at Gavilan College in which Mayer assisted on both Ohlone goals, which were scored by Jarod Fluke and David Kulhanek. At week’s end, Ohlone is 5-2 in early season play. Ohlone’s women’s soccer team didn’t have as successful a week as their male counterparts, losing two close games to fall to a 2-3 record. Diablo Valley College started off the Renegades’ week with a 2-1 decision, making the most of their three shots on goal against Ohlone’s keeper Jessica Mortimer. Ohlone’s goal came off the foot of Laura Gorecki, who is the Renegades’ offensive leader with two goals and two assists. Later in the week, Ohlone visited Canada College and again was on the wrong end of a 2-1 score. Mari Sol Luna scored her first goal of the year for the Renegades, but unfortunately it was not enough.

The men’s soccer team from Chabot College had an uninspiring week, playing two games, scoring zero goals, but only suffering one loss as their record fell to 2-3-1 in nonconference play. West Hills College handed the Gladiators a 1-0 loss early in the week, but Chabot keeper Anthony Ahedo and the Gladiator defense was able to hold Contra Costa scoreless in a 0-0 tie on September 17. Chabot’s women’s team finally got off their winless, scoreless streak. After a 3-0 loss to West Hills dropped the Gladiators to 0-3, Chabot took out their frustrations with a 3-0 win over host Mission College. Jessica Panuco scored two of Chabot’s goals in the win. In volleyball, Ohlone suffered their first loss of the season, 3-2 to Columbia College (by scores of 16-25, 25-19, 25-16, 23-25, 159), but continued to show that they are an improving team with a 3-0 win over Lassen College. Meanwhile, Chabot’s volleyball continues to struggle. After losing four matches at the Delta Classic Tournament at San Joaquin College, the Gladiators dropped a match to Yuba on Sept. 15 by scores of 25-19, 2520, 25-21.

day, Sept. 24, the Warriors open league play at Contra Costa Christian High School. Coach Katrina Pedersen’s Eagles traveled to San Domenico High School of San Anselmo last Tuesday, Sept. 14, and came away with a 3-1 victory (25-23, 25-8, 11-25, 25-10). CSD was led by Alexandrina Brinkley-Green with nine aces, nine digs and six kills. According to Pedersen, “Freshmen Darriyan Thomas and LiAn Jackson showed that they belonged on the court continued on page 24

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with their defense.” Thomas had 10 digs, three kills and an ace while Jackson came up with eight digs. Setter Malage LeBlanc had 10 assists and six aces. Two days later, the Eagles traveled to Valley Christian High School of Dublin and lost 3-0. Next week, CSD hosts Fremont Christian on Saturday, Sept. 25, at 10 a.m. Mission Valley Athletic League (MVAL) play last week saw coach Lindsay Simeone’s Cougars of Newark Memorial High School come up with two, 3-0 home wins. Tuesday they defeated Skyline High School of Oakland (25-5, 25-15, 25-9) and Thursday, Hayward High School fell 25-9, 25-16, 25-8.

John F. Kennedy High School Titians defeated Tennyson High School last Tuesday, Sept. 14, 3-0 (25-14, 25-8, 25-14). Leading JFK were Paige Mattsson-Boze with three kills and three digs; Audrey Schlachter with eight aces; and Kelsy Fine seven assists. In the Oak Grove High School Invitational at San Jose last Saturday, Sept. 18, the Titians were defeated 2-0 (25-19, 25-20) by Gunderson High School of San Jose. Also last Saturday, Washington High School lost 2-0 (25-20, 25-18) to Branson High School of Ross in the Albany Cougar Challenge. Other MVAL games saw James Logan High School defeat Valley Christian 3-2; American High School over San Leandro, 3-1; and Irvington lose to Moreau Catholic High School, 3-2. Hayward Area Athletic League play had Moreau Catholic beat Ygnacio Valley High School 3-0. HAAL schools playing in the San Lorenzo High School Varsity Tournament saw Alameda High

Against Skyline, Cougar leaders were Kelsey Peace with eight kills and three blocks; Amy Blakley had four kills, three blocks and an ace; and Libby Snyder notched 18 assists and five aces. In the Hayward match, top players were Ariella Grozbord with four kills, four digs and an ace; Blakley with four kills and a block; and Snyder with her 15 assists and two kills. Newark is now 5-1 on the year and start MVAL play this Thursday, Sept. 23, at Mission San Jose High School.

School defeat both Tennyson (2-0: 25-17, 25-10) and Mt. Eden High School twice by the score of 2-0 (25-13, 25-17 and 25-13, 25-16). Tennyson also lost to Berkeley High School 2-0 (25-9, 25-9). Milpitas High School of the Santa Clara Valley Athletic League, El Camino Division lost last Monday, Sept. 13, to American, 3-1, and on Tuesday, Sept. 14, to Leland High School of San Jose, 3-2. Then last Thursday, Sept. 16, Milpitas picked up its first win of the year against Leigh High School of San Jose, 3-1.

BY GIOVANNI ALBANESE JR. After getting off to an 8-0 start to its season with a 3-2 road win over No. 11-nationally ranked UC San Diego, the No. 24-nationally ranked Cal State University-East Bay’s Lady Pioneers volleyball team stumbled over the weekend against two unranked teams. Cal State came up from La Jolla and fell in consecutive days to San Francisco State (Friday, Sept. 17) and Cal State Monterey Bay (Saturday, Sept. 18), both on the road, and both by scores of 3-1. Against San Francisco State, East Bay got off to a one-set-tonone lead with a 25-20 win. But San Francisco was able to rebound by claiming the next three sets – 17, 20, 23 – to get its first CCAA win, and move to 4-4 on the season while dropping the Lady Pioneers to 8-1 (3-1 in CCAA). In the losing effort, K.C. Walsh led the team with 20 assists; Lauren Massa led the Pioneers with 18 digs. Then on Saturday, East Bay went to Monterey and was handed its second straight CCAA match to Cal State Monterey Bay. Monterey Bay got off to a two-set lead with consecutive 25-21 wins. And after East Bay pulled within a set with a 25-20 win, CSMB put the match away with a 25-22 win in the fourth set. With the win, CSMB went to 6-1 on the season, 3-1 in CCAA, while CSEB fell to 8-2, 3-2 in CCAA. Amanda Limeberger had 29 assists in the losing cause; Sukhjit Athwal and Kitona Offord both had 13 kills for East Bay. East Bay finishes up its current five-game road swing with

matches at Cal State Stanislaus and Chico State on Friday, Sept. 24, and Saturday, Sept. 25, respectively. On the pitch, East Bay’s soccer program, both men and women, had a successful weekend, combining for three wins and a defeat. Amy Gerace’s Lady Pioneers picked up their first CCAA victory with a 1-0 shutout over Sonoma State on the road on Friday, Sept. 17. Michelle Garcia scored in the 80th minute to break the deadlock and give CSEB its first conference goal, and win, improving to 3-2-1 overall. “I’m very excited about our win today,” Gerace said. “Wins in the CCAA don’t come easy and I’m especially proud of the team effort. A lot of players really stepped up and did an excellent job for us.” Meanwhile, after watching the Lady Pioneers go over .500 with its win, East Bay’s men’s soccer club didn’t have the same fortunes, losing 2-0 at Sonoma State on Friday. Sonoma raced out to the 2-0 lead within 11 minutes from the opening kickoff. Taylor Varnadore scored in the third minute, while Trevor Hurst netted the Seawolves second goal in the 11th for the insurmountable lead. Andy Cumbo’s club fell to 1-5 on the season, 0-3 in CCAA, and has not put the ball in the back of the net since its opening match. “We’re making progress,” Cumbo said. “We did a better job today limiting our mistakes, although we still made a few. We need to continue to limit the amount of mistakes we’re making.” All those struggles that the men endured over a five-game

stretch disappeared on Sunday, Sept. 19, when they went to Arcata and topped Humboldt State, 3-1. Goals by Alexis Romo, Michael Dowson and Daniel Burst led the Pioneers to its first CCAA win under the guidance of Cumbo. “The team played great today,” Cumbo said. “They were focused on winning for 90 minutes. We started nine freshmen and two sophomores and they played like seniors.” Romo, a freshman, scored in the 19th minute and stopped a 512-minute scoring drought for the Pioneers. After Humboldt tied the match before the half, it was sophomore Dowson (in the 59th) and freshman Borst (in the 67th) who put the game away. For good measure, freshman keeper Bryce Bookhamer saved 12 shots to improve CSEB to 25, 1-3 in CCAA. Meanwhile, the women kept on the winning track, also topping Humboldt State in Arcata on Sunday, 2-1. Gail Bassett and Eugenie Foote each scored in the first half to propel the Lady Pioneers to 4-2-1 on the season, 2-2 in CCAA. Bassett scored in the 27th minute to get the scoring underway; eight minutes later, Foote scored the eventual game winner, burying a shot in the upper 90 and beating Jennifer Paugh in the 35th minute. Humboldt was able to get on the board in the 61st minute, but it was all Donna Williams would allow, as the freshman keeper guided her club to victory. “Our team executed the game plan very well in the first half,” Gerace said. “The second half was very emotional and extremely intense. I’m happy to get the second win this weekend and get back on the road.” East Bay’s soccer teams finish up a four-game road trip this weekend with games at San Francisco State on Friday, Sept. 24, and at Cal State Monterey Bay on Sunday, Sept. 26.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

Housekeeping

PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Mona Shah EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

WILLIAM MARSHAK

C

ity council sessions have now resumed and it is interesting to look back prior to the summer break and examine loose ends still remaining. With November elections and requests for additional funds from voters looming, incumbents will tout their experience and accomplishments while challengers focus on shortcomings. In Fremont, for instance, Niles has a new plaza and is busy using it while Centerville’s gaze still lingers on the vacant “unified” parcel, saddled with a developer intent on retaining control while pitching a second rate product. Meanwhile, the Center Theater remains dormant, waiting for the right combination of citizen revolt, city initiative and an owner who will finally come to grips with economic reality. Development of Fremont Boulevard in this district is in the balance. A landowner who wants monopolistic control of one side of the street by purchasing the old fire station claims this will be the impetus to visionary development. The current state of storefronts under his ownership and his lease of a “gateway” location at Fremont Boulevard and Mowry Avenue to a thrift store tells a different story. Irvington pins its hopes on renovating Bay Street and the construction of a BART station. Mission San Jose strug-

