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INSPIRING HOMES WITH HEART

staying in Create a home you won’t want to leave

60+

beautiful Mother’s Day buys

WINDOW DRESSING

How to do curtains well

17

page special

bathrooms

with attitude

+ inspiring moodboards + Shannon’s top trends + surfaces and tiles we love

Wayd Munro’s Peter Walsh’s building know-how new Q&A

Lighten up Top picks for pale flo

ors


Main image photography John Gollings Photog credits, see colorbond.com/photog. COLORBOND , Monument , The Colours of Australia Since 1966 , BlueScope and the BlueScope brand mark are registered trade marks


THE COLOURS OF AUSTRALIA SINCE 1966. COLORBOND steel is a familiar sight around our homes and yards, but there are many larger buildings that incorporate COLORBOND steel into their designs too, such as Ivanhoe Grammar School’s Science and Senior Years Centre. Inspired by a volcanic rock called a ‘thunder egg’, the design uses COLORBOND steel in the colour Monument for its outer skin to ensure that the building fits well in its surroundings and to contrast with the wonderland of colours inside. McBride Charles Ryan architect, Debbie Ryan, said ‘COLORBOND steel helped us out enormously – the cost was reasonable, the material is efficient and it looks beautiful’. Visit COLORBOND.COM to find out more.

of BlueScope Steel Limited. Phone 1800 022 999.

2017 BlueScope Steel Limited ABN 16 000 011 058. All rights reserved. 19176.IO.0517


[ Geometric Accessories ]

[ Textured Glass Lanterns ]

[ Lattice Dining ]

Let’s keep in touch | Become a Homestyle member for the latest product news

[ Margot Cushions ]

#bedbathntable


Creating your dream home DESIGN. INNOVATE. CREATE. DECORATE.

[ Baluchi ]

SHOP ONLINE OR FIND YOUR NEAREST STORE | bedbathntable.com.au


EDITOR’S LETTER

Our cover home makes it easy to see the forest for the trees

R

oad trips – do you love them? I do, always have – it’s the unique combo of music, car snacks and conversations that meander in a way that they don’t when you’re squeezed into a cafe. The majority of my road trips currently involve driving to my parents’ home on the NSW south coast. The payoff is long, lazy afternoons in their sun-drenched garden. A little while back, I was lucky enough to be able to pretend it was necessary for me to go on a little road trip to our cover home, which is near Oberon, NSW. And didn’t we have a lovely time? (I mostly carried rugs and stopped Coco the pug from eating our lunch.) In fact, the home is owned by a familiar face in Inside Out. Stylist Jono Fleming (you’ll find his lovely SJB-designed apartment in our December 2016 issue) took on this very personal project a couple of years ago when he and Allison Williams of Green Apple Interiors & Design set about creating his parents’ dream home. Having stayed in the worker’s cottage on the land for years, Peter, Tracy and the rest of the family now have a few more creature comforts when they visit their beautiful property. Turn to page 56 to get the full picture. (Thanks for the tour of the pines, Pete!) On a practical note, this issue we’re serving up bathroom inspiration. For those trying to decide on their surfaces, you’ll find all kinds of ideas from page 110. Shannon Vos throws in his two cents’ worth on page 123 with his top five killer bathroom style details. Lastly, happy Mother’s Day to all those incredible women out there who make the houses we feature into homes. You make the world a better place – we love you!

PS. Follow me on Instagram at @clairebradley_ed

10 / Inside Out

This liv a bay w pink-st and an had In double

HAIR & MAKEUP: SAM POWELL. PHOTOGRAPHY: (PORTRAIT) NIGEL LOUGH. (FACEBOOK) BROOKE HOLM, (PINTEREST & INSTAGRAM) MAREE HOMER. STYLING: (FACEBOOK) MARSHA GOLMAC, (PINTEREST) KERRIE-ANN JONES, (INSTAGRAM) KRISTIN RAWSON

TELL US WHAT YOU LOVE!


contents

May 2017

56

66 76 things we love 14

INSIDEOUT.COM.AU A taste of what’s on our site this month

19

THINGS WE LOVE IKEA’s latest range combines clean, modern

lines with the natural warmth of timber and rattan 20 TRENDS Explore the rich, seductive tones of moody burgundy,

plus the ‘eyes’ have it in this collection of friendly faced pieces 24 PERFECT PAIRS Pieces that form a meant-to-be combination 26 3 OF A KIND Hang out with the makers of three designer planters 28 PALETTE Cool greys and blues meet fresh cream and white 30 ASK AN EXPERT Stylish solutions to all your design dilemmas 32 34 36 38 42

PROFILE Artist and designer Evi O’s skillset covers a range of

creative pursuits: find out what inspires her diverse work CULT CLASSIC The story behind a design icon and what’s next KID’S ROOM Create this cosy nursery look for your little one JUST FOR HER A curated collection of gifts, perfect for Mum LEARN THE ROPES Gemma Patford’s crafty DIY projects to try

inside: homes & renovation 56 GRAND ALPINE ADVENTURE Two designers and a builder

84 LA DOLCE VITA An interior designer combines her Norwegian

background with a relaxed Italian lifestyle in her family home 92 THE PANEL: OUR HOUSE ISN’T BIG ENOUGH This Canberra

couple love their home but are in need of room to grow 96 PUSHING THE BOUNDARIES Our guide to easements and lanes 98 DREAM IT. DESIGN IT. DO IT. A sleek warehouse renovation

in Melbourne results in an entertainer’s dream home 106 TAILOR-MADE SOLUTION A fresh and modern bathroom

makeover takes this family’s unique requirements on board 110 DRAWING BOARD Mix and match your favourite looks and

hot style buys from three distinctive bathroom styles 116 STANDOUT SURFACES Touchable timber and stone finishes

get up close and personal with tiles, laminate and more 123 TOP 5 BATHROOM WOWS Shannon Vos shares his pick of the

top new trends for up-to-the-minute bathroom style 126 BED NEWS Update your sleeping zone with luxe textured buys 128 THE HIT LIST Give your kitchen a taste of smart style with the

latest and greatest products and ideas to try this month 130 BUYER’S GUIDE: CURTAINS How to pick complementary

come together to create this idyllic country house

window dressings for every space in your house

66 A SPACE FOR EVERYTHING This young family look to an

134 SEE THE LIGHT Give into the allure of pale timber, tiles

architect’s creative mind to steer their home’s renovation 76 ORIGINAL CHARM A couple with a passion for vintage

homewares put their personal stamp on a historic cottage

or carpet with our complete guide to lighter flooring 136 CATHARTIC CLEANING: CALM IN THE STORM Peter Walsh

offers a solution to an all-too-common organisation dilemma


140

in this issue Everything you need to know about bathrooms, plus make Mother’s Day magic out: gardens & entertaining 140 GARDEN VARIETY When it came time to plan his family’s garden,

this landscape designer ensured every detail was covered, right down to the vegie patch and a cubby house for his daughter 148 FAVOURITE THINGS Treat Mum to our complete Mother’s Day menu, featuring an array of beautiful blooms, tender baked salmon and fresh-out-of-the-oven almond cake

regulars 52

SUBSCRIPTION OFFER Subscribe now for 29 per cent off

38

the cover price, plus receive a bonus set of four mugs from Salt&Pepper, valued at over $39 156 ADDRESS BOOK Where to find and buy products 162 ASK MEGSY Meg Mason’s trademark take on DIY dramas

our cover look INSPIRING HOMES WITH HEART

on the cover 30 Wayd Munro’s building know-how 38 60+ beautiful Mother’s Day buys 110 Bathrooms with attitude: inspiring moodboards 116 Bathrooms with attitude: surfaces and tiles we love 123 Bathrooms with attitude: Shannon’s top trends

staying in Create a home you won’t want to leave

60+

beautiful Mother’s Day buys

WINDOW DRESSING How to do curtains well

17

page special

bathrooms

with attitude

+ inspiring moodboards + Shannon’s top trends + surfaces and tiles we love

130 Window dressing: how to do curtains well 134 Lighten up: top picks for pale floors 136 Peter Walsh’s new Q&A

Wayd Munro’s Peter Walsh’s building know-how new Q&A

Lighten up Top picks for pale floors

Natural stone and timber bring warmth to this crisp, modern space. The built-in fireplace creates a cosy cabin vibe, while contemporary furniture choices are a breath of fresh air, ensuring a clean and sharp look. The vaulted ceiling provides a sense of spacious grandeur and the raw timber beams speak to the home’s rural location. Turn to page 56 for the full story on this beautiful farmhouse.

Photography: Anson Smart Styling: Jono Fleming


STAY IN TOUCH

insideout. com.au

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mia Daminato ASSOCIATE EDITOR Victoria Baker

inspiration for your home,

w

CHIEF SUB-EDITOR Virginia Jen SUB-EDITOR Louisa Bathgate DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR Crystal Osborn DESIGNER Michelle Clark COMMERCIAL ONLINE EDITOR Samantha McMeekin SOCIAL EDITOR Gianni Borrelli STYLE EDITOR Jessica Hanson MARKET EDITOR Natalie Johnson EDITORIAL COORDINATOR Belinda Kemp (02) 8045 4850

Advertising Sales and Strategy

to cosy up your home for winter

60+

17

COMMERCIAL SOLUTIONS DIRECTOR, LIFESTYLE Milena Hopkins GROUP SOLUTIONS MANAGER, HOMES Georgia Halfacree COMMERCIAL SOLUTIONS MANAGER Emily Jorgensen DIGITAL COMMERCIAL SOLUTIONS MANAGER Larissa Sutton QLD COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR, LIFESTYLE Rose Wegner (07) 3666 6903 ASIA ADVERTISING Kim Kenchington, MediaWorks Asia (852) 2886 1106 CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING Rebecca White 1300 139 305 ADVERTISING CREATIVE DIRECTOR Richard McAuliffe ADVERTISING CREATIVE MANAGER Eva Chown ADVERTISING SENIOR ART DIRECTOR Bev Douglas, Amanda Anderson ADVERTISING COPY EDITORS Annette Farnsworth, Brooke Lewis ADVERTISING CREATIVE PRODUCERS Jenny Hayes, Yasmin Shima

Production NATIONAL PRINT SERVICES MANAGER Mark Moes PRODUCTION MANAGER Leanne George (02) 8045 4921 ADVERTISING PRODUCTION Gina Jiang (02) 8045 4923

Publishing MARKETING DIRECTOR Diana Kay ACTING MARKETING MANAGER Melissa Morphet BRAND MANAGER Kimberley Grace EVENTS MANAGER Danielle Isenberg MARKETING EXECUTIVE Rachel Christian PRODUCT MANAGER – DIGITAL EDITIONS Danielle Stevenson NATIONAL CIRCULATION MANAGER Mark McTaggart SUBSCRIPTION ACQUISITION MANAGER Grant Durie (02) 8045 4699 SUBSCRIPTION MANAGERS Crystal Ewins, Sue Reeman

CHECK US OUT

NewsLifeMedia CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Nicole Sheffield PRESTIGE AND LIFESTYLE DIRECTOR Nick Smith GENERAL MANAGER, RETAIL & CIRCULATION Brett Willis DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Sharyn Whitten SENIOR COMMERCIAL MANAGER Josh Meisner

brilliant designs and advice

make it matt:

best new buys

For digital versions and back issues, see Zinio au.zinio.com For Apple users, download now from News in the App Store For Android users, download now from Google Play For Barnes & Noble customers, download now from the Nook Newsstand Inside Out Level 1, 2 Holt St, Surry Hills NSW 2010 Mailing address Locked Bag 5030, Alexandria NSW 2015 Phone (02) 8045 4850 Subscriptions 1300 656 933 or subs@magsonline.com.au Email insideout@newsltd.com.au Website insideout.com.au Inside Out is published by NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd (ACN 088 923 906), Level 1, 2 Holt St, Surry Hills, NSW 2010. ISSN 1443-6043. NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd is a wholly owned subsidiary of News Corp Australia (ACN 007 871 178). Copyright 2017, NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. Pre-press by News PreMedia. Printed by Offset Alpine, 42 Boorea St, Lidcombe, NSW 2141, under ISO14001 Environmental Certification. Paper fibre is from certified forests and audited sources. Distributed by Gordon & Gotch, Unit 2, Bldg 2B, MFive Industry Park, 1 Moorebank Ave, Moorebank, NSW 2170. Tel: (02) 8706 1704. Images and manuscripts sent to Inside Out magazine are at owner’s risk, and neither Inside Out nor its agents accept any liability for loss or damage. Information and prices are correct to the best of our knowledge at time of print.

stay connected... Environment ISO 14001 Certification applies to Offset Alpine Printing

14 / Inside Out

EDITED BY SAMANTHA McMEEKIN. PHOTOGRAPHY: (BEDROOM) JACQUI TURK, (BATHROOM) SEAN FENNESSY. STYLING: (BEDROOM) JEN BISHOP. BEDROOM IMAGE COURTESY OF WEST ELM, WESTELM.COM.AU. BATHROOM IMAGE COURTESY OF REECE, REECE.COM.AU. BOTTOM IMAGE COURTESY OF FERM LIVING, FERMLIVING.COM

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF CLAIRE BRADLEY


breathing


NEWSLIFEMEDIA CREATIVE SERVICES. ARTWORK (OPPOSITE, TOP): INWARD OVER THROW (2012) BY EMILY FERRETTI; ARTWORK (OPPOSITE, MIDDLE): UNO COMBINATION Q1, BY CLARE O’DONOGHUE. THE BLUETOOTH® WORD MARK IS OWNED BY BLUETOOTH SIG INC. NOT ALL DEVICES WILL BE COMPATIBLE AND FUNCTIONALITY VARIES DEPENDING ON THE DEVICE. *ONLY AVAILABLE IN THE PRIUS V I-TECH®. CURRENT NAVIGATION MAPPING DATABASE ENCOMPASSES MAJOR CAPITAL AND PRIMARY NATIONAL ROAD NETWORKS AND OFFERS SOME COVERAGE IN REGIONAL AREAS.

Make the most of the areas you live in and explore the potential of an active family life with the Toyota Prius v

room to move Fresh and uncluttered spaces not only make us feel free and invigorated; they invite great potential. They provide the opportunity for memorable times spent with friends and family, and offer sanctuary from the busy demands of everyday life. Make a large room warm and inviting with colours in earth tones and furniture in soft, neutral hues. Add serenity to a home office by combining a minimalistic desk-and-chair set with a comfy lounge. And take that stylish, easy ambience with you wherever you go in your car. A MOVEABLE FEAST (opposite) The Prius v i-Tech® seats up to seven people. ACTIVE ALL AREAS (top right) The Prius v i-Tech® has ample boot space for your gear. CREATURE COMFORTS (right) The Prius v i-Tech® is well equipped.

• TO FIND OUT MORE, VISIT TOYOTA.COM.AU/PRIUS-V


# things we love


THINGS WE LOVE

2

3

5

4

COLOUR TREND

burgundy

1

Make a splash with this intoxicating red-wine shade

6

STYLING NATALIE JOHNSON

7

10

8

9

11

20 / Inside Ou

PAINT COLOUR MAY VARY ON APPLICATION

12

1. Republic Of Fritz Hansen ‘Fri’ chair, $5300, Cult, cultdesign.com.au. 2. Once Milano throw, US$175, WallpaperStore*, store.wallpaper.com. 3. Fort Standard ‘Standing’ bowl, $205, Douglas And Bec, douglasandbec.com. 4. &tradition ‘Topan VP6’ pendant light by Verner Panton, $525, Great Dane, greatdane furniture.com. 5. Muuto ‘Compile’ bookend, $60/pair, Living Edge, livingedge. com.au. 6. ‘4 Seasons’ low sheen exterior paint in Indian Red, $62.90/4L, British Paints, britishpaints.com.au. 7. Woud ‘Vowel’ shelf, $189, Floc, flocstore.com.au. 8. ‘Kukko Ja Kana’ cushion, $49.50, Marimekko, marimekko.com.au. 9. Ligne Roset ‘Cover 1’ settee, POA, Domo, domo.com.au. 10. ‘Holy Golden’ notebooks, from $29 each, Mishmash, mishmashaustralia.com. 11. Normann Copenhagen ‘Stay’ side table, $370, BYMR, bymr.com.au. 12. Lexon ‘Tykho 2’ radio, $139.95, Design Mode International, designmode.com.au.


