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July 2018

Announcing

THE HOUSE & GARDEN DESIGNER OF THE YEAR

Summer decorating IDEAS FOR SMALL CITY GARDENS A fresh take on stripes, rattan and grasscloth SMART OUTDOOR FURNITURE

BLUEPRINT FOR SUCCESS ARCHITECTS’ INTERIORS FROM NORWAY TO NORTH YORKSHIRE

Plus A TASTE OF EUROPE SIX DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN RECIPES


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C ON T E N T S July 2018 ON THE COVER The main bedroom of an eighteenthcentury weavers’ cottage in Wiltshire (pages 72–77), photographed by Paul Massey. Cover stories are in colour

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In Crowd Reader events and The List

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Art scene The untold story behind an August Sander photograph; exhibitions to see; and a history of the Royal Academy

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Books A selection of literary offerings

F R OM T H E E DI T OR

DE COR AT I NG

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Swatch Ruth Sleightholme showcases printed grasscloth wallcoverings

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Shopping Charlie Porter selects stylish chairs and tables for the garden

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Design ideas Elizabeth Metcalfe presents inspiring options for city gardens

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Notebook What’s new in fabrics, lighting and home accessories

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Rita notes Rita Konig shares her tips for decorating children’s bedrooms

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Wise buys Anouska Cave chooses pendant lights for under £200

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News and views A new tile range inspired by Forties and Fifties fabrics; plus, our 2018 award winners are revealed

Profile Elizabeth Metcalfe meets Ciara Ephson, the founder of Fentiman Design, to discuss her career and projects

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Outside interests Clare Foster focuses on the exotic garden; deckchairs and armchairs to buy; and a tribute to the late garden designer John Brookes

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Out and about Laura Houldsworth reveals her best buys

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LIFESTYLE

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Threaded with meaning Mumbai-based textile designer Hema Shroff Patel is preserving the art of Maheshwari handloom weaving and supporting local women to achieve independence through craft. By Gabby Deeming 컄 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 3


Contents continued

THE HEVENINGHAM COLLECTION

20 EDIT: INTERIORS, GARDENS, STORIES 72

A new chapter Harry and Rebecca Whittaker have brought an eighteenth-century weavers’ cottage in Wiltshire back to life, restoring original features and filling it with salvaged objects. By Dinah Hall

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Creative direction Ashley Hicks has introduced hints of irreverence and bold fabrics to a villa in Wiltshire. By Elfreda Pownall

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Scale model Architect Tom Brooksbank devised an award-winning house in Yorkshire for his parents, which uses glass, half-height walls and lofty ceilings to stretch its proportions. By Caroline Clifton-Mogg

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Take the view Mountain vistas and access to nature were key requirements for this modern Norwegian cabin. By Elizabeth Choppin

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Colourful collaboration With the help of designers from Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler, Alexandra Tolstoy has filled her London house with antique furniture and patterned textiles. By Susan Crewe

104 The knowledge Inspired by the houses in this issue, Bethan Hyatt gives directions on how to achieve similar style

106 Euro stars Ruth Sleightholme creates fresh schemes in a Parisian apartment, using pieces from the city’s best interiors shops

112 The mill’s tale Rupert and Elizabeth Nabarro have restored order to the gardens of their once derelict mill house. By Stephanie Donaldson

116 A riot of colour In the fourth part of her series, Clare Foster cultivates bright vegetables as warm weather promises an abundant harvest

118 Elements of surprise A new tropical garden brings unexpected splashes of colour to The Salutation hotel in Kent. By Jodie Jones

F O O D & T R AV E L

123 Tastes of travel Blanche Vaughan creates elegant recipes inspired by summer holidays in the Mediterranean

129 Taste notes News, reviews and tips for cooks and food lovers 130 Designer haunts Jeanette Mix, owner of hotel Ett Hem, shares her favourites places to eat, drink and shop in Stockholm

132 Off the beaten track Nicaragua offers many options from which to explore its magical forests and historic cities, says Sarah Gilbert

134 Specialist holidays: Cookery course Bethan Hyatt acquires new culinary skills at an idyllic farmhouse in the Loire Valley

E V E RY I S S U E

135 Subscriptions How to subscribe to House & Garden in the UK and US

www.heveningham.co.uk sales@heveningham.co.uk +44 (0) 1424 838483

136 Stockists 152 Self portrait The fabric designer Nicole Fabre paints a picture of her life, work and inspirations 첸


T h i s m o n t h’ s contributors

BETHAN HYATT Deputy chief sub-editor

TOM BROOKSBANK Architect Childhood holidays in Bavaria inspired Tom Brooksbank to become an architect: ‘We spent a lot of time in rococo churches and at Neuschwanstein Castle.’ After working at practices in London and New York, Tom set up his own studio in 2012 with Alan Collins. His favourite project has been a town-house refurbishment in Chelsea that ‘was like making a silk purse from a sow’s ear’. His knack for transformation is displayed in the Yorkshire house from page 86, which won him a RIBA Regional Award.

Who has inspired your taste? ‘Enzo Mari for design, Gianni Agnelli for how to wear a watch and Winston Churchill for his choice of cigars.’

‘I’ve been a sub-editor from the get-go – it was probably my destiny, given my lifelong obsession with magazines and spelling,’ says House & Garden’s deputy chief sub-editor. Although she is ostensibly ‘a words person’, at the weekend Bethan can be found illustrating dogs for her greeting cards business, Chasing Cola Cards, based on Etsy. Having ‘grand country aspirations’, it was essential that Bethan’s favourite house featured in the magazine had an Aga: ‘Henrietta Courtauld’s house (April 2017) stands out. I coveted her green Plain English kitchen with cream Aga, as well as her garden studio [which also features on page 54 this month].’ Bethan headed to France to take part in a cookery course (page 134) for this issue.

Have you got your eye on anything new for your house? ‘I’m expecting my first baby in July, so all house additions are currently being channelled towards the nursery. Smallable has lovely things.’

FOR SOME, SLEEP IS SOMETHING T H AT J U S T H A P P E N S . AT S O M N U S IT HAPPENS BY DESIGN.

Our handmade craftsmanship, combined with innovative Sensa Intelligent pocket springs and home-grown natural fillings, from

WORDS: LEANNE WALSTOW. PHOTOGRAPHS: OWEN GALE (HYATT); MAT COLLISHAW (SLOWIK)

our farm in North Yorkshire, makes every bed unique.

DANIEL SLOWIK Decorator Daniel Slowik is a ‘John Fowler obsessive’ and indeed, when asked who his dream collaborator would be, he names Fowler. It is safe to say, therefore, that after stints at Sotheby’s and Kensington Palace, he found the right job as a decorator at Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler. Helping to source furniture for Alexandra Tolstoy’s Moscow home was a favourite project: ‘Our taste was perfectly in tune and played out against a fascinating backdrop.’ Her London home is on pages 98–103.

What is your favourite piece in your own home? ‘Sourced by my partner, who runs A.Prin gallery, it is a watercolour by John Minton of the Caribbean. It gives me such joy’ 첸

We’ve redesigned sleep. And you’re invited to see the results. H A N D M A D E I N YO R K S H I R E S I N C E 1 840

W W W. S O M N U S . C O . U K P R O U D TO B E PA R T O F T H E H A R R I S O N S P I N K S F A M I LY


VO G U E H O U S E , H A N OV E R S Q UA R E , L O N D O N W 1 S 1 J U ( T E L : 0 2 0 - 74 9 9 9 0 8 0 )

H AT TA B Y N G EDITOR

E M M A R E D M AY N E PUBLISHING DIRECTOR

PA TO THE EDITOR/EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Leanne Walstow

PA TO THE PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Charlotte Bailey

MANAGING EDITOR/CHIEF SUB-EDITOR Caroline Bullough

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Sophie Fairclough ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER EUROPE Christopher Daunt ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Lorna Clansey-Gramer ADVERTISING MANAGERS Georgina Penney, Marina Connolly SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER Nichole Mika ACCOUNT MANAGERS Olivia McHugh, Olivia Capaldi

ART DIRECTOR Jenny Lister EDITOR-AT-LARGE Liz Elliot DECORATION DIRECTOR Gabby Deeming DEPUTY DECORATION EDITOR Ruth Sleightholme DECORATION STYLIST Charlie Porter DECORATION INTERN Anouska Cave FEATURES DIRECTOR David Nicholls ARTS EDITOR/DEPUTY FEATURES EDITOR Emily Tobin FEATURES AND FOOD ASSISTANT Elizabeth Metcalfe GARDEN EDITOR Clare Foster TRAVEL EDITOR Pamela Goodman FOOD EDITOR Blanche Vaughan

HEAD OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Melinda Chandler SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER India Barclay ART DIRECTOR Joan Hecktermann ART EDITORS Richard Sanapo, Rebecca Gordon-Watkins SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR Arta Ghanbari PROMOTIONS AND PROJECT MANAGER Phoebe Wood SPECIAL PROJECTS INTERN Lisa Walden REGIONAL OFFICE – SALES DIRECTOR Karen Allgood ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Heather Mitchell (020-7152 3279)

DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR Joshua Monaghan ART EDITOR Eva Farrington PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Owen Gale

HEAD OF THE PARIS OFFICE Helena Kawalec (00-33-1-4411 7880; helena.kawalec@condenast-europe.com) US OFFICE Nichole Mika (00-44-20-7152 3838; nichole.mika@condenast.co.uk) MIDDLE AND FAR EAST, ASIA PACIFIC Peter Jeffery (00-852-3910 6388; peterjeffery@asianimedia.com) INDIAN OFFICE Rachna Gulati (00-91-11-2373 0869; rachna.gulati@mediascope.in) GROUP PROPERTY DIRECTOR Fiona Forsyth

CONSULTANT EDITOR Susan Crewe CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Lavinia Bolton (locations), Virginia Fraser, Matilda Goad, Rita Konig, Nonie Niesewand, Elizabeth Rees-Jones, Aude De La Conté (France)

EXECUTIVE EDITOR Laura Houldsworth EDITOR, THE LIST Charlotte Richmond EVENTS AND SALES COORDINATOR, THE LIST Natalie Loveless

ONLINE EDITOR Emily Senior ONLINE FEATURES AND SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Alice Riley-Smith ONLINE INTERN Virginia Clark

CLASSIFIED DIRECTOR Shelagh Crofts SENIOR CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER Lucy Hrynkiewicz-Sudnik CLASSIFIED SENIOR SALES EXECUTIVES Pandora Lewis, Ellice Everett

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Fabric background: ‘Aurora on Nivelles Oyster’ (blue), linen, from Paolo Moschino for Nicholas Haslam

FROM THE EDITOR spent yesterday in our garden giving it a much needed sort-out for summer. We moved there five years ago and soon after built a studio at the end, but otherwise we have simply tweaked and added to the previous owners’ planting. We have had some help from a family friend who runs a garden maintenance company, but mostly I have enjoyed pottering about in it. As have our children – although my five-year-old seems to favour the secateurs above all else and snips away at anything and everything the minute I turn my back. Now, seeing the city gardens that Elizabeth Metcalfe has pulled together for this month’s ‘Design ideas’ (from page 53), I wonder if we could have been a bit more ambitious with our little London rectangle. Elizabeth’s examples show that there is actually so much more you can do than plant a border up and down the sides. I love the idea of filling it with box hedges and vegetables like Henrietta Courtauld of The Land Gardeners, for instance, although sadly a patch of grass is probably a necessity for small children. This issue is full of ambition and people who have not shied away from hard work to achieve

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extraordinary results. On pages 72–77, Rebecca and Harry Whittaker took on a ‘gruelling’ project transforming a disused weaver’s house and workshop into a beautiful house for themselves. In Yorkshire, the architect Tom Brooksbank has turned two fairly ordinary farm cottages into something quite grand for his downsizing parents (from page 86), and from page 92, the owners held an invited competition to select an architect to create a striking modern house in a remote part of Norway. To honour ambition in design this year, we presented three awards at a party last month to celebrate the 100 Top Designers. I have always been rather nervous of giving awards – award ceremonies for a start can be tedious – but having won my first magazine industry award last year and now handed out these ones, you realise how affirming it is for the recipient and the teams behind them. All three of our winners show imagination and ambition – even bravery – in the way that they approach a project and in the end result. Please turn to page 28 to see who they are 첸

F O R M O R E D E C O R AT I O N I N S P I R AT I O N , V I S I T H O U S E A N D G A R D E N .C O.U K

8 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

NICHOLAS SEATON

F O L L O W U S O N T W I T T E R , FA C E B O O K , I N S TA G R A M A N D P I N T E R E S T, A N D


Dynasty Collection: Wallpaper, Print and Woven Fabrics     


Born from bespoke. A collection of 10 specially selected pieces drawn from the best of our bespoke work. rupertbevan.com


INSIDER SHOPPI NG | N EWS | A RT | BOOK S

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Great outdoors CHARLIE PORTER selects stylish garden furniture in bright colours and natural materials 1 Teak and polyester ‘Mistral 104 Sunlounger’, 28 x 202 x 77cm, £3,409.34, from Roda. 2 Iroko ‘Indian Lattice Chair’ (terracotta), 107 x 47 x 59cm, £1,130, from Andrew Crace. 3 Maple wood and cotton canvas ‘Rocker-Recliner’, 88 x 60 x 100cm, £273, from Manufactum. 4 ‘Mastholmen’ rattan and cotton sofa, 80 x 118 x 67cm, £145, from Ikea. 5 ‘Lyra’ rattan and steel chair (green), 71 x 63 x 67cm, £179 for two, from Made. 6 Aluminium ‘McNeill Arm Chair’ (shenandoah gray green), 99 x 54 x 65cm, £3,160, from McKinnon & Harris. 7 Steel and cotton ‘Palm Springs Chair’ (green stripe), 70 x 75 x 69cm, £250, from Raj Tent Club 컄 ILLUSTRATIONS JOAN HECKTERMANN

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 11


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1 ‘Vitti’ iron and ceramic coffee table, by Rhonda Drakeford, 33 x 101 x 41cm, £249, from Made. 2 Rope, aluminium and solutiondyed acrylic ‘Net Dining Armchair’ (terracota), 82 x 59 x 61.5cm, £715, from Kettal. 3 Aluminium ‘Costa Coffee Table’ (honey), by Fermob, 41 x 100 x 80cm, £563, from Barbed. 4 PVC and metal ‘Guajira’ chair, 94 x 75cm diameter, €680, from Marni. 5 Steel and concrete ‘Marrakech Table’ (blue), 30 x 42cm square, £350, from Skargaarden. 6 ‘Cocci’ stainless steel and ceramic table (PML112), 40 x 43cm square, £2,880, from Paola Lenti. 7 PVC and metal ‘Juan’ chair, 110 x 60cm diameter, €680, from Marni 컄

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1 Acacia ‘Hudson Round Table’, 73 x 150cm diameter, £1,390, from Neptune. 2 Oak and steel ‘Danish Garden Armchair’, 87 x 56.5 x 57cm, €312, from Manufactum. 3 Oak ‘Orangerie Bench’, 48 x 150 x 44cm, £6,600, from Howe. 4 Synthetic rattan and polyester ‘Marietta Armchair’, 80 x 80 x 77cm, £790, from Oka. 5 Wicker and teak ‘Isola Chaise Lounge’ (weathered finish), 38 x 200 x 89cm, £673.69, from Frontgate. 6 Oak ‘Saltram Garden Bench’, 120 x 70 x 58.5cm, £3,360, from Jamb. 7 Alu-rattan ‘Paris Chair’, by Arne Jacobsen, 83 x 68 x 102cm, €1,579, from Sika Design. For suppliers’ details, see Stockists page 첸


by Louis De Poortere

Rug Collection romo.com


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‘Iksel x Tory Burch’ custom-made wallcovering, from £294 a square metre, from Iksel

‘Dillisk’ lino print on washi paper, 52 x 43cm, €78, from Superfolk

GABBY DEEMING shows us what has caught her eye this month

GARTH HACKER; PIXELATE IMAGING

Cotton velvet, beech, birch and plywood ‘Lupe Velvet Swivel Chair’, 76 x 71cm diameter, £595, from Oliver Bonas

Earthenware clay ‘The Guardian Table Lamp’ with linen shade, by Camilla Bliss, 28 x 18cm base diameter, £1,339.99 including shade, from The New Craftsmen

‘Antalya’ embroidered silk borders (from left: indigo/red, olive/peach), 12cm wide, £120 a metre, from Susan Deliss

From left: ‘Azilal’ (grey), ‘Dakhla’ (white carrare) and ‘Guercif ’ (blue) zellige tiles, by Idris by Ait Manos, from £1,551 a square metre, from Ann Sacks at West One Bathrooms 컄

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 17


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Straw and cotton pendant shades, from left: ‘Ihaya’, 5 x 50cm diameter, €186; ‘Oude’, 25 x 25cm diameter, €216; ‘Bella’, 20 x 35cm diameter, €214; ‘Tama Totem Lamp’, 40 x 20cm diameter, €208; all from AAKS

‘Habitat Naturelle 1’ print, by Paule Marrot, 135 x 105cm, $3,245 framed, from Natural Curiosities

‘Elan’ sycamore and dyed veneers armoire, 199 x 135 x 60cm, £8,450, from Pinch

‘Anacapri’, by Lars Nilsson, cotton canvas, €130 a metre, from Svenskt Tenn

18 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

6M.PRODUCTIONS

‘Tribeca’ lacquered hardwood side tables, from left: 2-tier, 45 x 60cm diameter, £1,192; 3-tier small, 66 x 35cm diameter, £1,088; both from Julian Chichester 컄


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‘Negro Vistas’ ceramic tableware, by Aaron Stewart Home, from left: deep plate, 24cm diameter, €19.71; small platter, 18.3 x 25.5cm, €43.11; both from La Cartuja de Sevilla

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‘Tri Cone’ brass and glass pendant light, 54 x 46.4cm diameter, $1,800, from Allied Maker Glass and brass ‘Bishop Lamp’ (forest), 66 x 22.5cm diameter, £1,428; with ‘Low Hat’ silk shade (alpine), 33cm diameter, £173; both from Porta Romana

‘Blocked Ikat’ silk cushion cover (citrus yellow), 50cm square, £29, from West Elm

Bamboo ‘Boho Chair’ with cotton seat pad, 76 x 46cm diameter, £159, from TH2 Studio

20 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

Lacquered wooden stools, 40 x 30cm diameter, £89.99 each, from Zara Home For suppliers’ details, see Stockists page 첸

PATRICK GALIBERT

‘Atacama’ linen rug (green mint), by Elitis, 350 x 250cm, £2,129, from Abbott + Boyd


ERMIONE ARMCHAIR FAUNO COFFEE TABLE EATON OTTOMAN ARTHUR COFFEE TABLE design Roberto Lazzeroni

FLEXFORM LONDON INTERDESIGN UK LTD Ground Floor, South Dome Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour London SW10 0XE flexform@interdesignuk.com

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INSIDER | SHOPPING WISE BUYS