State Treasurer kicks off college savings month SUBMITTED BY JOE DEANDA State Treasurer Bill Lockyer has kicked off College Savings Month, announcing events across the state to inform families about planning and investment tools to

gles with the impact of heavy traffic along Mission Boulevard, The Warm Springs district is searching for an identity and the Patterson Ranch development is problematic, open to questions relating to increased housing and an impact on schools and the environment. Along with the historic districts, the grand plan for a central district continues to slumber as lighting and parking alternatives are tested. The biggest project on the drawing boards is the “NUMMI” parcel adjacent to the future Warm Springs BART station. Here, one of the largest parcels open to development waits for direction. Fremont’s new General Plan, long on concepts and short on specifics, will emerge soon accompanied by a “coffee table book” of graphics to illustrate the vision. With so many opportunities, it is almost unimaginable that the City of Fremont will remain two dimensional in scope. Emergence of specific and defined outcomes is necessary to create a vibrant vision attuned to the future. Leadership that can shake off the malaise of business as usual and face the challenges of Fremont’s future is required. This year’s elections will have a large impact on the direction of Fremont’s growth. Dogmatic party loyalties, political posturing and nonsensical verbal wanderings of the past are not suitable for the rapidly changing environment. Voters have an opportunity in November to determine whether current councilmembers Natarajan and Harrison will represent them in an embrace of a vibrant future. It is a fair question to ask these candidates if and how they are prepared for a dynamic period of growth

help them give their children the college education needed to compete for good jobs. “Planning and saving early for college is critical to ensuring a successful future for our children,” said Lockyer. “A college degree provides increased opportunity, better jobs and higher earnings in the emerging national and global economy. Despite difficult economic times, I encourage all parents and families to use College Savings Month to develop their plan to fund their children’s higher education expenses.” ScholarShare, California’s “529” college savings plan, will sponsor events throughout the state. Events include: “ScholarShare Free Second Sunday” at The Tech Museum of Innovation

or… are they simply occupying council seats to maintain the status quo. While two incumbents ask for voter support, another prepares to leave. Bob Wieckowski’s anticipated departure for statehouse verbosity, pseudo-intellectual glory and dearth of action may provide a welcome opening for new ideas in Fremont. The appointment to that vacant seat depends heavily on election results of the two incumbents seeking reelection. Party politics are already in play to select Weickowski’s successor. Previous political manipulations have led to the present council composition and results have been mixed. With some notable exceptions, much council business has been reduced to “me-too” decisions lacking in incisive review of staff presentations and direction. Handpicked party faithful are not always the best choice for a healthy future. Although councilmembers are poorly compensated, not even equivalent to entry level part-time staff (another editorial for another time), they still have the responsibility to act as the governing body of a large city. Voter decisions will have great bearing on the near future direction of Fremont. It is time to pay close attention to the demeanor, attitude and ideas of the candidates. Decisions at the polls this November will be critical.

in San Jose on September 12; “Grandparents Day” at the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center in San Diego, also on September 12; and “ScholarShare Children’s Book Festival” at Fairytale Town in Sacramento September 25-26, among others. For more information and a complete list of events, visit www.treasurer.ca.gov/scholarshare. As Treasurer, Lockyer serves as chairman of ScholarShare’s governing board. Named for the section of IRS code under which they were created, 529 plans are highly regarded for their tax-advantaged status. Earnings on investments grow tax-deferred, and disbursements, when used for tuition and other qualified higher education expenses, are federal and state tax-free.

William Marshak PUBLISHER

ScholarShare accounts may be opened online with as little as $50 or $15 when combined with regular, automatic contributions of at least $15 per month. ScholarShare has no annual account maintenance fee, no income limit, and offers a high maximum contribution limit of $320,000. The program currently holds more than $3.6 billion in assets with more than 272,000 accounts opened since inception. The College Board estimates that an employee with a bachelor’s degree will earn 61 percent more over a lifetime than one with only a high school diploma, creating a difference of nearly $1,000,000. To open an account or for information on ScholarShare, visit www.treasurer.ca.gov/scholarshare.

GOVERNMENT Simon Wong PROTECTIVE SERVICES Meenu Gupta SPORTS Giovanni Albanese Jr. SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Jeff Weisinger Gary van den Heuvel Nick Zambrano DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY William Mancebo PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Colleen Ganaye ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Pahoua Sayaovang Patricia Cragin BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua CARTOONS Angelo Lopez STARR TEAM Denny Stein J. D. Wolfe REPORTERS Julie Grabowski Janet Grant Todd Griffin Philip Holmes Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Joe Samagond Shavon Walker Alyson Whitaker INTERNS Alissa Gwynn Fina Mora WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for (1) the City of Union City, (2) the City of Fremont, (3) the County of Alameda, and (4) the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Union City, California. The principal office of TriCity Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher. Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com.

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2010® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

September 21, 2010

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

Page 27

Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.ci.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Hayward City Council

Fremont City Council Fremont City Council September 14, 2010

Hayward City Council September 14, 2010

Consent Calendar: Replace letter of credit from Allied Irish Bank (AIB) with U.S. Bank letter of credit. The change is precautionary due to downgrade of AIB short term rating and resulting increase in weekly interest rate of Fremont Certificates of Participation. Other Business: Approve Fremont Skate Park and art design for the staff preferred location next to Aqua Adventure Water Park. The budget is set at approximately $2M with approximately $1.2M slated for construction costs. Completion is anticipated Fall 2011. Neighbors living across Paseo Padre from the selected location in Central Park have opposed the site and asked that other locations be considered. Skateboard enthusiasts were present as well as a representative of the neighborhood directly across Paseo Padre Parkway from the proposed site. Council discussion centered on whether the preferred location was the best location. Councilmember Wieckowski strongly supported the staff recommendation noting that city staff had done all the background research necessary. Councilmembers Natarajan and Chan asked if construction would be delayed if alternative sites near the Teen Center and at the corner of Stevenson and Paseo Padre were explored more fully. They were told it would not. Councilmember Harrison and Mayor Wasserman were not willing to delay the decision citing concerns that if the vote was not completed immediately, there was a chance for more delays. Councilmember Natarajan relented with the statement that although she felt more exploration of alternative sites was warranted, she did not want to exhibit any appearance of blocking construction of the skate park. Mayor Bob Wasserman Aye Vice Mayor Bob Wieckowski Aye Anu Natarajan Aye Bill Harrison Aye (absent for Consent Calendar vote) Suzanne Lee Chan Aye

Sugar Bowl Bakery presented with Business Recognition Award for September 2010. Accepted by Michael Ly, VP and General Manager. Boards, Commissions, Committees and Task Force Administered Oath of Affirmation for appointments and reappointments to various boards, commissions, committees and task force. Work Session Access Study for South Hayward BART Transit-Oriented Development Mixed-Use Project presented by BART, Nelson Nygaard and City of Hayward. Consent Approved June 29, 2010 Special City Council/Redevelopment Agency meeting minutes (6 YES and 1 Abstention (Peixoto)). Accepted resignations of Meg Shaw from Downtown Business Improvement Area Advisory Board and Dulce Andrade from Hayward Youth Commission. Alternate Malcolm DeFrantz will serve the remainder of Andrade’s term which expires on June 30, 2012. Approved support for Local Streets and Roads Arterial Pavement Rehabilitation Federal Funding in the amount of $1.336M with a local match of $173,000, as per policies adopted by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission. Funding is administered by

the Alameda County Transportation Commission. Supported the cooperative, detailed vulnerability assessment of the impact of sea level rise on the Hayward/San Leandro shoreline’s infrastructure, following recommendation for such a study in the report “Preliminary Study on the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Resources of the Hayward Shoreline” presented on March 16, 2010. Hayward Area Shoreline Planning Agency and East Bay Regional Park District staff will continue to meet with other agencies, which will adopt this resolution and are interested in protecting the Hayward/San Leandro Shoreline, to develop a master plan. Approved plans, specifications and call for bids for demolition of Centennial Hall building (6 YES and 1 NO (Halliday)). Supported Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Program Financing. Public Hearing Inclusionary Housing Interim Relief Ordinance. Staff directed to return with ordinance, which will expire on December 31, 2012, to “Create an Affordable Housing Trust Fund” and determine how it might impact the Housing Element (5 YES, 2 NO (Halliday, Zermeno)). Public Comments Marilyn Foxx’s home has been burgled 27 times in the past 23 years and sought help. Mayor

Sweeney referred her to Police Chief Ron Ace. Real estate broker Rob Simpson asserts the city has not been as thorough in its review of the Russell City Energy Center project and its impact, as the Bay Area’s fifth largest polluter, on the Hayward Shoreline as it has with other developments and sub-divisions. Doug Ligibel praised Councilman Zermeno’s lead in starting a local task force in his neighborhood, supported by the Keep Hayward Clean and Green Task Force, and encouraged other council members to follow suit. He also expressed concern about the growing number of teenage murder victims. He attributes this, in part, to immediate peer pressure noting that the young seldom take a longer-term view of their lives. Ligibel requested an update by the end of 2010 on how Measure A (Utility User Tax) revenue has been spent. Mayor Sweeney pointed out that Measure A prevented job losses in Hayward Police Department which is staffed at its highest level in 10 years and has enabled the introduction of a gang injunction program. Mayor Michael Sweeney – Yes Barbara Halliday – Yes Olden Henson – Yes Marvin Peixoto – Yes Bill Quirk – Yes Mark Salinas – Yes Francisco Zermeno - Yes

Sunol Glen School Board meeting review BY ALYSON WHITAKER

BY ALYSON WHITAKER When the numbers were announced, there was a mixture of joy and pride. A 23-point increase in the Sunol Glen USD API score to 909 brought the one-school district to the number two district spot in the county—second only to Piedmont’s score of 925. Parents, staff, and students alike are thrilled with the number. The district has the philosophy of educating the “whole child.” Academics play a key role at the school, but staff members also work to ensure that kids can be kids. Art, music, computer lab, and other enriching programs are incorporated into the daily curriculum. Over the past few years the small school has grown in popularity. Seventy-five percent of the student population comes from neighboring districts. Many are drawn to the small-school appeal, and a desire for their students to participate in the “extras” that have been reduced or eliminated altogether from so many districts in recent years from a lack of funding. Having a strong academic program makes the school even more appealing. The school has capped enrollment at 270, and current enrollment is almost at that level. All grades now have a waiting list, and some students now in attendance were on the list for nearly two years. The STAR test in the spring is an important indicator of what students are learning throughout the year, and is the standard used for ranking schools throughout California. The state urges all schools to be above 800. Yet many schools struggle to meet that minimum requirement. Principal/Superintendant Molleen Barnes credits the fabulous staff for the achievement. “Through careful and ongoing assessment of students’ abilities and their learning styles, our teachers really do implement individualized teaching plans for each student.” Early intervention helped pull students up to the “proficient” and “advanced” levels. This is Barnes’ fourth year at the district. “I am extremely proud of the staff. I feel extremely fortunate to work with the staff, parents, and community. As a cohesive unit, we are working together to create this amazing school environment. I truly believe this is what has made our school as successful as it is!” Barnes and the staff had hoped to reach the 900 benchmark by 2011. A year ahead of schedule, now the staff is excited to see what levels can be reached in the years to come.