From relocating to renovating. Whether you’re looking to move home, add a dream pool or keep up to date with the latest trends, realestate.com.au is the place for your daily home ideas and inspiration.

realestate lifestyle


THINGS WE LOVE

1

3

TOP 10 PICKS

faces

We have our eyes on these double-take-worthy pieces STYLING JESSICA HANSON

1. ‘Zeus (as a Swan)’ wall mirror by Sarah K/Blakebrough+King, POA, Criteria, criteriacollection.com.au. 2. Fornasetti ‘Ortensia’ candle, $742, Mecca Cosmetica, mecca.com.au. 3. Luckyboysunday ‘Face It’ blanket, $189, Little Pie Street, littlepiestreet.com.au. 4. ‘Hola’ side plate, $29.90, Città, cittadesign.com. 5. Fine Little Day ‘Eye Eye’ poster, $54.95 (unframed), Childish Things, childishthings.com.au. 6. Oyoy ‘Egg People’ eggcups, $49/assorted set of 3, Luumo Design, luumodesign.com. 7. Soludos ‘Wink’ smoking slippers by Jason Polan, $119.95, M Dreams, mdreamsmelissa. shoes. 8. ‘Round Eye’ cushion, $49, Arro Home, arrohome.com. 9. ‘Long Face’ earring, $260, Sarah & Sebastian, sarahandsebastian.com. 10. Nude ‘Mr. & Mrs. Night Curvy’ jug and glass set, $169, Città, as before.

5 6 8 22 / Inside

4


From market trends to designer trends. Whether you’re looking for market insights, the latest kitchen styles or this season’s colours, realestate.com.au is the place for your daily home ideas and inspiration.

realestate lifestyle


THINGS WE LOVE

MID-CENTURY CURVES

1 dresser & mirror Some pieces belong together. Turn to these shapely examples of bedroom essentials STYLING NATALIE JOHNSON

2

SIMPLE FORMS

3 DARK DRAMA

24 / Inside Out

editor’s fave

PHOTOGRAPHY: (MAIN) CITIZENS OF STYLE/LIFE INTERIORS, LIFEINTERIORS.COM.AU, (HENRY WILSON MODULE) SVEN KOVAC

PERFECT PAIRS


THINGS WE LOVE

3 OF A KIND

hanging planters Give your plants a taste of the high life with these crafted pots EDITED BY LOUISA BATHGATE

Urban Eden & Co ‘Blue Splatter’ pot

DESIGNERS: Bianca Lambert

& Thomas Wilson Melbourne-based duo Bianca and Tom were both designers and makers before forming Capra Designs. Bianca began with a fashion label, while Tom’s carpentry background saw him tinkering with furniture. “This passion for designing and creating is one of our common interests,” says Bianca. “My obsession with plants led us to where we are today.” The pair is dedicated to ensuring their homewares are “produced with a conscience”. Each piece is designed and made in their studio, or produced locally, while their eco resin pieces are made using water resin, rather than solvent-based material. “This makes them greener than other resin products,” says Bianca. The ‘Diamond’ planter was designed with mid-century and industrial style in mind. “I love that it brings beauty to the plant by framing it,” she says. An emphasis on quality is a key feature of their ethos. “Our stands and hangers are made of powder-coated steel, so they’re suitable for inside and out,” says Bianca. “They’re timeless and durable – there’s no point having one without the other!” $169, capradesigns.com.

26 / Inside Out

$

Angus & Celeste ‘Spiral’ planter DESIGNERS: Asha Cato & Keir MacDonald In a secluded home studio in Melbourne’s Dandenong Ranges, you might find Asha and Keir hard at work on new designs. Otherwise, their warehouse and head office is just down the hill in Ferntree Gully. “We both studied Fine Arts and have always loved plants and gardening,” says Asha. “We started designing ceramics together seriously around eight years ago.” In response to a need for interesting, high-quality vessels to house their own plant collection, the pair created their hanging planter range, which has now become a large part of their overall design focus. “The shape of our spiral planter was inspired by sacred geometry and the way water flows downwards as it drains,” says Asha. “It looks wonderfully light suspended from fine stainless-steel wire – the view from underneath is an important part of the design.” With a range that includes planters, tableware, jewellery and more, Asha and Keir are keen to see each item last the distance. “We always try to use the most durable materials possible to ensure each piece has a long and loved life.” $99, angusandceleste.com.

PHOTOGRAPHY: (CAPRA DESIGNS) EVE WILSON, (URBAN EDEN & CO) ZOË PATERSON, (ANGUS & CELESTE) DAMIEN PLEMING

Capra Designs ‘Diamond’ planter

DESIGNER: Prue Glazebrook New Zealand-born Prue looked to her farming background when creating Urban Eden & Co, a company dedicated to helping people connect with nature through gardening. “With my mother and grandmothers being keen gardeners, I grew up with soil under my nails and spent my childhood enjoying their orchards and gardens,” she says. “When I first moved to the city in Sydney, it was those green surroundings I missed most.” Her first apartment had only a bathtub-sized balcony and no access to soil. Undeterred, Prue created her own planters as a way of staying in touch with her rural upbringing. Today, her shop in Manly does more than just sell pots and planters: “We also host workshops where you can plant your own herb garden or a selection of indoor pots,” says Prue. “We teach all the ins and outs of plant care, so you’re not left in the dark post purchase.” Prue looked to her surroundings for inspiration for this piece. “Living by the beach, we’re heavily influenced by the sea, so we have a lot of


THINGS WE LOVE

PALETTE

ice magic

Celebrate the season’s cool grey, chilled white and pale blue shades

‘Clean & Protect’ low sheen interior paint in Road Ahead, $62.50/4L, British Paints, britishpaints.com.au.

‘Eggshell Acrylic’ paint in Affogato, $103.55/4L, Porter’s Paints, porterspaints.com.

For more of our favourite trends, visit insideout.com.au/products/trends. 28 / Inside Out

PHOTOGRAPHY: (MAIN) MAREE HOMER. STYLING: (MAIN) VANESSA COLYER TAY. ARTWORK: COMPASS BY LISA MADIGAN. PAINT COLOUR MAY VARY ON APPLICATION

COMPILED BY KATE GALLAGHER


INTRODUCING

BATH ROO M FU R NITU R E COLLECTION

Featuring: HPL Wafer Top with Matte White Cabinetry Made in Italy, 15 year guarantee.

®


THINGS WE LOVE

ask an expert Each issue, we’ll find stylish solutions to all your decorating and design dilemmas from those in the know

Q

Q

welcoming?

or a metallic finish, which looks grand and reflects light,” says Lisa Tilse, creative director at We Are Scout (we-are-scout.com). “Position two or three pendants along the hallway to add light and create a cohesive look. Paint the walls white or on-trend pale ‘greige’ and bring pattern and texture with floor runners. A gallery wall of art or photos in A3 size or larger will create interest. If space allows, a narrow console near the front door would be a practical addition and a point of interest.”

Q

I have solar panels and I’m considering battery storage for the power they generate. What do I need to consider? Craig, via email “The price of solar batteries has plummeted over the last year,” says Jon Dee, anchor host of Smart Money on Sky News Business Channel. “Brands to look out for include Tesla’s Powerwall 2, which leads the market, and LG, Enphase and GCL Poly. Don’t plan to take your house fully of the grid just get enough batteries for evening peak time, when grid electricity is most expensive. For cloudy days, recharge your batteries overnight using cheap of-peak electricity.”

Send us your questions via Facebook or Instagram, or email insideout@newsltd.com.au.

EDITED BY FIONA JOY. PHOTOGRAPHY: (PORTRAIT) NIGEL LOUGH, (TOP RIGHT) ANSON SMART, (TESLA BATTERY) COURTESY OF TESLA, TESLA.COM, (BOTTOM LEFT) COURTESY OF FINNISH DESIGN SHOP, FINNISHDESIGNSHOP.COM, FEATURING FERM LIVING PRODUCTS. STYLING: (TOP RIGHT) MARIA DYONIZIAK. NORMANN COPENHAGEN ‘BELL’ PENDANT LAMP, FROM $635, DESIGNSTUFF, DESIGNSTUFF.COM.AU

My brick house sits on heavy clay soil. Afer a long period of dry weather, big cracks open up on internal walls, but they close again afer rain. Should I be worried, and if so, what can I do? Sharon, via email Clay soil is highly reactive to moisture. If your house is built on clay, and especially if it’s an Wayd Munro older house, it’s common for it to move slightly, is the builder on our renovation due to the weather. Cracks expand during dry specialists Panel weather when the clay dries out and shrinks. (for more on the When the clay gets wet, it expands and the Panel, turn to page 94). Here, cracks reduce. Mostly this is cosmetic damage he explains when rather than structural. If the cracks are up to to worry about 2mm during dry weather and almost closed cracks in the wall. when wet, and there’s no sign of lateral movement, then it should be okay. If the crack grows over time or moves laterally, then you should definitely have a structural engineer inspect the property. A common cause of excess moisture after rain is faulty stormwater pipes not draining onto the street, so you could get a plumber to take a look at your stormwater, and look for obvious signs of water around the foundations after rain. If the cracks are bad enough and you need to address them structurally, you can have the footings of the house underpinned to stabilise them. This can be a costly exercise. I’ve also seen people keep constant moisture around the footing of their house with an irrigation type system that keeps the clay wet and therefore stable.


paris: new veined stones enrich these sophisticated quartz surfaces


DESIGN PROFILE

paintings (top left & centre, below) have featured in an exhibition at Sydney’s Saint Cloche and her first solo show last year with The Design Files in Melbourne. Her book designs (far right & below) have seen her pick up a slew of awards. A collaboration with Kate & Kate (left & bottom) has inspired a love for the tactile.

You work across a number of different fields; do these influence each other within your work? Absolutely. I’m always restless and curious. I like juggling 10 things at once. Having the luxury of exploring different mediums means you’re constantly thinking from different artistic angles – cross-inspiration is inevitable. Can you take us through your design process? I spend a lot of time thinking before doing any visuals. I prefer to understand the subject/ brief and research quite extensively before putting anything to paper. Then I think of different solutions, followed by quick experiments, then the final execution often takes the least time. Tell us about your workspace. Painting happens at home and usually turns the whole apartment into a studio. Often this means no guests for long stretches! I do design work in my Surry Hills studio, which I share with five creatives from different disciplines. It’s stimulating to see so many different things being created in one small room. How does your personal experience influence your art? I think art is always personal and comes from the artist’s true self, for me at least. My art tends to not be too serious in subject. It’s often

feel happy and positive when I create art, and I hope that people

to try colour. My design work is continually changing, as it’s not personal. Each project needs a different solution, and I’m catering to that every day and always experimenting with visual approaches. What continues to inspire you? People and places are my main inspiration. Understanding space and emotion is a constant journey. You get a lot of that from travelling and soaking in different cultures. What’s next on your creative agenda? I’d love to dabble in fabric for that tactility or something large in scale, perhaps involving digital technology, but I need to find the right collaborators first. For more details, visit evi-o.com.

PHOTOGRAPHY: (PORTRAIT) MAGENTA BURGIN, (TOP LEFT) JACQUI TURK, (TOP CENTRE) LUISA BRIMBLE, (UPPER MIDDLE & BOTTOM) JASON LOUCAS, (BOOKS) EVI O. STYLING: (UPPER MIDDLE & BOTTOM) CLAIRE DELMAR. T2: THE BOOK BY MARYANNE SHEARER ($39.99, LANTERN). NAPLES: A WAY OF LOVE BY CARLA COULSON & LISA CLIFFORD ($49.99, LANTERN)

Evi O


Flos ‘Superloon’ floor lamp

‘Fortuny’ floor lamp The form: A floor lamp with a tripod base and umbrella-like shade. What makes it special: Spanish-born fashion designer Mariano Fortuny was also a keen lighting designer and inventor, working across a range of disciplines from photography to set design and architecture. His interest in lighting came at a time when electricity was first being introduced into Europe. From his couture house and atelier in a beautiful palazzo in Venice, he devised a clever method for reducing the glare from the unsophisticated light bulbs of the time using concave reflectors. Utilising this, Fortuny designed special systems for projecting light onto sets in some of Europe’s most famous opera houses such as La Scala in Milan. Although the floor lamp, which was designed in 1907, was primarily designed for photographers with its folding leg system and adjustable height, the lamp has subsequently become a big hit with interior designers. Reissued in 1985 by Italian lighting company Pallucco, the giant reflector has the look of a vintage parasol and is available in a standard version, as well as in special fabrics such as the Rubelli gold linen and silk plissé or the Giudecca 805, which uses original Fortuny fabrics. The lamp also comes in two sizes. Expect to pay: From $5500. Buy at: Fanuli, fanuli.com.au.

34 / Inside Out

PHOTOGRAPHY: (‘SUPERLOON’ FLOOR LAMP) FRANK HÜLSBÖMER

THE ORIGINAL


THINGS WE LOVE

2 “

PAINT COLOUR MAY VARY ON APPLICATION. THIS IMAGE IS SHOT IN A STUDIO AND SHOULD SERVE AS GENERAL INSPIRATION ONLY. CONSIDER WHETHER THESE PRODUCTS ARE SUITABLE FOR YOUR CHILD BEFORE PURCHASING

1

we love The natural woven basket of this rocker will safely cradle your little person through sleepy days and nights, while the gently curved rocker base provides a soothing motion. Rocker, $850, Vos Kho, voskho.com.

3

Inevitable sleepless nights are made a little easier with the luxe silver lining that is this iconic seat. Hans J. Wegner ‘J16’ rocking chair, $3150, Great Dane, greatdanefurniture.com.