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Pendants ANOUSKA CAVE selects hanging lights for under £200

BJÖRN DAHLGREN; JEPPE SØRENSEN; FOTOGRAF CHRISTIAN B; S&B PHOTOGRAPHY

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1 Steel ‘Ranarp’ (off-white), 23cm, £19, from Ikea. 2 Glass ‘Swirly’ (antiqued silver), 30cm, £76, from Pooky. 3 Bamboo and polypropylene ‘Grain’ (dusty green), by Jens Fager for Muuto, 21cm, £109, from Twentytwentyone. 4 Glass and marble ‘Amp’ (gold/green), by Simon Legald for Normann Copenhagen, 11.2cm, £97, from Skandium. 5 Concrete ‘Terrazzo’, by Bloomingville, 12cm, £69, from Amara. 6 Brass ‘Socket Pendant Low’, 6cm, €84; with metal ‘Cone Shade’ (dark green), 25cm, €109; both from Ferm Living. 7 ‘Fisherman’s Bamboo’, by Bloomingville, 42cm, £155, from Beaumonde. 8 Glass and brass ‘Deco Small’, 16cm, £120, from Old School Electric 첸

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ALL MEASUREMENTS ARE FOR DIAMETER. FOR SUPPLIERS’ DETAILS, SEE STOCKISTS PAGE

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INSIDER | NEWS

By ELIZABETH METCALFE

FROM LEFT A selection of Sophie’s tiles and her mother Mary’s designs. The Pattinsons in Sophie’s Hampshire studio

Family affair Inspired by the textile prints her mother created in the Forties and Fifties, designer Sophie Pattinson has created a range of ceramic tiles with colourful motifs

I

don’t know how I did all of these,’ says 98-year-old Mary Pattinson, looking over a table piled high with samples of fabric that she designed in the late Forties and Fifties. It is a rather astonishing output considering they were all designed in a seven-year period before Mary began to have children. Having studied fashion design in the Thirties, Mary soon turned her focus to print design and started doodling on bits of old envelopes. ‘I would sit by my bedroom window in my parents’ house in Somerset and draw all day long.’ Soon Mary was taking her designs round the Manchester cotton mills and went on to sell her patterns

PHOTOGRAPHS DEAN HEARNE

to companies including Liberty. ‘I sold each design for seven-and-a-half guineas, which seemed a reasonable fee.’ Her colourful and jolly motifs and shapes were exactly what the post-war audience wanted, and some of her designs were exhibited at the Festival of Britain in 1951. Mary’s daughter Sophie is now using her mother’s designs as the basis for a collection of ceramic tiles, though she is mainly a textile designer, creating cushions, bedspreads and throws embroidered by women in Bangladesh as part of a charitable project she set up. ‘I tried to incorporate the designs in my embroidery, but it was hard to recreate the beautiful variations in the watercolours and patterns,’ says Sophie. ‘My kitchen tiles

needed an update and I thought tiles with my mother’s designs on would work well. I had no experience with clay though.’ Sophie spent a day with a ceramicist friend who taught her the basics and then bought a kiln at auction. After a bit of trial and error, she decided to make terracotta tiles and etch the patterns onto them using the sgraffito technique. ‘It took a while to develop the glazes; I diluted them to get the right colours,’ she explains. She took a few tiles to a fair where she was selling textiles, and there was a flurry of interest. ‘I had a huge order from an interior designer and decided I should start selling them properly.’ The tiles start at £8 each for the small size (7cm square). sophiepattinson.com 컄 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 25


INSIDER | NEWS

New to the

collection

Following the success of House & Garden’s first furniture collection with Arlo & Jacob, launched at Decorex last year, we have added two new pieces to the range, designed by our decoration director Gabby Deeming. This pretty new armchair – the ‘Stella’ – has a rolled edge and combines the form of a Victorian tub chair with a more mid-century Scandinavian design. The ‘Jackson’ sofa, by contrast, is clean-lined, with a loose cover in the Belgian style. ‘I wanted it to be contemporary and comfortable,’ says Gabby. All the pieces can be upholstered in any of Arlo & Jacob’s fabrics, including 20 selected by House & Garden, or in a fabric of your choice. The ‘Stella’ is shown here in Kit Kemp’s ‘Rick Rack’ for Christopher Farr Cloth and costs from £700. The new pieces are available now. arloandjacob.com

DI A RY DAT E S

Masterpiece June 28–July 4 The art fair returns to the Royal Hospital Chelsea, SW3 for its ninth year. It brings together over 160 international dealers, with antiques, art and design, including this ‘Triennale’ lamp by Angelo Lelli, from 88 Gallery. Admission £35. masterpiecefair.com

London Festival of Architecture June 1–30

TA L E N T S H OW Find fresh talent at New Designers, which presents the work of over 3,000 graduating designers at the Business Design Centre, N1 this month. The show is split into two parts – week one (June 27–30) includes glass, ceramics and contemporary craft and week two (July 4–7) focuses on furniture, product and graphic design. Make sure you also visit One Year In, which runs for the full two weeks, where over 100 designers who have recently launched their businesses will be showing and selling their work. A broad range of disciplines is covered, including textiles, ceramics and furniture. This woven blanket by textile designer Majeda Clarke is one of the pieces on offer at One Year In. Admission costs from £9. newdesigners.com

NIGHT SCHOOL Historic Decoration, the organisation behind a series of informative study days at Syon House in west London that explore the history of interior and architectural design, is putting on a number of evening lectures at Brunswick House, SW8 (pictured). Edward Bulmer will be talking about paint on June 20 and, on July 18, art historian and curator Stephen Calloway will discuss the architectural elements of an interior. ‘The evenings will be social with plenty of practical advice,’ says Oliver Gerrish, co-founder of Historic Decoration. Tickets cost £25. historicdecoration.com 26 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

A Collectors’ Paradise June 29–July 6 To coincide with London Art Week, three ceramic dealers – Christophe Perlès, Robyn Robb and Brian Haughton Gallery (who will be showing this rare salt-glazed Stafordshire cofee pot) – will present a selection of fine ceramics at the Brian Haughton Gallery on Duke Street, SW1. Admission free. haughton.com 컄

SIMON BEVAN

‘Stella’ chairs with the ‘Grace Lamp’ from Porta Romana and ‘Server With Side Doors and Drawers’ from Chelsea Textiles

Now in its fifteenth year, this city-wide event celebrates the role of architecture in London. The theme is identity and the programme includes exhibitions, talks and tours. For the full schedule, visit the website. Pictured is one of last year’s exhibits. londonfestival ofarchitecture.org


INSIDER | NEWS

And the awards go to...

DESIGNER OF THE YEAR

PROJECT OF THE YEAR

PINEAPPLE AWARD

Sponsored by Element7

Sponsored by Avis

winner

winner

winner

BEATA HEUMAN

SHALINI MISRA

SUSIE ATKINSON

It was no mean feat choosing one name from such an incredibly diverse list of 100 talented interior designers. But it was with happy unanimity that the panel (comprised of editor Hatta Byng, editor-at-large Liz Elliot, features director David Nicholls and decoration director Gabby Deeming) chose Beata Heuman. Having cut her teeth working for Nicky Haslam, Beata set up on her own in 2013. We have featured several of her projects, including the truly original house that made the February 2017 cover. Beata creates not only exciting and liveable interiors, but also furniture, textiles and lighting. Why did she win? ‘Beata’s interiors are imaginative and fun, yet deeply stylish. While her projects are always fresh and modern, she embraces the ideas and details of classical interior design. Her work captures the spirit of House & Garden in 2018.’ Hatta Byng

This London house was the first Shalini Misra project to be featured in House & Garden (in the November 2017 issue), and what a project it is. An already substantial Victorian house was nearly doubled in size, providing ample opportunity to show off Shalini’s f lair for the dramatic, as well as her incredible attention to detail. The design of the space was in part a response to the owners’ contemporary art collection, including the creation of a curved wall to accommodate a photographic series, which hung in this manner in the gallery from which it was bought. Why did she win? ‘Walking into this house, I was immediately struck by the quality of the finish, the interesting and cohesive use of materials, and its ability to delight and surprise.’ David Nicholls

With an impressive roster of hotel projects to her name, Susie is a worthy winner of the Pineapple Award for Outstanding Contribution to Hotel Design. Following Babington House in Somerset, Soho House Berlin and London’s Dean Street Townhouse, she is now reworking 13 rooms and some of the public spaces at Lime Wood in the New Forest. Her largest and most significant project to date, however, has been Beaverbrook, the conversion of the Surrey estate of Lord Beaverbrook into a country-house hotel, where she has created elegant and fun interiors. Why did she win? ‘Susie has the knack of delivering a quintessential Englishness. Her love of texture, colour and prints makes for interesting interiors and her work at Beaverbrook – full of inspiration for country-house design – makes her a worthy winner.’ Pamela Goodman, travel editor 첸

28 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

SIMON BROWN; JOSHUA MONAGHAN; MICHAEL SINCLAIR; RACHEL WHITING; MEL YATES; CHRIS GLOAG

In the June issue, we unveiled our Top 100 Interior Designers 2018. During a party to celebrate their achievements, we also announced the winners of our inaugural design awards


C O L L E C T I O N

Designed by House & Garden. Handcrated by Arlo & Jacob. Reflecting over 70 years of the best in design and decoration, the House & Garden Collection is handcrafted in Britain by Arlo & Jacob.

Jackson maxi sofa 03301 341 724 London SW6 3NS Bristol coming soon arloandjacob.com


EXTERIORS | INTERIORS | BIG SPACES +44 (0) 1235 859300 www.davidharber.com


INSIDER | NEWS

Outside Interests CLARE FOSTER finds fresh gardening inspiration

Swe et dreams

PLANT OF THE MONTH Euphorbia x pasteurii If you are after a striking, low-maintenance shrub to take you through all seasons, this euphorbia is a winner. A cross between E. mellifera and E. stygiana, it forms a large, evergreen bush about 1.5 metres tall. Its beautiful dark green leaves are lifted by a creamy white midrib and it produces loose umbels of acid-yellow flowers. It is completely hardy and thrives in any well-drained soil. Look out for the tall, narrow cultivar ‘Skinny Bere’ from the Edulis nursery (edulis.co.uk) and ‘Phrampton Phatty’ from Pan-global Plants (panglobalplants.com), which is shorter and wider.

Visit Easton Walled Gardens in Lincolnshire for Sweet Pea Week (July 1–8). More than 50 varieties are grown in a special trial area, including heritage, modern, scented, striped and bicolour types. You can also explore the rest of the historic 12-acre garden, restored by owner Ursula Cholmeley. The gardens are open daily throughout the year, 11am–4pm, and entry costs £7.50. visiteaston.co.uk

MARIANNE MAJERUS GARDEN IMAGES; FRED CHOLMELEY

TAKE A SEAT Admire your garden in bloom from one of these deckchairs and armchairs

Neptune’s ‘Harrington Relaxed Armchair’ is made from woven synthetic rattan. It measures 84 x 72 x 97.5cm and costs £550. neptune.com

This birch ‘Harmen Outdoor Chair’ from Rowen & Wren can be folded up for easy storage. It measures 100 x 55 x 90cm and costs £148. rowenandwren.co.uk

There is a retro vibe to the ‘Faux Rattan Garden Chair’ from Cox & Cox, with its powder-coated steel legs. It measures 82 x 60 x 82cm and costs £150. coxandcox.co.uk

There are three reclining positions on this cotton canvas and wood ‘Pea Pod Deckchair’. When folded, it measures 132 x 56cm. It costs £135. thornbackandpeel.co.uk 컄 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 31


INSIDER | NEWS

Focus on... T H E E XO T I C GA R D E N Inspired by the tropical borders at the gardens of The Salutation in Kent (see our feature ‘Elements of surprise’), here is a selection of the most rewarding exotic plants to grow in your own garden [1] Cannas

Easy to grow, cannas combine vibrantly coloured blooms with wonderful architectural leaves and thrive in semi shade as well as sun, as long as you give them a sheltered spot and a good rich soil. They grow from rhizomes, which should be treated in a similar way to dahlia tubers, ideally lifted in autumn to be overwintered under cover. There are plenty of cultivars to choose from in colours ranging from magenta and crimson to orange and yellow. ‘Durban’ (pictured) is a classic, with tangerine f lowers and maroon and pink striped foliage, while ‘Ehemanii’ is tall and graceful, with bright pink f lowers. Both are available from Hart Canna. hartcanna.co.uk [2] Salvias

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Some of the larger-growing New World salvias (from Central and South America, rather than Europe) are perfect for use in exotic gardens, providing injections of late summer colour. Salvia involucrata ‘Bethellii’ has sprays of shocking pink f lowers and grows to about 1.5 metres if it is given the right conditions. Although it is perennial, it is not fully hardy in the UK, but it can be grown as an annual, started off in the greenhouse and then planted out in the late spring. Available to buy from Dyson’s Nurseries, it will put on masses of growth and f lowers in late summer. dysonsalvias.com [3] Schefflera

[4] Tetrapanax

Bleddyn and Sue Wynn-Jones from Crûg Farm Plants have popularised this genus in the last decade, having discovered several species and varieties in the wild in Taiwan that have proved hardy enough to be grown in warmer parts of the UK. Schefflera taiwaniana is a small tree or multi-stemmed shrub with gorgeous, exotic-looking palmate leaves with fingers that spread out from a central stem. The new growth is bronze, and the evergreen leaves mature to a glossy dark green. It should be grown in a sheltered spot in well-drained soil. crug-farm.co.uk

The huge leaves of Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Rex’ are a must-have for an exotic planting scheme, and its tropical appearance belies the fact that it is reasonably hardy in the UK. Frosts may cause the leaves and stem to die back to ground level, but the roots usually survive and will reshoot the following year. Available from Architectural Plants, it can grow up to 2 metres in a year, and has amazing architectural leaves that provide structure. Grow it in full sun or partial shade in well-drained soil, and mulch thickly in winter to protect the roots. architecturalplants.com

32 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

Exotic plants in a border at The Salutation in Kent


FRUITS OF YOUR LABOUR

CLIVE NICHOLS; GAP PHOTOS/MANUELA GOEHNER; © ANDREA JONES/GARDEN EXPOSURES PHOTO LIBRARY; SHUTTERSTOCK; GAP PHOTOS/FRIEDRICH STRAUSS; RBG KEW

At RHS Garden Wisley, on Monday July 9, join some of the team for a morning course on summer fruit pruning. Learn how to prune a range of trees and bushes, including restricted and trained forms, for maximum productivity. The course runs 10.30am –1pm and costs £46 (£32 for RHS members). rhs.org.uk

Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour samuel-heath.co.uk Made in England

INSTALL | ADVISE | PROCURE | CONSTRUCT | DECORATE | MANAGE

New beginnings Kew’s iconic Temperate House has recently reopened after a restoration project lasting five years. Twice as big as Kew’s Palm House, the Temperate House was designed 158 years ago by Decimus Burton, and has been home to some of the world’s most exotic and rare plants. For the duration of the project, the plants were moved to a temporary nursery, where they have been used to propagate new material. The magnificent glasshouse now has a phenomenal 10,000 plants and is open daily 10am–6pm. Entry costs £17.75 (£16 online). kew.org 컄

By appointm e nt only DESIGN CENTRE STUDIOS CHELSEA

www. l oop 3.co. u k


INSIDER | NEWS

Celebrating the life of... JOHN BROOKES MBE 1933–2018 he garden design world is mourning the loss of John Brookes, who died on March 16 aged 84. A hugely influential figure in landscape design, Brookes devoted his whole life to creating gardens, believing passionately that they should be functional as well as attractive and designed with people in mind. His first book, Room Outside (1969), set out his views and marked a new way of thinking about British gardens, looking at the garden as a space to enjoy and be lived in. ‘A garden is essentially a place for use by people… not a static picture created by plants,’ he wrote. ‘Plants provide the props, the colour and texture, but the garden is the stage.’ As a lecturer and author of more than 20 publications, he passed on his strongly held views to generations of garden designers, not only in Europe but also in the US, Argentina, Russia and India. In the Eighties, he set up his own design school, the Clock House School of Garden Design, at his home in Denmans, West Sussex, where until last year he opened the garden to the public, receiving 20,000 visitors a year (it will reopen after renovation on June 1). Sadly, Brookes did not live to see the publication of his final book, A Landscape Legacy, in the spring. Providing a comprehensive and well-illustrated summary of his life, work and influences, from art and architecture to landscapes and plants, the book is a fitting and timely tribute to one of the twentieth century’s most important designers. A Landscape Legacy is published by Pimpernel Press and costs £40 첸

T

ALL PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN FROM A LANDSCAPE LEGACY BY JOHN BROOKES; MAIN PORTRAIT: GWENDOLYN VAN PAASSCHEN; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF JOHN BROOKES AND HIS CLIENTS.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP The young designer. John’s final book, published after his death, beautifully summarises his life, work and influences. The garden at Château de la Napoule, designed by John. A front garden project in Wimbledon. Surrounded by students at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. With his dog Puggy

34 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


LIVING LIFE OUTSIDE 6JG5RNCUJ%QNNGEVKQP 'ZRCPUKXG5EWNRVWTCN+PXKVKPI Handcrafted in Oak

+44 (0)1420 588444 info@gazeburvill.com www.gazeburvill.com


INSIDER | NEWS

Shades of blue

FINE FELINE

Laura outside the Designers Guild showroom on the King’s Road, SW3

‘Misha’, from the Calypso collection of Sunbrella fabrics by Thibaut, features a big jungle cat motif. It is suitable for use outside as well as indoors. Seen here in blue, it costs £138 a metre. thibautdesign.com

Give an old lamp a new lease of life with Vaughan’s ‘Bedford’ marbled paper lampshade. It costs from £113 and is seen here with the ‘Trentham’ porcelain table lamp in blue, from £486. The lamp measures 65 x 38cm diameter including shade. 020-7349 4600; vaughandesigns.com

A spot to soak up the sun I can picture this ‘Loubes Bench’ by Paolo Moschino for Nicholas Haslam in a leafy garden room. Seen here in ‘Brittany Glazed Linen’ in white and navy, with a metal frame in antiqued black and gold, it is 65.5 x 153.5 x 64.5cm and costs £5,640 excluding fabric. 020-7730 8623; nicholashaslam.com

SOFT TOUCH Zimmer + Rohde’s ‘Champ’ polyester chenille fabric has a velvety soft feel and comes in subtle colours including brown, blue, green and lilac. It costs £80 a metre. zimmer-rohde.com DON’T MISS Artisanal flower company Aesme hosts workshops at its west London studio, creating naturalistic arrangements using cuttings from its Hampshire garden. Workshops cost from £325 and range from the one-day ‘English Rose’ class to intensive courses on flowers for weddings. For prices and schedules, visit aesme.co.uk 컄

36 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

PHOTOGRAPHS: JOSHUA MONAGHAN; PIXELATE IMAGING. LAURA IS WEARING SHOES BY BOTTEGA VENETA

Latest launches… chic showrooms… hot buys… LAURA HOULDSWORTH takes note


INSIDER | NEWS

ALABASTER ELEGANCE Charles Edwards’ ‘Style 28’ alabaster hanging light is fully customisable. Seen here with chains in a black bronze finish, it is 92 x 60cm diameter and costs £5,400. 020-7736 7172; charlesedwards.com

to the point This Loaf oak furniture has a chevron design reminiscent of wood flooring. From left: ‘Little Flapper’ side table, £295; ‘Young Flapper’ chest of drawers, £825; and ‘Super Flapper’ wardrobe, £1,595. 0845-459 9937; loaf.com

ALL NATURAL Louis de Poortere’s ‘Takana’ cotton rug for Romo will be available this summer. This natural colourway has a geometric pattern on a striped background. It comes in two sizes: 170 x 240cm, £650, and 200 x 280cm, £895. 01623-756699; romo.com

TWO-TONE TRIUMPH I love the contrast between the white honed granite top and grey oak legs of the new ‘Bardot Side Table’ by Julian Chichester. It measures 60 x 60cm square and costs £930. 020-7622 2928; julianchichester.com

On a roll These new wide-width wallpapers from Christopher Farr Cloth are, from top: ‘Mosaic’ (cobalt), 134cm wide; ‘Africana’ (cobalt, slate), 132cm wide; and ‘Mosaic’ (sky), 134cm wide, all by Javier Mariscal; and ‘Belge’ (lapis blue, slate), by Barron & Larcher, 141cm wide. Each one costs £70 a metre. 020-7349 0888; christopherfarrcloth.com 38 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

Calm reflection New to Tom Faulkner, the ‘Phoenix’ mirror is asymmetrical yet perfectly balanced. Its steel frame is finished in rich black and luminous gold. It measures 110 x 77cm and costs £3,500. 020-7351 7272; tomfaulkner.co.uk


In crowd NEWS ON THE LATEST READER EVENTS

Designer insight

KITE S GROVE Managing director Sophie Coller and creative director Sophie Elborne (below let), members of The List, discuss their latest interior-design project with Charlotte Richmond

HOUSE & GARDEN FESTIVAL Look out for the Decorated Spaces room sets by Edward Bulmer and Rachel Chudley (pictured above) at this ive-day event at Olympia London. The designers will also discuss their work with House & Garden editor Hatta Byng on June 21 at 2.15pm. The festival is open June 20–24, 10.30am–5.30pm; advance tickets cost from £16 online. Visit houseandgardenfestival.com.