The September 14 Sunol Glen School Board meeting began with the introduction of three new grade level teachers. Stephani Fallini has joined the staff as the sixth grade homeroom teacher. Recently relocated from Oregon, she has taught fourth and fifth grades for the past six years. Ashley Amaro and Lynn Schirmer both joined the K/1 teaching team. Both from Brentwood, this is Ashley’s fourth year teaching and Lynn’s third. The board reviewed and approved the textbooks in use at the school for the 2010/11 school year. Textbook selection is an ongoing process for many schools and districts. They are continually changing with updates and changes in teaching philosophies, and most textbooks are obsolete or outdated within seven years. Board member Don Ball hopes that in the near future, electronic versions of textbooks will become the standard. Publishers need to realize the need to keep up with technology, and recognize that the high price of textbook replacement puts a strain on the already underfunded public school system. Jeff Potter, Director from the Alameda County Office of Education, presented the Unaudited Actuals from the 2009/10 yearend. Ultimately, total expenditures were $84,000 less than anticipated. Federal revenue de-

creased slightly from the Estimated Actuals, but some portions of Unrestricted and Restricted Local Revenue were higher than anticipated at year-end. The Sunol Glen Preschool and Eagle’s Nest (after-school care program) both came in with higher revenue than expected, with a combined excess of over $11,000. Sunol Glen qualifies for a portion of the one-time funding from the New Jobs Bill for Education. A preliminary estimate of $49,000 is expected to pass through to the District, with funds anticipated within four to six weeks. Until the money is received, it will not be added into the 2010/11 budget. Principal/Superintendant Molleen Barnes outlined the staff development plan for the new school year. She worked with staff over the summer to compile a list of goals, aimed at maximizing each student’s potential. “Every student, every lesson, every day” is the motto. Year-round assessments will help teachers ensure that all students are reaching and exceeding grade-level benchmarks. Last year, Mrs. Barnes had presented the staff with a goal of reaching 900 API by 2011, and was thrilled to announce that this milestone was reached and surpassed, with a 2010 API score of 909. Maintaining a positive attitude on campus is another goal of the staff. A positive school climate directly impacts student achievement. Detentions and sus-

pensions are down 55 percent from 2008/09, and staff members incorporate building important character traits into the curriculum. Monthly student council assemblies focus on good citizenship and school spirit is promoted on a weekly basis. The current enrollment is strong, with waiting lists in almost every grade. A goal of 96 percent Average Daily Attendance (ADA) is in place, which is directly tied to the money the district receives from state and federal funding. The school has kept class sizes down, with K–3 at 22:1 and grades 4–8 at an average of 26:1. Representatives from the school’s parent teacher organization, Sunol Glen Community Club, presented fundraising plans for the year, and gave an update on the membership drive. The Community Club supports many of the “extras” at the school, including field trips, classroom technology and literacy, intramural sports, subsidy to the art and music programs, and more. The board commended the Community Club for its positivity and support. Two seats are up for election in November, and four candidates are running. Current board members Don Ball and Guin Van Dyke are on the ballot, along with community members Diane Everett and Gerry Beemiller. The next Board meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, October 19.

Home of Hope Gala SUBMITTED BY JENNIFER NEALE The Home of Hope (HOH) 13th Annual Gala Fundraiser Dinner will be on Saturday, October 2, at the Chandni Restaurant in Newark. Cocktails for this Black & White Gala begin at 6 p.m., and because it was so popular last year, there will also be a Martini Bar and Diamond Giveaway. Scott Budman,

from NBC, will be our MC, and Jill Ellis, co-Founder of the Center for Early Intervention of Deafness in Berkeley, will be our keynote speaker. Ms. Ellis will present the six-day Sister City Project that she and R. P. Singh from the Ardash School, part of the Pingalwara Trust, created in Amristar, India. For the first time in India, HOH shared cultural perspectives about deafness, and educational oppor-

tunities for children were coordinated for 100 physicians, nurses, and teachers. Also at the dinner, the new Home of Hope Youth Chapter will be introduced. Our entertainment program will feature the Tattva Fusion Dance Company, the Dil Se ‘A Cappella’ Team, and dancing after dinner. Tickets are $70 per person. You can mail your check to Home of Hope, 190 Tobin Clark Drive, Hillsborough, CA

94010, and tickets will be waiting for you at the Gala. You can also call, or send an email to, Nilima Sabharwal at (650) 5203204 or nilima_sab@yahoo.com. Home of Hope Gala Saturday, October 2 6 p.m. The Chandni Restaurant 5748 Mowry School Road, Newark (510) 668-1051 Tickets: $70

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. FG10535202 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Chien-Chun Chang, Yeou-Song Lee for son Shih-Pu Lee for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Chien-Chun Chang, Yeou-Song Lee for son Shih-Pu Lee filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Shih-Pu Lee to Jasper Shih-Pu Lee The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Notice of Hearing: Date: November 4, 2010, Time: 2:30 PM, Dept.: 608 The address of the court is 39439 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice Date: September 8, 2010 Richard O. Keller Judge of the Superior Court 9/14, 9/21, 9/28, 10/5/10 CNS-1943879# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. FG10534602 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Brainer Youkhaneh Koulan for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Brainer Youkhaneh Koulan to Bryner Youkhaneh The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Notice of Hearing: Date: October 14, 2010, Time: 2:30 PM, Dept.: 608 The address of the court is 39439 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: September 2, 2010 Richard O. Keller Judge of the Superior Court 9/14, 9/21, 9/28, 10/5/10 CNS-1943875# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. FG10532786 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Jeffrey Brian Santis for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Jeffrey Brian Santis filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Jeffrey Brian Santis to Yitzhak Aharon Santis The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: October 21, 2010, Time: 2:30 p.m., Dept.: 608 The address of the court is 39439 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Whats Happenings Tri City Voice-Fremont Date: August 24, 2010 Richard O. Keller Judge of the Superior Court 8/31, 9/7, 9/14, 9/21/10 CNS-1935353#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 442625 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Can - Do ! Installations, 5051 Silver Reef Drive, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Edward Aguirre, 5051 Silver Reef Drive, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Edward Aguirre This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 8, 2010 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/21, 9/28, 10/5, 10/12/10 CNS-1949066# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 441858 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Herrera Entertainment, 36763 Silk Ct., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Richard Herrera, 36763 Silk Ct., Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Richard Herrera This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 17, 2010 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/14, 9/21, 9/28, 10/5/10 CNS-1944713# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 442089 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Apparent Etch, 2347 Lockwood Ave., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Anson Liu, 2347 Lockwood Ave., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Anson Liu This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 28, 2010 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County

Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/14, 9/21, 9/28, 10/5/10 CNS-1944545# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 441987 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Airsdream Deli and Catering, 2910 East Ave., Hayward, CA 94541, County of Alameda Virginia “Ginger” Jo Brown, 2910 East Ave., Hayward, CA 94541 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Virgina Brown, Sole Proprietor This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 19, 2010. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/14, 9/21, 9/28, 10/5/10 CNS-1944047# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 442352 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Sunny Sidhu, 4510 Peralta Blvd. #25, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Amaninder Pal Singh, 4510 Peralta Blvd. #25, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on May 2005 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Amaninder Pal Singh This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 30, 2010. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/7, 9/14, 9/21, 9/28/10 CNS-1940649# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 442321 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Maglay, 46864 Shale Common, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Chenchulakshmi Balakrishnan, 46864 Shale Common, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Chenchulakshmi Balakrishnan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 30, 2010. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/7, 9/14, 9/21, 9/28/10 CNS-1939975# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 442180 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Handyman Paul, 3008 San Andreas Dr., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Paul David Simmons, 3008 San Andress Dr., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Paul David Simmons This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 25, 2010 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/31, 9/7, 9/14, 9/21/10 CNS-1936604# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 441621 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: McElligott Consulting, 41547 Chadbourne Drive, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Anthony S. McElligott,41547 Chadbourne Drive, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 6/22/1998 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Anthony S. McElligott This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 09, 2010. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/31, 9/7, 9/14, 9/21/10 CNS-1935826#