OR TRY THIS

Head in the clouds? Keep bits and pieces organised in this hanging storage system. Handmade from washable cotton, it’s ideal for everything from bibs to lotions. Numero 74 ‘Wall Pouchette’ storage system, $95, Mamapapa, mamapapa.com.au. AND THE REST… ‘Cloud’ cushion (in rocker), $109.95, Homely Creatures. ‘Sweden’ storage vessel, $445, Plyroom. Cam Cam baby blanket, $189, Designstuff. Oeuf ‘Merlin’ dresser, $1399, Kido Store. Fog Linen Work baby blanket, $65, and Redecker ‘Whale’ hairbrush, $29.95, Saison. ‘Bun Bun’ comforter, $29.95, Mister Fly. ‘Reva’ basket, $115, Olli Ella. Cam Cam quilted cushion (on chair), $104, Designstuff. Cooper wears Oeuf Clothier ‘Kimono’ onesie, $69, and Rylee & Cru bloomers, $52, Kido Store. ‘Viking’ blocks, $55, and ‘Organic’ ring stacker, $45, Noc Noc. ‘Teepee Geo’ rug, $599, Olli Ella. On wall: Bloomingville ‘Cloud’ shelves, from $88 each, Kido Store. Books, stylist’s own. Lucie Kaas elephant toy, $89.95, Kido Store. Briki ‘Mushroom De Paris’ figures, $44/assorted set of 4, Leo & Bella. Paper Plane print, $35 (unframed), Sprout And Sparrow. Background in ‘Clean & Protect’ low sheen interior paint in Delicious Mint, $43.50/2L, British Paints, and ‘Raindrops’ wallpaper, £59.95/roll, Hibou Home. ‘Impressive Ultra’ laminate flooring in Soft Oak Light, $62/sqm, Quick-Step. ADDRESS BOOK page 156

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ikea.com.au. 2. ‘Monarch’ washcloth, $12, Ninnho, ninnho. com.au. 3. ‘Laurel’ teapot, $29.95, CO:Home By Cotton On, cottonon.com. 4. Notebook, $39.95, The Daily Edited, thedailyedited.com. 5. ‘Peach And Cream’ cup, $37/ assorted pair, Love Tea, lovetea.com.au. 6. ‘Kali’ platters, from $14.95 each, Aura By Tracie Ellis, aurahome.com.au. 7. Mini casserole, $35, Le Creuset, lecreuset.com.au. 8. Rig Tig ‘Hold On’ pot holders, $49.95/pair, Design Mode International, designmode.com.au. 9. Kartell ‘Jellies’ cup & saucer by Patricia Urquiola, $30, Space, spacefurniture. com.au. 10. ‘Rose Hibiscus’ face mist, US$32, Herbivore Botanicals, herbivorebotanicals.com. 11. Lucy Folk ‘Vino’ socks, $40, Incu, incu.com. 12. Bookend, $39.95, Behr & Co., behrandco.com.au. 13. Nail polish in The Future Is Female, $20, Kester Black, kesterblack.com. 14. ‘Cane’ keyring, $40, Hay, hayshop.com.au. 15. Cutlery, from $12/piece, Kip&Co, kipandco.com.au. 16. ‘Darcel’ lamp, $49.95, CO:Home By Cotton On, as before. UNDER $100: 1. ‘Pikku’ pyjama pants, $65, Elk, elkaccessories.com. 2. ‘Kaleido’ tray, $64, Hay, as before. 3. ‘Modern’ watering can, $99, West Elm, westelm. com.au. 4. ‘Stone’ resin keyring, $60, Dinosaur Designs, dinosaurdesigns.com.au. 5. ‘Personal’ mirror, NZ$99, Everyday Needs, everyday-needs.com. 6. ‘Mena’ throw, $59.95, CO:Home By Cotton On, as before. 7. ‘Le Silence’ candle, $69, Maizon Balzac, maisonbalzac.com. 8. Ferm Living ‘Ripple’ champagne saucer, $59/pair, Designstuff, designstuff.com. 9. ‘Half-Half’ bowl, $55, Fazeek, fazeek. com.au. 10. HK Living breadboard, $69, House Of Orange, houseoforange.com.au. 11. ‘Damn’ sweater, $95, Castle, castleandthings.com.au. 12. ‘Unico’ flower pot, €60, Studio Arhoj, arhoj.com. 13. Gotlier canvas artwork, $79, CO:Home By Cotton On, as before. 14. ‘Dotty’ yoga bag, €42, Pijama, pijama.it. 15. Iris Hantverk leather slippers, NZ$59, Paper Plane, paperplanestore.com.

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UNDER $200: 1. ‘Moss Stitch’ throw, $129, Aura By Tracie Ellis, aurahome.com.au. 2. ‘Classic’ mill, $130/set of 2, Le Creuset, lecreuset.com.au. 3. ‘Gingham’ cushion, $175, Langdon Ltd., langdonltd.com.au. 4. Flensted ‘Life & Thread’ mobile, $114.95, Design Mode International, designmode. com.au. 5. Tivoli artwork, $199 (unframed), Lumiere Art + Co., lumiereartandco.com au. 6. ‘Meea’ scarf, $195, Marimekko, marimekko.com. 7. ‘Remnants’ ring, $120, Elke, studio-elke.com. 8. Ferm Living tray, $119, Arrival Hall, arrivalhall.com.au. 9. ‘Seaside’ wall-hanging, US$150, WKNDLA, wknd.la. 10. ‘Lattice Biscuit’ bathrobe, $139, Kip&Co, kipandco.com.au. 11. Tom Dixon ‘Form’ cake slice, 40, Dedece, dedece.com. 12. Hem ‘Table’ mortar, POA, rict, district.com.au. 13. ‘Hold Me Tight’ vase, from $195, Great Dane, greatdanefurniture.com. 14. ‘Valentine’ pyjama shirt, $179, Andrea & Joen, andreaandjoen.com. 15. ‘Colour’ vase, $151, Hay, hayshop.com.au. OVER $200: 1. ‘Fly Away’ sunglasses, $365, Lucy Folk, lucyfolk.com. 2. Desk organiser, €198, Kristina Krogh, kkrogh.dk. 3. ‘Striped’ rug, $400/90cm x 150cm, Langdon Ltd., as before. 4. Bedcover, $420/queen, Cultiver, cultiver. com.au. 5. Indoor Garden Series No. 1 artwork, $350 (framed), B. For Brian, bforbrian.com. 6. ‘Sweden’ storage vessel, from $395, Plyroom, plyroom.com.au. 7. Jewellery frame, $259, H&G Designs, handgdesigns.com. 8. ‘Baxter’ backpack, $450, Du Zen!, duzen.com.au. 9. Drifting print, from $990 (unframed), Belynda Henry, belyndahenry.com. 10. ‘Margarita’ brooch, $210, Marimekko, as before. 11. Rag & Bone fedora, $305, Incu, incu.com. 12. ‘Camargue’ throw, $450, Maizon Balzac, maisonbalzac.com. 13. ‘Dock’ charging dock set, $359.90, Native Union, nativeunion.com.au. 14. ‘H5’ wireless earphones, $389, B&O Play, beostore. com.au. 15. ‘Line’ table lamp, NZ$565, Douglas And Bec, douglasandbec.com. 16. Lexon ‘Terrace’ speaker, $250, Design Mode International, designmode.com.au.

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Gemma Patford’s signature rope vessels are just one of the projects you’ll find in her new book.


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BLOOD PLUM & MASCARPONE TART

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DREAMY LEMON CURD MERINGUE PIE

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VANILL A & HA ZELNUT L AYER CAKE

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ITALIAN-ST YLE R ASPBERRY TRIFLE

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SMEG 50S STYLE STAND MIXER IN PANNA COTTA (SMF01CRAU), $799. ON SHOW: Slicer grater attachment (sold separately, $149). Meet the new kitchen all-rounder with retro good looks and dynamic performance. The powder-coated die-cast aluminium Smeg 50s Style Stand Mixer has 10 variable speeds and a host of optional accessories so you can do everything from slicing and grating vegetables to whipping cream, mixing dough and making pasta.

ZUCCHINI, PESTO & ROSEMARY PIZZA

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GA M E C H A N G E R With an array of attachments, from a whisk to the 3-Piece Pasta Roller and Cutter set, the Smeg Stand Mixer is like having a second pair of hands in the kitchen.


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SMEG 50S STYLE STAND MIXER IN PASTEL GREEN (SMF01PGAU), $799. ON SHOW: 3-Piece Pasta Roller and Cutter Set (sold separately, $299).

FRESH FETTUCINE WITH MUSHROOM R AGU

For recipes, visit HN.COM.AU/ RECIPES

Shop at your local store, online at hn.com.au or call 1300 464 278. To find out what’s happening at your local Harvey Norman®, contact your store directly. Harvey Norman® stores are operated by independent franchisees. Colours may vary per store. Ends 8/6/17.


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PHOTOGRAPHY: TARA PEARCE. STYLING: JANE FROSH. ARTWORK: BUST & SMALL PORTRAIT, DON MACFARLANE. PORTRAIT (BACK LEFT), FLEA MARKET FIND. PORTRAIT (BACK LEFT), KIM BARTER, KIMBARTERART.COM

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$$$$

EXTERIOR (opposite) Peter and Tracy’s farmhouse sits in a picture-perfect countryside setting. OPEN-PLAN LIVING Dark tones and timber touches feature prominently in this cosy yet refined family retreat.


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here were only two things Peter and Tracy Fleming

really wanted for their weekender: a pitched roof with a cathedral ceiling and a large stone fireplace. Their property, Brook Downs, was a cattle farm when Peter’s father bought it back in 1969. The couple and their kids, Jono and Sharlene, had loved spending time there over the years in a series of converted garages, sheds and basic kit-home cottages, but the time was finally right to build something a little more comfortable. They had transformed the property into a pine plantation along the way - “Pine trees are easier to look after than cows!” explains Peter – and the site for their new house was now surrounded by pine forest on three sides, with an open outlook over rolling countryside on the southern side. A kit home was the couple’s first thought, but Peter and Tracy were discouraged by the number of changes they’d need to make to get exactly what they wanted.Their son Jono, an interior designer then teaching at the Whitehouse Institute of Design, came up with a plan: he and his colleague Allison Williams of Green Apple Interiors & Design, along with Allison’s husband Todd, a builder, would take on the project themselves. After pitching their ideas to Peter and Tracy, Jono and Allison headed up to the property in January 2015 with several bottles of red wine and came up with the basic plan.

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“Despite all the wine, I think the final building includes about 90 per cent of what we came up with that night,” says Jono. Then the real work began, with Allison taking on all the planning requirements and design drawing. A block with no restrictions on the size or style of the building might sound like a dream to city-bound renovators battling with local councils, but the location did throw up some planning challenges. It’s classified as a sub-alpine location, with an N3 wind rating, which means a whole raft of requirements to deal with snow and wind, as well as bushfire rating and access restrictions. Everything from the pitch of the roof to the materials were carefully selected and engineered to be able to withstand harsh weather and wind. The build began in June 2015, with Allison’s husband Todd Williams and his team living on-site for much of the project. Straightaway, the weather put itself front and centre. “Everything that could go wrong did go wrong,” says Allison. “Within a couple of weeks of starting we had cyclonic winds as well as the heaviest snow in 40 years, which filled the just-dug footings.” According to Jono, “it was like an episode of Grand Designs – we kept waiting for Kevin McCloud to turn up and shake his head.” The team battled on, putting up the home’s timber frame, which was clad with Hebel AAC (autoclaved aerated concrete) panels then rendered and painted. “Todd and the team were able to have

MRD HOME LEATHER CHAIRS, DESIGN TWINS, DESIGNTWINS.COM. COFFEE TABLES & TIMBER SIDE TABLES, WEYLANDTS, WEYLANDTS.COM.AU. WIRE SIDE TABLE & RUG, TEMPLE & WEBSTER, TEMPLEANDWEBSTER.COM.AU. ARMCHAIRS, URBAN COUTURE DESIGN + HOMEWARES, URBANCOUTURE.COM.AU. MJG POUF, LIFE INTERIORS, LIFEINTERIORS.COM.AU. ARTWORK: (RIGHT) OP-SHOP FINDS, (OPPOSITE) LISA MADIGAN

PORTRAIT (left) Owners Tracy and Peter with son Jono. ENTRY (above) The sense of family comes through at the front door. The bench was crafted from an old log found at designer Allison’s uncle’s farm. LIVING AREA (above) A green Jardan ‘Wilfred’ sofa is topped with cushions made by Tracy.


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the house clad in under a week; if we’d used brick and render, it would have taken a couple of months,” says Allison. Peter and Tracy are generous hosts, and wanted to be able to accommodate at least 14 people in the farmhouse, so everything was designed with this in mind. “Peter and Tracy wanted to bring their guests on a journey, from a grand entry point to a welcoming kitchen and entertaining space with a connection to the beautiful setting,” says Allison. Initial plans for a glazed wall on the southern side proved very difficult to reconcile with the requirements for a BASIX (sustainability index) certificate, so Allison instead used custom-made windows as pockets to frame the view from various spots in the house. The home was built around a large central ‘great room’ with an open-plan kitchen, dining and living area. “We weren’t limited on size because of our location but we wanted the home to feel warm and inviting,” says Peter. The dramatic cathedral ceiling features exposed steel frames with timber cross beams and the ceiling-height stone fireplace was created with the help of a local stonemason. The concrete floors were polished to expose the aggregate selected by Allison at a local quarry and include sub-floor hydronic heating, and the walls are double thickness to keep the warmth inside. At the eastern end, Peter and Tracy’s

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master bedroom and ensuite look out over the hills, with another guest bedroom and ensuite also in this wing. At the other end, two generous bedrooms, sleeping six (or more if required) and a large bathroom lead to a laundry/mudroom and garage. A mezzanine level provides a retreat for guests and extra sleeping quarters if needed. Jono was key to translating Peter and Tracy’s design brief and focused on the details of surfaces, finishes and furnishings, treading a fine line “somewhere between a bossy client and a co-designer”, in his own words. He and Allison managed to include some surprises for Peter and Tracy, including the letters B.D. (for Brook Downs) laid into the mosaic tile entry, and a sewing room for Tracy tucked under the stairs. And the result? “It’s magnificent.” says Peter. “It’s everything we wanted and it feels warm, inviting and cosy.” “I really love the living area, particularly the way you can be in the kitchen and still be connected with the other areas, and also have private spaces to retreat to,” adds Tracy. “We’ve gone from coming up once a month to being here almost every weekend. It’s always a shame to leave the place and come back to Sydney.” For more details on Allison’s work, visit greenappleid.com.au, and to find out more about Todd, visit toddwilliamsbuilding.com.au.

STOOLS, LIFE INTERIORS, LIFEINTERIORS.COM.AU

READING NOOK (left) A daybed from Dunlin makes the most of the picturesque view in a tranquil spot with an artwork by Magnus Gjoen. STAIRS (above) The Tasmanian oak stairs lead to the master suite. KITCHEN & DINING (opposite) A blend of American oak, carrara marble and black joinery by Coco Joinery By Design in the kitchen signals the weekender’s modern take on farmhouse living. Shapely Thonet chairs bring a traditional aesthetic, sitting on top of a polished concrete floor.


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BRIGHT IDEA With a weekender, you want to create a place to relax and these bathrooms showcase simple style taken to the next level with a couple of luxe touches - a claw-foot bath and a built-in shower bench.

BATHROOMS (this page) Subway wall tiles and hexagon floor tiles from BIGA+ Waitara set the scene for dramatic monochrome appeal in the wet zones. A shower bench in the ensuite and a claw-foot bath in the guest bathroom complete the relaxing vibe. MASTER BEDROOM (opposite) Acoustic panels from Bunnings behind the bed lend a cosy feel, as do the Sheridan quilt cover and Major Minor mustard sheet from The D E A Store.

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LAUNDRY (left) V-joint wall panels were installed to match the joinery in Dulux Domino, which has also been used in the kitchen and ensuite. GUEST BEDROOM (opposite) The guest sleeping quarters feature ‘Sunday’ beds from Domayne dressed with woven blankets from Anthropologie. A fibre art wall-hanging from Crossing Threads and a Middle Of Nowhere photograph from Life Interiors reference the landscape outside.

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vincentdesign.com.au. 3. ‘Y 03’ chandelier, $1980, Douglas And Bec, douglasandbec.com. 4. ‘Shapes’ mirror, $351, Hay. hayshop.com.au. 5. ‘No. B9 Le Corbusier’ chair, from $346, Thonet, thonet.com.au.