BELOW A Viking longship on the Danube. BOTTOM The Parrot Bar at Beaverbrook

e are about to complete the renovation of this wonderful G eorgian house in Chelsea, which has been three years in the making. The design journey grew out of the owners’ collection of South American art, combined with a desire to design a quintessentially British family home. Our team of 10 brought together antiques and contemporary furnishings to create a scheme that we are extremely proud of.

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*PRICE BASED ON TWO GUESTS SHARING A STANDARD ROOM. PHOTOGRAPHS: PHOTOPIA PHOTOGRAPHY; M WOLLSDORF/MOVING PICTURES; EDMUND DABNEY

EVENT REMINDER Join House & Garden and Viking, the river and ocean cruise line, at Beaverbrook hotel, Surrey, on June 19, 12–3pm, for a Champagne reception in the Parrot Bar and a three-course lunch with wine in the Anglo-Italian restaurant. The hotel has been given new life by the designer Susie Atkinson. Tickets cost £65 per person, plus a £5.66 booking fee, and include a gift bag and entry to a draw to win a hamper courtesy of Viking and afternoon tea for two with Champagne at Beaverbrook. A special rate of £350 per room per night is available for guests staying on June 18 or 19*. To book, visit po.st/HGVikinglunch.

Visit The List today to find a design professional near you. Or perhaps you are a design professional and want to appear in The List Directory 2019? Sign up now to be a part of it. 020-7152 3639, or email charlotte.richmond@condenast.co.uk 첸

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 39


HOUSEAND GARDEN.C O.UK SHOPPING EDIT What to buy for your house this month, from the House & Garden decoration team. houseand garden.co.uk/ topic/shopping

P E R F E C T P L A C E S T O S TAY B E A U T I F U L H OT E L S A N D H O U S E S TO R E N T, FROM THE GREEK ISLANDS TO THE G R E AT B R I T I S H S E A S I D E . V I S I T H O U S E A N D G A R D E N .C O. U K / TO P I C / P L AC E S -TO - S TAY

GORGEOUS HOUSES All your favourite house stories in one place. Take a tour through the magazine’s extensive archives at houseand garden.co.uk/topic/houses

D E C O R AT I O N I D E A S Design inspiration, from wallpapers to tiles, and from kitchens and bathrooms to hallways and small, awkward spaces. houseandgarden.co.uk/topic/decoration

DOWNLOAD THE DIGITAL EDITION NOW

ONLINE THIS MONTH Recipes that make the most of July’s best ingredients – from crisp and crunchy salads with aubergines, beetroot and fennel, to a courgette and poppy-seed cake, and puddings made with plump peaches and cherries. Plus, what to do with in-season crab and mackerel, and how to make perfect Pimm’s. houseandgarden.co.uk/ recipe/collection/ july-seasonal-food

GLORIOUS GARDEN ROOMS Create a stylish garden room that ofers the best of indoors and out – perfect for the unpredictable British summer. Find shepherd’s huts, loggias, sheds, conservatories and porches at houseandgarden. co.uk/gallery/garden-rooms

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SUMMER ON A PLATE


art scene Edited by EMILY TOBIN

THE UNTOLD S T O RY Exploring the history behind works of art

AUGUST SANDER, BOXERS, 1929 (PRINTED 1972), GELATIN SILVER PRINT, PHOTOGRAPH: GENEVIEVE HANSON; © DIE PHOTOGRAPHISCHE SAMMLUNG/SK STIFTUNG KULTUR – AUGUST SANDER ARCHIV, COLOGNE/DACS 2018

BOXERS, 1929, BY AUGUST SANDER ugust Sander was a man of lofty ambitions – his goal was to photograph every citizen in Germany. The innate impossibility of the task, teamed with the outbreak of the Second World War and ultimately his death, thwarted the project. However, he succeeded in recording a glorious cast of 619 dignified souls – a series that went on to be known as People of the 20th Century. Hikers, farmers, blacksmiths, nuns, innkeepers, painters, lovers, infants, doctors, dukes and film stars were all documented with equal poise, gravitas and generosity of spirit. The breadth of his subjects makes for an impeccable record of a turbulent period in the history of Germany, after the First World War and before the arrival of the Nazis and – en masse – these photographs hold an extraordinary cumulative power. BOxers is one of Sander’s best-known images and shows Paul Röderstein, a seriouslooking blonde, who was a cruiser-weight district champion who never hit the big time but was well-liked by all, and his shorter, grinning opponent Hein Heese. A quick glance at the pair soon explains the reason for Heese’s somewhat maniacal glee – he has tied his sparring partner’s shoelaces together and a slapstick tumble is surely imminent. The carefully curated and somewhat Laurel and Hardy-ish set-up makes clear that Sander was not simply a documentarian, but also a creator with a taste for the irreverent. In a radio lecture delivered in 1931, Sander observed, ‘Every person’s story is written plainly on his face, though not everyone can read it. These are the runes of a new, but also ancient language.’ He may not have succeeded in photographing every last person in Germany, but People of the 20th Century was an encyclopedic project that spanned the entirety of Sander’s career, in which he painted a vivid picture of interwar Germany and saw the humanity in everyone. The Nazis destroyed thousands

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of Sander’s negatives because, of course, he found the beauty in many of the people they sought to extinguish. His great-grandson Julian Sander says, ‘Growing up surrounded by my great-grandfather’s work taught me one key lesson from an early age. Don’t judge people on their appearance. Everyone deserves a chance.’ August Sander’s portraits will be on show at Hauser & Wirth London, Savile Row, W1 until July 28; hauserwirth.com 컄 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 41


INSIDER | ART EXHIBITIONS ON FORM This month, Asthall Manor in Oxfordshire plays host to On Form – a selling exhibition with a ‘please do touch’ policy. Expect to see sculptures by the likes of Helaine Blumenfeld, Peter Randall-Page and John Greer. June 10–July 8; onformsculpture.co.uk Pictured Jason Mulligan, The King & Queen of Portoro

BUYING ART Three works to consider adding to your collection

[1 ] FREYA DOUGLAS-MORRIS Dance Myself, watercolour, gouache, ink and collage on paper, 56 x 38cm, £1,400. freyadouglas-morris.co.uk

[2] ANNA TOPURIYA Hot Air Rises 4, paint on canvas, 97 x 61cm, $3,800. topuriya.com

ED RUSCHA: COURSE OF EMPIRE In 2005, Ed Ruscha represented the US at the 51st Venice Biennale. His installation evoked Thomas Cole’s nineteenth-century painting cycle, The Course of Empire. Unlike Cole’s work, Ruscha’s Course of Empire focuses on industrial buildings in LA. Both artworks will be at The National Gallery. June 11–October 7; nationalgallery.org. uk Pictured from top Thomas Cole, Scene from ‘The Last of the Mohicans’ Cora Kneeling at the Feet of Tamenund, 1827. Ed Ruscha, The Old Trade School Building, 2005

AN EDUCATION This month, London Art Studies launches a new series of online art history courses. There are over 100 short ilms, hosted by art historians that aim to demystify subjects such as the nude in art, the history of colour and the role of women artists. A monthly subscription costs £8.99; londonartstudies.com 42 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

[3] DENISE FORD Remains of Summer, oil on canvas, 60cm square, £925. deniseford.co.uk


WADSWORTH ATHENEUM MUSEUM OF ART, HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT, © WADSWORTH ATHENEUM/ALLEN PHILLIPS; WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART 2005.136, © ED RUSCHA/PHOTOGRAPHY PAUL RUSCHA; ART COLLECTION 2 / ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

a brief history of

T H E R OYA L AC A D E M Y O F A R T S As the doors open on the redevelopment of Burlington House to coincide with the RA’s 250th birthday, Emily Tobin considers the eventful history of the London institution ike so many things in Britain, the Royal Academy of Arts started life in a pub. Following a hearty dinner, a group of artists convened at the Turk’s Head Tavern in Soho, and after much wine and heated debate, a decision was made to create a club that would bring art to the masses. A number of these artists later converged on St James’s Palace for an audience with George III. The king, eager to be seen as a patron of culture, happily agreed to help, and the Royal Academy of Arts was born. It was to be run by artists who were elected by their peers, with an art school and a venue for exhibitions that would satisfy the public hunger for art, which was indeed great – the first show attracted 1,000 people a day. Joshua Reynolds, a bewigged and frock-coated sculpture of whom still greets visitors on arrival, was named president and the 36 founding members were memorialised in Johan Joseph Zoffany’s The Academicians of the Royal Academy, 1771-72, pictured, as a motley band of posers and eccentrics. Mary Moser and Angelica Kauffmann, the two founding women, are conspicuously not shown in person, but as portraits. The RA has a peripatetic past. It has shifted and shunted from Pall Mall to Somerset House, then up the road to Trafalgar Square (where it shared its premises with the newly founded National Gallery) and, finally, into Burlington House, where it remains to this day on an annual rent of £1. It is an institution that has not been without scandal. Stories of infighting and nefarious behaviour among the founding members were rife; tantrums a frequent occurrence when artists discovered their works had been hung in unfavourable positions. Much later, on a quiet Monday morning in May 1914, the RA hit the headlines when a white-haired woman dressed in a loose purple overcoat walked into the galleries. The reason for her capacious coat soon

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became clear when she whipped a meat cleaver out from within its folds and began to hack away at John Singer Sargent’s portrait of the author Henry James. Mary Wood, who was making a public stand in support of the women’s suffrage movement, later stated, ‘If they only gave women the vote, this would not have happened.’ In the Forties, the then-president, Sir Alfred Munnings, famously misfired by using his position to denounce the art of Picasso and Matisse; worse still, he tried to persuade policemen to prosecute fellow Academician Stanley Spencer under Britain’s obscenity laws. Several decades later, in 1997, the exhibition Sensation lived up to its title. A portrait by Marcus Harvey of Moors murderer Myra Hindley made from multiple copies of children’s handprints was deemed to be more shocking than anything else in the Academy’s history. It was twice vandalised by outraged members of the public. Nonetheless, people flocked to the exhibition. Throughout the centuries, artistic genius has flourished at the RA – from Turner and Constable to David Hockney and Tracey Emin, but during its long life, it has also rejected, or been rejected by, a host of reputable British names, including Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth, Francis Bacon and Frank Auerbach. If there is one constant, it is that it has always evoked – and no doubt will continue to evoke – strong opinions. This is largely because the public feels hugely invested in it. When David Chipperfield’s comprehensive redevelopment of Burlington House is revealed this month, there will be plenty clamouring to have their views heard. Regardless, the RA continues to be an institution run by artists, for artists, and its expansion will make it the largest artistic campus in central London – an impressive feat for an institution that sprung from a boozy evening in a Soho pub 첸 ‘The Great Spectacle: 250 Years of the Summer Exhibition’ is at the Royal Academy of Arts on June 12–August 19; royalacademy.org.uk HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 43


INSIDER | BOOKS

WOR D S A N D P IC T U R E S What to read: the latest books chosen by ELIZABETH METCALFE

Ju l y r e a d i n g l i s t THE STORY OF THE ENGLISH GARDEN by Ambra Edwards (National Trust Books, £25)

Our love affair with gardens goes back 500 years. In this book, due for release on June 28, Ambra Edwards shows how they evolved to their current form, starting in the medieval period. An excellent range is considered, from Henry VIII’s lavish garden at Hampton Court to Capability Brown’s sweeping landscape at Bowood House. Dotted throughout are informative profiles on elements such as trelliswork and rock gardens, and cultural aspects such as books and our enthusiasm for visiting gardens. The book seems proof of Ambra’s final sentence: ‘Our gardens are the very best of us.’ EM

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nclusion rider’ – those were the baffling closing words in actor Frances McDormand’s 2018 Oscar acceptance speech, after one of the most tumultuous years in Hollywood history. As she later explained, an inclusion rider is a little-called-upon contract clause that can be triggered at the request of an actor or director to insist on gender and ethnic diversity across the cast and crew of a film. As such, this new book by writer and curator Libby Sellers could be regarded as a retrospective inclusion rider for the history of design. The book highlights female designers and architects active over the past century. Working alone, or as part of creative teams, they have one thing in common: their work has often been overshadowed by their male counterparts’. In her introduction, Sellers explains that ‘Women Design redresses the balance by placing women at the start of the action, not the end.’ By doing so, Libby forces the reader to rethink perceived knowledge. ‘Ray Eames changed the world of design,’ writes Libby, who also observes how Denise Scott Brown changed the path of architectural discourse when she turned her academic lens on the Las Vegas strip in the Sixties. Eames and Scott Brown’s roles in the creative partnerships they formed with their 44 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

husbands have been frequently disregarded. When her partner Robert Venturi received the Pritzker Prize in 1991, Scott Brown was excluded from the honour. An appeal against the decision in 2013 was rejected. Ray Eames was similarly ignored throughout her lifetime for the role she played as co-creator in all the Eames’ projects. Instead, she has often been regarded as the woman behind Charles Eames. But these women were active agents in changing the course of design and architecture, rather than passive bystanders. The book profiles some female members of the Bauhaus, including Anni Albers and Marianne Brandt. Libby also explores the contributions to set design made by Sally Jacobs and Alexandra Exter, and highlights the progressive work of textile designers Maija Isola and Althea McNish. Of course, there are many omissions, but at only 176 pages this book cannot claim to be exhaustive. Instead, it is a useful tool for recognising that history is a multitude of different interpretations and, sadly, to date, we have been fed a rather limited and limiting account. As a statement, the title of the book is a worthwhile reminder also to the contemporary design industry. Women design, too. That is a fact. Johanna Agerman Ross, curator at the Victoria and Albert Museum

THE SPIRIT OF THE BAUHAUS edited by Olivier Gabet and Anne Monier (Thames & Hudson, £40)

The word ‘Bauhaus’ is so often used in conjunction with the words ‘style’ or ‘movement’ that we tend to overlook its origins as an art school. Containing essays by curators and artists, this book looks at how the school, which was founded in Weimar by the architect Walter Gropius in 1919 and closed by the Nazis in 1933, came to be a place of progressive experimentation. The book acknowledges the key players – including the artists Paul Klee and Wassily Kandinsky – but pays more attention to how the school operated and what influenced it. It is surprising to learn that the Bauhaus approach to design was hugely shaped by William Morris: both resisted machines and encouraged the rediscovery of forgotten skills. EM GREEN ESCAPES: THE GUIDE TO SECRET URBAN GARDENS by Toby Musgrave (Phaidon, £16.95)

An excellent resource for the greenfingered traveller, this book features 260 urban gardens in 150 cities across the world. The focus is not on public parks, but on more secret spaces, including rooftops and conservatories; as author Toby Musgrave puts it, these are ‘hidden gems that are unknown even to many locals’. While Chelsea Physic Garden in London or Peggy Guggenheim’s sculpture garden in Venice may seem obvious choices, most are relatively unknown. For example, instead of listing the Jardin Majorelle for Marrakech, the book suggests the Dar Si Said museum and the Bahia Palace. In London, the volunteer-run Phoenix Garden near Covent Garden is an exciting discovery. EM 첸

PIXELATE IMAGING

WOMEN DESIGN by Libby Sellers (Frances Lincoln, £20)


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From classic to contemporary, four distinct yet complementary events, featuring a wealth of expertise and shopping from interior, lifestyle and garden brands alongside leading art antique dealers


D E C O R AT I N G SWAT C H | D E S I G N I D E A S | R I TA N O T E S | P R O F I L E

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Fibres of life RUTH SLEIGHTHOLME decorates miniature houses with printed grasscloth wallcoverings PHOTOGRAPHS ROCIO CHACON

1 ‘One Way’ (rose), by Kit Kemp, raffia, 87cm wide, £65 a metre, from Christopher Farr Cloth. 2 ‘Bark’ (fuchsia), raffia, 87cm wide, £65 a metre, from Christopher Farr Cloth. 3 ‘Tango’ (jade), by Neisha Crosland, sisal, 85cm wide, £680 a 10-metre roll, from Turnell & Gigon. 4 ‘Small Way’ (rose), by Kit Kemp, raffia, 87cm wide, £65 a metre, from Christopher Farr Cloth. 5 ‘Pena Palace’ (kelly green and blue on white), hemp, 86.3cm wide, £112.20 a metre, from Phillip Jeffries. 6 & 7 ‘Feather Bloom’ (sun & fog, fuchsia & jet), by Schumacher, sisal, 86cm wide, £216.40 a metre, from Turnell & Gigon. Hand-thrown porcelain miniature vases, by Yuta Segawa, from £40 each, from Maud & Mabel 컄 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 49