GOVERNMENT

WILL HOLD PUBLIC HEARINGS ON THE FOLLOWING PROPOSALS. SAID PUBLIC HEARINGS WILL BE HELD AT 2:00 P.M., ON MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2010, AT THE CITY OF FREMONT DEVELOPMENT SERVICES CENTER, RANCHO HIGUERA CONFERENCE ROOM, 39550 LIBERTY STREET, FREMONT, CALIFORNIA, AT WHICH TIME ANY AND ALL INTERESTED PERSONS MAY APPEAR AND BE HEARD. Item 1. GUPTA AFTER SCHOOL – 194 FRANCISCO LANE – (PLN2011-00022) – to consider a Zoning Administrator Use Permit for an after school tutoring center (ages 8-18) to be located in the Warm Springs Planning Area. This project is categorically exempt from the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) per section 15301, Existing Facilities. Project Planner – Tanu Jagtap, (510) 494-4537, tjagtap@fremont.gov For further information on any of the above items, call (510) 494-4440 and request to speak with the project planner in charge of the particular project. * NOTICE * If you challenge the decision of the Zoning Administrator in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the Zoning Administrator at, or prior to, the public hearing. BARBARA MEERJANS ZONING ADMINISTRATOR 9/21/10 CNS-1949550# SUMMARY OF PROPOSED ORDINANCE As Introduced September 14, 2010 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF FREMONT ADOPTING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONSOLIDATED AMENDED AND RESTATED REDEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR THE FREMONT MERGED REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT (INCLUDING IRVINGTON, NILES, CENTERVILLE, AND INDUSTRIAL AREAS) PURSUANT TO HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE SECTION 33333.6(e)(2)(D), AND AMENDING RELATED ORDINANCES IN CONNECTION THEREWITH On September 14, 2010, the Fremont City Council introduced the above Ordinance adopting an amendment (the “Amendment”) to the Consolidated Amended and Restated Redevelopment Plan for the Fremont Merged Redevelopment Project (the “Consolidated Redevelopment Plan”), and making related statutory findings under the California Community Redevelopment Law (the “CRL”). The Amendment extends the time limits on the effectiveness of the Consolidated Redevelopment Plan, and on the repayment of indebtedness and receipt of property tax increment revenue by the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Fremont (the “Agency”) under the Consolidated Redevelopment Plan by two years with respect to the Irvington Original Area, Niles Original Area, and Industrial Area portions of the Fremont Merged Redevelopment Project Area, as permitted by Health and Safety Code Section 33333.6(e)(2)(D), as a result of the payment by the Agency to the Educational Revenue Augmentation Fund of the amounts required for Fiscal Years 2004-05 and 2005-06 (the “ERAF Payments”). In accordance with the CRL, the Ordinance includes findings and supporting evidence that: the Agency has complied with various statutory obligations related to affordable housing and adoption of a five-year implementation plan; and that the funds used to make the ERAF Payments would otherwise have been used by the Agency to pay costs of the redevelopment program for the Fremont Merged Redevelopment Project. A certified copy of the full text of the Ordinance is posted in the office of the City Clerk, 3300 Capitol Avenue, Building A, Fremont, and is available for review upon request. The second reading for adoption is currently scheduled for September 28, 2010, at 7:00 pm, at City Hall, 3300 Capitol Avenue, Building A, Fremont. DAWN G. ABRAHAMSON CITY CLERK 9/21/10 CNS-1948536# CITY OF FREMONT PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the City of Fremont City Council will hold a public hearing to consider the following proposal. Said public hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m. , Tuesday, October 5, 2010, Council Chambers, 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg. A, Fremont, CA, at which time all interested parties may attend and be heard: HALIMI RESIDENCE DEMOLITION PERMIT REQUEST – 43569 ELLSWORTH STREET Public Hearing (Published Notice) to Consider an Appeal of a Historical Architectural Review Board (HARB) Determination that an Existing SingleFamily Dwelling Located in the Mission San Jose Conservation District is a Potential Register Resource and of the Accompanying HARB Denial of a Request for Permission to Demolish the Structure (PLN2010-00249)(Continued from 9/14/10) If you challenge any decision of the City Council in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City Council at, or prior to, the public hearing. DAWN G. ABRAHAMSON CITY CLERK 9/21/10 CNS-1948531# ORDINANCE NO. 735-10 ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF UNION CITY APPROVING MUNICIPAL CODE AMENDMENT, AT-03-10, TO MODIFY CHAPTER 7.16, PROPERTY MAINTENANCE, TO ADD PROVISIONS RELATING TO THE MAINTENANCE OF DISTRESSED, VACANT PROPERTIES THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF UNION CITY DOES ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: SECTION 1. The Ordinance including Exhibit A, attached hereto and made a part hereof by this reference, a copy of which is on file with the City Clerk, will modify Chapter 7.16, Property maintenance, to clarify the City’s expectations regarding the maintenance and management of vacant, distressed properties and incorporate the provisions of California Civil Code Section 2929.3 regarding unmaintained, residential foreclosed properties. SECTION 2. A red-lined copy of the proposed amendments to Chapter 7.16, labeled Exhibit B, are attached hereto and made a part hereof by this reference, a copy of which is on file with the City Clerk. SECTION 3. The proposed Ordinance is consistent with applicable General Plan goals and policies that seek to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the community and discourage blight, and is necessary and desirable to achieve the purposes of Title 18, which include: • Promotion and protection of the public health, safety, morals, comfort, convenience and the general welfare of the people; • Protection of the character and maintenance of the stability of residential, business and industrial areas within the City, and to promote the orderly and beneficial development of such areas; and • Conservation of the taxable value of land and buildings throughout the City. SECTION 4. The Ordinance is exempt from further environmental review in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guidelines Section 15061(b)(3). SECTION 5. Within fifteen (15) days from and after adoption, this Ordinance shall be published once in the Tri-City Voice, a newspaper of general circulation printed and published in Alameda County and circulated in the City of Union City, in accordance with California Government Code Section 36933. This Ordinance shall take effect and be enforced thirty (30) days after its adoption. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Union City at a regular meeting held on September 14, 2010, by the following vote: AYES: Councilmembers Dutra-Vernaci, Fernandez, and Navarro, Vice Mayor Valle, Mayor Green NOES: None ABSENT: None ABSTAIN: None APPROVED: /s/ Mark Green MARK GREEN, Mayor

N O T I C E OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY OF FREMONT ZONING ADMINISTRATOR

ATTEST: /s/ Renee Elliott RENEE ELLIOTT, City Clerk

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE ZONING ADMINISTRATOR OF THE CITY OF FREMONT

APPROVED AS TO FORM: /s/ Benjamin T. Reyes II

BENJAMIN T. REYES II, City Attorney 9/21/10 CNS-1948437#

PROBATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF BERNARD LENGBRIDGE CASE NO. RP10-528978 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of continuance: Bernard Lengbridge A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Raymond S. Smith, Public Administrator in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Raymond S. Smith, Public Administrator be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 14, 2010 at 9:30 a.m. in Dept. 201 located at 2120 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Berkeley, CA 94704. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a formal Request for Special Notice (DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: Raymond S. Smith, Public Administrator, P.O. Box 2071, Oakland, CA 94604, Telephone: 510-577-1968 9/17, 9/21, 9/28/10 CNS-1945158#

TRUSTEE SALES NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE T.S No. 126554302 APN: 463-0099-057-00 TRA: 15001 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx8538 REF: Nawabi, Sameh IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED November 13, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 12, 2010, at 12:00pm, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded November 20, 2007, as Inst. No. 2007399550 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, executed by Sameh Nawabi, An Unmarried Man, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank At the steps to the entrance of the county courthouse 1225 Fallon Street Oakland, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 30420 Meridien Cir Union City CA 94587-1551 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $726,766.24. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. Regarding the property that is the subject of this notice of sale, the “mortgage loan servicer” as defined in civil code § 2923.53(k)(3), declares that it has obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to civil code section 2923.53 and that the exemption is current and valid on the date this notice of sale is recorded. the time frame for giving a notice of sale specified in civil code section 2923.52 subdivision (a) does not apply to this notice of sale pursuant to civil code sections 2923.52. This California Declaration is made pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.54 and is to be included with the Notice of Sale. I, Jaimee Gonzales, of Wachovia Mortgage, FSB (‘Mortgage Loan Servicer’), declare under penalty of perjury, under the laws of the State of California, that the following is true and correct: The Mortgage Loan Servicer has obtained from the Commissioner of Corporation a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the accompanying notice of sale is filed AND The timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Civil Code Section 2923.52 does not apply pursuant to Section 2923.52 or 2923.55. Date: 7/22/09 Name of Signor: Jaimee Gonzales Title and/or Position: Vice President For sales information: Mon-Fri 9:00am to 4:00pm (619) 5901221. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: September 10, 2010. (R342907 09/21/10, 09/28/10, 10/05/10) 9/21, 9/28, 10/5/10 CNS-1946665# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale No. : 20100015006016 Title Order No.: 100368592 FHA/VA/PMI No.: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 03/28/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEX WEST, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 04/04/2005 as Instrument No. 2005128271 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of ALAMEDA County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: FREDDY ALVARADO, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 10/12/2010 TIME OF SALE: 12:30 PM PLACE OF SALE: AT THE FALLON STREET ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON STREET, OAKLAND, CA. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2663 MORELLO CT, UNION CITY, CALIFORNIA 94587 APN#: 486-0093-083 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $630,348.87. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and

Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AGENCY SALES & POSTING 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 714-730-2727 www.lpsasap.com NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 09/18/2010 NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. 15000 Surveyor Boulevard, Suite 500 Addison, Texas 75001-9013 Telephone: (866) 795-1852 Telecopier: (972) 661-7800 ASAP# 3723017 09/ 21/2010, 09/28/2010, 10/05/2010 9/21, 9/28, 10/5/10 CNS-1946064# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS # CA09-281741-CL Order # 114880 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 9/1/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): SUNILJEET KHALSA, AN UNMARRIED MAN AND MARTHA URZUA, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN Recorded: 9/8/2005 as Instrument No. 2005385739 in book -, page - of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, California; Date of Sale: 10/18/2010 at 12:30 PM Place of Sale: At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $569,070.56 The purported property address is: 36374 BETTENCOURT ST NEWARK, CA 94560 Assessors Parcel No. 092A-0510-08701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, please refer to the referenced legal description for property location. In the event no common address or common designation of the property is provided herein directions to the location of the property may be obtained within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale by sending a written request to Aurora Loan Services LLC 10350 Park Meadows Dr. Littleton CO 80124. Pursuant to California Civil Code 2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: [ 1 ] The mortgage loan servicer has not obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the notice of sale is filed; [ 2 ] The timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Section 2923.52 does apply to this notice of sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: 9/16/2010 Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com Reinstatement Line: 619645-7711 x3704 Quality Loan Service, Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder’s rights against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3733085 09/21/2010, 09/28/2010, 10/05/2010 9/21, 9/28, 10/5/10 CNS-1946062# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE File No. 7662.20108 Title Order No. 3809103 MIN No. APN 501-0730-085 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/24/07. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in §5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Trustor(s): Nestor De La Cruz Recorded: 06/01/07, as Instrument No. 2007206721, of Official Records of Alameda County, California. Date of Sale: 10/06/10 at 12: 00 PM Place of Sale: At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street., Oakland, CA The purported property address is: 4097 ABBEY TERRACE #231, FREMONT, CA 94536 Assessors Parcel No. 501-0730-085 The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $433,000.83. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid, plus interest. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the beneficiary, the Trustor or the trustee. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or its authorized agent was recorded with the appropriate County Recorder’s Office and reads substantially as follows: The mortgage loan servicer declares that (1) it has obtained a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to California Civil Code § 2923.52 and (2) the timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of California Civil Code § 2923.52 does not apply pursuant to California Civil Code § 2923.52 or 2923.55. Date: September 10, 2010 NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC., as Trustee Victoria Gutierrez, Authorized Signatory 505 N. Tustin Avenue, Suite 243, Santa Ana, CA 92705 Sale Info website: www.USA-Foreclosure.com Automated Sales Line: 714-277-4845 Reinstatement and Pay-Off Requests: (866) 387-NWTS THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE FEI# 1002.114671 09/14, 09/21, 09/28/2010 9/14, 9/21, 9/28/10 CNS-1945459# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS # CA-09232834-PJ Order # 400016398 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 7/27/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): DAVID VALENCIA, AND MARBELLA VALENCIA, HUSBAND AND WIFE Recorded: 8/10/2007 as Instrument No. 2007296634 in book -, page - of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, California; Date of Sale: 10/5/2010 at 12:30 PM Place of Sale: At the