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omething that I’ve always wanted is a window seat where the sun comes in that I can lie on to read the paper,” says owner Gabrielle (pictured above) of this Melbourne home. “The day we moved in, the kids were straight up on the window seat, using it as a stage and setting up their dolls’ house. It was really interesting to have had our own ideas about how we’d use different parts of the house then have the kids adapt those ideas for themselves.” That the window seat is located in what is considered the grown-ups’ sitting room doesn’t matter. “We had a really clear idea of what we wanted in terms of space and how we wanted the house to feel,” says Gabrielle. “We knew we didn’t want a big barn of a room out the back that was all white and gleaming. We wanted it to feel cosy and to make sure we created spaces that we could all grow into.” Gabrielle and her husband James began having concepts drawn up and costed while they were expecting their twins five years ago. They then decided, having never undertaken a renovation project before, to look at other homes to ensure they were making the right decision. In the end, with the house’s location within walking distance of schools, shops and the park, they decided it was worth investing in such a huge project. Through friends who were undergoing a similar upgrade, they found Nathanael Preston of architectural firm Preston Lane. “We’re not really creative, design-y type people, so through the whole process we thought, ‘Let’s just see what they come up with’,” says Gabrielle. “We didn’t have any clear idea of what we wanted to do, but that’s what we went to an architect for: to come up with something a bit different. They took us to another job they’d done and said, ‘This is what we were thinking with the concrete, brick and timber.’” It was enough to convince

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ARTWORK: (OPPOSITE) PRINT FROM VINTAGE POSTERS ONLY, VINTAGEPOSTERSONLY.COM, (KITCHEN) FRAMED PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINT, LES WILLIAMSON, CONTACT RACHEL VIGOR, HELLO@RACHELVIGOR.COM. GREY THROW (ON SOFA), COUNTRY ROAD, COUNTRYROAD.COM.AU. FAGERHULT ‘GAUDI LINEAR’ LIGHT (OVER ISLAND), EAGLE LIGHTING AUSTRALIA, EAGLELIGHTING.COM.AU. LIGNE ROSET ‘LES OISEAUX’ VASE, DOMO, DOMO.COM.AU


designed the step-down kids’ space, but it’s really important where that’s located. Mum and Dad can be in the kitchen and look in there to see the kids doing their homework, but there’s also a sliding door in that brick wall that allows it to be closed off if they’re having a dinner party and the kids want to watch a movie.” Set in the middle of the space, the dining area has a higher ceiling and a row of high-level windows – some clear and others frosted – that provide visual interest, extra light and, since some of them open, an escape hatch for hot air. The adults’ living area is defined by a curved timber-panelled wall that promotes privacy from the deck and also focuses attention into the backyard. From the day they moved back in, it’s not just the immediate family who’s enjoyed the new spaces. “We had people here all weekend,” says Gabrielle. “The whole summer we had friends around here swimming in the pool and enjoying themselves.” Go to prestonlane.com.au to see more of Nathanael’s work. Get in touch with the builder, Filippone Constructions on 0418 320 774.

ARTWORK: FRAMED PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINT, DEREK SWALWELL, CONTACT RACHEL VIGOR, HELLO@RACHELVIGOR.COM. LUCITALIA ‘ZERO 2’ LED WALL LIGHTS (OPPOSITE & THIS PAGE), LASER LIGHTING, LASERLIGHTING.COM.AU. L’ASCARI CANDLES, NORSU INTERIORS, NORSU.COM.AU

the couple to take the firm – and the project – on, with the team from Filippone Constructions taking on the building work. A year after moving out, the family returned to their perfect home. Traditional features, such as the ceiling roses, cornices and fireplaces, have been retained and restored, although the pine floors – too worn to save – were replaced with wormy chestnut. A walk-in robe and all-slate ensuite were added, and a new central bathroom created. The shower has no screen, which makes the entire room feel spacious, while the deep vanity with an abundance of drawers will cater for a growing family. “It needed to have enough storage for four girls, and to be big enough for them all to be in here at the same time,” says Gabrielle. The back half of the house is where the skill and creativity of the architects comes into play. “As a family house, it was important that the renovation wasn’t just a big box on the back and that the spaces were really well defined,” says Nathanael. “That’s been done in a couple of different ways. Responding to the site, we’ve


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“As a family house, it was important that the renovation had spaces that were really well defined” NATHANAEL PRESTON, ARCHITECT


“Each of the rooms has its own experience”

NATHANAEL PRESTON, ARCHITECT

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(OPPOSITE) PENDANT LIGHT, LASER LIGHTING, LASERLIGHTING.COM.AU. CHESTNUT FLOORING, TAIT, TAITTIMBER.COM.AU

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bright idea This dark, moody sleeping space is instantly calming. Stick to a limited palette in the bedroom to ensure a good night’s sleep. Here, the rug and wallpaper add texture, while the bedding and decor offer interest.


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ADDITIONAL PRODUCT SOURCING: NATALIE JOHNSON. ARTWORK: (BEDROOM) PAINTINGS, MONIQUE WILLIAMSON, CONTACT RACHEL VIGOR, HELLO@RACHELVIGOR.COM. PENDANT LIGHT (IN BATHROOM), MARK DOUGLASS DESIGN, MARKDOUGLASSDESIGN. COM. THROW (ON POOL FENCE), NORSU INTERIORS, NORSU.COM.AU

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ARTWORK: BUST SCULPTURE, DON MACFARLANE. (OPPOSITE) CLOUDSCAPE PAINTING, BERNADETTE TRELA, BERNADETTETRELA.COM.AU

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DINING AREA (opposite) As keen entertainers, owners Melissa and Frank love their large dining table. This recycled elm table, from Melissa’s shop Kabinett, seats 10, and is paired with budget-friendly IKEA pendant lights. LIVING AREA Lush greenery complements the woven brass pendant light from Calavetti Gallery, repurposed from one of the couple’s restaurants. The timber doors are from Kabinett.

cheat sheet Who lives here: Former restaurateurs Melissa Macfarlane (now owner of Kyneton vintage store Kabinett) and her husband Frank Moylan, who runs Outlines, an antiqued mirrored glass finishes company originally started by his mother-in-law Helen Macfarlane. Style of home: A heritage 1900s brick-and-weatherboard cottage with a modern extension housing a new kitchen, dining and living area. After a year of waiting, the build took five months. The total cost came in $$$$ at just under $200k.


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hey say beauty is in the eye of the

beholder and that’s true of the first time Melissa Macfarlane (pictured below) set eyes on the 113-year-old country cottage that was to become her and husband Frank’s future home. Although she was living in a farmhouse in nearby Kyneton, Melissa wanted a house with a sense of place and history. “Our previous home had been moved onto the property so I was keen to find something that was original to the land,” she says. “There was also a lot of development happening around us.” She struck gold when she spotted a picture-perfect brick-andweatherboard house in the hamlet of Spring Hill. Set on nearly three acres, it would certainly provide plenty of privacy and, perhaps most importantly, ticked the history box with the remains of the village post office and general store still in the grounds. Amazingly, others who had viewed it seemed impervious to its charms. “It had been on the market for six months and no-one wanted it,” says Melissa. “The previous owner was a bit of a hoarder and it was painted pink and burgundy so I guess a lot of people couldn’t see past that, whereas I could.” “I was very excited. In fact, I tried to keep a poker face when I first viewed it but I failed miserably,” says Melissa. “We put in an offer in right away and got it for bargain.”

Melissa, what originally prompted you and Frank to embark on a tree change? We came to the country for work. Frank and

The history of your home obviously cast a spell from the get-go – what else appealed to you? The garden is amazing. It’s more

than 100 years old, very dense and full of interesting plants. And it was the positioning of the garden that led us to build a modern standalone extension – connected with a glass-walled walkway – rather than knocking the back off the original house and extending out that way. What did you do to the original house? Did you embrace the pink and burgundy? No, we painted throughout, inside and out.

The house was in pretty good condition for its age and had already been rewired. We renovated the original bathroom and, after the new extension was finished, ripped out the original kitchen and turned it into our main bathroom.

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ARTWORK: (OPPOSITE) VINTAGE PRINTS FROM BULGARIA

I wanted to do good food in a country pub so we started The Farmers Arms in Daylesford on the first day of the GST – July 1, 2000 – and later moved on to The Royal George in Kyneton. Did it take some time to settle in the country? No, we were working the whole time so to be honest it didn’t matter where we lived! But it’s a good choice to live here. I don’t think living in the country has to be seen as something not as sophisticated as the city. We love it here.


LIVING AREA (opposite, top) The colour scheme here was dictated by the large Jordan Grant painting. The blue GlobeWest sofa is a modern touch alongside a vintage timber gun box and low chest of drawers. KITCHEN “Even though we’ve run kitchens for 20 years, this is the first time we’ve had a good kitchen at home,” says Melissa. To that end, two built-in Blanco ovens allow for multiple cooking tasks, while the generous island bench with double sink is made for entertaining. Urban Edge Ceramics tiles echo the home’s history.


bright

What were your aims with the new extension? We didn’t want

any windows at the front, so it could be completely private. All the windows we do have look out onto the garden and towards the really nice view all the way to Bendigo. We also wanted plenty of space to entertain. How did you approach the interiors? You’ve obviously used some vintage pieces from your own shop. I wanted to mix old

and new together and not be locked into any particular style. I like simplicity in old furniture – the simpler it is, the easier it is to pair it with new things. My view is that if something’s interesting and well-made, it’s going to look good, as long as there is art there as well. So it’s just a collection of simple pieces in a simple space, because really it’s about what’s on the outside and I didn’t want the interiors to compete with that. How does the space work for you now? It’s a bit of a party house. There is a lot of dancing that goes on here. Friends who have come to stay tell us that it’s impossible to cook a bad meal here,

so there is something special about the social aspect of it. But equally, it still feels quite intimate when it’s just the two of us. It’s not a big extension – we purposely chose to keep it at a reasonable size so we could heat and cool it efficiently and didn’t have to clean rooms we don’t use. What did you end up doing with the old post office building?

Frank fixed it up properly and we’ve made it into a private pub that seats 10 people. It’s a little homage to our hospitality background. We’ve called it The Post Office Hotel and when we posted something about it on Facebook, we got lots of calls from people asking if they could book in for dinner! Is this your forever home? Definitely, we won’t move again. And that’s exactly why I wanted the interiors to work as a blank canvas for our furniture and art because when we get bored, we can just change them! Learn more about Melissa’s homewares store Kabinett at kabinett.com.au, and see Franks’s work at outlines.com.au.

ARTWORK: PAINTING, MELISSA MACFARLANE. MICROMACRO ‘GEOMETRY MADE EASY’ PENDANT LIGHTS, KABINETT, KABINETT.COM.AU

An old conso transformed can provide personality w the history o home. Here, Luscombe T white walls p


BATHROOM (opposite) Previously the kitchen, this was the last room to be finished. “The bathroom is fairly casual with a vanity found in Rajasthan, topped with a lab sink from Swan Street Sales,” says Melissa. BEDROOM A mirror from Frank’s business Outlines and a beautiful velvet bedhead offer old-world glamour. Soft blue, pink and grey create a peaceful yet distinctly modern palette.

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MASTER BEDROOM Velvet reigns supreme in the bedrooms. The bedhead, made using velvet from Warwick Fabrics, is a regal partner for the bedspread, found long ago in Jodphur. The vintage wall lamp came from a now-closed shop in Melbourne. EXTERIOR (opposite) A glass corridor connects the original cottage with the new section. Vertical cladding on the extension contrasts with traditional horizontal weatherboard cladding on the old property.

lessons learnt “ IT’S IMPORTANT TO SPEND YOUR MONEY WISELY. KNOW WHEN TO SPLASH OUT AND WHEN TO SAVE” “Spend up on some statement pieces, like great lighting or fantastic tiles, but then compromise on items like taps, door handles and light switches. And a good interior is more than fittings, so save some money for some nice furniture and original art.” Best surprise: “We were going to have a concrete-topped island bench in the kitchen, but seeing as we’d already had the concrete floor polished at the beginning of the build, we decided we didn’t want to run the risk of messing it up. We switched to marble at the last minute, and, despite people advising against it because it marks easily, we love it. It keeps changing and ageing.” What I’d change: “If I was doing this again, I’d probably have a bigger butler’s pantry. Because we’re keen cooks, we’ve filled the one we have so we could do with some more space.” Best tip: “Have a lighting plan. Instead of putting your downlights in a grid in the ceiling, run them along walls and down corridors so your house looks more interesting at night.”

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ADDITIONAL PRODUCT SOURCING: NATALIE JOHNSON. CUSHION, MERCURIOUS, MERCURIOUS.COM.AU

MELISSA MACFARLANE, HOMEOWNER


The house is just a collection of simple pieces in a simple space because it’s really about what’s on the outside MELISSA MACFARLANE, HOMEOWNER


la

dolce

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DINING AREA Owner and interior designer Hanne Poli designed this wenge timber table and had it made in Amsterdam 22 years ago. Hans J. Wegner ‘Wishbone’ chairs further showcase enduring style. PORTICO (opposite) Hanne sits with Arabia the dog in this relaxed space that forms the transition from indoors to out.


INSIDE overseas inspiration

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I tend not to embrace design ‘rules’. Instead, I look to make spaces practical and beautiful at the same time HANNE POLI, OWNER

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anne Poli’s life has always been that of a wanderer. An interior designer, she left her home country of Norway at 18 and has been chasing professional dreams and searching for beauty all around the world ever since. After several years living in New York, Malaysia and Amsterdam, she was ready for change. “I had a strong desire to live in a large and isolated property, with plenty of space where my children could run free and the climate would remain sunny most of the year,” says Hanne. “Italy had been calling me for a while, and I was lucky enough to have the chance to choose where to live and create my own tailor-made environment.” After some searching, Hanne stumbled upon Trevignano Romano, a small village on the shore of Lake Bracciano about 30 minutes’ drive from Rome. “I found it driving around with my kids in the back seat, searching for the ‘perfect spot’,” says Hanne. “I saw Trevignano and fell in love.” To her delight, there was a large block of land for sale, which contained a very basic structure and permission to build. “It was just a roof and eight pillars,” says Hanne, “but the structure was perfectly rectangular and I knew right away I could do wonders with that.” All this natural beauty just 45 minutes from the airport was perfect professionally, as Hanne often travels around Europe. She was also fascinated by the idea of having boars, foxes and sheep as neighbours. The scenery reminded her of Tuscany, although a wilder, greener version. Hanne purchased the property in 1999, and set about planning. At first she had two hectares of nothing: no water, electricity, no gas, and just her dream for a home. “The first thing we did was dig a 180-metre-deep well,” she says. “I arrived here with two very small children, I was working on a project in Sweden and learning Italian while I was communicating with the workmen building the house. Never again! The fact that I had lived all around the world helped me get through this great challenge. It’s probably also why my family and I were so warmly welcomed by the people here.” Her home, built over the period of a year, combines her own Scandinavian style and the more relaxed Italian lifestyle. The importance of a warm and welcoming living space comes from her Norwegian upbringing. But a striking detail of Hanne’s home is the strong bond between the interior and the outdoors: glass doors, a long portico and verandah create the conditions for a relaxed ‘barefoot’ lifestyle that works for the Italian climate. “The way Italians live their life had always been a source of inspiration for me,” says Hanne.“Living here, I learned to approach time at a slower pace, but also how to combine the dolce vita of Italy with my natural Norwegian efficiency.” This plays out in her decorative choices, too, with the grey and white tones so prevalent in Scandinavian style creating a serene base for a range of rustic textures suited to the Italian countryside. “I added insulation to the fabric of the house, which the Italians thought was unnecessary, and heating under the concrete floors – thank goodness I did!” she says. “I used traditional Italian plaster, intonaco colorato for the walls, and mixed the natural colour pigments myself, plus I bought antique floor tiles from Sicily and old roof tiles to give it a sense of history.”