DECORATING | SWATCH

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1 ‘Geneva’ (compass), sisal, 84cm wide, £750 a 7.3-metre roll, from Holland & Sherry. 2 ‘Belge’ (night sky), by Barron and Larcher, raffia, 87cm wide, £80 a metre, from Christopher Farr Cloth. 3 ‘Tanger’ (prolonger l’été), by Élitis, raffia, 142cm wide, £160.40 a metre, from Abbott & Boyd. 4 ‘Acanthus Stripe’ (fog & chalk), by Schumacher, sisal, 87cm wide, £142 a metre, from Turnell & Gigon. 5 ‘Jungle’ (JUA225), sisal, 91cm wide, £58 a metre, from Brian Yates (also on fringe). 6 ‘Grasseffects’ (JC21610), manila, 52cm wide, £185 a 10-metre roll, from Brian Yates. Miniature tandem bicycle model, stylist’s own. For suppliers’ details, see Stockists page 첸 50 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


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DECORATING | DESIGN IDEAS

Design ideas

SMALL GARDENS

ANDREAS VON EINSIEDEL

Though they may not seem inspiring at first, there are many options for compact urban gardens, from magical wildernesses to smart paved spaces. ELIZABETH METCALFE explores the opportunities

This charming courtyard, owned by Lizzie and Ion Florescu, has high walls that provide ample space for climbers. The white walls amplify the light and prevent the space feeling cramped. Crittall doors are a smart touch and blur the boundaries between inside and out. 컄

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DECORATING | DESIGN IDEAS

‘Our London garden needed evergreen structure, such as box and yew,’ explains Henrietta Courtauld of The Land Gardeners. Her design studio sits at one end of the space, while woven willow fences soften the boundaries. Henrietta plants vegetables every year and grows fruit such as figs and kiwis. thelandgardeners.com

If you do not want to clutter up a balcony with pots, use a wall-mounted plant rack similar to this one. Bacsac’s fabric ‘Hanging Window Pots’ system (£80 for a two-pot version from SCP) is a good option, as is the three-pot ‘Reclaimed French Oak Planter’ (£152 from Clippings) scp.co.uk | clippings.com

For high roof terraces, choose plants that are drought- and windtolerant. Garden designer Emily Erlam used Gaura lindheimeri, santolina and lavender to blur the boundaries here. Kinley planters, which are just 3mm thick and have no bases, minimise the amount of weight on the roof. erlamstudio.com | kinley.co.uk

Consider breaking up a rectangular garden into zones to make it more visually exciting. A wealth of ideas can be gleaned from this one by designer Jinny Blom, who removed the lawn and path, and added a rectangular pool, raised beds, reclaimed decking and a brick terrace. jinnyblom.com

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DECORATING | DESIGN IDEAS

Gardener Charlie McCormick grows vegetables and herbs in long, rectangular planters on the small roof terrace of his London flat. ‘Tomatoes and peppers grow especially well, as they can cope with exposed and windy areas such as roofs,’ he says. mccormick.london

Symmetry is an excellent way to create order in a small space. Squares of box-edged grass, paving – arranged in a cruciform layout – and a central statue give this garden the feel of an Italianate Renaissance one. Pale-colour tiles arranged in a mosaic pattern add to the formal style.

ELSA YOUNG; SHANNON MCGRATH; RICHARD BLOOM; ANDREW MONTGOMERY; JAKE CURTIS; ANDREAS VON EINSIEDEL; SIMON BROWN

CHARLIE’S A DV IC E GROWING VEGETABLES IN SMALL ROOF GARDENS If you are planting vegetables in pots, make sure you have good irrigation and shelter from the wind. Pots dry out very quickly, so it is worth installing a simple automated watering system. Q

Cut-and-come-again salad varieties are outstanding, as you will have a crop throughout the spring and summer months. Q

Keep an eye out for garden pests, even if you are a few metres up from the ground. It is amazing how slugs and snails seem to come from nowhere. Q

Make sure you have a seating area, so you can enjoy the beauty of your productive garden.

Designer Butter Wakefield created a wildflower meadow in her London garden. ‘It made my dull lawn suddenly feel rather dreamy,’ she says. Meadows are also a great way to attract wildlife. Butter used Wildflower Turf ’s ‘Wildflower Landscape Turf ’ (£16.80 a square metre). butterwakefield.co.uk | wildflowerturf.co.uk 컄

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DECORATING | DESIGN IDEAS

Designer Sussy Cazalet has used a green tile-clad wall to divide this small west London garden into distinct sections. She added a pair of antique doors at the bottom of the garden, which gives the illusion that it extends further. ‘The owner has children and this introduces a magical element,’ says Sussy. sussycazalet.co.uk

London gardens often have a larger vertical surface area than a horizontal one. Make the most of it, as designer Alasdair Cameron has done here with an impressive fern wall. Vertical planting creates ample room for dining and relaxing. camerongardens.co.uk

A L A S DA I R’ S A DV IC E HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OF A SMALL GARDEN Do not overcomplicate the design – use clean lines and stretch the perspective by using see-through elements such as slatted screens. Q

Embrace vertical gardening. Install trellises and use wire on the walls. Consider creating a green wall of evergreen plants and herbs. Include bird boxes to encourage wildlife. Q

Rather than traditional flower beds, install narrow beds for climbers. You can also use pots and planters, which can be moved easily. This oak auricula theatre maximises the space for plants in this small front garden by landscape designer Chris Moss, and sits seamlessly alongside the Victorian house. Potted auriculas and succulents line the shelves, but the plants can be changed to provide a year-round display. chrismossgardens.com

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Add mirrors to bounce the light around and make the garden appear larger.


CHRIS TUBBS PHOTOGRAPHY; LUCAS ALLEN; MARCUS HARPUR; SHARYN CAIRNS; MARIANNE MAJERUS; PAUL MASSEY

DECORATING | DESIGN IDEAS

The placement of two box cones and a similarly shaped slate vase, made by the sculptor Joe Smith, draws the eye around this small garden. Artificial grass is a good low-maintenance option; LazyLawn’s range costs from £13.99 a metre. joe-smith.co.uk | lazylawn.co.uk

This jungle-style garden by designer Tom Stuart-Smith is small yet otherworldly. Tree ferns – Dicksonia antarctica, which can be bought from Crocus from £49.99 each – are planted in a lush carpet of woodland grasses, box and climbing plants. tomstuartsmith.co.uk | crocus.co.uk

This sunken front garden could have been a dank, forgotten space, but it is enlivened by large box balls, white valerian and beech columns. Designer Chris Moss used golden gravel and whitewashed the garden wall to brighten the space. Gravel is a great choice because plants can self-seed in it. chrismossgardens.com

Do not despair if your garden is only one or two metres long with a brick wall at the end. Grow creepers, which will soften the brickwork and stop the space from feeling claustrophobic. Another alternative would be to whitewash the wall. Here, potted plants have been placed on plinths for a layered look 첸

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DECORATING | ADVICE

Rita Notes RITA KONIG shares her tips for decorating children’s rooms PHOTOGRAPH CRAIG FORDHAM

t is a fine balance, a child’s bedroom. Do you want to go full tilt into the fantasy bedroom or let it be a little more fluid? I remember, as a child, a boy I knew had his walls painted with a Star Wars mural, which was amazing. As my own daughter, Margot, has grown (she is now four), her room has evolved from a sliver of a room off our bedroom to what was my husband’s study. It still has the black-and-white floral wallpaper from when, in an even earlier incarnation, it was my bedroom, and this has catered for the room’s diverse tenants remarkably well. Children’s stuff dictates the decorative tone of their rooms. In Margot’s, the pink plastic has now arrived in force. I do not think it looks too bad, though I am grateful she does not also have pink walls and curtains. Bookshelves filled with toys and books take up one wall, making the room look like a toy shop. I would never previously have thought to put so much open shelving in a child’s room, but it is actually useful to have everything on display. Margot’s pale pink bed from Bobo Kids (bobokids.co.uk) is not quite as bright as she would like (she dismisses it as white), but it is really pretty. I have also put a king-size pillow behind the soft standard pillow she sleeps on, which makes reading stories at night so much more comfortable. I am currently decorating a bedroom for a small boy who wanted a camouflage theme. It started with khaki and brown paint, and a bunk with a mess tent underneath. But now that Nathan Turner’s line of wallpapers for Wallshoppe (wallshoppe.com) includes a camouflage one called ‘Camo’, we have covered the walls in that, with Paint & Paper Library’s brilliant ‘Masai’ shade on the woodwork (paintandpaperlibrary.com). Nate’s terrifically bright papers work so well for children. I would advise using anything cute that you fear your child will grow out of in a bathroom, where they will tolerate it longer than they might in their bedroom. Children’s tastes can be alarming, but by giving them a voice, one can steer them gently in a more palatable direction. I am happy for Margot to scratch her pink itch in our house in the north of England. We have chosen Edward Bulmer’s ‘Rose Pink’

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Rita and Margot in Margot’s London bedroom

paint (edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk) for the walls, tempered with blue-grey ticking curtains and Howe’s ‘Little F’ linen for the blinds (howelondon.com). I also found the most charming single white metal four-poster bed from Maisons du Monde (maisonsdu monde.com). Ikea’s ‘Sundvik’ table works well painted any colour beside a bed and remember, ugly pine drawers can be painted in terrific shades. There is an Anglo-French dealer whom I follow on Pinterest called La Petite Brocante (lapetitebrocante.net) and she always has nice wicker pieces ideal for children’s rooms. As children get older, it can be easier to change the accessories in their room, rather than the whole decoration scheme. Do not underestimate how nice a lot of the things from our childhood bedrooms can be later on in life. Margot has a bow-fronted mahogany chest of drawers in her room that I was given for my thirteenth birthday and it has stayed with me through my life. Buy nice pictures for their walls when you find something you like; you are not wasting good things on children, but starting their collections and developing their taste. I think it really pays dividends 첸

R I TA’ S P I C K S O F C H I L D R E N ’ S B E D D I N G A N D B E D S

Cotton poplin ‘Pink Block Print Duvet Set’, £92, from Caramel. caramel-shop.co.uk. ‘Bahia Nido Block Bed with Frieze and 6 Drawers’ (cotton candy), £1,850, from Bobo Kids

‘Cashmere Blanket with Pompoms’, by Madeleine Thompson, £195, from Blue Almonds. bluealmonds. co.uk. ‘Eglantine’ fourposter bed (ivory), £256.50, from Maisons du Monde

Jersey cotton ‘Mr Bear Single Duvet Set’, £65, from Tobias & The Bear. tobiasandthebear.com. ‘Treehouse Single Bed’, £1,549, from The Conran Shop. conranshop.co.uk

‘Three Colour Striped Linen Duvet Cover’, by Lab, £89, from Smallable. smallable.com. ‘Bohème Bed’, £428.50, from Bonton. bonton.fr HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 59


DECORATING | PROFILE DESIGNER

Ciara Ephson ELIZABETH METCALFE meets the founder of new interiors studio Fentiman Design to discuss her career and projects

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She says ‘I am really interested in the more architectural side of interiors, such as joinery design, as well as selecting colour schemes and art.’ They say ‘Ciara is instinctively creative and has a passion for design. Her attention to detail is incredible’ – Kate Earle of Todhunter Earle. We say ‘Ciara’s interiors are fun and contemporary. She isn’t daunted if she needs to completely gut a place.’

PROJECT This three-bedroom f lat in Fulham is split over two levels. The top floor, which houses the kitchen and sitting and dining areas, previously had a clunky layout with a poky kitchen, so Ciara took down the stud walls and created an open-plan space. A large floral pastel by Joanna Kirk sets the tone in the dining area (above left), and walls elsewhere are dotted with artworks, such as in the spare bedroom (top right), where posters sit above a sofa upholstered in a Fermoie fabric. Ciara added smart storage along one wall of the study (middle), and tweaked the size of the tiled main bathroom (bottom) to make the space work better 첸

KRISTY NOBLE PHOTOGRAPHY

t was inevitable that I would end up working in interior design,’ says Ciara Ephson. The designer grew up surrounded by impressive interiors, thanks to her father Martin Ephson, who cofounded Farrow & Ball and later Fermoie. In 2011, fresh from an art-history degree, Ciara enrolled on a full-time interior-design course at KLC, after which she spent three months at John Cullen Lighting. ‘I saw how detrimental it is for an interior if lighting is not done properly,’ she says. She was then snapped up by Todhunter Earle, where she spent three years as a designer. ‘It was there that I learnt the importance of spatial planning.’ When an opportunity to overhaul three flats in Fulham came along in 2016, Ciara set up her own London-based practice, Fentiman Design. ‘It is named after the first street I lived on,’ says Ciara. Her fresh, unfussy aesthetic combines bespoke joinery, contemporary art and a mix of new and antique furniture. So far, most of her work has been in London, where her style sits well in modern and period houses alike. ‘I’d really like to do a country house,’ says Ciara. fentimandesign.com


HOUSE & GARDEN PROMOTION

LET US INSPIRE YOU Book your special discounted tickets now and get into the spirit of the season at this year’s House & Garden Festival, from June 20-24 at Olympia London

*Calls cost 7 pence per minute plus network extras. £2.20 transaction fee applies. 30% discount applies to on-the-door prices. Advance box office closes at 11pm on 19 June 2018.

ABOVE A kitchen by exhibitor Martin Moore. A sketch of Edward Bulmer’s Decorated Space. Seating by Arlo & Jacob, another exhibitor

Whether you are looking to refresh your home, find that eye-catching statement piece or get tips on creating the perfect outdoor space, the House & Garden Festival is the go-to destination for all your design needs. This year’s Festival presents four shows, including HOUSE, Spirit of Summer, GROW, and for the first time The Art & Antiques Fair. From June 20-24 at Olympia London, visitors can peruse the treasures of art and antique dealers alongside beautiful hand-picked products ranging from sofas to garden parasols and ceramics. No other fair offers visitors such an opportunity to shop a diverse mix of stylish brands, including Martin Moore, Sofas & Stuff and Farrow & Ball. It’s also a chance to meet industry gurus and glean specialist knowledge at the daily programme of inspiring talks and advice clinics with 25 professionals from the BIID as well as experts from the Inchbald School of Design, who will run free 20-minute sessions – all available to pre-book online. Don’t miss this year’s Decorated Spaces, where leading interior designers Rachel Chudley and Edward Bulmer, whose drawing for his scheme is pictured above, have created beautiful rooms to inspire. BOOK IT House & Garden readers can enjoy discounted tickets for £14 (30% off). Quote ‘HGF2’ when calling 0844 854 0501* or when booking online at www.houseandgardenfestival.com.

WORKSHOPS The House & Garden Festival is also a great chance to learn a new skill with an exciting programme of workshops. Take on flower arranging with royal wedding florist Philippa Craddock (pictured left), or book a horticultural workshop with the Botanical Boys. Meanwhile at PopUp Painting, you can have a go at creating your very own masterpiece. All workshops are available to pre-book on the website.


The List DIRECTORY 2019 Calling all design professionals House & Garden will be publishing a print edition of The List with the January 2019 issue. Are you an interior designer, architect or a garden designer? Do you provide a brilliant design service?

Sign up now or renew your existing membership to be a part of it. Visit houseandgarden.co.uk/the-list

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LIFESTYLE Threaded with meaning Mumbai-based textile designer HEMA SHROFF PATEL is preserving the art of Maheshwari handloom weaving with her sophisticated fabrics, while supporting local women to achieve independence through craft

TEXT GABBY DEEMING | PHOTOGRAPHS ANDREW MONTGOMERY

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 63


PREVIOUS PAGE Hema on the veranda of her Art Deco apartment in Mumbai. THIS PAGE ANTICLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT Hema with client and gallerist Priya Jhaveri and artist Yamini Nayar at Jhaveri Contemporary gallery in Mumbai. A meeting on the veranda with Priya. A cupboard full of blockprinted fabrics and Amba shawls (also bottom middle). In the drawing room with her design administrator Darshana Bhatia. OPPOSITE Hema in the woodpanelled lift in her apartment building

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or textile designer Hema Shroff Patel, pinpointing the precise moment that her life changed course is easy. Having moved to Mumbai from Michigan nearly 30 years ago, economics degree in hand, she met and fell in love with her husband Rahul. Neither wanted a big, traditional Indian wedding, so they mooted the idea to their respective parents that the money for the celebration could instead be given to a charity. However, both families were keen to keep things traditional, so Hema found another way of giving something back by buying all her wedding saris from a non-profit weaving enterprise she had heard about called Rehwa, based in Maheshwar near Indore. As she sat in their Mumbai showroom falling in love with the beautiful handwoven silks, Hema heard the unmistakably Texan drawl of Sally Holkar coming from the office. Sally was a founder of Rehwa and fiercely dedicated to the preservation and promotion of handloom textiles, along with her husband, Richard Holkar, the Maharaja of Indore. As the two women got talking, it emerged Sally was looking for someone to help them with an exhibition in the suburbs and did Hema know anybody who might be interested? ‘I just found myself volunteering,’ says Hema, with characteristic calm. ‘That one decision changed everything for me.’ Hema and Rahul, who runs an aviation company, live in Mumbai with their two grown-up children in the same perfectly preserved Art Deco apartment building that Rahul’s family has lived in since the Fifties in Malabar Hill, an area of south Mumbai that rises high above Marine Drive. 컄

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LIFESTYLE

Teak doors, cool terrazzo floors and soft rolled grass blinds at the windows transport you back in time


Although the once-uninterrupted view of the sea is a thing of the past, much of the apartment’s interior remains unchanged. The original wood-panelled lift with sliding cage doors carries you (fairly reliably) up to the apartment, where grand teak doors, cool terrazzo floors and soft rolled grass blinds at the windows transport you back in time. A large, airy salon gives way to a charming panelled side room, where Hema hosts client meetings and has her design office. The interior is a lesson in editing; at one end of the room, a beautifully simple antique glass and metal oil lantern hangs over a wooden card table, where a metal cooking pot belonging to her grandmother sits with two much loved ceramic pears and a recently added pomegranate, all with a similar Japanese glaze. Hema has a keen eye for balancing tones, which becomes more obvious as she unfolds some of the silk and wool handloom shawls she has designed for her label, Amba. Drawing inspiration from sources as diverse as the abstract paintings of Agnes Martin, whose 2016 exhibition at the Guggenheim in New York inspired last year’s pared-back monochrome collection, to the remarkable seventeenth-century wall paintings of Rajasthan’s Bundi Palace, Amba’s pieces are distinctive through their restrained colour palette, the thoughtful combination of fibres and the application of intricate weave techniques that she first learnt on the looms of Rehwa in Maheshwar. ‘I made the jump from working on the business side to weaving when I started buying Maheshwari textiles and making little pyjama sets for my kids. The