September 21, 2010

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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PUBLIC NOTICES Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $606,594.19 The purported property address is: 425-427 C ST UNION CITY, CA 94587 Assessors Parcel No. 486-0015-031-02 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, please refer to the referenced legal description for property location. In the event no common address or common designation of the property is provided herein directions to the location of the property may be obtained within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale by sending a written request to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. 7301 Baymeadows Way Jacksonville FL 32256. Pursuant to California Civil Code 2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: [ 1 ] The mortgage loan servicer has not obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the notice of sale is filed; [ 2 ] The timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Section 2923.52 does apply to this notice of sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: 9/8/2010 Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com Reinstatement Line: 619645-7711 Quality Loan Service, Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder’s rights against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3727483 09/14/2010, 09/21/2010, 09/28/2010 9/14, 9/21, 9/28/10 CNS-1943632# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TSG No.: 09-8489206 TS No.: 20099077400662 FHA/VA/PMI No.: APN:543-0468-008 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 08/29/07. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 4, 2010 at 12:00 PM, First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC f/k/a First American LoanStar Trustee Services, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 08/31/07, as Instrument No. 2007318580, in book , page , of Official Records in the Office of the County Recorder of ALAMEDA County, State of California. Executed by: PARMESHWAR NAIDU and ANITA NAIDU,. WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) At the Fallon Street emergency exit to the Alameda County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon St., Oakland, CA. All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST APN# 543-0468-008. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 4495 MARTIN STREET, UNION CITY, CA 94587. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $1,070,867.19. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. The beneficiary or servicing agent declares that it has obtained from the Commissioner of Corporations a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the Notice of Sale is filed and/or The timeframe for giving Notice of Sale specified in subdivision (s) of California Civil Code Section 2923.52 applies and has been provided or the loan is exempt from the requirements. Date: 09/07/10, LANDSAFE DEFAULT TITLE RO First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC f/k/a First American LoanStar Trustee Services, LLC, 1800 Tapo Canyon Road, Mail Stop SV-2-174, Simi Valley, CA 93063 Original document signed by Authorized Agent, Chet Sconyers -- FOR TRUSTEE’S SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (916) 939-0772. First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC f/k/a First American LoanStar Trustee Services, LLC May be Acting as a Debt Collector Attempting to Collect a Debt. Any Information obtained may be used for that purpose. NPP0165610 09/14/10, 09/21/10, 09/28/10 9/14, 9/21, 9/28/10 CNS-1942928# TSG No.: 4274116 TS No.: 20099073502191 FHA/VA/PMI No.: APN: 483 -0049-065 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 11/ 08/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 10/04/2010 at 12: 00 P.M., First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC f/k/a First American LoanStar Trustee Services, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 11/17/2005, as Instrument No. 2005494337, in book , page , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California. Executed by: AUTONIO BANIAS and LUZVIMINDA VENTURA, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) AT THE STEPS TO THE ENTRANCE OF THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE 1225 FALLON STREET OAKLAND CALIFORNIA All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST APN# 483 0049-065 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 31409 SAN JACINTO CT, UNION CITY, CA 94587 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $613,411.43. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. First American Title Insurance Company First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC f/k/a First American LoanStar Trustee Services, LLC 3 FIRST AMERICAN WAY SANTA ANA, CA 92707 FOR TRUSTEE’S SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 619-590-1221 Date: 09/03/2010 First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC f/k/a First American LoanStar Trustee Services, LLC MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Requirements of SB1137 have been met pursuant to the Notice of Sale

Declaration of record. The beneficiary or servicing agent declares that it has obtained from the Commissioner of Corporations a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the Notice of Sale is filed and/or The timeframe for giving Notice of Sale specified in subdivision (s) of California Civil Code Section 2923.52 applies and has been provided or the loan is exempt from the requirements. Authorized Signature: Chet Sconyers 09/14/10, 09/21/10, 09/28/10 R-341303 9/14, 9/21, 9/28/10 CNS-1942898# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE APN: 087-0222006 Trustee Sale No. 1273577-15 LOAN NO: XXXXXX3353 TRA:15078 REF: WONG, PAUL UNVER Property Address: 35540 MONTERRA TERRACE #201, UNION CITY CA 94587 IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED November 14, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On October 04, 2010, at 12:30pm, CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded November 28, 2007, as Inst. No. 2007405424, in book XX, page XX, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of ALAMEDA County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: PAUL KIN WA WONG AND SUINING DENG, HUSBAND AND WIFE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: AT THE FALLON STREET ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE 1225 FALLON STREET OAKLAND CALIFORNIA all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: COMPLETELY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 35540 MONTERRA TERRACE #201 UNION CITY CA 94587 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $483,217.68. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. Regarding the property that is the subject of this notice of sale, the “mortgage loan servicer” as defined in Civil Code 2923.53(k)(3), declares that it has obtained from the Commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Civil Code section 2923.53 and that the exemption is current and valid on the date this notice of sale is recorded. The time frame for giving a notice of sale specified in Civil Code Section 2923.52 subdivision (a) does not apply to this notice of sale pursuant to Civil Code Sections 2923.52. CALIFORNIA DECLARATION I, John Kennerty, of America’s Servicing Company (“Mortgage Loan Servicer”), declare under penalty of perjury, under the laws of the State of California, that the following is true and correct: The Mortgage Loan Servicer has obtained from the Commissioner of Corporation a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the accompanying Notice of Sale is filed. AND/OR The timeframe for giving Notice of Sale specified in subdivision (a) of Civil Code Section 2923.52 does not apply pursuant to Section 2923.52 or 2923.55. DATE: 07/03/ 2009 FOR SALES INFORMATION: Mon - Fri 9: 00am to 4:00pm (714)730-2727 CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION 525 EAST MAIN STREET P.O. BOX 22004 EL CAJON CA 92022-9004 Dated: September 01, 2010 CALWESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION By: - Authorized Signature ASAP# 3724583 09/ 14/2010, 09/21/2010, 09/28/2010 9/14, 9/21, 9/28/10 CNS-1942670# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS # CA-10340223-AL Order # 100068481-CA-GTO YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 1/17/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): GLORIA B VALENCIA AND, HERMINIO Z VALENCIA JR , WIFE AND HUSBAND Recorded: 1/27/2006 as Instrument No. 2006029242 in book -, page - of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, California; Date of Sale: 10/4/2010 at 12:30 PM Place of Sale: At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $441,276.93 The purported property address is: 6185 MADELAINE DR NEWARK, CA 94560 Assessors Parcel No. 092A-0615-011 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, please refer to the referenced legal description for property location. In the event no common address or common designation of the property is provided herein directions to the location of the property may be obtained within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale by sending a written request to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. 7301 Baymeadows Way Jacksonville FL 32256. Pursuant to California Civil Code 2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: [ 1 ] The mortgage loan servicer has not obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the notice of sale is filed; [ 2 ] The timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Section 2923.52 does apply to this notice of sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: 9/2/2010 Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com Reinstatement Line: 619645-7711 Quality Loan Service, Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder’s rights against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3720776 09/14/2010, 09/21/2010, 09/28/2010 9/14, 9/21, 9/28/10 CNS-1942040#

T.S. No.: 2010-02190 Loan No.: 70168463 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 2/24/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: MARIA CORAZON SANDING AND ROGER SANDING, WIFE AND HUSBAND, AS JIONT TENANTS Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC Recorded 8/30/2006 as Instrument No. 2006331578 in book ---, page --- and rerecorded on --- as --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Alameda County, California, Date of Sale: 10/4/2010 at 12:00 PM Place of Sale: At the Fallon Street emergency exit of the Alameda County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $717,380.79 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 30856 Cambridge Way Union City , CA 94587 A.P.N.: 482-0015-032-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. Pursuant to California Civil Code §2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: The beneficiary or servicing agent declares that it has obtained from the Commissioner of Corporation a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the Notice of Sale is filed and/or the timeframe for giving Notice of Sale Specified in subdivision (s) of California Civil Code Section 2923.52 applies and has been provided or the loan is exempt from the requirements. Date: 9/2/2010 Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee c/o 18377 Beach Blvd., Suite 210 Huntington Beach, California 92648 For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (866) 960-8299 Robin Pape, Trustee Sale Assistant 9/14, 9/21, 9/28/10 CNS-1941896# T.S. No.: 2010-02146 Loan No.: 70204128 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 8/8/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: DANNIE L ANDERS AND CHARLENE ANDERS, HUSBAND AND WIFE AND DONNA BASE, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC Recorded 8/18/2006 as Instrument No. 2006317519 in book ---, page --- and rerecorded on --- as --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Alameda County, California, Date of Sale: 10/4/2010 at 12:00 PM Place of Sale: At the Fallon Street emergency exit of the Alameda County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $597,605.88 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 34705 Clover Street Union City , CA 94587 A.P.N.: 087-0008-002-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. Pursuant to California Civil Code §2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: The beneficiary or servicing agent declares that it has obtained from the Commissioner of Corporation a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the Notice of Sale is filed and/or the timeframe for giving Notice of Sale Specified in subdivision (s) of California Civil Code Section 2923.52 applies and has been provided or the loan is exempt from the requirements. Date: 9/2/2010 Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee c/o 18377 Beach Blvd., Suite 210 Huntington Beach, California 92648 For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (866) 960-8299 Robin Pape, Trustee Sale Assistant 9/14, 9/21, 9/28/10 CNS-1941881# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale No. 09-510270 INC Title Order No. 090533954CA-DCI APN 092A-0511-072-00 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 07/25/05. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 09/27/10 at 12:30 p.m.. Aztec Foreclosure Corporation as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 07/29/05 in Instrument No. 2005324527 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, California, executed by: Jean Ton Nguyen and Leon H. Nguyen, wife and husband, as Trustor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Nominee for OneWest Bank FSB, as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state), at the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California described as: 35998 BETTENCOURT STREET, NEWARK, CA 94560 The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $543,097.50 (Estimated) Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. Requirements of SB1137 have been met pursuant to the Notice of Sale Declaration of record. The mortgage loan servicer has obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the notice of sale is filed. DATE: August 31, 2010 Elaine Malone Assistant Secretary & Assistant