GLASSHOUSE (opposite, top) Sitting just off the kitchen, the glasshouse features a living area that embraces the natural light. KITCHEN The sleek modular cooking zone is by Modulnova, with the shelves custom-made by a local carpenter. Tonalite tiles bridge the gap between old and new.


Hanne drew on the experience of local craftspeople, too; a local blacksmith made all the windows and French doors, which open onto the long shaded portico and built the ‘glasshouse’, a brick-paved room between the kitchen and the garden, which features a centuries old stone fireplace (pictured opposite; “my biggest investment”, says Hanne). Extra-tall oak doors were made by a local carpenter and Hanne specified a dry stone wall crafted from local volcanic stone. “My house is my heart and my way of experiencing life, and that’s why I tend not to embrace fashion or ‘rules’ when I design,” says Hanne. “Instead, I look for a way to make spaces practical and beautiful at the same time.” For her own home, this means furniture and accessories collected over many years and from many countries. Old pieces such as her 22-year-old dining table are mixed with market finds from Kenya, Moroccan lights and a 1940s leather chair found in Zurich. “Amazingly, all of it works really well together,” says Hanne. “What I’ve realised is that the design of the house is timeless. It still feels very modern and it’s getting more beautiful every year. I think that’s down to good interior architecture and material choices plus a smart colour scheme. In 16 years of life in the Trevignano countryside, I have never felt that I’ve made the wrong choice in moving here. I travel a lot but I think I’ve chosen the most beautiful place in the world to live.” To see more of Hanne’s work, visit hannepoli.com and check out @hannepoli on Instagram.

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LIVING AREA (opposite, top left & bottom) An artwork by Eva Germani brings a further tactile quality to the intonaco coloratotreated walls. A cement staircase “leading to nowhere is my library,� says Hanne. This display storage solution lends the velvet sofa a sunken lounge feel. GLASSHOUSE A vintage leather club chair and patchwork rug soften the harder materials in this semi-outdoor space.

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ENSUITE (above left) The antique clawfoot tub was shipped over from Amsterdam. MASTER BEDROOM (above right) Flos lamps by Philippe Starck hang on either side of an Eva Germani artwork above the bed. PATIO (opposite) Hanne’s beloved patio is made up of unique finds. The floor tiles are from Sicily. Sitting atop an IKEA table are a jug and tray, both found in Turkey. The antique daybed is from Indonesia while the floral cushions are by Eva Germani.


The design is timeless. It still feels modern and it’s getting more beautiful every year HANNE POLI, OWNER


“big enough the problem

the family

to be our forever home ”

This Canberra couple love their home but are looking at the future to drive their reno plans with the Panel’s expertise on hand WORDS FIONA JOY PHOTOGRAPHY SAM McADAM-COOPER

the story so far Sophie and James bought this 1969 single level three-bedroom brick home on a quiet street as their first house together in May 2015. They love this suburb and the surrounding areas; Aranda is just 10 minutes from Canberra’s CBD and a few minutes’ walk to a beautiful nature reserve. They decided to live in the house for a year to get a feel for what they like and what they want to change. “We’ve done a lot of work landscaping the backyard and now our focus has moved inside the house so we can create a home that’s ours,” says Sophie. “As we think about starting a family, we’d like to look at options for adding another bedroom and second bathroom. We also want to bring some more natural light into the living areas on the southern side of the house.” What’s stopping them? Sophie and James married last year and have been busy collecting ideas and saving money for the renovations. “We want to make sure we get it right and that it’s something that we will still like in 10 years time,” says Sophie.

the budget

$50k (for now)

NEED A LARGER LIVING SPACE


INSIDE renovation

THE TIRED BRICK EXTERIOR

THE DATED KITCHEN

what the real estate agent says... “Aranda was the first Belconnen suburb to be settled, back in the 1960s. Traditionally, there’s an older demographic here with the majority of the original owners still living in the homes they built or bought. But the area is becoming Carly Clough popular with young families LJ Hooker who love the larger blocks and the fact that it’s a safe and established area. The market in Canberra is generally stable but there’s high demand here and low stock. That, coupled with the fact that some people from interstate are prepared to pay higher prices just to get into the market, means Sophie and James have bought very well. They paid $625k for this house a couple of years ago and recent sales indicate it would be worth at least $700k now. They can also feel confident that if they were to add more room and renovate, they would not overcapitalise as the record price for the suburb was recently set at $1.4 million for a house in their street.”

the realtor

MAKING THE MOST OF THE GARDEN

Inside Out / 93


the solution

your

reno”

the Panel’s advice Andrew Benn Architect and director, Benn + Penna Architecture, bennandpenna.com The bones of this house are great but the layout is a little confusing. The entry is huge so I’d suggest knocking out the walls to create a larger living space and a sightline from the front door right through to the garden. The garden is a great asset and it’s north facing so the light is wonderful – a verandah across the back of the house would make the most of the aspect. In terms of adding to the footprint in the future, I’d suggest an L-shaped extension to make the most of the connection to the garden. There’s a carport to the left of the house, which means they could lose the garage on the right and instead build on an extra bedroom, another bathroom and a second living area that’s modern in style.

Wayd Munro Builder, Focusbuild, focusbuild.com.au

Lisa Koehler ISCD educator, stylist and interior decorator

Sophie and James want this house to be their forever home but are worried about how much it’s going to cost to meet the needs of family life. In my experience, it’s best to spend the money now on what they want rather than wait until they decide to sell; the unhappiest sellers are those who have the work done to make their home more sellable and don’t get to enjoy it. The best thing to do is to get your grand plan in place, then you can work out what’s best to do first, in an order that will take into consideration future work, and spend the money in sections over time rather than all at once. Here, I’d concentrate on sorting out the kitchen, living area and verandah so they BOXED-IN can enjoy life for the next couple of years then KITCHEN look at extending once the family grows.

It’s obvious that this home has been really well looked after but it’s stuck in a time warp. Sophie likes Scandi style and I think that’s a good starting point for this home but I’d like to see that look mixed with a bit of Japanese-style warm timber and clean lines to stop it feeling too cold. You should start your moodboard with the floor and these red boards just need sanding and refinishing and they should come up beautifully. I love the idea of the verandah across the back of the house. James asked about composite decking, which can be great because it’s low maintenance but with an eye on the future, it can get hot for little feet. I’d suggest blackbutt timber because it ages beautifully and it can also be whitewashed to work back with the interior floor.

PHOTOGRAPHY: (PORTRAIT) NIGEL LOUGH, (VERANDAH) ANSON SMART, (LIVING AREA) MELANIE DUZEL-ZAMMIT, (KITCHEN) MARTINA GEMMOLA. STYLING: (PORTRAIT) ALICIA SCIBERRAS, (VERANDAH) MARIA DYONIZIAK, (LIVING AREA) MELANIE DUZEL-ZAMMIT, (KITCHEN) RUTH WELSBY. ARTWORK: (LIVING AREA) RACHEL CASTLE. TIMBER DECKING IN BLACKBUTT, FROM $90.85/SQM, BORAL TIMBER, BORAL.COM.AU/TIMBER. ‘4 SEASONS’ EXTERIOR PAINT IN LOVE NOTE, $57.50/4L, BRITISH PAINTS, BRITISHPAINTS.COM.AU. PAINT COLOUR MAY VARY ON APPLICATION

the panel


INSIDE renovation

& the rest... brick by brick

variety store

“The one thing that dates this house more than anything else is the exterior brickwork,” says Wayd. “Sophie and James have several options to improve the look if they don’t want to go for a full render, which can be pretty expensive. They could simply paint over the bricks with a paint designed to cope with the silica content (that’s what makes them a bit shiny). Or they could consider ‘bagging’ where you basically wipe a sand and cement mixture over the bricks with a broom or hessian cloth before painting. It gives a rougher finish than render and you can still see the brick character, but it’s softened. Or they could do what the people opposite have done and pack-point every second line, then paint so it looks like weatherboard! It actually looks pretty good and you get the aesthetics of weatherboard with the longevity of brick.”

“Someone has spent a lot of time building cupboards in this house,” says Lisa. “Sophie and James want to update the built-ins and one option is to change the doors. The choice includes louvres, laminates and veneers but I think just a simple coat of paint would work well here. You can paint in semi gloss – doors should be up a sheen level from the walls for durability – and interesting handles will add personality and take the doors to another level. One thing to think about when choosing wardrobe doors is to make sure the style, colour and texture works with the other elements in the room, like the window treatment and wall colour, which are the other dominant features of the room. All three vertical elements need to work as a team.”

“I think the Scandi style is a good starting point but I’d like to see that look mixed with a bit of Japanese-style warm timber” LISA KOEHLER, PANEL INTERIOR DECORATOR

light the way “Sophie and James have installed sheer blinds and while these let some light through, it’s still pretty dark,” says Andrew. “I’d put shutters on the outside. Shutters are an affordable, practical shading solution – they can be angled remotely to control the light at any given time of day and they allow daylight through while providing adequate ventilation and privacy. You can buy them in vinyl, timber, composite or aluminium depending on the budget but I’d recommend a white powder-coated aluminium, as it will stand the test of time. Exterior shutters look great, too, and are a cost-effective way to give the outside of the house a facelift.”

An updated kitchen, such as this design from Cantilever Interiors (cantileverinteriors. com), is on the cards.

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INSIDE renovation

Could an easement on your property affect your reno plans? And what’s the deal with fences? We asked the experts to set us straight

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hen you’re buying a property, due diligence should reveal niggles such as easements and shared boundaries. But how will these affect you if you want to renovate? When it comes to shared zones, where do you stand? Three property experts weigh in with their explanations and advice.

pushing the boundaries


But beware. “The simple answer is that you do not own the dunny lane at the rear of your house and there is always a chance that your council may want the laneway back,” says Bruce. “Having said that, if all your neighbours have reclaimed the dunny lane, then there’s a good chance you won’t ever be asked to remove it.” This doesn’t mean it belongs to you, however. “Sometimes councils will sell a dunny lane and if you can legally incorporate the lane into your property then such a move could result in the value of the house going up considerably,” says Bruce.

right of passage If you’re renovating, rear access to your property can be worth its weight in gold. So can you use it? “It may be that the easement allows the owners of the row of houses to access their properties from the dunny lane, so anyone who erects a wall or gate preventing this is breaking the law,” says Bruce. “Pedestrian or vehicle access to the rear of your property may add significant value and if the easement benefits you, then it may be worthwhile to write to the owners who have erected the gate to have them remove it. Before you do anything, however, make sure you obtain legal advice.”

PHOTOGRAPHY: JASON BUSCH. GARDEN DESIGN: PETER FUDGE GARDENS, PETERFUDGEGARDENS.COM.AU. THIS IS A GENERAL GUIDE AND REGULATIONS DIFFER FROM STATE TO STATE. CHECK WITH YOUR LOCAL COUNCIL AS TO WHAT REGULATIONS ARE APPLICABLE TO YOUR RENOVATION PLANS

boundary lines

to give up their rights, you can get rid of it,” says Bruce. “Sometimes they may want money to give it up, or they might just be friendly neighbours. Either way, expect to pay the legal fees.”

dunny lanes

A dunny lane is a particular type of easement set up in the mid-19th century for ‘night-cart men’ to take away sewerage. With the arrival of indoor plumbing, the network of narrow dunny lanes became obsolete, but the right of way remains. Many old terraces in cities and towns across Australia have extra bits of land that aren’t on title where, over time, homeowners have ‘reclaimed’ them and incorporated them into their existing backyards.

The boundary line – or property line – marks the place where your property ends and your neighbour’s (or public space) begins. Until a wall or fence is erected, they are invisible. If you are planning to build or renovate, it’s crucial that you know exactly where your boundary line is, because it may not be where you think. “The biggest misconception is that a property’s boundary line aligns with the current position of a fence,” says surveyor James Thorpe of Beveridge Williams (beveridgewilliams.com.au). “This can cause angst and disputes with neighbours if, for example, a builder uses an existing fence to set out a new building.” If you have any doubts about where the boundaries lie, you should hire a surveyor to check and identify your boundary lines before undertaking any work that may affect it.

toeing the line Your local council will have regulations that govern how close to the boundary line you can build and what sort of structures are acceptable when it comes to determining the relationship of the position of a dwelling to the boundary.

“The Building Code of Australia (BCA) sets out technical requirements relating to fire and ventilation; for example, if there are no windows in a fire-rated wall it can be built to the boundary,” says James. “But you need to check with council, too, as most will have planning controls to say that buildings must be a certain distance from the boundary.” If you want to build out the front of your house where your land meets public land, the same rules apply. “This again is covered by the council planning controls and in some instances, there can be covenants or restrictions placed on the title of the land that stipulate what type of fencing you can have and where you can build it,” says James. “These covenants should be with the contract for sale of the property, or your surveyor or solicitor can get copies from the Land & Property Information office.”

rooms with a view

So you have a great view. And so does your neighbour. But what happens when one of you wants to extend or build something that affects that? The very simple answer is that you cannot stop someone obstructing your view, provided they are building within the applicable planning laws of the local Council – and therein lies the rub. “While someone does not own their view, view loss is seriously considered in the realm of town planning,” says town planner Eli Gescheit from Navon Solutions (navon solutions.com.au). “Councils consider view loss very carefully, to the extent that there are ‘planning principles’ that are used to assess view loss. This identifies the type of view in question and takes into consideration things such as: is it iconic – the Sydney Harbour Bridge for example – or is it of a local park? The significance of the view plays a big role.”

leafy vista Many DA-approved plans now include a landscape plan that specifies the types of plants to be planted so restrictions don’t just apply to actual structures. Some councils treat hedging the same way they do fencing to combat the tactic of so-called ‘spite hedges’ that provide privacy for one neighbour and interrupt a view for the other. “If there were no details regarding a hedge, or if the hedge is contrary to the approved DA, I’d recommend contacting the local council to file a complaint,” says Eli. “Council is then required to investigate the hedge and view loss and they’ll help resolve the matter.”

Inside Out / 97


INSIDE renovation

DREAM IT. DESIGN IT. DO IT.

NEW URBAN A slick revamp of this Melbourne warehouse has created a home where chilled family time and easy entertaining fuse effortlessly WORDS ROSANNE PEACH STYLING LUCY BOCK PHOTOGRAPHY TOM BLACHFORD

living area A Jardan ‘Sky’ sofa and SP01 coffee tables from Space Furniture carve out an inviting spot in the open space. Where possible, the textured brickwork was retained. “The light hits it slightly differently to a normal plasterboard wall and it’s a bit of a connection back to the existing shell of the building,” says interior designer Jonny Mitchell.


kitchen Don’t be fooled by its understated lines – this is one kitted-out cooking zone, with everything from a hidden fridge to integrated deep-fryer, as well as a wine fridge and induction cooktop. “This is just a really fun kitchen to cook in,” says Fiona. The granite splashback and benchtops add lively texture to this entertaining hub, complete with Hay stools from Cult.

F Piper and interior designer Jonny Mitchell of Techne Architecture + Interior Design. “It was funny, I brought along a magazine spread of a house I liked and Karina had actually pulled the same house,” says Fiona. “I thought: we’re on the same page here!” The addition of an ensuite and a better connection between the kitchen and outdoors for easy entertaining were crucial. But the vision hung on a pared-back, sleek aesthetic. “They wanted a minimal palette to try and expand the space,” says Jonny. It was a trick that would help compensate for low ceilings and create cohesion. Style-wise, the intention was to create a flexible backdrop. “I wanted a colour palette that would allow us to bring personality into the house with artwork and bits and pieces from our travels or collected along the way,” says Fiona.