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big leap came when I wanted to add shawls and scarves to this repertoire,’ says Hema. This led to in-depth training so she could design original textiles herself. Maheshwar is famous for the eighteenth-century fort that rises from the ghats of the holy river Narmada, where rows of gaudy tourist boats jostle for trade alongside fishermen casting their nets. ‘The first time I saw the fort, I was smitten,’ explains Hema. ‘I remember standing on the banks of the Narmada, knowing that I had come somewhere very special. I felt as if I was home. Then Sally asked, “Who wants to swim across the river?” We swam across and climbed the ghats up through the temples and into the beautiful Rehwa weaving unit #1. I was in love!’ As Hema’s creative skills have developed, so has her relationship with the town. Hema’s value as an ‘outsider’ with a sophisticated vision has proved extremely useful to Rehwa, where she has worked with a team to ensure that the traditional textiles stay relevant to a discerning contemporary audience. She is also a design consultant and on the board of Sally’s more recent not-for-profit enterprise, WomenWeave. THIS PAGE Hema and Sally’s contribution over decades to Sally Holkar, who runs nonthe weaving community of Maheshwar profit weaving enterprise (and beyond) cannot be underestWomenWeave, catch up imated. Uniting business sense, an on the river in Sally’s boat. eye for design and a passion for the OPPOSITE BOTTOM LEFT preservation and promotion of handVisitors to Maheshwar’s loom textiles, WomenWeave is where 컄 holy river look out over the water from the ghats


LIFESTYLE CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Freshly washed and woven cloth is hung out to dry at WomenWeave. Sally and Hema watching the women work in the organisation’s Gudi Mudi finishing centre; behind this area is a crèche. A weaver


Previously unemployed women have learnt to produce sophisticated checks and stripes that find their way into the studios of designers worldwide


LIFESTYLE previously unemployed rural women have learnt to produce sophisticated cotton khadi checks and stripes that find their way into the studios of fashion designers and boutiques worldwide. Hema also co-teaches a colour theory course to students of The Handloom School, part of the WomenWeave enterprise (although some of the students are male). The school takes weavers from all over the country and teaches them how to elevate and understand their craft. They learn simple bookkeeping, computer skills and English, and graduate with the skills to take their ancient craft into a modern world and, most importantly, to become independent businesses. One graduate of the school, Wasim Ansari, now runs his own weaving workshop in Maheshwar and is a key member of Amba. Within the simple mud walls of his working space, looms flash with bright-coloured silk threads. Wasim and Hema spend hours on the loom perfecting the intricacies of each new design. Years of experience and understanding are needed to produce one of Hema’s pieces. Wasim is a third generation weaver, so it is in his blood. With the intervention and patronage of people like Hema and Sally, the preservation of these skills feels more secure than ever, and the beautiful cloths and their weavers will grow to be recognised and valued throughout India and beyond 첸

OPPOSITE Hema with veteran weaver Chandra Bai at the Rehwa weaving unit in Maheshwar. THIS PAGE CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT Wasim Ansari, a graduate of The Handloom School, with his father Bashir, who is also a weaver, in their workshop. Bashir at the loom working on one of Hema’s pieces. At Ahilya Fort Hotel in Maheshwar. Sally and Hema with female students at The Handloom School

Amba: ambaweave@gmail.com | WomenWeave: womenweave.org | Rehwa Society: rehwasociety.org The House & Garden team stayed at Ahilya Fort Hotel, Maheshwar: 00-91-11 4155 1575; ahilyafort.com

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EDIT

Inspirational INTERIORS, beautiful GARDENS, fascinating people, compelling stories

PAG E

PAUL MASSEY

72 In a former weavers’ cottage in Wiltshire, a rear extension houses a kitchen with reclaimed marble surfaces

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A NEW CHAPTER Harry and Rebecca Whittaker have brought an eighteenth-century weavers’ cottage in Wiltshire back to life, restoring original features and filling it with salvaged objects for the latest phase of its story TEXT DINAH HALL | PHOTOGRAPHS PAUL MASSEY | LOCATIONS EDITOR LIZ ELLIOT

KITCHEN (both pages) The courtyard entrance and kitchen, with its metal-framed windows, have an unexpected French feel. The floor is made from a patchwork of marble slabs sourced by Harry and Rebecca online. Harry turned his childhood ping-pong table into a trestle table, which he topped with elm loorboards salvaged from the house. The shelves display objects from his collection, including earthenware pots and a plaster cast of a cherub’s head HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 73


hen Harry and Rebecca Whittaker bought a handsome limestone building where weavers once lived and worked, it had very little to recommend it beyond its eighteenth-century windows and views of Bradford on Avon. You would have needed a forensic architectural eye to spot the potential beauty hidden by the render, concrete slabs and featureless rooms. Fortunately, as an experienced conservation architect – ‘but without the tweed suit and mustard trousers,’ he jokes – Harry was well equipped to tackle what, for most people, would be a nightmare project. He has recently set up his own firm, Bath Conservation Architects. Rebecca’s profession as a relationship counsellor must also have come in handy over the two gruelling years it took to renovate the house while they lived in a rented farmhouse, doing much of the work themselves before they had the money to extend the house. There was a lot of hard labour – taking down ceilings and stripping loose plaster, opening up fireplaces, laying marble and timber f loors, and ferrying rubble to the tip. Every weekend, they took one of the original windows back to the farmhouse, Harry repairing the frame while Rebecca extracted and cleaned the thin panes of mouthblown glass. When they could no longer afford to pay rent, they had to move into the unfinished house. ‘It was very hard work at times. And uncomfortable,’ says Rebecca. ‘I remember sitting in the cold, dark kitchen, crying on the phone to my mother, saying we’d made a terrible mistake.’ But as soon as the one-storey back extension’s steel windows were fitted, flooding the timber-framed kitchen with light, there was no more talk of mistakes. If you approach the house from the back, via a small stone courtyard, these glamorous windows alert you to the fact that this is no tweed-suit-and-mustard-trousers conversion. Whereas the three-storey side extension is a textbook work of conservation, seamlessly blending a new hallway, utility rooms and bathrooms into the original building, the kitchen extension announces its contemporary status with a mix of opulent salvaged pieces and practical repurposed objects, which sets the tone for the rest of the house. Worktops were made from a slate billiard table, the kitchen table was once a ping-pong table (made by Harry’s grandfather), 74 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


EXTERIOR (opposite top let) The Whittakers’ garden has views over the rooftops of Bradford on Avon. ENTRANCE HALL (opposite top right) In the side extension, a wide hall is laid with flagstones from the old lean-to kitchen. SITTING ROOM (opposite bottom right and this page) Harry built the stone chimneypiece and itted an old Carron cast-iron insert. The Queen Anne chair belonged to his father and the square armchair is by Jasper Conran. The sofa, which is a copy of an 1820s American design, was bought on Ebay


MAIN BEDROOM (this page) Two rooms on the top floor were combined to make this substantial space. At the foot of the bed is a seventeenth-century oak table, and a Chippendale chair sits near the door to the bathroom. EN-SUITE BATHROOM (opposite top let and bottom right) A copy of John Rocque’s 1746 map of London hangs above the bath. Harry converted an old French marble pestle into a basin and set it on a marble base found on Ebay. SPARE ROOM (opposite top right) Both the first-loor bedrooms have their original elm loorboards. The French orange linen drapes here provide a rare lash of colour


now topped with salvaged elm f loorboards from upstairs. A collection of marble slabs, sourced online and combined to create a stunning floor, has echoes of history, with none of the ‘polished perfection’ that Harry dislikes. This piecemeal approach to materials is a reminder that houses are a patchwork of shared histories, passions and previous lives lived there. All this is woven into the fabric of the house, along with the couple’s own family backgrounds. Rebecca feels an affinity with the wide, shallow stairs from the sitting room to the first-f loor bedrooms, as they remind her of the Lutyens-style houses where she grew up in Kent. Harry’s father was a lecturer in architectural history at Newcastle University and a keen collector. ‘Dad would be restoring broken chairs and cracked china while my mother, who was an architect, would be worrying about the drainage.’ Despite rebelling when younger against what he calls this ‘knobbly old background’, Harry is clearly his father’s son. He has amassed a collection of ironmongery, industrial lights, plaster casts, doors and mouldings, to which Rebecca has added her own obsession: salvaged sanitaryware and taps. Floorboards and old windows were found on the internet. Where possible, the couple reused existing materials; the flagstones in the hallway of the side extension were found in the old lean-to kitchen, under four layers of carpet, Sixties newspapers, lino and concrete. Weavers’ cottages were built to house looms on the top f loor and living quarters below, and designed with profit in mind, rather than beauty or comfort. Panelling the thin walls of the sitting room has lent the house the appearance of a grander history and allowed Harry to add insulation. On the top floor, which once resounded with the clatter of looms, Harry and Rebecca luxuriate in a vast space made from knocking two rooms into one and removing the ceilings to reveal ancient roof trusses. The half-tester bed is one of Harry’s concessions to Rebecca’s need for softness. ‘He’d prefer a horsehair mattress like a monk, whereas I need to be comfortable in a feather bed,’ says Rebecca. But discord is rare – this is a house where harmony reigns in every sense 첸 Bath Conservation Architects: 01225-314074; bathconservationarchitects.com. The house and garden studio are occasionally available to rent on Airbnb; visit airbnb.com HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 77


creative direction Rescuing the owner of this nineteenth-century villa in Wiltshire from a crisis of decision-making, Ashley Hicks has reinvented the country-house interior by introducing hints of irreverence, his own furniture designs and bold fabrics TEXT ELFREDA POWNALL | PHOTOGRAPHS JAMES MERRELL | LOCATIONS EDITOR LIZ ELLIOT

EXTERIOR (this page) The back and side of the house, as seen from the approach to the steep dell in the garden. The stone part of the house on the left is Victorian, while the red-brick section was a Twenties addition. DRAWING ROOM (opposite) A portrait of King Carl XIV Johan of Sweden, with whom the family has a connection, hangs on one of the grasscloth-covered walls. The doorway next to it leads into the dining room

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ome people deny the existence of ‘post-baby brain’, but the owner of this house in Wiltshire is not among them. She had done up a couple of houses and was happily bringing up three daughters when, after the birth of her fourth daughter, she succumbed to this much-disputed condition of indecision and lack of confidence. Travelling to Wiltshire once a week to oversee the workmen at the house, to which the family was moving from London, she realised that something had to give. She telephoned the designer Ashley Hicks, as their daughters are close friends. ‘Like the gentleman that he is, he came to my rescue,’ she says. The house is an 1820s villa, to which a ballroom was added later that century, with further additions in the Twenties. Ashley’s brief was to give character to the main rooms. ‘The owners had done a lot,’ he says. ‘The house was in a grim state when they bought it six years ago and when I arrived, the planning was well advanced. They also had an electrical scheme, though I insisted it should be changed. Thirty downlighters in a grid – ridiculous!’ Ashley does not suffer from indecision. The lighting in the hall was the first change he made. ‘There were empty niches and I thought why not fill them with light sculptures inspired by the standing stones at Avebury.’ As you turn right from the hall, you enter the drawing room, where the straw-coloured grasscloth walls are dominated by a huge convex mirror, like a gigantic

DRAWING ROOM (this page top) Ashley designed the mirror, turquoise leather fender and striking pelmet in the bay window, which is in a custom-printed fabric. LIBRARY (this page above) The bookcase has a recess to hide a cinema screen; the Fifties leather chair is from Glaisher & Nash. DINING ROOM (opposite) The rich aubergine wall colour is from Dulux Trade 80 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


VESTIBULE (this page top left) By the front door are a stufed anteater and Chinese terracotta warrior. HALL (this page top right) Ashley chose a peat-brown paint to add strength. KITCHEN (this page above) The painting above the chimneypiece is by Gillian Ayres. French windows lead to the garden. DINING AREA (opposite) The units at the other end of the kitchen are by Plain English 82 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


T H E K I T C H E N WA S P R E V I O U S LY T H E V I C T O R I A N B A L L R O O M : ‘ I T ’ S A G R E AT R O O M F O R PA R T I E S – W E ’ V E H A D 70 P E O P L E S I T T I N G I N H E R E ’


A S H L E Y S O LV E D T H E D I L E M M A O F H OW T O R E C O N C I L E T H E OW N E R’ S S E N S E O F F U N W I T H T H E TRADITIONAL FEEL OF THE HOUSE


stylised flower. There are elements of a traditional drawing room, but they have been cleverly subverted. The giant damask pattern of the curtains is in bright lime-green cotton, and the mirror is fun and quirky. This room shows the way Ashley solved his client’s dilemma: how to reconcile her irreverent sense of fun and love of mid-century design with the traditional feel of the house. Ashley has filled the bay window with a huge sofa, dubbed ‘the Sunday papers sofa’. ‘The aim in a family house is to make a sitting room the whole family likes to use, and not have the kids wanting to go off somewhere else,’ says Ashley. ‘That’s why I always put a cinema of some sort in a sitting room or library.’ Across the hall, the library, which also serves as the husband’s study, has a cinema screen concealed in a recess in an elegant bookcase. A sofa faces the screen, with a raised tier of built-in seating behind it, on a platform that conceals drawers full of DVDs. Walking from the hall, through a vivid yellow corridor, you reach the quieter tones of the kitchen, where the family also likes to congregate. It was previously the Victorian ballroom and now has a dining area at one end and a seating area at the other, with a vast central kitchen island and units designed by Plain English. This room was the owner’s project and, after its dark panelling had been removed, neutral colours were chosen to create a calm backdrop for works by Gillian Ayres and David Spiller, as well as a couple of her own oil paintings. ‘This is a great room for parties – we’ve had 70 people sitting

down in here,’ she says. Much smaller dinners take place in the dining room, where aubergine walls and polished mahogany table are lightened by Ashley’s gilded console tables and pictures of Popeye and Olive Oyl. Ashley kept the main bedroom simple: a bed curtain wrapping round the headboard matches the window curtains, as well as the headboard and bedcover, which are trimmed with blue braid. He added bedside tables and two chairs of his own design, and the owner’s collection of dog paintings hangs on either side of the bed. The family’s own dogs range the garden that surrounds the house, a first glimpse of which is a new, minimalist stone-edged rill set in a lawn. The side of the house overlooks a steep and beautiful dell, planted in the Fifties with camellias, magnolias and rhododendrons; now giants, they stand amid carpets of snowdrops, wild narcissi and bluebells, and make this an enchanting place in spring. On flatter ground above, there is a rose tunnel and, beyond it, the designer Liz Sanderson has made a bee garden, with hives nearby, to extend the garden’s season into late summer. In an area once used for parking cars, beds of sedums, veronicastrum and nepeta swirl around a grid of young fruit trees, with a river of blue salvias running across the space. Indecision banished and the house complete, its delighted owner is forging ahead with this new project, but looking back in thanks to Ashley Hicks 첸 Ashley Hicks: ashleyhicks.com Liz Sanderson Garden Design: lizsandersongardens.com

SPARE ROOM (opposite) Farrow & Ball’s ‘Downpipe’ paint sets the rich tone in this room; the bench was designed by Ashley. MAIN BEDROOM (this page) The wallpaper here is the same Philip Jefries grasscloth as in the drawing room. The bedside tables are by Ashley, with lamps from Graham & Green. A collection of dog paintings hangs on either side of the bed HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 85


scale model When architect Tom Brooksbank’s parents decided to downsize, he devised an award-winning house that uses glass, half-height walls and lofty ceilings to stretch its proportions TEXT CAROLINE CLIFTON-MOGG | PHOTOGRAPHS PAUL MASSEY


SITTING ROOM (both pages) A bold decorative glass panel by Rupert Bevan hangs on the wall behind a pair of mirrors by the eighteenth-century designer John Linnell. The curtains of the large, west-facing bay window are concealed in niches on either side when not in use HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 87


rchitect Tom Brooksbank is a partner (with the artist Allan Collins) in a practice specialising in architecture and design. In 2017, he was the winner of the RIBA Yorkshire Award and the RIBA Yorkshire Emerging Architect of the Year, both for the house he built for his parents in the North Yorkshire countryside. Emma and Nicholas Brooksbank wanted to exchange their large Victorian house for something smaller and easier to run, and felt the answer was to convert a pair of semi-detached farm cottages that stood on their land. The verb ‘downsize’ is an ugly word, neither euphonic nor descriptive. It suggests doll’s-house proportions and a meanness of spirit – the opposite of generosity and largesse. Tom has created a small house whose ‘outward modesty’, to quote the RIBA citation, belies the feeling of space and privacy in its interior. ‘I like to discover what the client thinks of as living well – their personal version of the good life. Helping a client realise this is the purpose of my work and it makes all the inevitable challenges worthwhile,’ says Tom. Of course, in this case the process was expedited. The house was envisaged as open-plan – not barnlike, rather a corridor-free space that flowed seamlessly. Living areas were to be flexible and multi-functional, with subtle spacebreakers in the form of sliding screens, half-height walls and the occasional discreet door. The unobtrusive soft pastel colour

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SITTING ROOM (above let) Tom created a triptych display of ceramics on shelves painted in Little Greene’s ‘Bone China Blue’ to match the walls. KITCHEN (above right and opposite) Panelling, spray-painted light grey, disguises the units when seen from the entrance and sitting room. DINING AREA (right) The table dates from the eighteenth century 88 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


The house was envisaged as open-plan – not barn-like, rather a corridor-free space that flowed seamlessly


‘ We d i d n ’ t p l a n t o s l e e p d o w n s t a i r s , b u t the house is so much part of the landscape that we wanted to be par t of that’


scheme, devised in collaboration with Yorkshire-based interior designer Averil Blundell, was chosen to merge the interior with the surrounding landscape. The approach to the house is across an expansive paved and gravelled area, and into an entrance lobby that opens to a large space of full-height windows. At first sight it seems to be a hall, but it also contains a beautifully designed galley kitchen, the working parts of which are hidden by half-height, pale-painted tongueand-groove panelling, at once effective and aesthetically pleasing. Off this space, on one side, an exposed brick wall – part of the original dwelling – partly divides the kitchen/hall from a narrow, high-ceilinged dining area, where the semi-formal aesthetic is in total contrast to the pale calm of the kitchen. The painted walls are hung with family portraits; an eighteenth-century chandelier, on a retractable cord, cascades over the antique dining table, and built-in shelves hold books and favourite objects. On the other side of the kitchen is a f loor-to-ceiling sliding screen made from panels of sycamore felled on the estate, set within grey spray-painted aluminium frames. This opens into the sitting room, which is dominated by a large bay window with built-in seating below – nothing hinders the view of the countryside. The full-height windows opposite look out onto a formal garden designed by Phillippa May. The garden, which is made up of irregular paths winding around densely planted beds, and punctuated by precisely placed clipped yew balls, is enclosed by an old brick wall, part of the original kitchen garden. The main bedroom is reached, via a dressing room, through a flush, semi-secret door in the sitting-room wall. Light streams in through the full-height windows. Emma says: ‘We didn’t plan to sleep downstairs, but the house is so much part of the landscape that we wanted to be part of that.’ For those who prefer an upstairs view, there are two spare rooms at the other end of the house, up a spiral staircase and connected to each other by a walkway. Tom’s forensic attention to detail and aesthetics is informed by the other important arm of his practice, Brooksbank & Collins, designing exquisite sculptural furniture and objects. Tom and Allan’s work is shown at Fumi gallery in London, and with their backgrounds in architecture and fine art, they complement each other well. The sitting-room chimneypiece and the shelving display around it exemplify this approach, says Tom: ‘The hearth is the focal point of a house, a kind of altar. My inspiration for this particular triptych arrangement was Stefan Lochner’s fifteenth-century Altar of the City Patrons in Cologne Cathedral.’ Tom’s triptych includes modern ceramics by Edmund de Waal in the centre, with seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Chinese Kangxi porcelain on the narrower shelves to either side. Updates were delivered from London to Yorkshire by email, and via such pleasingly old-fashioned avenues as scale models transported in the guards’ vans of inter-city trains. And what was the verdict of Tom’s parents? ‘It’s wonderful to live in a lightfilled, modern house,’ says Emma. And as for Nicholas: ‘Father and son isn’t always an easy combination where work is concerned, but Tom was a joy to work with.’ High praise indeed 첸 Brooksbank & Collins: brooksbankcollins.com Averil Blundell Interior Design: averilblundell.com Phillippa May Design: phillippamay.com MAIN BEDROOM (opposite) Textiles in this room include a rug from The Rug Company and curtain in Zoffany’s ‘Annapurna’ linen-mix fabric. DINING ROOM (this page top) The artwork is by Brooksbank & Collins. EXTERIOR (this page bottom) The house was originally two semi-detached cottages. Phillippa May designed a dense planting scheme for the garden HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 91


take the view Mountain vistas and access to nature were key requirements in the design of this modern timber cabin, set in the picturesque isolation of a Norwegian national park TEXT ELIZABETH CHOPPIN | PHOTOGRAPHS JAMES SILVERMAN