Vice President Aztec Foreclosure Corporation c/o 4665 MacArthur Court, Suite 250 Newport Beach, CA 92660 Phone: (800) 731-0850 or (602) 222-5711 Fax: (847)627-8803 For Trustee’s Sale Information Call 714-730-2727 http:// www.lpsasap.com www.aztectrustee.com ASAP# 3717943 09/07/2010, 09/14/2010, 09/21/2010 9/7, 9/14, 9/21/10 CNS-1939812# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE T.S No. 117632202 APN: 486-0045-048-01 TRA: 15-072 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx3164 REF: Perez, Sonya IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED December 31, 2003. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On September 27, 2010, at 12:00pm, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded January 12, 2004, as Inst. No. 2004012388 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, executed by Sonya Renee Munoz Perez An Unmarried Woman, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank At the steps to the entrance of the county courthouse 1225 Fallon Street Oakland, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1330, 1362, 1364 I Street Union City CA 94587 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $342,246.77. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. Regarding the property that is the subject of this notice of sale, the “mortgage loan servicer” as defined in civil code § 2923.53(k)(3), declares that it has obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to civil code section 2923.53 and that the exemption is current and valid on the date this notice of sale is recorded. the time frame for giving a notice of sale specified in civil code section 2923.52 subdivision (a) does not apply to this notice of sale pursuant to civil code sections 2923.52. This California Declaration is made pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.54 and is to be included with the Notice of Sale. I, Jaimee Gonzales, of Wachovia Mortgage, FSB (‘Mortgage Loan Servicer’), declare under penalty of perjury, under the laws of the State of California, that the following is true and correct: The Mortgage Loan Servicer has obtained from the Commissioner of Corporation a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the accompanying notice of sale is filed AND The timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Civil Code Section 2923.52 does not apply pursuant to Section 2923.52 or 2923.55. Date: 7/22/09 Name of Signor: Jaimee Gonzales Title and/or Position: Vice President NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE EXHIBIT “A” Trustee Sale No. 117632202 Loan No. XXXXXX3164 Regarding Sonya R Perez, (hereinafter referred to as “borrower”) as required by Californian Civil Code Section 2923.5 ©, I, Jaime Gonzales, an officer of Wachvovia Mortgage, FSB, declare as follows: As indicated below, Wachovia Mortgage, FSB, made the following efforts to contact the borrower, but contact was not made. Mailed correspondence to the borrower containing a toll free number for Wachovia Mortgage, FSB, and regarding the delinquency. The undersigned authorizes the trustee, foreclosure agent and/or their authorized agent to sign on behalf of the beneficiary/authorized agent, the Notice of Sale containing the declaration required pursuant to Civil Code 2923.5. I certify (or declare) under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of California that the foregoing is true and correct. For sales information: Mon-Fri 9:00am to 4:00pm (619) 590-1221. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: August 26, 2010. (R-339705 09/07/10, 09/14/10, 09/21/10) 9/7, 9/14, 9/21/10 CNS-1937804# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE T.S No. 128661002 APN: 087-0018-079 TRA: 15-078 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx7930 REF: Flores, Verly IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED December 20, 2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 12, 2010, at 12:00pm, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded December 29, 2006, as Inst. No. 2006472702 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, executed by Verly Flores, A Married Woman, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank At the steps to the entrance of the county courthouse 1225 Fallon Street Oakland, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 34884 Herringbone Way Union City CA 94587-4685 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $567,065.73. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. Regarding the property that is the subject of this notice of sale, the “mortgage loan servicer” as defined in civil code § 2923.53(k)(3), declares that it has obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to civil code section 2923.53 and that the exemption is current and valid on the date this notice of sale is recorded. the time frame for giving a notice of sale specified in civil code section 2923.52 subdivision (a) does not apply to this notice of sale pursuant to civil code sections 2923.52. This California Declaration is made pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.54 and is to be included with the Notice of Sale. I, Jaimee Gonzales, of Wachovia Mortgage, FSB (‘Mortgage Loan Servicer’), declare under penalty of perjury, under the laws of the State of California, that the following is true and correct: The Mortgage Loan Servicer has obtained from the Commissioner of Corporation a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the accompanying notice of sale is filed AND The timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Civil Code Section 2923.52 does not apply pursuant to Section 2923.52 or 2923.55. Date: 7/22/09 Name of Signor: Jaimee Gonzales Title and/or Position: Vice President For sales information: Mon-Fri 9:00am to 4:00pm (619) 5901221. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: September 20, 2010. (R339272 09/21/10, 09/28/10, 10/05/10)

9/21, 9/28, 10/5/10 CNS-1936375# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale No. : 20100015005472 Title Order No.: 100342450 FHA/VA/PMI No.: - YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/24/2002. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEX WEST, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 06/14/2002 as Instrument No. 2002263272 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of ALAMEDA County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: MELIZA A. GARCIA, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 09/27/2010 TIME OF SALE: 12:30 PM PLACE OF SALE: AT THE FALLON STREET ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON STREET, OAKLAND, CA. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 36394 CONCORD STREET, NEWARK, CALIFORNIA 94560 APN#: 092A-0611-027 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any , shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $289,510.22. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AGENCY SALES & POSTING 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 714-730-2727 www.lpsasap.com NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 09/05/2010 NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. 15000 Surveyor Boulevard, Suite 500 Addison, Texas 75001-9013 Telephone: (866) 795-1852 Telecopier: (972) 661-7800 ASAP# 3707997 09/ 07/2010, 09/14/2010, 09/21/2010 9/7, 9/14, 9/21/10 CNS-1935588# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee’s Sale No. 05-FWA-96279 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 11/9/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On September 28, 2010, at 12:30 PM, AT THE FALLON STREET ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON STREET, in the City of OAKLAND, County of ALAMEDA, State of CALIFORNIA, REGIONAL SERVICE CORPORATION, a California corporation, as duly appointed Trustee under that certain Deed of Trust executed by GLORIA TAN, A MARRIED WOMAN, as Trustors, recorded on 11/17/2006, as Instrument No. 2006428245, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, State of CALIFORNIA, under the power of sale therein contained, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, for cash, or cashier’s check (payable at the time of sale in lawful money of the United States) without warranty express or implied as to title, use, possession or encumbrances, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it as such Trustee, in and to the following described property situated in the aforesaid County and State, to-wit: TAX PARCEL NO. 087-0336-034-00 From information which the Trustee deems reliable, but for which Trustee makes no representation or warranty, the street address or other common designation of the above described property is purported to be 1020 CARNELIAN TERRACE , UNION CITY, CA 94587. Said property is being sold for the purpose of paying the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust, including fees and expenses of sale. The total amount of the unpaid principal balance, interest thereon, together with reasonably estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Trustee’s Sale is $441,248.12. In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c), the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrowers) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one or more of the following methods: by telephone, by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting or the borrower has surrendered the property to the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent and that the compliance with Civil Code Section 2923.5 was made at least thirty (30) days prior to the date of this Notice of Sale. The mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: it has obtained a final or temporary order of exemption and said order is current and valid as of the date of the Notice and the time frame set forth in California Civil Code 2923.54 does not apply or California Civil Code 2923.54 does not cover this loan.Dated: 9/4/2010 REGIONAL SERVICE CORPORATION, Trustee By: JEAN GREAGOR, AUTHORIZED AGENT Agent for Trustee: AGENCY SALES AND POSTING 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200, IRVINE, CA 92602 Telephone Number: (800) 5422550 Sale Information: (714) 730-2727 or http: //www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3691879 09/07/2010, 09/14/2010, 09/21/2010 9/7, 9/14, 9/21/10 CNS-1932079# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 100064877 Title Order No. 10-8-273194 Investor/ Insurer No. 1103317833 APN No. 543-0362-025 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 09/20/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.” Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by ROY TABORA AND MARIVEL TABORA, HUSBAND AND WIFE, dated 09/20/2004 and recorded 09/30/04, as Instrument No. 2004443749, in Book -, Page -), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 10/05/2010 at 12:30PM, At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 5109 SLOAN WAY, UNION CITY, CA, 94587. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $1,115,674.31. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ‘’AS IS’’ condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 09/05/2010 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ASAP# 3696478 09/07/2010, 09/14/2010, 09/21/2010 9/7, 9/14, 9/21/10 CNS-1931787#

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

News from New Haven Unified SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE Heroes and tailwinds: During an address that was part of the District’s Back-to-School celebration for employees, Superintendent Kari McVeigh talked about how ordinary folks sometimes become heroes. She also pointed out that heroes often benefit from others who provide a “tailwind” to push them along. The Superintendent then invited employees to pass along stories of “heroes and tailwinds” that she could share with others. Here are three stories from District principals: “The first person I thought of was Pat Lothian, kindergarten teacher at Pioneer. Knowing I am a new principal at the site, she has been checking on me almost daily since I returned to work at the beginning of August. She has definitely gone above and beyond the call of duty time and time again. Everything from arranging a teacher’s room that will be out on maternity leave when school starts, to helping our custodian decide which furniture goes where. I would not have been ready for school to start this year without her help and guidance!” - Cheri

Benafield, Pioneer Elementary “I just want to put a plug in for Grace Kim. She has been working tirelessly and relentlessly on a new job that has been assigned to her, the master schedule. Grace never complains about the long hours she puts in or the fact she has given up many of her summer weekends to work on this giant task. You will often find a light on in her office at 10:30 p.m. at night as she works to balance our classes and make sure the schedule works for our staff and students. I think she really deserves a pat on the back. Her work ethic is truly extraordinary.” - Amy McNamara, James Logan High “Aland Walker, technician, has always gone over and above for our staff. He maintains the dignity of the District expectations while making sure things run smoothly for us. He helps set up for meetings, he answers questions as needed and he really keeps our technology needs in check. When we’re in a “panic” he responds quickly so we can get our work done effectively. All with a smile and good-humored conversations. He is truly a gem.” - Debi Knoth, Searles Elementary Parents, employees and other community members are invited

Milpitas Unified increases API scores SUBMITTED BY BEVERLY JAMES Milpitas Unified School District Academic Performance Index (API) gained another 17 points in 2010 from 814 to 831. Congratulations to the students and staff! Milpitas Unified exceeded the API growth of Santa Clara County and the State of California and all schools made their school wide targets. Ten of Milpitas’ schools currently exceed the State target of 800. Seven schools made tremendous API gains from 2009 to 2010. Spangler School had the largest gain of 46 points from 806 to 852; Russell experienced the second highest gain of 45 points with an API increase from 827 to 872. Other significant gains include: Randall’s API from 730 to 768; Rancho’s API from 825 to 856; Burnett’s API from 827 to 853; Weller’s API from 781 to 795 and Milpitas High’s API from to 783 to 796. Under the federal No Child Left Behind accountability rules, schools and districts must make progress towards meeting Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) criteria. The proficiency targets are increasing about 11 percent each year, with the goal of all students being proficient by 2014. Districtwide, we met AYP participation and proficiency criteria. The District is pleased to have increased the percent of students reaching proficiency in all of our significant subgroups. Still, some of our student subgroups did not meet the proficiency targets in English Language Arts. Similarly, the Milpitas schools met their AYP criteria school-wide, but some did not meet the proficiency targets of some of their significant subgroups. More great news! The District met all state Title III Accountability objectives for its English language learner student population. Primarily, the objectives monitor if students are gaining proficiency in the English language in reading, writing, listening and speaking. While there is much to celebrate there are still areas the District needs to focus on to maximize the learning of all our students. MUSD will continue efforts to address the needs of all students and achieve our Strategic Plan goal of closing the achievement gap while improving academic achievement for ALL students. The following California Department of Education (CDE) website provides API/AYP information on schools and districts: data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/