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Leather recessed pulls with oak core, from $33 each, MadeMeasure, mademeasure.com.


INSIDE renovation

bar Come cocktail hour, the discreet joinery opposite the kitchen is opened to reveal a glam little mirror-backed cocktail bar.

dining area Colourful Moroso ‘St. Mark’ chairs from Hub Furniture surround a Rolf Benz dining table from Pad Furniture. Track lighting makes the most of the low ceilings. Mafi ‘Oak Clear’ flooring completes the clean, crisp look.

‘Wash&Wear’ low sheen interior paint in Natural White, $71.90/4L, Dulux, dulux.com.au.

Rubber plant, $75/250mm, Domus Botanica, domusbotanica.com.au.


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Lush textured loop carpet from Cavalier Bremworth mimics the look of the granite in the ensuite behind. The green of a giant oak tree in Fiona and Shaun’s wedding picture, above the bed, is followed through with a Hay side table from Cult. The wall light is also from Cult.

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bathroom A round mirror breaks up the straight lines of the wall covered in Inax tiles from Artedomus. The sleek feel is softened with white-washed oak timber veneer joinery, a warm partner with natural stone tiles underfoot and a honed granite vanity top.

master bedroom MadeMeasure leather pulls add texture to the cool palette. A chair and side table, both from Anibou, form a sophisticated nook.

BEDLINEN (OPPOSITE), KIP&CO, KIPANDCO.NET.AU

DESIGN IT.

“The home was fairly robust and slightly industrial-looking externally but internally it was a much more suburban fitout. The two didn’t align at all,” recalls Jonny. The team at Techne worked back and forth with Fiona and Shaun to resolve the disconnect. “I didn’t want to make it just an industrial warehouse look,” says Fiona. “I wanted something that was a lot sleeker and more refined than that. A nod back with the steel windows was a really nice way to do it.” The fine black steel windows set the tone for black fittings and sharp finishes throughout. “In a house that’s not very big, you want your joinery and all your finishings to speak and create that bit of bling around the house,” says Fiona. The architects also took their cue from the couple’s interest in art and design, creating a plinth in the living area to showcase pieces, while plotting the living room around existing furniture. “We had already begun buying pieces of furniture that we were going to have for a long time, like the Jardan couch and some of the occasional chairs. We were able to consider how the house would evolve around that,” says Fiona.

“IT’S IMPORTANT TO BE AWARE OF THINGS LIKE HOW THAT DOOR IS GOING TO BE FINISHED; AND HOW THE WALL WORKS INTO THOSE CUPBOARDS” FIONA CHALMERS, OWNER Inside Out / 103


lessons learnt

“BE PREPARED THAT EVERYTHING WILL PROBABLY TAKE LONGER THAN YOU THINK, BUT ALSO THAT YOU’LL GET THE BEST RESULT IF YOU SPEND THE TIME ON THE PLANS” FIONA CHALMERS, OWNER

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ROCKER CHAIR & TABLE, TAIT, MADEBYTAIT.COM.AU

The nine-month build, planned as six, came with a few challenges – original floorwork that wasn’t to code, joists being out, windows delayed – but it did little to fluster Fiona, despite the fact she was planning their wedding at the time. Fiona and Shaun moved into their new home just three days before they tied the knot. “It was a deadline the builder could not move,” says Fiona with a laugh. While the shell remained the same, the house was gutted and floors replaced. By reversing the stairs, the team at Techne won space for a powder room and utility area downstairs, and could move the kitchen closer to the courtyard. A chic bar, fitted into joinery opposite the kitchen, fits the entertainers to a tee. “You open the bar up and you have the drama of the cooking but you also have cocktail making and it’s fun,” says Fiona. The courtyard is decked out to enable seamless entertaining and hosts the growing garden needed to soften the home. Upstairs, a slight rejig has allowed for an ensuite and a calm collection of rooms, one recently claimed by their new son, Henry, who has come along nearly a year later. “This was our first renovation and we loved the process,” says Fiona. “Creating something that is exactly what you want is an incredibly rewarding experience.” Visit Techne Architecture + Interior Design at techne.com.au.

“We love entertaining and often spill outside for drinks. We open up the concertina doors so dinner can be back on the dining table but it’s all connected,” says Fiona. Built-in seating “helps to break up that back wall so it’s tiered with greenery, planters and seating,” says interior designer Jonny. Herrod Landscapes created the green wall to match Fiona’s colour palette. “The green wall is fantastic. We love it,” she says.


are you going home to a bathroom you love? reece.com.au/bathrooms


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In this elegant bathroom, easy-to-maintain porcelain tiles provide the look of beautiful veined marble but are less prone to staining.

TAILOR-MADE SOLUTION

A high-rise bathroom renovation required a mix of clever space planning and practical magic

WORDS VICTORIA BAKER

PHOTOGRAPHY FRANÇOISE BAUDET

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fter their youngest child moved out of home, the owners of this Sydney apartment did two things: booked a long overseas trip and called Hellen Pappas of H Interior Design to refurbish their bathrooms. Their existing ensuite and guest bathroom were dark and tired so the brief was for something lighter and brighter. So far, so standard, but Hellen’s clients also had some quite specific needs arising out of the fact that one of them is in a wheelchair. First up was the layout. An existing over-bath shower was removed and replaced with a long vanity with double under-counter basins and push-latch drawers. Extra space, including an external window, was stolen from an adjoining laundry, which was relocated to the guest bathroom. The angled area became the shower, complete with a flush-mounted ceiling shower and hand shower. A sliding glass screen separates the wet area from the rest of the room. “Renovating a bathroom in an apartment can be tricky,” says Hellen. “Removing fittings and fixtures and changing plumbing locations can sometimes mean you need to access the apartment


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get the look

key to success “The large-format tiles and fresh white palette give the bathrooms a sophisticated, comfortable and spacious feel” HELLEN PAPPAS, DESIGNER

below and remove part of a ceiling, but we managed to avoid that problem by making as few plumbing changes as possible.” Next came the mix of materials. With the ‘light and bright’ brief in mind, Hellen chose polyurethane joinery in Dulux Natural White, topped by a Stone Italiana ‘Cartapietra’ quartz benchtop in Super White. She had envisaged natural stone, and while her clients loved the look, they were worried about maintaining the surface so Hellen proposed porcelain tiles from Surface Gallery, which resemble marble. “The ‘Marble Concept’ tile in Calacatta is a brilliant bright white and features slight irregularities typical of natural marble,” she says. “I chose a large-format tile at 450mm x 900mm to make the rooms feel larger.” The tiles are rectified, so grout lines are minimal for a seamless result. The guest bathroom was treated to the same materials palette, with the washing machine and dryer hidden behind cupboard doors below bench height. “Another issue in apartment renovations is access,” says Hellen. “We had to make sure all the joinery and mirrors could fit into the lift. The size of the mirror in the guest bathroom was actually determined by the size of the lift!” The process went smoothly, with the clients calling in via Skype from overseas when needed. “They were amazed when they got back home,” says Hellen, “and we were so pleased to be able to give them a beautiful and practical bathroom, purpose-built for them.” To see more of Hellen’s work, visit hinteriordesign.com.au. Find the builders for the project at orishonprojects.com.au and bearthebuilder. com. Joinery by MSA Prestige Woodcraft, msapwc.com.au.

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STYLING ASSISTANCE: ROSIE MEEHAN. PAINT AND MATERIAL COLOUR MAY VARY ON APPLICATION


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SINK DIFFERENTLY. Abey Australia’s diverse range of sinks provides you with a selection from around the world. Visit an Abey Selection Gallery to browse the range. Barazza Cubo Single Bowl – Barazza 1 & 3/4 Bowl – Barazza Easy200 Double Bowl

VICTORIA Selection Gallery 335 Ferrars St Albert Park Ph: 03 8696 4000

NEW SOUTH WAL ES Selection Gallery 1E Danks St Waterloo Ph: 02 8572 8500

QUEENSL AND Selection Gallery 94 Petrie Tce Brisbane Ph: 07 3369 4777

* N E W LY O P E N E D * WESTERN AUSTR ALIA Selection Gallery 12 Sundercombe St Osborne Park Ph: 08 9208 4500

www.abey.com.au


BATHROOM

TOP BATHROOM WOWS

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The Block: Glasshouse co-winner and interior architect, Shannon Vos. voscreative. com.au

style & design special

Shannon gives us the scoop on the need-to-know bathroom trends for 2017 – and yes, timber does make an appearance

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EXTRA-SPESH TILES, REIMAGINED

PHOTOGRAPHY: (LEFT) MAREE HOMER, (RIGHT) RYAN LIN

Tiles should be that perfect balance between function and form. What we’re seeing now is the next generation of tiles that, quite simply, blow me away. It’s no longer necessary to specify stone, concrete, granite or even marble in bathrooms as the quality of tiles that replicate the real deal is so damn good. Beautifully rendered carrara and calacatta-look tiles (as seen below in this Schemes & Spaces project, schemesandspaces. com.au) can see you save thousands, and the hardy finish of tiles means there’s no fussing about with the maintenance of more porous materials in a wet zone. Beaumont Tiles (beaumont-tiles. com.au) now supplies tiles up to three metres in length! But… wait for it… with only 3.5mm in thickness. These ‘slabs’ are super lightweight, strengthened by a fibreglass backing and perfect for seamless design with minimal joins and grout lines, making them great for small spaces and even better for larger ones.

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The evolution of timber can be likened to the evolution of tiles: very slow, until now. We are finally starting to see incredible specifications in engineered timber. Practically waterproof timber boards from Mafi mean we now have the option of using this wonderful element in our wet areas, something that has been a big no no for so long. An natural oil treatment gives these timber boards the ability to breathe, contract and expand while also repelling water. This reduces the possibility of the timber cupping or warping due to water absorption and opens up a whole new ball game in bathroom finishes.

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Want to make a statement and accentuate your black tapware? Frame your showerscreen in black aluminium for a timeless and bold look. For many years now, the trend for showerscreens has been frameless glass, but we’re starting to see a complete reversal and what was invisible is now becoming a striking feature. Defined frames can be adapted to just about any bathroom design and can easily be a cost-effective option to turn your drab look instantly sexy.

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Finally, an option other than the generic ceramic sink. Pressed metal and solid surface bowls are making a huge impression in the bathroom scene, and it’s about time! Solid surfaces are stone/polymer blends that are moulded into a sink and/or vanity bench combination. Another option is pressed metal – it’s just sexy as hell. With painted-on enamel, much like that old camping mug, it’s super tough, has a lovely feel and can be less prone to chipping than the typical delicate china or porcelain sink. The slim profile of pressed metal makes these basins (usually above-counter) really stand out from the crowd and I can see them making a huge impression this year.

ditch the chrome and finally embrace a new metallic in our bathrooms. Yeah, we’ve seen the emergence of the matt black and even tumbled brass (i.e HOT) fixtures, but now we’re starting to see gunmetal grey, pewter, rose gold and even combos of brass and neutrals. Brass is such an on-trend metal, replacing the copper tones of recent times. Sussex Tapware (available through Reece, reece. com.au) can customise and colour your tapware and Phoenix Tapware (phoenixtapware.com.au) creates taps with beautiful combinations of brass and matt black or white. Chrome is starting to look dated, so step outside the box and bring the latest bling into your bathroom.

GET THE LOOK Our pick of go-to fittings and fixtures to give your bathroom up-to-date style.

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HRIS WARNES/WARNES & WALTON. STYLING: N: (LEFT) CANNY, CANNY.COM.AU, (RIGHT) ADELE ) THE DESIGN ALLIANCE, THEDESIGNALLIANCE.COM

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DITCH THE ‘CHROME DOME’


EXPERIENCE LUXURY reece.com.au/bathrooms


RUG UP Warmth and texture underfoot are yours with Armadillo & Co’s ‘Ghan’ rug. A contrasting high pile and flat weave adds plenty of interest to sleeping zones while providing you with a soft landing. From $1620, armadillo-co.com.

The Woods, weighs in

BEDROOM NEWS

in

to make a statement in the bedroom. Adding a feature wall can be a quick and inexpensive way to give a bedroom a lift. The cons: There’s an overreliance on using a bold and contrasting block colour feature wall as the only way to enhance the drama in bedrooms, without considering the room’s size or what else is going on in the space. Wallpapering a section of the room or panelling your bedroom are great alternatives. The verdict: Nay! There are plenty of ways to give a bedroom a fresh look without splashing an expanse of flat colour across the space. Look at your overall mix of materials and tones – in my current renovation, we’re removing the plaster altogether and rendering the brick to introduce texture into the space. Visit downtothewoods.com.au.

ok with the nd choices BATHGATE

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For more new homewares, visit insideout.com.au/products.

WORDS: (YAY OR NAY) VIRGINIA JEN

The deal: Your bedroom is the space you start the


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the tool From smoothies to soups, purees to frozen desserts, Vitamix’s ‘Professional Series 750’ blender has everyday routines and dinner-party favourites covered. This clever mixer, now in a copper-toned finish, even has a self-cleaning function. It’s $1395, vitamix.com.au.

the look

the hit list

What’s cooking on our kitchen wishlist this month the smart fixture

EDITED BY NATALIE JOHNSON & VIRGINIA JEN

The innovation behind the ‘Vapore’ stainlesssteel rangehood ($299 means excess water an condensation is no long a problem for induction cooktops. Visit ilve.com for more information.

the table Oak veneer, round legs and a clean form come together in Hem’s simple yet fun ‘Log’ table. It’s POA from District, district.com.au.

the cooktop Bringing the professional kitchen to home cooking, Gaggenau’s ‘Flex’ induction cooktop offers defined heat areas, a frying sensor feature and booster functions for searing and super-fast heat. It’s $5999, gaggenau.com/au.

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yay or nay?

… having a wine fridge. Virginia Selleck, sommelier and owner of Magnum + Queens Wine, weighs in

The deal: Customised wine fridges from Vintec, Liebherr, Transtherm and EuroCave are some of the best, and look super stylish. Wine will become oxidative, volatile and taste ‘cooked’ with temperature fluctuations and heat. The pros: A wine fridge offers reliable temperature-controlled storage for wine bottles while also providing a spot for an immaculate display of bottles. Smaller units can hold 30 bottles or so and fit neatly under a bench. As long as you have the space, it’s worth the investment. The cons: At my house when friends are over, we always gravitate to the kitchen. I’m positive that the temptation would be too great for us, so a lock would be a must! The verdict: A definite yay for me! You could also try seeking the cool, dark and quiet space in the back of a bedroom cabinet, or lie the bottles on their side deep under a staircase. Visit magnumandqueenswine.com.


BUYER’S GUIDE


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A generous drape (left) allows for the base of these Lizzo curtains to pool on the floor. This style is more practical in a low-traffic area, as dirty feet and floors will damage the fabric. The sheer curtains (opposite) are in a busy dining area, so skim the floor to maximise convenience.