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SITTING ROOM A concrete window seat and chimneypiece complement the oak-clad walls and floor to create a sparse yet warm aesthetic. The furniture includes Eilerson sofas and a Hødnebø chair


KITCHEN (opposite top and this page) Bespoke units were designed for this open-plan space by the architects, Christopher Adams and Henriette Salvesen. Built-in shelves in the island display china and glassware, including white porcelain bowls by Sรถgne DINING AREA (opposite bottom) Christopher and Henriette also designed an oak dining table for the kitchen. With chairs from Carl Hansen and pendant lights from Metalarte, it provides a hub for the family to eat together and entertain

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ike many Norwegian urbanites, the owners of this extraordinary house had wanted to find a peaceful, out-of-town spot on which to build a cabin retreat. The family, with three teenage children, is based in Oslo, and decided on the Hallingdal valley as the setting for weekend escapes. The area is just a few hours’ drive away from the capital and is known for its crosscountry skiing in the winter, and hiking and fishing in the summer. The plot of land they bought is situated on the edge of a large national park, home to elks, reindeer and ptarmigans, and the perfect place for a hideaway. Having a cabin in such a place is a cornerstone of Norwegian life, but the design by Christopher Adams and Henriette Salvesen, who head up architecture practice Div.A Arkitekter, challenges the familiar image of the Scandinavian second home. As did the process by which the pair were commissioned to conceive it. The owners held an invited competition to select their architects – an unusual step, but a sign of their commitment to getting it right. What Christopher and Henriette proposed was a series of subtle timber structures that are modern yet sensitive to their surroundings. It is an approach that is at the heart of Div.A’s philosophy. ‘We aim to create timeless and functional architecture for everyday needs. Projects shouldn’t make a statement and dominate the context,’ says Henriette, who is Norwegian. She and Christopher, who is British and moved to Norway after studying architecture, are a husband-and-wife team who have collaborated with David Chipperfield and Richard Rogers Architects on notable civic projects in Oslo. This cabin was completed in 2016. ‘The owners didn’t want to be off-grid necessarily, but they wanted to have the feeling of being quite remote in the middle of nature,’ says Henriette. There were just a handful of requests: views of the mountains, easy access to nature and a minimalist, refined aesthetic. They also wanted both the sitting room and the main bedroom to look straight at the mountain ridge. ‘The only way to achieve it was with two parallel buildings, both pointing towards the ridge,’ explains Christopher. The concept was enough to win them the commission. As with so many modern chalets in Scandinavia, the cabin’s most striking quality is its simplicity. Strict planning regulations limited the size of the property’s footprint, as well as the materials used and the shape. This is why Christopher and Henriette designed doublepitched roofs for the structures to echo the traditional vernacular of the area. It is a nod to the past without falling into the trap of pastiche. The exterior of the house is clad with untreated cedar, which will weather gently over time. ‘The connection of Norwegians to wood cannot be overemphasised,’ says Christopher. ‘From spending holidays in a wooden cabin, to getting married in a wooden stave church, or raising a

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TOP ROW Cool-toned textiles contrast with the oak cladding in the owners’ son’s bedroom. The main bedroom is connected to the house by a glazed walkway. The oak staircase to the basement has built-in storage at its base 96 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

family in a wooden house – it’s a lifelong relationship.’ Inside, the cabin’s exquisitely finished floors, walls and ceilings have been clad with vertical and horizontal oak boards, which are punctuated by picture windows. There are also expanses of polished concrete, such as the sitting room’s chimneypiece and window-ledge seating area. Four of the five bedrooms are in the main house, with two on the ground f loor and three on the basement level, which is accessed by a custom-made staircase with builtin storage at the base. The basement, which was dug out so that the cabin would comply with height restrictions, creates an additional 80 square metres of liveable space. It gives the family all the ancillary areas they need, including a laundry room, a television lounge, storage for sports equipment, and a sauna and steam complex. Back up on the ground level, which covers an area of 127 square metres, an open-plan kitchen and dining area leads to the sitting room, where the family can flop down on the sofas and take in the dramatic views from fullheight windows to the south and west. ‘They wanted to be able to have all five members of the family seated at the same time, as well as guests,’ Henriette explains. With this in mind, the spacious dining table can comfortably seat 10. A wood-burning stove, a window seat laden with furs and underfloor heating add to the warm and inviting feel in the sitting room. ‘The contrast between the harsh, howling winter storm outdoors and a refined welcome inside is something that brings a lot of happiness to Norwegians,’ Christopher explains. The second structure houses the main bedroom, with its all-important mountain view, and is connected to the main house by a glazed walkway that creates a feeling of privacy and separation from the living areas. ‘The owners wanted to be able to retire to their bedroom away from all the other bedrooms,’ says Henriette. A third, timber-clad annexe houses a carport and an area for waxing and repairing skis – ‘quite important for Norwegians,’ explains Henriette. As a group, the clustered units create a kind of courtyard, giving a central focus to the house. ‘Our challenge was to give this house a contemporary design feeling,’ Henriette continues. ‘With the views, all of the big windows are almost like pieces of art on the wall, so you don’t need to add much to the interior.’ Likewise, nothing seems extraneous in the design. Except for the normal challenges of building in a remote place, the construction was fairly straightforward, albeit with one or two rough patches of weather. The winters in Hallingdal are merciless, with heavy snowfall and winds forming insurmountable snowdrifts, so building needed to start as soon as possible after the thaw in order to finish the project before another winter rolled around. ‘Modern Norwegians expect comfort,’ Christopher explains. ‘If they manage to get to their cabins, that is’ 첸 Div.A Arkitekter: diva.no

MIDDLE ROW The exterior of the cabin is clad in untreated cedar, which requires little maintenance. No art was needed on the interior walls, as the full-height windows offer views of the surrounding countryside

BOTTOM ROW A bedroom for the children, with bunk beds and a miniature loft, is situated on the basement level. The cabin comprises three timber-clad buildings. These were constructed on a levelled concrete base


DRAWING ROOM (both pages) Two rows of botanical prints and antique celadon vases on plinths help to break up the height of this loty, light-illed space on the first floor. Cushions and textiles add colour to the pale linen-covered sofas

COLOURFUL C O L L A B O R AT I O N Alexandra Tolstoy’s London house was originally a pair of artists’ studios. Now, with the help of designers from Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler, she has filled it with antique furniture and patterned textiles TEXT SUSAN CREWE | PHOTOGRAPHS SIMON BROWN | LOCATIONS EDITOR LIZ ELLIOT

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t is not surprising that Alexandra Tolstoy would very much like to continue living in her home in Chelsea. Converted from two adjacent houses that were built as artists’ studios, the lofty, light-filled space is where she has raised her three young children and created an interior that is exuberant, elegant and welcoming. However, the future is uncertain on account of there being some dispute about who the house belongs to. Her former partner Sergei Pugachev – the father of Alexandra’s children – is an absent Russian oligarch whose assets have been seized, leaving her with something of a problem. If anyone can find a solution, I would put my money on the 40-something former banker, television presenter and fashion muse, who is a distant relative of Leo Tolstoy. She was born in the UK to a Russian father and English mother, and her eventful life has been well documented since 1999, when she and three friends undertook a 5,000-mile ride by horse and camel across central Asia and China. This adventure resulted in a book; marriage to an Uzbek horseman, which ended in 2009; and a somewhat precarious life in Moscow, where she first met Sergei. Two days before the birth of her first child, Alexis, now aged nine, Alexandra wandered into the showroom of Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler, which was then still in Brook Street. There she encountered Daniel Slowik, who was looking after the antiques side of the famous decorating firm and has since become one of its eight interior designers. The pair hit it off immediately and Alexandra credits Daniel with helping her source nearly all the furniture and objects in the house. Over the years, they have gone antique hunting together many times, and besides having a lot of fun, she says that she has learnt a lot from him. Daniel’s instinct for what will work is most evident in the double-height first-floor drawing room, where a long and narrow provincial Italian table stands under the studio’s windows beside a glass-fronted cupboard made from Scottish oak. Both pieces are huge, but they do not appear so, as they are in proportion to the tall room. Another device to mitigate the height is a group of 30 or so botanical prints, arranged

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LIVING AREA (this page top and opposite) This large space, open to the mezzanine, encompasses the dining area, kitchen and an informal seating area (where Alexandra is pictured), with a selection of fabrics sourced by Emma Burns. DRAWING ROOM (this page bottom) A provincial Italian table and glass-fronted oak cupboard were two of Alexandra and Daniel’s antique finds 100 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


in two rows around the walls of the mezzanine and, above them, a display of celadon vases on mismatched plinths. Having found a kindred spirit to help furnish her house, Alexandra turned to Daniel’s colleague Emma Burns, one of the senior interior designers at Sibyl Colefax, to help with the decoration. One of Emma’s great strengths is an ability to interpret her clients’ taste rather than to impose a look, and so a happy collaboration began. It involved not only the London house but also the couple’s house in Moscow and Alexandra’s cottage in Oxfordshire (which was featured in House & Garden in April 2014). I would describe Alexandra’s look as ‘couture ethnic’ because of her passion for texture, pattern and embroidery, and one look at her Instagram profile will leave you in no doubt that colour plays a vital part in her life. Although the walls of this house are pale and the sofas are covered with neutral linen, everything else is a rich medley of vibrant hues. Woven, appliquéd and embroidered cushions jostle in mounds, tapestry covers chairs, samplers hang on the walls and colourful rugs zing underfoot. There are ruby red lampshades and mossy green tiles in a bathroom. The luscious teal curtains in the hall have exquisite embroidered panels at their foot, which are taken from Ivan Bilibin’s early twentieth-century illustrations of Alexander Pushkin’s fairy tales. This gives a hint of what a child-friendly home it is. Although the photographs here show rooms on their best behaviour, on the day of my visit, Alexandra’s bed has a collection of the children’s furry animals arranged on it. In the first-floor studio, which encompasses the open-plan kitchen, dining and informal seating area, there is a delicious cake on the table that Alexandra has baked and the f loor is strewn with toys. The children’s bedroom itself, on the ground floor along with the entrance hall, playroom and more bedrooms, is full of charming things to engage young imaginations, but free of the whimsy and bad design that so often characterises nursery furniture. Undaunted by the turn her life has taken, Alexandra is full of enterprise. There is a television project in the pipeline, her Instagram posts are a source of fashion inspiration and she is writing a book about her life, which promises to be as colourful as her house 첸 Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler: sibylcolefax.com Alexandra Tolstoy’s Instagram: @alexandratolstoy HALL (this page top) The curtains have embroidered panels taken from Ivan Bilibin’s illustrations of Alexander Pushkin’s fairy tales. MAIN BEDROOM (this page bottom) Tapestry cushions and a Jajim throw add colour and texture to this mezzanine room. CHILDREN’S ROOM (opposite) The nautical-inspired coat hooks are from The Lacquer Chest. Emma Burns designed the bunk beds 102 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


The

K NOW L E D G E FLOORING

TA K E T H E VIEW Pages 92–97

Much of the interior of this Norwegian cabin is clad in light oak, giving a sense of continuity, as well as a connection to the surrounding woodland. London-based flooring specialist Ebony & Co sells oak flooring in a variety of finishes, including ‘American White Oak Faded White Ultramatt Hardwax’, which is similar in look to the finish in the cabin. It sources its wood from mature trees at the end of their growth cycle, so they yield a beautiful and stable timber that allows it to create extra-wide planks. Flooring costs from £100 a square metre. ebonyandco.com

T H R OW Textured throws and linens in a palette of greys add softness to the clean-lined wooden interior. The Conran Shop’s blue grey bedding, made of soft pre-washed linen, is a good match. A housewife pillowcase, measuring 50 x 75cm, costs £35. This can be layered with textural throws, such as this ‘Silver Jura Lambswool Angora Throw’, by Scottish company Begg & Co, which is also sold through The Conran Shop. It measures 130 x 180cm and costs £250. conranshop.co.uk

S A LT A N D P E P P E R MILLS

CANDLEHOLDER Another interesting Nordic piece is the cast-iron candleholder in the sitting room. It is the ‘ILDHANE’ design by Anderssen & Voll for Nedre Foss, which was created in 2015 for Nedre Foss Gård, a restaurant in Oslo. It has an unusual shape resembling a bird – ‘ild’ means ire and ‘hane’ rooster in Norwegian. It is 14cm high and costs £54 from Twentytwentyone. twentytwentyone.com 104 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

Among several examples of bold Nordic design are the striking salt and pepper mills on the kitchen island, which are by Danish company Menu. The minimalistic ‘BOTTLE GRINDERS’ are 20.5cm high and cost £60 for a set of two from Heal’s. heals.com

LIGHTING There is a streamlined black floor lamp beside the sofa in the sitting room. It is the ‘Polo’ design by Joan Gaspar for Marset. The versatile aluminium piece is available in several versions, including this desk lamp, which has an arm height of 44cm and length of 35cm, and costs £326 from Nest. nest.co.uk


Inspired by the houses in this issue, BETHAN HYATT gives directions on how to achieve similar style

A NEW CHAPTER Pages 7 2–77

C R E AT I V E DIRECTION Pages 78– 8 5

SINK LIGHTING The quirky lamps in the drawing room are Porta Romana’s iconic ‘DUCK FEET LAMP’. It measures 87 x 35.6cm diameter including the ‘Top Hat Duck Feather Shade’. The lamp costs £1,358 and the shade £1,438. portaromana.com

Rebecca Whittaker, one of the owners of this Wiltshire house, confesses to an ‘obsession’ with salvaged sanitaryware. The bathroom sink is a French marble pestle set on a marble base found on Ebay. Herefordshirebased English Salvage sells a range of marble sinks, including this similar ‘Antique Light Grey Marble Corner Basin’, salvaged from Turkey, which measures 16.4 x 62 x 52.2cm and costs £500. englishsalvage.co.uk

RECLAIM AND S A LV AG E Rebecca and her husband Harry also love reclaimed and salvaged furniture and accessories. Lassco is a great resource; it currently has in stock this ‘Edwardian Kitchen Prep Table’ circa 1900, which measures 83 x 240 x 92cm and costs £2,650. It also sells early-twentieth-century handthrown terracotta pots, like the ones in the garden, which cost from £2. lassco.co.uk

JAMES MERRELL; PAUL MASSEY; JAMES SILVERMAN; PIXELATE IMAGING; LAURA ROBERTS; SIMON BROWN

A RT W O R K A N D A S H L EY ’ S D E S I G N S Several of Ashley’s own furniture and fabric designs have been put to good use in this Wiltshire house. Pictured here in the dining room is his carved gilt wood ‘Coral’ console table with an oak top, from £17,500. The armchair in front is covered in his ‘Openweave’ linen/cotton, £89 a metre. On the wall is a screen print by David Spiller, called Your Time Will Come (Popeye). This piece, which measures 95cm square, is available to buy as part of a pair with Just You Know Why (Olive Oyl), for £9,000, from Wetpaint Gallery in Stroud. ashleyhicks.com | wetpaintgalleryonline.com

PAINT S Ashley painted the diamond design on the library’s chimney breast, reflecting the pointed finials on the bookcase. ‘I drew the design on the wall and painted it by hand to avoid the hard, raised edges left by masking tape,’ he says. ‘I didn’t plan the design, just drew what felt right. The colours play with elements in the room and pull everything together.’ If you are brave enough to try to recreate it, the Dulux paint shades pictured are a good match, from left: ‘Lost Lake’, Caramel Cream’, and ‘Cocoa Powder’, £27.56 for 2.5 litres matt emulsion. dulux.co.uk

VA S E A built-in unit houses Harry’s collection of plaster casts, including a selection by Marianna Kennedy. Pictured here is her ‘Artichoke Vase’, which measures 50 x 38cm diameter and costs £10,000 from Galerie Chastel Maréchal in Paris. chastel-marechal.com

CHAIR Tolix chairs and stools nod to the house’s industrial heritage. Launched in the Thirties, before a redesign to make it stackable in the Fifties, the steel ‘MODEL A’ chair is a retro design classic. The chair measures 85 x 51 x 44cm and costs £222 from Twentytwentyone. twentytwentyone.com 첸 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 105


PHOTOGRAPHS ANDREW MONTGOMERY

Euro stars RUTH SLEIGHTHOLME creates inspiring schemes in a Parisian apartment, using geometric fabrics, quirky ceramics and modern furniture from the city’s best interiors shops