to share their stories of “heroes and tailwinds” by e-mailing Superintendent McVeigh (kmcveigh@nhusd.k12.ca.us). Another hero – and an opportunity: In the aftermath of last year’s public discussions about budgeting priorities for items such as class-size reduction, home-toschool transportation, and cocurricular and extra-curricular activities, the parent of a New Haven elementary school student was moved by stories told by families for whom it was difficult to get their children to school. The parent donated her daughter’s bus pass, which was used for the rest of the year by a middle school student from a disadvantaged family. And this year – even though state budget cuts have forced the District to limit transportation only to middle school students whose families live farthest from school – the elementary parent has offered to buy a pass for another student. If you’d like to make a similar contribution, please contact Director of Parent and Community Relations Rick La Plante at (510) 476-2610 or

rlaplante@nhusd.k12.ca.us. A full-year, round-trip pass for a student who qualifies for free or reduced-price lunch costs $240, and a semester pass is $125. If you’ll buy the pass, we’ll find a student who can use it. Cesar Chavez Middle School is “Cool School of the Year”: Cesar Chavez Middle School (CCMS) is one of only five schools in North America – and the only one in California – to win the 2010 “Cool School of the Year” competition sponsored by Office Depot. As part of this year’s Back to School campaign, Office Max associates across North America were asked to submit entries on behalf of a student in their lives that explains why their school deserves to be named “Cool School of the Year.” Cesar Chavez Middle School was nominated by Pamela Nonato, a service consultant in the education division of Office Depot, who worked with teacher Hilda Perez. According to Principal Alberto Solorzano, more than 30 CCMS students wrote essays in support of the school’s nomination. The school will receive a

$1,000 gift card from Office Depot. Names ‘n Notes: Logan freshman and aspiring comedian Joey Bragg has reached the final round of the San Jose Improv stand-up comedy competition, reports his father, Emanuele Elementary media specialist Ken Bragg. The finals will be Tuesday, October 5, starting at 8 p.m. Free tickets are available by e-mailing Mr. Bragg (kbragg@nhusd.k12.ca.us). New Haven students who need a little extra help can get it Monday through Thursday afternoons at the Homework Center at the Union City Library, 34007 Alvarado-Niles Road. Students in kindergarten through 10th grade can get help in all subject areas, from high school students under the supervision of adult tutors. Paper, pencils, calculators, and some textbooks and laptop computers are available. The Homework Center is open from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. For elementary students, a parent or caregiver must remain in the library while the child is receiving help. For more information call (510) 745-1464, ext. 7.

FUSD shows strong gains in API scores SUBMITTED BY OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT Just released test results of the annual California Department of Education Accountability Progress Report (APR) show that Fremont Unified School District has continued to achieve strong gains in the Academic Performance Index (API). The API is one measure of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) and is given on a scale of 200-1,000 with schools scoring above 800 ranked as “high performing.” FUSD’s 2010 Academic Performance Index (API) growth score remains strong at 868, an increase of 9 points from last year’s base API. “This District’s academic gains are built on a foundation of good teaching, but continuous improvement only happens when we all work together,” said Dr. Morris, FUSD Superintendent. “These impressive test scores require the work of committed students, dedicated teachers, involved parents, and the support of our secretaries, bus drivers, cafeteria workers, custodians, etc. Every employee plays a role in the success of our students.” Thirty-two of FUSD’s 42 schools maintained or increased from their 2009 base API score. Robertson High School, the district’s continuation school, showed the greatest increase in API in the district at 84 points. “Our focus going into the school year was to continue our work to improve the teaching and learning that goes on at Robertson High School,” said principal Sal Herrera. “With that in mind we were more strategic in our approach to instruction, and we helped students understand the importance of the STAR test to themselves, to Robertson, and to the District. Overall, the students and staff at Robertson High School have plenty to be excited about.” Durham Elementary School increased their API score by an impressive 64 points, the second largest increase in the district. This will keep them from progressing further into Program Improvement. “Teachers shared their best ideas with each other, improving their everyday teaching and providing powerful interventions focused on specific skills gaps of students,” said Principal Teresa Bonaccorsi. “Focus, teamwork and positive energy were the key elements to our success.”

Mission San Jose Elementary school has the highest API score in the district at 995. “The staff at Mission San Jose Elementary is gratified and proud of this increase in our API scores because it validates our focused efforts with students who did not pass some portion of the STAR test the previous year,” said Principal Bonnie Curtis. “MSJE is committed to continuing this effort during the 2010-11 school year as well as meeting the academic needs of students of all ability levels.” A few additional highlights from this year’s report include: Of 28 FUSD elementary schools, 19 met their 2010 AYP goals, as did 1 of 5 junior high schools and 2 of the 5 comprehensive high schools. 25 of the 28 elementary schools, 4 of the 5 junior high schools, and 2 of the 5 comprehensive high schools have API scores above 800, ranking them as “high performing”. 18 schools posted double-digit increases in their API score. Hirsch increased their API 46 points to 885 and Brier, a Title I school, showed an increase of 37 points to 856. Four schools had API increases of more than 20 points: Maloney (27 points to 851), Irvington (25 points to 856), Azevada (23 points to 829) and Mattos (22 points to 863). “The Board members are proud of all of our schools for continuing to make gains, year after year,” said Lara York, FUSD Board President. “Even during these trying times, our students and teachers continue to show that hard work pays off. We all are proud of our Fremont schools.” The AYP and API present increasing challenges for all California districts because the bar for success is now being raised higher every year. FUSD uses an on-line assessment reporting and analysis system to better examine students’ specific skill strengths and weaknesses. With this tool and other resources and supports, schools will be better able to provide the needed strategies to help all of our students succeed. The goal continues to be for all students to test proficient or above by 2014. Fremont Unified School District is comprised of 42 schools including 29 elementary, 5 junior high, 6 high schools, an adult school, and the Mission Valley ROP. For more information visit www.fremont.k12.ca.us.

SUBMITTED BY RALPH BORRMANN The week beginning September 13, 2010, marks the 40th anniversary of the Clean Air Act, a landmark law that serves to protect and improve air quality in the United States. The Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the regional agency chartered with protecting air quality in the ninecounty Bay Area, was established in 1955 to deal with increasingly unhealthy air quality in the region. Since its passage in 1970, the Clean Air Act has spurred significant improvements in human health policies and lead to the implementation of increased environmental conservation efforts in the United States. Since 1970, the law’s impact can be measured in the Bay Area in several key ways, including: Ozone pollution has been reduced by one third, even though population and the economy have grown significantly. Public exposure to ozone pollution has decreased by 90 percent. Carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide have been effectively controlled and have not reached unhealthy levels for decades. In 1973, the Air District pioneered vapor recovery controls on gas pumps which are now used throughout the world. The Air District continues to pioneer innovative and cost-effective air quality controls. In support of the Clean Air Act’s 40th anniversary, the Air District will share with the public landmark achievements that have come from the District’s work in support of the Act in the last four decades. Residents can check the Air District’s Facebook and Twitter feeds to view photographs showing air pollution from times past in the Bay Area, and information highlighting improvements in public health and air quality. For more information about the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, visit www.baaqmd.gov.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

Page 31

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Senior Systems Analyst in Fremont, CA. Analyze business requirements & design/conduct performance testing of web apps. Requires BA/BS in Comp. Sci. or Electronics/Electrical Eng. & 5 yrs. exp. Position involves visits to customer sites. Mail resumes to Cavisson Systems, Inc., 44426 Cavisson Ct., Fremont, CA 94539, Attn: Anil Kumar.

Senior Software Engineer in Fremont, CA. Develop, support, maintain, & implement complex project modules; manage design & architecture of products. Requires BA/BS in Comp. Sci. or Eng. & 5 yrs. exp. Position involves travel to customer sites. Mail resumes to: CSWL, Inc., 39465 Paseo Padre Parkway, Ste. 2900, Fremont, CA 94538, Attn: Human Resources

Business Development Specialist, Fremont, CA. Analyze company business development Opportunities and finance. MBA degree required. Send resumes to Greatlink Int'l, 44168 S. Grimmer Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538

Name Change I, ‘Usha Rani Sandi’ resident of Fremont, CA changed name for US Passport, shall henceforth be known as ‘Usha Reddy Sandi’

Room for Rent Niles District in Fremont. 2nd floor four plex with stair. $650/month single person. Access to living room, kitchen, bedroom and bath with shower Contact Bob 541-261-9263

Pancake breakfast BY SIMON WONG PHOTO COURTESY OF MIKE JAY Mission Peak District Scout Troop 176 invites the public to start the day with a hearty breakfast at Centerville Presbyterian Church, Fremont, on Sunday, September 26. Following the tremendous success of their first fundraising breakfast in 2009, members of the Troop, leaders and parents decided to make the event an annual tradition. Last year, approximately 250 people consumed a total of 500 pancakes prepared from two gallons of milk, 25 lbs of butter, 45 lbs of pancake mix and four large bottles of syrup. Incredibly, one person manned the grill. Bob Christie, whose son left the Troop four years ago, is no shrinking violet. He belongs to the Dawn Breakers Lions Club which hosts its own annual Spring pancake fundraiser at which he also volunteers. He brought his own equipment to assist the boy scouts. Parents keep a low profile, working in the kitchen, preparing the pancake mix and arranging other breakfast items. The boy scouts will serve the visitors. This year, the organizers hope to attract 400 people to the event and beat the $2,424 raised in 2009. The funds raised go towards the purchase of camping

and cooking equipment, subsidize camping trips and events, pay for the merit badges awarded to members of the Troop and benefit boy scouts who would otherwise be unable to attend camp. “In the past, Troop 176 organized flea markets and other fundraisers but last year we decided to hold a pancake breakfast. Amita Gupta is the brains behind the operation, which takes about

Singh, Kimberly Tinsley, Elena Vera, Yen Willis and Virginia Wong) created a very successful event. This year we hope to repeat that success,” said Mike Jay, Troop 176 Committee Chairman. “This event would not be possible without everyone volunteering their time and effort. Our sponsors have been extremely generous, providing pancake mix, coffee and all the other breakfast Members of Mission Peak District Boy Scout Troop 176 serving, Pancake Breakfast 2009, Centerville Presbyterian Church, Fremont.