PHOTOGRAPHY: (OPPOSITE) ARMELLE HABIB. STYLING: (OPPOSITE) JULIA GREEN. PRODUCT: (THIS PAGE) CURTAINS IN ‘MENFIS’ LINEN FABRIC, POA, WESTBURY TEXTILES, WESTBURYTEXTILES.COM. PRODUCT SOURCING: IMOGENE ROACHE

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urtains are controversial. Anyone who lived through ’80s fashion will also remember ’80s window coverings with their balloon pleats, scalloped pelmets and draping swags, and feel a little nervous about their return. Fear not, the new curtains are like a Pilates-toned, rehabbed version of their old selves, so we’re welcoming them back to the party. Sheers are lightweight curtains that allow light to penetrate and are the go-to for modern interiors. “An open-weave sheer creates a delicate, refined look, and can be combined with a textured plain fabric for a more polished feel,” says Cam Warwick, joint managing director of Warwick Fabrics (warwick.com.au). Filtering light is but one of the benefits; sheers can also soften a hard-edged space, without hiding any architectural features. “Sheers are most effective when hung as a wall-to-wall treatment,” says stylist Imogene Roache. Mid-weight fabrics, such as linen, are a popular choice. “Casual linens and crinkled cottons provide a timeless aesthetic, and technological advancements mean man-made fabrics can now provide the same relaxed movement and finish with less creasing and fading,” says Cam. This kind of fabric also blocks more light, if this is required, and with the addition of lining, can provide complete blockout, which is perfect for bedrooms. Lining also has insulation benefits, making it harder for heat to transfer through the windows, and will protect the curtain fabric itself from fading in the sun. Heavier fabrics – such as velvet or silk – create a grand, dramatic feel. These options are best if you’re looking to create a luxurious statement – and if so, you’ll also want the fabric to puddle on the floor. Either midweight or heavy fabrics can be teamed with sheers, using a double track or double rod. This will give you multiple options for privacy and light control.

Once you’ve settled on the style of fabric, pay attention to the detail of where and how to hang your curtains. Placement is everything. “The higher the curtain rod, the taller the window looks,” says Imogene. “The best rod position is halfway between the top of the window and the ceiling.” Length and width are also important; your aim is always for the curtains to look generous, rather than stingy. You’ll want your curtains to fall to the floor, not just to the bottom of the window. And that means they should actually touch the floor, either barely skimming or pooling generously, rather than sitting a few inches off the floor. Take this into account when choosing your fabric and check whether washing or dry cleaning may shrink the material. “When your curtains are open, the stack of fabric shouldn’t cover too much of the window itself,” says Imogene. “When they’re closed, they should still have some drape, rather than looking stretched tight across the window. You’ll need enough fabric for two-and-a-half times the width of the window to create this effect.” It’s possible to buy ready-made curtains and hardware to install yourself – try West Elm (westelm.com.au), IKEA (ikea.com.au) or Freedom (freedom.com.au) – but if you can’t find anything to fit or have something special in mind, consider getting professionals involved. Most businesses will send someone out to assess your needs and measure your windows, then come back to install the curtains once they’re made.

NEUTRALS Shades of pale grey, beige and white or darker charcoals are a safe bet, adding a layer of texture without hogging the decorative limelight. “Choosing a slightly darker tone than your walls can be a subtle and understated addition to your room,” says Imogene.

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PATTERN & COLOUR If you’re looking for a statement window, go with bold colour or dramatic pattern. “Large-scale prints and patterns lift a room and can even make a space feel larger,” says Imogene. A fine print can also work if windows are not the dominant feature in the room.


INSIDE renovation

HARDWARE The two most popular options are curtain rods and tracks. “The weight of the fabric will determine what kind of rod is best to use,” says Imogene. “Lightweight and sheer curtains will sit well on a slimline rod but a heavier curtain will need a sturdier system. Eyelets and tab-top curtains are best in a casual space, but use quality hardware as it will be more on show with these styles.”

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THE RIGHT TRACK “Pinch and pencil pleats on a tracking system are the most sophisticated look for curtains,” says Imogene. Tracks often run along the ceiling line or are concealed behind a shadow line or bulkhead. If your curtains are hung at ceiling height, look at motorised tracks: try somfy. com.au or silentgliss.com.au.

1. ‘Mid Century’ curtain rod, from $139, West Elm, westelm.com.au. 2. PB Standard ball finial & curtain rod, from $104, Pottery Barn, potterybarn. com.au. 3. ‘Industrial Pipe’ rod, from $119, West Elm, as before. 4. PB Standard glass square finial & curtain rod, from $104, Pottery Barn, as before. 5. ‘Harrison’ timber rod set, from $59.95, Freedom, freedom.com.au. 6. ‘Pin’ adjustable metal rod, from $79, West Elm, as before.

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PHOTOGRAPHY: (OPPOSITE) DEREK SWALWELL, (THIS PAGE) PRUE RUSCOE. STYLING: (OPPOSITE) HEATHER NETTE KING, (THIS PAGE) CLAIRE DELMAR. DESIGN: (OPPOSITE) INFORM, INFORMDESIGN.COM.AU & PLEYSIER PERKINS, PLEYSIERPERKINS.COM.AU; (THIS PAGE) JPR ARCHITECTS, JPRA.COM.AU

timber The trend towards light-coloured wood floors reflects our increasing focus on the outdoors, according to Elle McCarthy, architectural finishes specialist at Tongue n Groove Flooring (tonguengrooveflooring.com.au). “Australia’s weather means we are a nation of brunch-loving beachgoers, and lighter interiors reflect this lifestyle,” she says. “Having a lighter and more open space brings emotional benefits, too – light has such a big impact on wellbeing so the more you can bring inside, the better.” Choose between warm or cool undertones, depending on your setting. “If you have ocean views or bush views, grey tones work well, and they fit with a Scandi aesthetic, too,” says Elle. “Warmer brown undertones add depth and texture when working with either cooler, neutral palettes or punchy, bold colours in accompanying finishes.” STYLE TIP Lighter timbers are a style match for coastal or Scandi interiors. 1. ‘Bespoak’ floorboards in Chiffon, from $59/sqm, Carpet Court, carpetcourt.com.au. 2. European oak engineered flooring in Sepia, from $123.20/sqm, Tongue n Groove Flooring, tonguengroove flooring.com.au. 3. Oak Trends engineered flooring in Frost, $99/sqm, Harvey Norman, harveynorman.com.au. 4. European oak engineered flooring in Alpaca, from $123.20/sqm, Tongue n Groove Flooring, as before. 5. ‘Archite Collection’ engineered flooring in Smoked & Limed, from $93.50/sqm, Royal Oak Floors, royaloakfloors.com.au. 6. Australian Timber Company ‘Herringbone Design Block’ blackbutt parquetry flooring, from $149.95/sqm (including installation), SE Timber Floors, setimber.com.au.

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Choose from natural stone, concrete, terrazzo, ceramic or porcelain, some of which are designed to mimic the irregular appearance of stone or timber. Hard-wearing and practical, tiles are a low-maintenance choice. STYLE TIP Consider rugs to soften a tiled space visually and help with noise control.

When you’re working with a pale colour scheme, it’s important to include different textures to avoid an overload of plain white or beige. Look for loop-pile carpet to create interest at floor level or a slightly heathered colourway with variations in tone, which also works to better hide dirt. Another option is a versatile natural fibre such as sisal or jute, which can be laid as wall-to-wall carpet or made-to-measure in large room-sized rugs. STYLE TIP Light-coloured carpet is a beautiful soft addition to bedrooms. Think carefully before installing a cream-toned carpet in a dining area.

1. ‘EM-1011’ Italian terrazzo tile , $104/sqm, Signorino Tile Gallery, signorino.com.au. 2. ‘Linnato’ honed limestone tile in Grey, from $134.95/sqm, Beaumont Tiles, beaumont-tiles.com.au.

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1. ‘Classic Stonefields’ wool textured loop-pile carpet in Quartz, from $70/sqm (including nstallation), Feltex Carpets, feltex.com. 2. Cream l carpet with sisal. from $65/sqm, The Natural oorcovering Centres, naturalfloor.com.au.

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cathartic cleaning

calm in the storm WORDS PETER WALSH

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Hi Peter, My husband and I never see eye-to-eye about the need to be organised. He says I’m a minimalist. I say he’s a slob. How do we solve this problem short of divorce! Maggie, Nunawading, Vic

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Hi Maggie. First of all, as a professional organiser, I hear this question A LOT (although, it’s funny, I never get it from the partner who’s less organised!). So, take comfort in the fact that you’re absolutely not alone. If you’re concentrating on the ‘stuff’, you and your partner will just concentrate on the fight. And, with fights, there has to be a winner and a loser. What’s the point of being the winner in an argument if you’ve only damaged your relationship? I definitely believe that being organised has a huge range of benefits and you have to start somewhere. I’m sure you’ve heard it before but in order for there to be a behavioural change, you both have to want it. And, I mean both. We give time to what we think is important. If your partner is not putting time into the idea of keeping your home neat and orderly

then he doesn’t believe it’s important for him to do that. And, if you’re constantly on the lookout for the last bit of clutter he’s left for you to ‘take care of’, then maybe you’re a little too focused on that as well. There has to be some room for compromise. Here’s my trick. Take your partner’s hand and go outside your home. Stand on the street together and have a good long look at your place. Start talking about the day you moved in: if you’re like most people, that day was filled with excitement as you both contemplated what this new place held in store for you both. What projects would you work on? What dreams did you have for your family? That’s the ‘vision’ you both had for the house. If you’re constantly fighting about ‘stuff’ then somewhere along the way, you’ve forgotten about that vision. Reestablishing the vision needs good conversation. Once you establish it, this vision will guide you both for how you’re living in your home. For some, their home is meant to be the place where all the kids, grandkids, and loads of friends gather, and in a constant state of activity. For others, they want their home to be a spa-like retreat where they can just find peace and quiet and a place to escape the craziness of the world. Once you and your partner have had a good refresher on your vision, discuss how you’ll make it a reality. Instead of looking at a pile of clutter and getting angry, simply ask each other whether that mass of unpaid bills on the kitchen benchtop is really helping you both get closer to or further away from that shared vision you have for your home. Take the frustration out of it. Help each other reprioritise what it is that’s most important to you both. Maybe it’s not as big a deal as you think, maybe it is, but either way if you’re both respecting the shared vision – and each other – you’ll be well on your way to having fewer fights about the stuff!

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If you and your partner are bickering over the clutter in the house, take this approach. Stop the argument in its tracks and, instead, find something that you and your partner both love doing together. Don’t try to win a fight. Don’t put yourself in a position to lose either. Just let it go for now and figure out something that will make you both less stressed. Once you’re both in a happier place, grab your diaries and pick a time in the next few days when you can devote an hour to yourselves and to each other. Once you’ve scheduled in that time, go back and read the rest of this column and start having that much-needed talk.

Peter’s latest book, Let It Go ($39.99, Rodale), is out now. Visit peterwalshdesign.com. 136 / Inside Out

ANSWER

PHOTOGRAPHY: JULIEN FERNANDEZ

Peter Walsh, the ‘get your whole life organised guy’, is an Aussie currently based in Los Angeles.

In his new decluttering column, our resident expert Peter Walsh gets real with everyday problems. His first challenge? Solving the age-old clash between the neat and the messy


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STARTS WITH CORINTHIAN THE MODA COLLECTION A door is a statement of what to expect as you enter a room. That’s why Sally Klopper of Sally Caroline Interior Design starts with Corinthian’s Moda Collection. With 24 timeless designs to choose from, a Moda door will be right at home in your home. To watch Sally talk about her timeless design principles, visit Corinthian.com.au


NEW

UP or stream it on Foxtel Play


out going for gold It’s easy to see why this standout garden is an absolute winner

PHOTOGRAPHY: AMELIA STANWIX

The Melbourne International Flower & Garden Show sees the industry’s best talents showcase their creativity. This year’s Best In Show was the ‘I See Wild’ garden by Phillip Withers Landscape Design (phillipwithers.com) with paths, vegie beds, a stone lookout, a river bed and these bespoke totem poles, all spread across 200 square metres. Look out for our show coverage next issue.


OUT gardens


garden variety A multi-layered approach combines clever planting, a vegie patch and a designer eye to form the perfect family hangout WORDS KATHERINE CHATFIELD PHOTOGRAPHY BRIGID ARNOTT

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hen landscaper Julian

Bombardiere moved into a 1980s brick home in the Sydney suburb of Kings Langley eight years ago, he knew the garden would be a labour of love. After renovating his house to give it a modernist feel and reflect his passion for mid-century architecture, he started to tackle the sloping garden three years ago. “The garden was a long-term project,” says Julian, also the owner of Ballast Landscape. The garden sits around the house on a 760 square-metre block, and Julian wanted to create a “lush green garden with many layers and plant combinations to blur the lines and heights of the sheer walls of the house”. He also wanted a private space where his family could relax. “I’ve used certain plants to create bold structural elements and softer, flowing species to create smooth seamless layering,” says Julian. The garden has a distinct flow to it. “I wanted it to slow you down as you walk through it, so you can experience each area,” says Julian. “Different ‘rooms’ create interest and provide focal points in each area, and give you the option to use the space in various ways. The front garden is accessed by stepping off the bluestone-tiled entrance steps to a crushed granite path. This leads you to a small section of level lawn, where my daughter Quinn’s cubby house sits and which is used as a play area.” The cubby house is five-year-old Quinn’s “garden home” and is designed to be in keeping with the style of the house. “I made

it with a flat roof, cedar shutters and v-joint cladding to make it a little easier on the eye,” he says. The entrance to the garden is structured into several layers; Japanese box is cut into a low hedge and a higher Metrosideros excelsa hedge sits behind. “To create layers in front of the hedges, I chose star jasmine ‘Tricolour’ that has a white tip, and Senecio cineraria, which gives a grey colour,” he says. “Together, these give great contrasting colour and foliage. The crushed granite underfoot creates a nice soothing sound when walked on.” The tightly pruned topiary balls add some focal points amongst the layers. “Correa alba, Westringia fruticosa and Escallonia rubra ‘Red Knight’ are clipped as rounds. Each plant has been carefully placed to adapt to the light conditions that vary from summer to winter.” Julian terraced the sloped garden to create large level areas. Where the land had to be cut and filled, he built retaining walls from local Sydney sandstone. “The sandstone provides a classic look that doesn’t date and gives a warm, textural feel,” he says. “Each stone was shaped using a hammer, bolster and scutch chisels, and they are all a different colour and shape.” The hardwood timber stairs alongside the cubby house lead to the recycled brick paved area and the fire pit. “I made the fire pit from a steel frame and a very large wok,” says Julian. “The seats around the pit are made from leftover firewood from a tree in poor health that needed to be removed from the garden.” This area of the garden is lush and tree-filled. “The sun is very hot in this area in the summer, so I used deciduous river birch (Betula nigra) on the north side to provide shade and help with cooling the home. The river birch drops its leaves in autumn, allowing light into these garden areas and the house.” Surrounding the seating area are more Westringia fruticosa topiary balls. “These provide an accent on the corner as you walk to the rear garden,” says Julian. “Behind these are maroontipped Loropetalum chinense ‘Rubrum’, used for their soft foliage, which contrast against the highly clipped Westringia balls.” The evergreen on the southern side is a tuckeroo tree (Cupaniopsis anacardioides). “I chose this as screening as it doesn’t block the low winter sun but still provides all-season privacy,” he says. Julian is delighted with the space he’s created. “The more time I spend in it, the more I appreciate it.”

I made the fire pit from a steel frame and a very large wok PE DESIGNER


Different ‘rooms’ create interest and provide focal points in each area, and give you the option to use the space in various ways PE DESIGNER


floor show Create different moods throughout your garden using a variety of hard surfaces.

garden plan This outdoor space creates ‘rooms’ using levels, greenery and built structures.