WALLS ‘Wevet’ paint, £45 for 2.5 litres of matt emulsion, from Farrow & Ball. ‘Dark Birch’ wooden picture frames (in background), £30 each, from Habitat. Nineteenthcentury gilded wood mirrors, £3,380 for similar, and (in background) £2,800 for similar, both from Ossowski. DL No 5, oil on canvas, by Steven Jimel, from Galerie W Landau. FURNITURE Daybed, for similar, ‘Delaktig’ aluminium and cotton/polyester chaise longue, £460, from Ikea. Sofa (foreground), stylist’s own, covered in ‘Swing’ (jean), by Boussac, acrylic, £117.60 a metre, from Pierre Frey. Sofa (right), stylist’s own, covered in ‘San Angelo’ (rouge), cotton/linen, £65.30 a metre, from Casamance; trimmed with ‘1.5” Jute Border Losange’, £28 a metre, from Samuel & Sons. ‘Week End’ rattan, brass and glass coffee tables, ¤5,000 for set of two, from India Mahdavi. ‘14 Juillet’ stoneware side table, by Vincent Collin, ¤390, from Édition Limitée. ACCESSORIES ‘Spider’ steel and aluminium ceiling light, £4,866, from Serge Mouille. ‘Large Merino Pom-Pom Bolster Cushion’ (pagoda green and black), £385; and daybed cushion covered in ‘Large Merino Tri-Blok Blanket’, £550; both by Shepherd England, from The New Craftsmen. (On mantelpiece) ‘Etourdi No 3’ metal desktop mobile, by Volta, ¤149, from Sentou. Artwork, Technics Mixtes on Wood, by Lionel Guibout, ¤1,500, from Galerie Fred Lanzenberg. ‘Triton’ earthenware vase, by Olivier Gagnère, ¤535, from Édition Limitée. (On coffee table) ‘Viva Le Puglie’ earthenware plate, by Paola Navone, ¤35, from Merci. Ceramic ‘Gobelets Rouge’, ¤15 each; and ‘Cruchon Marine et Rouge’, ¤59; all by Coralie Marabelle, from The Socialite Family. Cushions in ‘Artigny’ (enfer, quartz, blanc), by Boussac, cotton, £43.20 a metre, from Pierre Frey 106 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


OPPOSITE WALLS ‘Wevet’ paint, £45 for 2.5 litres of matt emulsion, from Farrow & Ball. Nineteenth-century gilded wood mirror, £3,380 for similar, from Ossowski. FURNITURE ‘Trombone’ steel and cotton chairs (from left: zigzag pm, rectangle, zigzag gm, damier), ¤360 each, from Caravane. Dining table, for similar, try oak ‘AT 329’, by Hans Wegner, £2,500, from Sigmar. ACCESSORIES Marble, aluminium and stainless steel ‘Arco Floor Lamp’, by Achille Castiglioni, £1,658, from The Conran Shop. Earthenware ‘Belem Large Bowl’ (black); and ‘Bulle Vase’ (white); both by Vincent Collin, ¤550 each, from Édition Limitée. Photo frame, for similar, try ‘Kiko’ brass frame, £22.95, from Nkuku. Vintage purses, by Louis Vuitton and Yves Saint Laurent, for similar, try 1stdibs. ‘Souvenir de Paris’ earthenware plates, ¤19 each, from Merci. Ceramic ‘Gobelet Rouge’ and ‘Gobelet Bleu’, ¤15 each; and ‘Saladier Bleu’, ¤79; all by Coralie Marabelle, from The Socialite Family. ‘Serifos’ wood and aluminium candelabra, ¤425, from Casamidy. THIS PAGE ‘Noé’ linen tablecloth (neige), ¤140, from Caravane. ‘Souvenir de Paris’ earthenware plates (anticlockwise from top right: fishmonger’s, eiffel tower, oysters, beaubourg, butcher, merci), ¤19 each; hammered metal knives and trident forks, by Serax, ¤3 each; all from Merci . Ceramic ‘Gobelet Rouge’ and ‘Gobelet Noir’, by Coralie Marabelle, ¤15 each, from The Socialite Family. ‘Tricolore’ terracotta cup, by Commune de Paris, ¤83, from Astier de Villatte HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 109


THIS PAGE WALLS ‘Wevet’ paint, £45 for 2.5 litres of matt emulsion, from Farrow & Ball. Artworks, Technics Mixtes on Paper, by Lionel Guibout, ¤900 each unframed, from Galerie Fred Lanzenberg. ‘White Birch’ wooden frames, from £20 each, from Habitat. Curtain in ‘Tipi’ (argile), wool/polyamide, £117.60 a metre; edged in ‘Oklahoma’ (curcuma), cotton, £156 a metre; both from Pierre Frey. FURNITURE ‘EDU’ plywood, birch and aluminium desk, by Charles & Ray Eames, £1,050, from Vitra. ‘Mezzadro’ beech and steel stool, by Achille Castiglioni for Zanotta, £599, from Aram. ACCESSORIES ‘Prisme’ glass, by Duralex, £6.59 for six, from Rinkit. Vintage leather-covered notebooks (yellow, cognac), by Hermès, £191 each, from Rebelle. Candles in ceramic jars, from left: ‘Burlesque’, ‘Silenzio’ and ‘RIP’, £140 each, from Fornasetti. Wooden-handled rubber stamp and ink pad, from £3.99 for similar, from Blade Rubber. ‘1.05’ ceramic, brass and glass lamp (cognac), ¤1,160, from Haos. Vintage handbag, by Hermès, for similar, try 1stdibs. OPPOSITE WALLS ‘Wevet’ paint, as before. ‘Céleste’ raffia and cotton wall lights (white with black piping, black, white), ¤200 each, from Sarah Lavoine. Gilded wood mirror, £2,800 for similar, from Ossowski. Fifties rope sconce, by Audoux-Minet, ¤1,800, from Atelier Vime. FLOOR ‘Zag’ wool rug (bleu canard), ¤1,100, from Sentou. FURNITURE ‘Solvay’ oak stool, by Jean Prouvé, £519, from Vitra. ‘Cavallo’ beech, cane and velvet armchair, ¤490, from The Socialite Family. ACCESSORIES Vintage hat boxes, by Louis Vuitton, for similar, try 1stdibs. Rope ceiling light, by Audoux-Minet, ¤2,800, from Atelier Vime. Wool scarf, for similar, try Uniqlo. Bedcover in ‘Wind and Sea Stripe’ (white tartan), acrylic, £142 a metre, from Ralph Lauren; backed in ‘Linara’ (indian green), cotton/linen, £38.50 a metre, from Romo; trimmed with ‘1.5” French Grosgrain’ (tomato), cotton/viscose, £11.50 a metre, from Samuel & Sons. ‘Sicilia’ velvet cushion (green), ¤120, from Sarah Lavoine. For suppliers’ details, see Stockists page 첸 110 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


The mill’s tale Over the course of 25 years, Rupert and Elizabeth Nabarro have lovingly restored order to the gardens and farmland of their once derelict mill house TEXT STEPHANIE DONALDSON | PHOTOGRAPHS ANDREA JONES

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The mill (pictured here before a fire in February) is bounded on one side by the River Test, with ancient weeping willows overhanging the far bank and cow parsley flowering among the long grass

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ABOVE The lane that leads to Bere Mill crosses the River Test via an ancient bridge. BELOW A grassed path curves round the bog garden, where Camassia leichtlinii and lowering skunk cabbage provide early summer colour

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t is hard to imagine a more picturesque setting than that of Bere Mill, near Whitchurch in Hampshire. The eighteenth-century weatherboarded buildings and their surrounding gardens sit low in the landscape, bounded on one side by the crystal-clear waters of the River Test. On the far bank, cattle and sheep graze the water meadows as they have done for hundreds of years. It is a timeless scene, but in reality, Bere Mill and its land were close to dereliction when Rupert and Elizabeth Nabarro first moved here 25 years ago. The house was just a tiny part of the mill buildings, there was no garden, the river had become a slow, muddy stream and the property had most recently been the site of a fish farm. Nevertheless, they knew they could make something of it. ‘It is incredibly rare to find a house like this in such a fine setting in the south-east of England,’ says Rupert. ‘A naturalistic approach has been central to our thinking,’ he continues. This has its roots in their love of traditional Japanese gardens and their commitment to the environmental movement. The garden and farmland are managed according to organic principles and the pair are working towards becoming self-sufficient. Rupert does not think a garden should ever be seen as separate from its surroundings. ‘Here, the entire river is a Site of Special Scientific Interest and while looking after the margins and caring for the wild flora and fauna is supervised by Natural England, beyond that it’s up to us to manage the water meadows and the hedges and bring trees back into the landscape.’ Surprisingly, for a garden where water is so central, f looding is not an issue, because the Test is fed by a rising aquifer, rather than streams that can flood as they carry debris and sediment downstream. Even in a wet year, when the water table can be a

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mere 25cm below ground level, the chalk soil is so free-draining that plants are not adversely affected. The garden – cultivated, naturalistic and wild – covers five acres, with the areas of cultivation being closest to the mill. ‘It’s too large a garden to be perfectionist about it all,’ says Rupert. ‘If I was a plantsman, I would have taken on a far smaller project. This is as much a landscape as it is a garden and an awful lot of the work done by myself and our three part-time gardeners is mowing and riverbank management. We’ve tried hard to get interesting things going in the herbaceous borders and in the bog garden, where it is warm enough to grow cannas and gingers. And there’s the new Mediterranean gravel garden that lies on either side of the driveway. We have perhaps a metre depth of made-up ground in this area and it is really dry, and full of clay and flint that was dumped here in the past. We have done a lot of soil improvement and given it a Beth Chatto-style covering of gravel. The planting is largely Mediterranean, with cistus, lavenders and tree peonies. ‘Bere Mill is a well-known beauty spot in the area, so the gardeners of Hampshire – some of whom are incredibly expert – have rallied round and encouraged our endeavours,’ he continues. With help and advice, and their own growing expertise, the couple have created a garden that blends harmoniously into the landscape. In February this year, Bere Mill suffered a devastating fire. In time it will be restored, but in the meantime, Rupert and Elizabeth will continue to open their garden to visitors 첸 Bere Mill: beremillfarm.co.uk. The garden is open for the Hampshire Country & Garden Festival on June 9–10 this year (hampshiregardenfestival.co.uk) and as part of the National Garden Scheme on September 16 (ngs.org.uk)

CLOCKWISE FROM BELOW LEFT The river rushes over a weir in front of the mill. Gunnera manicata frames a view of the water meadows. A wooden bridge leads to the orchard. Mediterranean plants dominate the gravel garden

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T H E K I T C H E N G A R D E N D I A RY | PA R T 4 | J U LY

A RIOT OF COLOUR Continuing her account of last year, CLARE FOSTER experiments with multicoloured tomatoes and stripy courgettes, as warm weather promises an abundant harvest PHOTOGRAPH SIGNE BAY

July 3 I spend hours in my greenhouse looking after my tomatoes at this time of year, lost in the calming ritual of tying in and pinching out, breathing in that evocative, uniquely tomatoey smell. I never really succeeded with tomatoes until I got a greenhouse. I tried growing them outside, but they always succumbed to blight, so as soon as I inherited the greenhouse, I put in raised beds and a Heath Robinson system of canes and string in order to grow tomatoes that I could show off to my green-fingered mother. Growing them indoors gives them warmth and shelter; you can start them off earlier and therefore get them cropping sooner, and they are sheltered from wind-borne blight. I like to try different varieties each year, mostly cordon or vine types (the tall ones that need staking) as opposed to smaller bush tomatoes. I am trying two new varieties this year: ‘Costoluto di Parma’ and ‘Black Crimean’, both from Franchi Seeds of Italy, as well as ‘Green Zebra’, from The Real Seed Catalogue, and the stalwart cherry tomato ‘Gardener’s Delight’. I should have a good mix of colour to make my salads look as good as they taste. The vines grow pleasingly quickly, but you have to keep a close eye on them, pinching out the side shoots as soon as they appear in order to keep the plant neat and controlled. If you let the plants become triffid-like, all the energy will go into producing greenery rather than fruit. One of the most important things I have discovered about tomatoes is that they need a regular supply of water; if you intermittently let them dry out and then

f lood them, they will be more susceptible to blossom end rot, which causes dark crusty blotches on the fruit. I’ve invested in a great, automatic self-watering system that took forever to set up but was worth every swear word in the time saved afterwards. Feeding tomatoes is not always necessary, especially if you have planted them in nutrient-rich compost, but to maximise your harvest, you can feed them a potassium-rich liquid such as Tomorite.

July 7

The recent warm weather has brought everything on in leaps and bounds. I am harvesting my first courgettes, sweet and delicious when picked young, and making the most of them before I go on holiday, as I know even a week’s absence will result in overgrown marrows when I return. I have learnt to restrict myself to growing only two plants, as these will produce more than enough courgettes for my family. Seduced by the Italian names more than anything else, I am growing stripyskinned ‘Striato di Napoli’ and a round courgette called ‘Tondo di Piacenza’. Last year, I was flummoxed by a complete failure of my courgette crop. The baby courgettes formed but then started rotting on the plant – a sign that they had not been pollinated. Having read up about it, I realised, too late, that I could have helped by hand-pollinating my plants – in other words, spreading the pollen from the stamens of a large male flower (one that does not have a courgette forming at the base) to the stigma of an open female f lower, either by using a paintbrush or by physically rubbing one against the other.

July 12 It is amazing what a difference a week can make. The weather has taken a nosedive, and I have been sheltering in the greenhouse sowing seeds for autumn crops. It is so easy to run out of steam in July, and to forget that if you do not keep sowing, your supply of vegetables will dwindle. Leaf vegetables like chard and oriental salad greens can be sown now, directly into the ground or into modular seed trays, as well as root crops such as carrots and turnips for winter stews. Today, I sowed turnips and chard in modules, and ‘Winter Marvel’ lettuces in the cold frame. I shall also have plenty of leeks to take me through the winter and, by the looks of my ‘Crown Prince’ plant, which is romping away in all this rain, plenty of winter squash, too.

July 22

We have raced through the first early Duke of York potatoes, and I have been wondering what to do with the cleared bed. I decided to sow some phacelia instead as a green manure. It promises to be swift growing, and I am hoping it will flower before the frosts so I can use some of it for cutting, as the mauve, spiky flowers are so pretty. The rest of the plants can stay in the ground all winter and I will dig them in next spring to return their nutrients to the soil. It took me all of 20 minutes to dig the bed over, give the soil a rake and then scatter the seed. I will not have to do much watering as the forecast is wet over the next few days. Another typical British summer.

J U LY C H E C K L I S T Sow spring cabbage, turnips, oriental vegetables, fennel and winter salads… Harvest spinach, chard, peas and beans, salads, potatoes and root vegetables… Watch out for signs of potato and tomato blight, and destroy plants that are affected… Check plants regularly for aphids… Tie in climbing beans and pinch out at the top to maximise cropping 첸 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK JULY 2018 117


A path leads through the new tropical garden, just beyond the front gate. Foliage and trees here include Corylus maxima ‘Purpurea’, Ensete ventricosum ‘Maurelii’ and Amaranthus cruentus ‘Velvet Curtains’

ELEMENTS OF SURPRISE The Salutation hotel in Kent is a Lutyens-designed treasure where a new tropical garden brings unexpected splashes of colour to the more traditional borders and garden rooms TEXT JODIE JONES | PHOTOGRAPHS CLIVE NICHOLS

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he Kent town of Sandwich is so full of brilliantly preserved medieval buildings that The Salutation might have been regarded as a modern monstrosity when it was built in 1912. Instead, this imposing Arts and Crafts house, designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, was so well received that, in 1950, it became the first twentieth-century building in the country to receive Grade I listing. Even so, following family dramas and financial disasters, by the Eighties the property had begun a slide into disrepair that was only halted when Stephanie and Dominic Parker (now known as ‘the posh couple’ from Channel 4’s Gogglebox) bought it in 2003 and began a painstaking restoration. Desperate for help making sense of their wildly overgrown 3.7-acre garden, the Parkers picked up a copy of the Yellow Pages and found a young landscape contractor called Steve Edney, who agreed to come and take a look. Twelve years later, Steve is still there as head gardener of a four-person team, although the Parkers moved out a while ago and the house now operates as a quietly luxurious boutique hotel. ‘I still remember walking in on that first day,’ says Steve. ‘Even though it was in such a state, you could see the garden had a great structure, as you would expect of Lutyens. It was never daunting because I could see its potential.’ He started by cutting back overgrown hedges and removing a small forest of self-sown sycamore trees. Gradually a network of original brick paths was revealed, but there was little evidence of the original border schemes. ‘Initially, we had been led to believe that Gertrude Jekyll had drawn up the planting plans – as she did for so many of Lutyens’ gardens – but extensive research proved that she had had nothing to do with it.’ Nevertheless, when Steve discovered that Jekyll’s renowned long borders at her home, Munstead Wood in Surrey, were exactly the same dimensions as the main borders at The Salutation, he decided to recreate her scheme as faithfully as possible. ‘The long border on the left of the garden now follows the colour theory of Jekyll’s long border. Her plans there included large clumps of a good half-dozen different dahlias, which suited me fine because I love the genus and already had a big collection of my own. The trouble was that none of the varieties she named are commercially available any more, so I had to substitute cultivars that were as near identical as possible.’ Since then, Steve’s dahlia collection has increased exponentially, and he has developed a particular passion for the dark-leafed forms, of which he has more than 100 named varieties, plus many unnamed that he has bred himself. ‘They are especially valuable as fillers for late-summer gaps and I use them in most parts of the garden.’ In fact, Steve’s urge to innovate is apparent from the moment you walk through the front garden gate and push past a stand of bamboo to find yourself in a tropical garden, where bananas, cannas and Arundo donax ‘Peppermint Stick’ tower up on either side of a path lined with squirting cucumbers. ‘If you are going for a tropical effect, you don’t want to see an inch of soil,’ says Steve. ‘It is vital to stuff the beds with strong, hot colours – like the clear orange Kniphofia ‘Alcazar’ – and big, bold foliage.’ Steve achieves this by choosing cultivars carefully (the fig he grows is Ficus carica ‘Adam’, reputed to have the largest leaves in the family), but also by managing the plants to create maximum drama. So, for example, the purple-leafed Ailanthus altissima ‘Purple Dragon’ and a fine Paulownia kawakamii are coppiced hard every year to promote super-sized foliage. ‘People expect to find a classic country-house garden,’ says Steve. ‘And we’ve got the vegetable garden, the bowling lawn and all of that. But I love the fact that they have to fight their way through a jungle to get there. As it happens, the Edwardians were mad about exotic plants, so it is exactly right for the period even though it’s exactly not what our visitors are expecting’ 첸

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The Salutation: 01304-619919; the-salutation.com THIS PAGE FROM TOP Canna iridiflora. The pinky-yellow flower of Dahlia ‘Lolo Love’. Canna ‘Durban’. OPPOSITE FROM TOP Borders surrounding the main lawn are inspired by Gertrude Jekyll’s long borders at her home, Munstead Wood; they are filled with bright colour, including red-hot pokers and Helenium ‘Rauchtopas’. Borders in the exotic garden (also bottom) include Dahlia ‘Gryson’s Yellow Spider’, red and yellow cannas and Musa basjoo 120 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


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Don’t miss our August issue

AFFORDABLE DINING TABLES AND PRETTY PLACE SETTINGS

A SIMPLE SEASONAL LUNCH SERVED IN HOWE’S LONDON SHOP

ON SALE JULY 5

SIMON BROWN

BEAUTIFUL BRITISH HOUSES AND GARDENS IN SUMMER TIME


F O O D & T R AV E L RECIPES | TASTE NOTES | STOCKHOLM | NICARAGUA | COOKERY COURSE

MEDITERRANEAN FISH STEW WITH SAFFRON MAYONNAISE (recipe overleaf)