Members of Mission Peak District Boy Scout Troop 176 laying tables, Pancake Breakfast 2009, Centerville Presbyterian Church, Fremont

four months to plan, and with the help of her team of parents (Hiten Bhuptani, Susan Garrett, Lynne Guagliardi, Rajesh Gupta, Mike Jay, Vera Kazak, Aarti Makhijani, Dharmesh Makhijani, Prity Patel, Sailesh Patel, Ashu

items we need to help the boys,” explained Amita Gupta, whose son Arjun is a member of Troop 176. Only a few remaining tickets are available. Individual tickets are $7 per person. Family tickets

(for four people) are $24. Anyone interested in Scouting can speak with an adult leader at any Troop’s weekly meeting. For more information about Scouting within the San Francisco Bay Area Council, visit www.sfbac.org. Alternatively contact Joe Barton at (510) 5779227 and joeb@sfbac.org or Steve Armstrong at starmstr@comcast.net about the different scouting units in the Mission Peak District (serves Fremont, Union City and Newark) and Tres Ranchos District (serves Hayward, Castro Valley, San Lorenzo and San Leandro). For more information about Scouting within the Santa Clara County Council, visit www.scccbsa.org. Alternatively, contact Ken Schott at (408) 280-5088 or ken@scccbsa.org about the differ-

ent scouting units in the Coyote Creek District (serves Edenvale, Evergreen, Milpitas, Berryessa, Alum Rock, Mt. Pleasant, parts of downtown and East San Jose).

BSA Troop 176 Pancake Breakfast Fundraiser Sunday, September 26, 2010 7:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Avenue, Fremont (510) 585-7590 Tickets: $7 (individual) $24 (family of four)

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

SUBMITTED BY SUSAN L. ROSE

T

he Fremont Symphony Orchestra opens its 47th season with “Triumph of the Spirit,” led by Conductor David Sloss in a program of three works demonstrating each composer’s spiritual triumph. Opening the evening will be Henry Mollicone’s ethereal “Final Light,” the last movement of a larger work, depicting “passage of the soul from this world to a higher realm and the attainment of true spiritual peace” according to the composer. Mollicone will give a concert preview of his work, beginning at 7:15 p.m. Fremont Symphony Young Artist Competition winner, Stephen Kim will perform Peter Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto. In writing this concerto, Tchaikovsky recovered both his inspiration and his health after a terrible bout of depression. Stephen has won many prizes, including first prize in the prestigious California International Young Artists Violin Competition. He also claimed first prize in the Felix Khuner Concerto Competition, the Mondavi Center Young Artist Competition, and the San Francisco Symphony Youth Orchestra Concerto Competition. He has been a featured soloist on National Public Radio’s From the Top. In the depths of despair over his deafness, Ludvig van Beethoven found a new voice and new hope in writing his Symphony #3, the Eroica. David Sloss describes this symphony as “one of the longest single strides in the evolution of the symphony....with the breadth of its emotional landscape, the intensity of its rhetoric and the grandeur of its formal design.” The Fremont Symphony will honor the Fremont Bank Foundation at this concert for their 15 years of support for the Symphony. “The Triumph of the Spirit” Concert Saturday, September 25 Preview at 7:15 p.m. 8:00 p.m. Smith Center for the Performing Arts Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 371-4859 www.fremontsymphony.org Tickets: $20-$48

SUBMITTED BY HEATHER MELLON You probably have noticed the Hayward home that looks like a castle on Second Street, which locals commonly refer to as “The Castle.” On August 28th, over 150 Hayward Area Historical Society members and friends celebrated the home’s 100th anniversary, with many spirited attendees dressed in medieval costumes. Party goers were treated to private tours given by the Wiese family, the current owners of the home. Entertainment was provided by the McBride Irish Dancers performing traditional dances, and live music by Darcy Noonan and her Celtic band. The Castle boasts many interesting stories from its 100 year history. First built in 1910 by William Conners, The Castle was a gath-

ering place for Hayward’s high society. Conners was a retired miner from Canada, and lived at the house with his wife, step-son, father-in-law and 2,000 ducks! He acquired the ducks in a short-lived effort to become a poultry farmer. In the 1940s, then owner George Luce converted The Castle into several separate apartment units, and in the 1960s the State Division of Highways tried to tear down The Castle to make room for a new freeway. The Williams family, who owned The Castle at that time, spent thousands of dollars in court fighting to save it while they continued to restore it. Patricia Wiese and her late husband, Robert, purchased the home in the 1980s and spent much time and energy restoring The Castle to the mint condition it is now in.

SUBMITTED BY JANELLE COLEMAN The public is invited to attend the 25th Annual College Night on Wednesday, October 6, sponsored by Fremont Unified, New Haven, and Newark School Districts. This event will be held in the Ohlone Community College – Epler Gymnasium from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Approximately 5,000 parents and students attend College Night each year to visit with representatives from over 80 public and independent colleges and universities, military academies, and ROTC programs. In addition, there will be a financial aid seminar from 7:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. A panel discussion among admission advisors from the University of California, the California State University system, and Ohlone College will begin at 7:45 p.m. Ohlone College Night Wednesday, October 6 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Ohlone Community College, Epler Gymnasium 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont For information contact: Janelle Coleman at jcoleman@fremont.k12.ca.us

SUBMITTED BY KELLY GRANT “Get your wag on” at Humane Society Silicon Valley’s Walk ‘n Wag fundraiser on Saturday, October 2, from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. at their Animal Community Center in Milpitas. All animal lovers are encouraged to walk the 5K course in honor of their pets. Check-in begins at 8 a.m., with the walk commencing at 10 a.m. Walk ‘n Wag is also open to schools and corporations that want to form walk teams. There is no fee to register for the walk, but walkers are encouraged to obtain pledges to help raise money for the shelter animals. All funds go towards the care of HSSV’s homeless animals. Dog agility demonstrations, dog costume contests, vendor booths, and more await the entire family at this event. HSSV’s 8th Annual Walk ‘n Wag Saturday, October 2 Check-in begins: 8 a.m. Walk begins: 10 a.m. Event ends: 1 p.m. HSSV Animal Community Center 901 Ames Ave., Milpitas (408) 262-2133 www.hssv.org/walk

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010

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For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

L

Special Life Events

Marriage

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge

important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat

mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Due to space limitations, only a brief announcement is possible without charge. Those who decide to publish more extensive information and/or a picture may do so at

Obituaries

low prevailing rates – as low as $35 - on this page. Although every attempt will be made to include announcements in a timely manner, since TCV is published weekly, submissions received after Friday of the week preceding a distribution date may not be published until a later issue.

Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the

Greater Tri-City Area.

Obituaries Aldon R. Janke William M. Consolacion RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 27, 1957 – September 15, 2010

RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 15, 1937 – August 28, 2010

Sister Patrice Bradshaw RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 23, 1922 – September 17, 2010

Taher M. Darghous RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 17, 1925 – September 19, 2010 Berge • Pappas • Smith

Fremont

Chapel of the Angels

Chapel of the Roses

(510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

(510) 797-1900 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

Special Life Events

Special Life Events

At 100 years old, Frances Boyle has no complaints It is said that the appearance of a comet portends great things. The appearance of two notable comets in 1910 – Daylight Comet and Halley’s Comet - was indeed a favorable omen; it was the year that Frances Boyle was born. She spent her childhood on a farm in south-

eastern Indiana farm between North Manchester and South Whitley. When asked what was grown on the farm, she replied, “everything.” One of eight siblings, her three brothers and five sisters helped with the chores on the farm and, when old enough, walked to grade school over a mile away. She remembers that the only time they needed help with the journey from school was when it rained. She says, “Dad would always come after us with the

horse and buggy but there was only one seat for the driver.” The kids would hang on as best they could for the ride back home. “That was the roughest part of my life,” recalls Frances with a chuckle. She adds, “I have come a long ways since then.” After attending high school in South Whitley, Frances began working at age 17 in town. Following marriage, the newlyweds moved to Wenatchee, Washington and eventually Southern California where Frances worked for Los Angeles County as a legal secretary until retirement at age 65. “I worked for attorneys as a secretary all my life and loved it,” she says with pride. Without regret, Frances says that she has always been drawn toward architecture, but was not able to pursue this field as a vocation. “I am fascinated by how buildings are constructed.” Looking fit and able to move about on her own, Frances is spry and active woman who belies her age. She continues to knit, crochet and read and during her 100year birthday party held at Besaro Mobile Home Community in Fremont, reflected on her years as happy and productive. Frances looks forward to many more years with her family, especially her greatgreat grandchildren. “I have had a very good life without any serious illness; I have no complaints.”

SUBMITTED BY MELANIE MCINERNEY Broadway and film veteran Duffy Hudson brings his talent and fascination with Edgar Allan Poe to life in this unique one-man play. Using a combination of biographical information and the dramatic interpretation of Poe’s literature, Hudson provides a unique, in-depth theatrical experience of the life and works of one of America’s best-known and most enigmatic personalities.

An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe Thursday, September 30 7 p.m. Milpitas Public Library Auditorium 160 North Main Street, Milpitas (408) 262.1171 ext. 3616 www.SantaClaraCountyLib.org Free

Former commissioner honored BY SHAVON WALKER Helen Cabiles, who retired from the Union City Human Relations Commission earlier this year, was recognized for her hard work when Council met on September 14. Mayor Mark Green presented her with a copy of the proclamation.

Cabiles began working with the Human Relations Commission in June 2003, providing leadership in a number of areas. She helped organize community gang awareness forums, advised the city on its Youth Violence Prevention and Intervention Program and supported and volunteered for other events such as Make-a Wish and National Night Out. She was also very involved with the Union City 50th Celebration (UC50). Serving as Treasurer, she provided financial reports and helped develop the internal accounting policies and procedures that helped make the event a success. In her free time, Cabiles works with the Reliance Center in San Francisco that focuses on helping opiate-dependent clients. Unfortunately, there have been budget cuts that threaten the program’s future. “I loved working for the Human Relations Commission but I when I realized that the Reliance Center was in trouble, I wanted to help,” she said. “They need me, my church needs me and my husband needs me.” Cabiles looks forward to using her time efficiently, as always, and will occasionally speak at Human Relations Commission meetings.

Research on Yucatan Peninsula SUBMITTED BY DIANE DANIEL PHOTO BY PHILLIP HOFSTETTER Cal State East Bay students Patrick Conlan of El Sobrante, Fabian Magaloni of San Leandro, Lilia McIntyre of Oakland, and Bruce Mishkit of Lafayette, have returned from the Yucatan peninsula where they compiled hours of video and hundred of images at Maya archaeological sites for their group masters thesis. Accompanying them on the six day, six-site visit were Phillip Hofstetter, professor and chair of art who lives in Orinda, and Janet Green, assistant professor of art who lives in Burlingame. The four multimedia graduate students gathered first-hand information for their group masters thesis, “Yaxche: The Tree of Life,” that is to be completed by June 2011. The project focuses on collaborative interpretations of life in an ancient Maya society, using the leading-edge technologies of Apple’s iPhone and iPad. A short video of the trip can be viewed at http://yaxche.net.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 21, 2010


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