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1. Driveway 2. Front lawn 3. Cubby house 4. Brick paving 5. Vegie gardens 6. Rear lawn 7. Deck 8. Residence


vegie plantings Create a flourishing produce garden all year round with these tasty edible plant picks.

the kitchen garden

F

or Julian, a kitchen garden was a must-have. “My father is a

horticulturist and we always had a vegetable garden growing up,” he recalls. “I love teaching my daughter about where food actually comes from. Nothing tastes better than something you have grown yourself without using chemicals.” At the moment, his herb garden contains hot chillies, basil, oregano, flat-leaf parsley, Thai basil, chives, thyme, fennel, sage and coriander, while the vegie patch boasts oak leaf and cos lettuce, spinach, zucchini, eggplant, rocket and capsicum, which are all good for a summer crop. The kitchen garden is in the walk-through area from the front to back garden, out of sight from the house. “Vegetable gardens don’t always look the most attractive,” he says “I terraced it with timber sleepers and decorative crushed granite paths, so even when the garden isn’t full of vegetables, it still looks good.” Get in touch with Julian at ballastlandscape.com.au.

Chilli plant

Cucumber vine

I love teaching my daughter about where food actually comes from JULIAN BOMBARDIERE, OWNER & LANDSCAPE DESIGNER

Basil


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Roasted citrus & olive salmon with Roasted cauliflower & fennel salad


favourite things


Roasted cauliflower & fennel salad


Roasted citrus & olive salmon


“ ”


Fig & almond cake


“ ”


extras

ANEETA

WILLIAMS-SONOMA

COLORBOND

a a

BLU DOT

HARDIEDECK

NESPRESSO a

a


ADDRESS BOOK

stockists

Here are all the numbers and websites you need to get shopping! Don’t be misled by suppliers listing Sydney or Melbourne phone numbers – they are often head offices or distributors who can find a retailer in your area

a-c

j-l

Anibou (02) 9319 0655, anibou.com.au. Anthropologie anthropologie.com. Artedomus (02) 9557 5060, artedomus.com. BIGA+ Waitara (02) 9487 4578, bigaplus waitara.com.au. Blanco 1300 739 033, blanco-australia.com. Boral boral.com.au. Bunnings bunnings.com.au. Calavetti Gallery 0417 506 440, cavalettigallery.com. Cavalier Bremworth 1800 251 172, cavbrem. com.au. Christopher Boots (03) 9417 6501, christopherboots.com. Classic Ceramics classicceramics.com.au. Cleverdon Cabinets (03) 9775 0506, cleverdoncabinets.com.au. Coco Joinery By Design 0411 144 992. Crossing Threads crossingthreads.co. Cult cultdesign.com.au.

Jardan (03) 8581 4988, jardan.com.au. Jordan Grant, Perc Tucker Regional Gallery facebook.com/PrecTuckerTCC. Kabinett (03) 5422 6695, kabinett.com.au. Life Interiors 1300 544 899, lifeinteriors.com.au. Luscombe Tiles luscombetiles.com.au

d-f

p-r

Derek Swalwell (03) 9533 7710, derekswalwell.com. Domayne domayne online.com.au. Domo (03) 9277 8888, domo.com.au. Dulux 132 525, dulux.com.au. Dunlin 1800 649 586, dunlin.com.au. Eco Outdoor 1300 131 413, ecooutdoor.com.au. Eva Germani evagermani.it.

Pad Furniture (03) 9421 6655, padfurniture. com.au. Pentland Furniture Co. (03) 5368 1213. Porter’s Paints 1800 656 664, porterspaints.com. RC+D (03) 9428 6223, rc-d.com.au. Reece reece.com.au.

g-i GlobeWest (03) 9518 1600, globewest.com.au. Hebel hebel.com.au. Herrod Landscapes herrodlandscapes.com.au. Hub Furniture (03) 9652 1222, hubfurniture.com.au. Huset (03) 8609 1443, huset.com.au. IKEA ikea.com.au.

Turn to page 56 for more of this country farmhouse.

m-o MadeMeasure 0431 489 504, mademeasure.com. Mafi (02) 9698 7877, mafi.com.au. Major Minor 0409 686 252, majorminorsydney.com. Middle Of Nowhere middleofnowhere.com.au. Modulnova modulnova.com. Norsu Interiors norsu.com.au. Outlines (03) 8336 1632, outlines.com.au.

s-z Sheridan 1800 223 376, sheridan.com.au. Smallshop hello@smallshoponline.com. Space Furniture (02) 8339 7588, space furniture.com.au. Supertuft (03) 9427 8600, supertuft.com.au. Swan Street Sales (03) 9428 0677, swanstreet.com.au. The D E A Store (02) 9698 8150, thedeastore.com. The Works bedbathntable.com.au. Thonet 1800 800 777, thonet.com.au. Tonalite tonalite.it. Urban Edge Ceramics (03) 9429 2122, urbanedgeceramics.com.au. Warwick Fabrics 1300 787 888, warwick.com.au.

PRIVACY NOTICE NewsLifeMedia collects information about you including, for example, your name and contact details which you provide when registering or using our services, as well as information from data houses, social media services, our affiliates and other entities you deal or interact with for example by using their services. We collect and use that information to provide you with our goods and services, to promote and improve our goods and services, for the purposes described in our Privacy Policy and for any other purposes that we describe at the time of collection. We may disclose your information to our related companies, including those located outside Australia. We may contact you for those purposes (including by email and SMS). We may also disclose your information to our service and content providers, including those located outside Australia. If you do not provide us with requested information, we may not be able to provide you with the goods and services you require. Where you have entered a competition, we may disclose your personal information to authorities if you are a prize winner or otherwise as required by law. Further information about how we handle personal information, how you can complain about a breach of the Australian Privacy Principles, how we will deal with a complaint of that nature, how you can access or seek correction of your personal information and our contact details can be found in our Privacy Policy available at newscorpaustraliaprivacy.com. FOR TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF COMPETITIONS AND READER OFFERS, PLEASE VISIT INSIDEOUT.COM.AU AND SEARCH FOR ‘TERMS MAY 2017 ISSUE’.


PHOTOGRAPHY: (OPPOSITE) ANSON SMART, (THIS PAGE) SAM McADAM-COOPER. STYLING: (OPPOSITE) JONO FLEMING, (THIS PAGE) JESSICA HANSON

drawing board

natural selection

shape shifters

geometry lesson

Clockwise from top left: Potted bonsai, $120, Ginkgo Leaf, ginkgoleaf.com.au. Terrazzo hook, $49, Zakkia, zakkia.com.au. Ferm Living bath towel, $69, Designstuff, designstuff.com.au. ‘Green Tea’ bath brew, $16.95, Page Thirty Three, pagethirtythree.com. Perrin & Rowe ‘Contemporary’ wall-mounted basin set in Pewter, $845, The English Tapware Company, englishtapware.com.au. Redecker ‘Hamman’ pumice stone, $9.95, Saison, saison.com.au. ‘Snow Leaf’ plate, $9, Funkis, funkis.com. ‘River Izu’ photograph by Terence Chin for In Bed, stylist’s own. Moebe A4 frame, $79, Designstuff, as before. ‘Wash’ bath towel, $79, Atolyia, atolyia.com. ‘Inkster’ pendant light, $475, Inkster, inksterprojects.com. Kiso Artech ‘Sumimaru’ lacquered sliding door handles in Moss Green, $99 each, Specified Store, specifiedstore.com. Alape ‘Klassiker’ wall basin, $387, Reece, reece.com.au. Bamboo charcoal with cedar wood, bergamot & peppermint soap, NZ$20, Sphaera, sphaera.co.nz. Soap dish, $39, Keepresin, keepresin.com.au. ‘pH Perfect’ body & hand wash, NZ$39, Sans [ceuticals], sansceuticals.com. ‘Balance Elixir’ roll-on balancing face oil, $39.99, Theseeke, theseeke.com. Jade face roller, $30, Collector Store, collectorstore.com.au. Iris Hantverk shaving brush, $60; shaving cup with soap, $90; and ‘Lillien’ necklace, $35, Funkis, as before. Resin ‘Volcanic’ jar in Rock Swirl (lid not shown), $120, Dinosaur Designs, dinosaurdesigns. com.au. Cotton buds, $3.95, MUJI, muji.com/au. Anne Black ‘Contain’ jar, $42, Elevate Design, elevatedesign.com.au. Background in ‘Canvas’ porcelain tiles in Grigio, $77/sqm, and ‘Plank’ porcelain tiles in Charcoal, $71/sqm, The Tile Palette, thetilepalette.com.au.

Clockwise from top left: Ferm Living bath towel, $69, Designstuff, designstuff.com.au. Anne Black ‘Contain’ jar, $42, Elevate Design, elevatedesign.com.au. ‘Bits And Bobs’ dish, $28, Hay, hayshop.com.au. Ferm Living brass towel holder, $58, Designstuff, as before. Hand towel, $19.95, Aura By Tracie Ellis, aurahome.com.au. Iris Hantverk bath brush with knob, $42, In Bed, inbedstore.com. Futagami brass towel rail, $100, Specified Store, specifiedstore.com. ‘Jade’ wallpaper in Musk, $72/lineal metre, These Walls, thesewalls.com.au. Hair bands, $4.95/assorted set of 3, MUJI, muji.com/au. Cluse ‘La Boheme’ watch, $149, Heart & Grace, heartandgrace.com.au. Long tray, $69, Keepresin, keepresin.com.au. ‘SlySkin Botanical’ soap, $16.95, Sly Australia, onthesly.com.au. ‘Zoe’ concrete & brass vanity basin, $957, and ‘Mabel’ marble & brass tap set on concrete back plate, $660, Wood Melbourne, woodmelbourne.com. ‘Tann’ toothbrush, $10, and ‘Paper Porcelain’ mug, $77, Hay, as before. Nail file, $4.95, MUJI, as before. ‘No.2’ earrings, $140, Two Hills Jewellery, twohills. com.au. Tangent GC ‘Oud’ organic hand wash, $32, Miss Glass Home, missglasshome.com. ‘Avri’ vase, $44.95, Sheridan, sheridan.com.au. ‘Leaf’ hooks, $99 each and Ex.t ‘Raso’ pendant light, $529, Meizai, meizai.com.au. Background in Popham Design ‘Plain Small Hex’ tiles in Fjord, $312/sqm, Onsite Supply & Design, onsitesd.com.au.

Clockwise from top left: By Lassen ‘Frame 14’ storage box, $149, Designstuff, designstuff.com.au. Ferm Living ‘Enter’ mirror, $149, Leo & Bella, leoandbella.com.au. ‘Vivid Slimline’ basin mixer in Brushed Gold, $352, Phoenix Tapware, phoenixtapware.com.au. Sort Of Coal ‘Kiro’ soap (top), $35, Seeho Su, seehosu.com. Herbivore Botanicals bamboo charcoal soap (bottom), $18, Collector Store, collectorstore.com.au. ‘Devon’ soap dish, $14.95, Cotton On, cottonon.com. Sort Of Coal ‘Shiro’ shampoo, $35, Seeho Su, as before. ‘Clean & Protect’ low sheen interior paint in Plastic Fantastic, $47.50/2L, British Paints, britishpaints. com.au. Ferm Living ‘Ripple’ glass, $59/set of 4, Designstuff, as before. Hand towel, $48, In Bed, inbedstore.com. Corian top-mount basin in Rain Cloud, $1098.90, CASF Australia, casf.com.au. ‘Eclipse’ watch, $239, Aãrk Collective, aarkcollective. com. Rose geranium & lavender essential oil soy candle, $59.95, Theseeke, theseeke.com. ‘Grid’ candle, $25, Candlelit & Co., etsy.com/au/ shop/candlelitandco. ‘Toi’ twin shower/wall mixer in Chrome/Matt Black, $803, Phoenix Tapware, phoenixtapware.com.au. ‘Tate’ frameless showerhead, $330, Wood Melbourne, woodmelbourne.com. ‘Revolve’ earrings (in dish), $209, Two Hills Jewellery, twohills.com.au. ‘Bits and Bobs’ dish, $40, Hay, hayshop.com.au. Sort Of Coal ‘Hai’ hand soap, $55, Seeho Su, as before. Mutina ‘Rombini Losange’ mosaic tiles, $39/275mm x 257mm sheet, Di Lorenzo Tiles, dilorenzo.com.au. Hooks in Colour 28 Burgundy, $121 each, Bit Part, bitpart. com.au. ‘Line 2.0’ wall-mounted light, NZ$448, Douglas And Bec, douglasandbec.com. Background in ‘Cumbria’ Spanish terrazzo tiles, $75/sqm, The Tile Palette, thetilepalette.com.au.

Inside Out / 157


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Q&A

Our Agony Aunt Meg Mason dishes out somewhat questionable style and decorating advice to would-be DIY renovators

As a mum to three boys, I struggle to keep the area around the front door clear and uncluttered. I’ve tried all sorts of systems but nothing’s worked. Is there a secret to keeping a hallway organised? Tahlia, via email

for one in this instance. I’m hardly going to starch my tabard, buckle myself into the Fiat and tap your coordinates into Google Maps (expensing $1.30 a kilometre for petrol) when I can already visualise your hallway down to the last soccer boot. I’m sure most readers can summon the scene and if not, they’d only need to go as far as their own front door to get the precise picture, since it’s such a common problem. To solve it, you practically need a degree in vestibule management! Which, thank goodness, I have (Hons, first class). But for the unqualified, I’ll share my working equation. Three boys times three pairs running shoes, three pairs school shoes, three pairs gumboots. Plus three schoolbags, one scooter and skateboard per head, violin, minus lost violin book, tennis racquets to the power of six, and a casserole dish waiting to go back to your sister. Where dog exists, add leash and sodden tennis ball, and subtract part of one shoe. And after 7pm, multiply by X, where X is Dad, his bike, his workbag, his dry cleaning and his empty Tupperware lunch container resplendent with bolognese residue. Carry the ten, no-one can get in or out, your weekday mornings are square-rooted and everything can just get factored. When you crunch the numbers, you can suddenly see why no colour-coordinated system of plastic trugs, no farmhouse dresser or repurposed meat locker, not even the almighty IKEA Expedit with labelled baskets, is sufficient control for the inflow of detritus at your egress point. Professionally, the general advice is to ‘zoom out’ from the immediate front-door area and reassess your entire entry sequence - the garage to the front steps, front door to hallway, hallway to bit of the fridge where the pinot gris is. Then, step through it and ask at each transition point, do the soccer boots need to come in from the car? Could the skateboards stay on the front steps? Could Dad actually just live at work? If the answer is no in all cases and there’s simply no way to reverse the tide of tat, the only solution is to go what we in

professional circles call The Downton Abbey, creating the most pristine, pared-back entry way for visitors and forcing the family to come and go by a service door. My partner thinks having all our liquor bottles on display in the living room looks cool and James Bond-ish. But I think it might be a tacky hangover from student days. What do you think? Genevieve, Maroubra, NSW

There is a distinction – albeit fine – between a few well-chosen bottles of small-batch whisky kept out on a mid-century side table, and a dusty display of the novelty shot glasses (Arsenal, Sea World, Jason’s Epic Stag ’13) and Beers of the World collection you’re so right to fear. My sense is you’re on the safe side of the line, and mine will be an Old Fashioned, no ice.

revive the… paper lampshade A forgotten objet ripe for resurgence Although they’re seen in homes today, there was a time when the $2 paper lampshade was a fixture in every room of every house – student digs to family manor – giving moths free rein as to where they’d most like to die a slow, noisy midnight death.

Stay tuned for more of Meg’s invaluable advice in our next issue. 162 / Inside Out

ILLUSTRATION: KAT CHADWICK

E

ven if I did offer house calls, Tahlia, there’d be no need


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