Ta s t e s o f t r ave l BLANCHE VAUGHAN CREATES ELEGANT RECIPES INSPIRED BY SUMMER HOLIDAYS IN THE MEDITERRANEAN, COMBINING AUTHENTIC INGREDIENTS WITH SIMPLE COOKING TECHNIQUES. ALL RECIPES SERVE 6 PHOTOGRAPHS ANDREW MONTGOMERY | FOOD STYLING JULIA AZZARELLO | PROP STYLING BLANCHE VAUGHAN AND ELIZABETH METCALFE

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FOOD & TRAVEL | RECIPES

MEDITERRANEAN FISH STEW WITH SAFFRON MAYONNAISE (pictured on previous page) Every French fisherman, Italian grandmother or coastal restaurant has its own recipe for fish stew or soup, and I love to try them all. When it comes to cooking it at home, I adapt the dish to make it suit the fish available. The main thing is to achieve a balance of firm, sweet-fleshed and shelled fish for maximum flavour. For the saffron mayonnaise X2 egg yolks X290ml olive oil XPinch of saffron, crushed and soaked in 1tbsp hot water XLemon juice, to taste For the tomato base X600g fresh tomatoes X2tbsp olive oil X2 cloves garlic, finely sliced

XPinch of hot

X600g fillets of

chilli flakes For the shellfish X1tbsp olive oil X600g mussels, cleaned X800g clams, rinsed X200ml light, fruity white wine For the rest of the stew X12 scallops, removed from shells and cleaned X1tbsp olive oil

firm white fish (such as mullet, bream or gurnard), skin on, cut into finger-size pieces X20g flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped To serve X1 garlic clove, halved X6 large slices of white sourdough, toasted XOlive oil, for drizzling

1 For the mayonnaise, put the egg yolks in a bowl and whisk while adding a thin stream of oil until the mixture thickens and emulsifies. Add the saffron and its soaking water, continue to whisk and add salt and the lemon juice, 1tsp at a time, tasting for a balance of richness, acidity and saltiness. Refrigerate until needed. 2 Put the tomatoes in a bowl and cover with boiling water. Leave for 30 seconds, then refresh under cold water and slip off the skins. Cut the tomatoes in half, scoop out the seeds and cut out any white core, then roughly chop the flesh. 3 Heat 2tbsp oil in a deep frying pan and cook the garlic briefly, so it just starts to colour around the edges. Add the tomatoes and a good pinch of salt and cook, mashing the tomatoes with a wooden spoon so they break apart for about 10 minutes, until you have a relatively smooth sauce. Add some freshly ground black pepper, the chilli flakes and more salt if necessary. 4 For the mussels and clams, choose a large pan with a lid and put it on a high heat. Add 1tbsp oil, the mussels, clams and wine, and cover. Allow this to cook for a minute or so, giving it a gentle shake, until the shells just open. Remove from the heat, transfer the shellfish to a bowl and set aside, covered, but leaving the liquid in the pan. 5 Return the pan to the heat and boil the liquid to reduce it slightly and cook off the alcohol. Add the tomato sauce and 1.2 litres water, and heat to make a delicately flavoured broth. 6 Pat the scallops dry and season with salt on both sides. Heat a frying pan until very hot and add 1tbsp oil. Fry the scallops until they are nicely browned but have not become completely firm; this should take a couple of minutes on each side. Remove from the pan and set aside. 7 Bring the broth to the boil and then add the white fish, parsley and some salt and pepper, turning down the heat to allow the fish to cook gently – this will take a minute or so. Add the scallops to the broth. 8 To serve, divide the mussels and clams between 6 large soup plates and spoon over the broth and fish pieces. Rub the garlic on the toasted bread and drizzle with oil. Serve each bowl with bread and a large dollop of saffron mayonnaise. 124 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

CROSTINI WITH ANCHOVIE S AND BUTTER There is a small restaurant near where I used to live in Florence that serves this dish – the simplest but most delicious combination of perfect ingredients. It reminds me of the importance of ‘less is more’ in summer cooking. X6–12 slices of best-quality white sourdough bread X6–12 anchovy fillets (preserved in salt or oil) X30g cold, unsalted butter (Italian if possible, which is lighter and creamier) X1 unwaxed lemon

1 Grill or toast the bread so it is coloured on both sides. Allow to cool (you want the butter to remain firm). 2 If you are using salted anchovies, run them under cold water and gently open the two fillets to expose the backbone. Remove this and discard so you are left with two clean fillets. Pat dry on a piece of kitchen towel and repeat with the others. For anchovy fillets in oil, just remove from the oil and dab off excess with kitchen towel. 3 Cut the butter into enough slices for each piece of bread and lay it on top. Lay one or two anchovy fillets on top of each slice and grate over a few strands of lemon zest before serving.


MARINATED COURGETTE S AND AUBERGINE WITH BURRATA When I worked at The River Café, we used to prepare a wonderful Italian antipasto called zucchini alla scapece – crisp courgette coins marinated in vinegar, chilli and mint. I have added courgette’s summer partner, aubergine, the dense, meaty flavour of which tastes so good with the sweet courgettes and wine vinegar, and mint to brighten the dish. Burrata cheese, a mozzarella filled with soft curds, is extra rich and creamy and benefits from the acidity of these marinated vegetables. Serve as a first course or with tomato bruschetta for a light lunch. X2 medium courgettes (about 300g) X1 aubergine (about 300g) XOlive oil, enough for frying and drizzling XSmall bunch of mint X1 red chilli,

finely chopped X1–2tbsp best-

quality red-wine vinegar (Volpaia, Forum or Unio Cabernet Sauvignon are all excellent) X6 balls of burrata (or mozzarella)

1 Cut the courgettes into 2mm discs and the aubergine into 4mm round slices. Lay these on kitchen towel, with another sheet on top, to dry them slightly. 2 Heat a large frying pan and add oil to generously cover the base. Add as many aubergine slices as you can without overlapping them, and fry on a medium-high heat for a minute or so before turning the pieces over so they become golden brown on both sides. Remove to a piece of kitchen towel while you cook the rest. Use the same pan, with slightly less oil, to cook the courgettes in the same way. 3 Put the cooked vegetables in a bowl, tear over the mint and scatter with the chilli, vinegar (start with half and add more later if necessary) and some salt. Gently turn everything with your hands and leave to sit for 10 minutes to allow the flavours to mix with each other, or all day if preferred. 4 Taste and add more vinegar and salt if necessary before arranging on 6 plates with a ball of burrata on each. Finish with a grinding of black pepper and a drizzle of oil. 컄


FOOD & TRAVEL | RECIPES

TOMATO -BRAISED GREEN BEANS I have never been a fan of squeaky, al dente green beans. I much prefer vegetables to be cooked to the point where they are yielding their natural sweetness. This works as a side dish or as part of a selection of vegetables for a lighter meal. X 4tbsp olive oil

X Small bunch

X 1 onion,

of fresh herbs (parsley, basil, oregano, mint or dill), chopped, to serve X Extra-virgin olive oil, to serve

finely sliced X 1kg really ripe, large tomatoes X 800g green beans, topped but not tailed

CHICKEN, LEMON AND P OTATOE S WITH WILD OREGANO There is a small Greek island that I go to in the summer where you can find a family-run restaurant on a beach. It serves a sharing plate of crisp-skinned chicken bathed in oil, juicy with lemons and fragrant with mountain oregano – flavours that I will always associate with hot summers on sun-drenched islands. X6 leg and thigh pieces of free-range, skin-on chicken XSmall bunch of dried wild oregano (available from Waitrose and specialist shops) X1 large unwaxed lemon X1kg potatoes (use a versatile variety, not too waxy or floury, such as Desiree) X4tbsp olive oil To serve Green salad

1 Put the chicken pieces in a bowl and season well with sea salt and the oregano. Cut the lemon into 8 chunks, leaving the skin on, and add to the chicken. If you have time, you can do this the day or night before and leave it in the fridge to marinate, which will add to the flavour. 2 Put the potatoes, whole and unpeeled, in a pan of well-salted water and bring to the boil. Boil for 10 minutes, or until just tender on the outside and uncooked in the middle. Drain and run under cold water until cool enough to handle, then peel off the skins with your fingers. Cut into large pieces (halves or quarters). 3 Heat the oven to 180°C/fan oven 160°C/mark 4. Pour some olive oil into the bottom of a large roasting tray and lay the chicken, lemon pieces and potatoes in one layer with no overlapping pieces (if your tray isn’t big enough, use two). Turn the potatoes so they are lying flat side down, to encourage maximum contact with the cooking surface. Drizzle the remaining olive oil over the top. 4 Cook for 11/2 hours, until the chicken skin looks golden and crisp. Use a metal spatula to lift the potatoes and chicken onto a warmed serving dish, then deglaze the roasting tray with a splash of water and pour this over the meat. Serve with the tomato-braised green beans (recipe right) and a simple green salad.

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1 Heat the oil in a wide-bottomed casserole or deep frying pan with a lid. Fry the onion with a generous pinch of salt on a medium heat for at least 10 minutes, or until soft and sweet tasting. 2 Meanwhile, put the tomatoes in a large bowl and cover with boiling water. Leave for 30 seconds, then drain, refresh under cold water and slip off the skins. Cut the tomatoes in half, scoop out the seeds and cut out any white core. Roughly chop the flesh. 3 When the onion is cooked, add the tomatoes and some more salt and cook for 5 minutes or so, until you have a thick sauce. Add the beans, some more salt and a splash of water, and stir to coat everything before covering with a lid. Allow this to cook for up to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally so the bottom does not catch. When the beans are ready, they should be completely soft and well coated in sauce. Remove from the heat, add the herbs and a good glug of oil. Serve hot, warm or at room temperature. 컄


FOOD & TRAVEL | RECIPES

RICOTTA CAKE Ricotta replaces butter in this cake and adds moisture, which keeps it tasting fresh for a few days. It is just as good eaten for breakfast with some strong coffee as it is at teatime or for pudding; I like this sort of versatility with summer recipes. To embellish it as a pudding, try serving with figs, nectarines or peaches and a dollop of crème fraîche.

X4tbsp olive oil, plus extra for greasing X3 eggs X80g caster sugar X230g ricotta X1 unwaxed lemon X170g plain flour X1/2tsp bicarbonate of soda X1tsp baking powder X4tbsp pine nuts

1 Heat the oven to 180°C/fan oven 160°C/mark 4. Lightly oil a non-stick loaf tin (or line it with baking paper if the one you have is not non-stick). 2 Whisk the eggs and sugar together until very light and fluffy and increased in volume by at least a third. 3 In another bowl, beat together the ricotta, grated zest and juice of the lemon and the oil until smooth. Add this to the eggs and beat to combine fully. 4 Sift the flour, bicarbonate of soda and baking powder with a pinch of salt into a separate bowl and stir to distribute well. 5 Fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture and pour into the loaf tin. Scatter pine nuts all over the top and lightly press them into the batter. Bake for 30 minutes, or until a skewer inserted into the middle comes out clean 첸

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FOOD & TRAVEL | NEWS

The world’s larder Merchant Gourmet scours the globe for interesting grains and pulses to add to its range, which now includes red rice, quinoa, freekeh and lentils. The latest addition is Champagne Lentils, grown in the rich earth of the French region: this pinkishcoloured, nutty variety is one of the most nutritious strains. A 250g pouch costs £2 from Sainsbury’s. merchant-gourmet.com

DIET ANOTHER DAY The Mediterranean diet has always seemed like the most appealing and least strict regime: masses of fresh, simple seasonal ingredients doused with olive oil. Susie Theodorou’s new book, Mediterranean (Kyle Books, £16.99), gives you plenty of tempting recipes to follow, including fig, thyme and honey with feta; Turkish chopped salad; faro and fennel pilaf; and beans with chorizo and escarole.

Taste Notes

A great catch Salted anchovies are a surprisingly versatile ingredient – they are essential in sauces such as salsa verde and caesar dressing, and even enhance the meatiness of roast lamb. It is always worth seeking out the best. Ortiz buys sustainably fished Cantabrian anchovies and cures them the same day; they have a firm texture and meaty taste. As a snack with drinks, try Nardin’s vinegar-cured boquerones or beech-smoked anchovies. All are available from brindisa.com from £3.95 for 100g. For recipe inspiration, see ‘Tastes of travel’ on the preceding pages.

BLANCHE VAUGHAN shares her news, reviews and tips for cooks and food lovers

GO EAST I am always on the lookout for indispensable items for my kitchen, and Muji’s vast array of utilitarian, wellpriced products – including a pocketed denim apron and woven table mats (bottom, £14.95) – caught my eye. I am particularly fond of the stainless-steel sieves and bowls (below, from £8.95). muji.eu 첸

P l a n t p owe r Athens-based Daphnis and Chloe sources the best Greek mountain herbs to bring a taste of the Mediterranean to your dishes. Its hand-picked oreganos (used in ‘Tastes of travel’) are full of essential oils produced by the rich soil and hot sun. The beautifully packaged range also includes mountain herbal teas, smoked chilli flakes and fragrant fennel seeds. Whole Greek Oregano costs £7. daphnisandchloe.com

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CLOCKWISE FROM BELOW LEFT Jeanette Mix. The library and seating area of her hotel Ett Hem. A bright rain jacket from Stutterheim

ask a local

stockholm JEANETTE MIX, OWNER OF HOTEL ETT HEM, SHARES HER FAVOURITE PLACES TO EAT AND SHOP IN THE SWEDISH CAPITAL PHOTOGRAPHS SIMON BAJADA

ACCOMMODATION I created Ett Hem in 2012 as a beautiful and stylish house for people looking for something more personal than a luxury hotel. From the start, and with the help of designer Ilse Crawford, I have tried to curate interiors that are filled with special things – art, antiques, vintage finds and contemporary design, which blend together with all the comfort and elegance of a private Scandinavian home. We have only 12 rooms and like to treat guests as friends of the family, encouraging them to mix and mingle in our public spaces, whether it is the library or the kitchen, or in the courtyard garden, which I think of as the perfect secret city wilderness. I wanted the hotel to feel casual and familiar, but a little bit glamorous, too – I hope I have achieved that. Double rooms cost from €400, B&B; etthem.se 130 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Ceramics by Birgitta Watz. Svenskt Tenn prints. Contemporary interiors pieces at Asplund


FOOD & TRAVEL | DESIGNER HAUNTS FOOD AND DRINK

ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHS: PAUL MASSEY

SHOPPING As one of the interior design capitals of the world, Stockholm has numerous interesting shops. Svenskt Tenn (svenskttenn.se) is an inspirational store selling elegant, colourful and quality products for the home – furniture, lighting, textiles, wallpaper, ceramics, table linen and all sorts of decorative accessories; I visit regularly and pop into the cosy tea room on the first floor. Asplund (asplund.org) is another favourite, where a selection of contemporary interior design pieces is available, including some by many of the best-known Swedish designers. One store from which I struggle to leave empty-handed is Garbo Interiors (garbointeriors.com); there is an excellent range of interior design ideas here, as well as a beautiful selection of cushions, candlesticks, mirrors and cashmere clothes. Stockholm is great, too, for sourcing vintage design. Dusty Deco (dustydeco.com) has cool, fun pieces from all over the world curated by owner Edin Memic Kjellvertz. Modernity (modernity.se) specialises in the collection and sale of rare and high-grade furniture, ceramics, glass, lighting and jewellery by the most renowned Scandinavian designers of the twentieth century. For ceramics, Birgitta Watz is the most brilliant craftswoman, as well as being a personal friend. We use her beautiful tableware at Ett Hem and it is possible to visit her studio in Värtahamnen by private appointment. Five Swedish fashion brands not to be missed are: Rodebjer (rodebjer.com), the most creative and inspiring womenswear designer with a flagship store at Norrmalmstorg; Acne Studios (acnestudios.com) – internationally known with several outlets in the city; Our Legacy (ourlegacy.se) at downtown Jakobsbergsgatan for timeless menswear; House of Dagmar (houseofdagmar.com), founded and operated by three sisters and famous for its knitwear and its sustainable approach; and Stutterheim (stutterheim. com) for the most stylish raincoats.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Ett Hem’s kitchen. A dish from Café Saturnus. A city square. Café Saturnus’ owners Christos and Tina Pispas. Babette’s menu. Seafood brasserie Sturehof

Babette (babette.se) – cool, casual and super popular – is almost my second home. The easygoing menu is focused largely on vegetables and the pizzas are divine. Café Saturnus (cafesaturnus.se) is fun and noisy with a true neighbourhood feel (the huge cinnamon buns are delicious), while lifestyle store Snickarbacken 7 (snickarbacken7.se) is a good spot for breakfast, lunch and a bit of shopping. At the weekend, I grocery shop at Matmarknad (stockholmsmatmarknad.se), a fabulous market set up by the owners of Sturehof (sturehof.com), one of Stockholm’s most iconic seafood brasseries. The market has stunning interiors by the Scandinavian designer Jonas Bohlin. For modern Swedish food at its best, Adam/Albin (adamalbin.se) and Agrikultur (agrikultur.se) are young, dynamic restaurants celebrating local produce. For Stockholm’s ultimate gourmet experience, go to Frantzén (restaurant frantzen.com), which reopened last year in a renovated, three-storey nineteenth-century building. It is the only restaurant in Sweden with three (recently awarded) Michelin stars 첸

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FOOD & TRAVEL | NICARAGUA

Off the beaten track FROM POLISHED ECO LODGES TO STYLISH SMALL HOTELS, NICARAGUA OFFERS MANY OPTIONS FROM WHICH TO EXPLORE ITS MAGICAL VOLCANO CLOUD FORESTS AND HISTORIC CITIES, SAYS SARAH GILBERT he crack of a branch gave them away. Above my head, artisans, including the centrepiece of the resort, a stunning cathedral-height a family of howler monkeys foraged for breakfast, unopen-sided building known as a palapa. perturbed by the grinning biped that had begun to snap My first stop in the country is Granada, founded by Spanish conquistadors away in a paparazzi-like frenzy. I watched two pelicans in 1524 on the shores of Lake Nicaragua. It is one of Central America’s oldest nosedive into the water and resurface, before I waded and loveliest cities, with pretty plazas, ornate churches and cobbled streets into the gentle swells without another soul in sight. of rainbow-coloured colonial mansions, where people still drag their rocking Nicaragua’s Pacific coast has long been a haunt of chairs onto the pavement to catch up on the news with their neighbours. surfers in the know, but, until recently, Central America’s largest country was At Tribal Hotel, the traditional façade gives way to an eclectic interior the preserve of backpackers, a seriously off-the-beaten-track destination. where Turkish kilims and Moroccan lanterns are mixed with furniture and There are even those with lingering memories of a war-torn nation who still ceramics from local craftsmen. When I tear myself away from my bedroom wonder if it is safe after almost 30 years of peace. Now, with sustainable yet terrace and the palm-fringed plunge pool, I find boutiques selling handstylish boutique hotels springing up around the country, it is the destination crafted leather bags, handwoven blankets from León and even hand-rolled of choice for travellers seeking a less crowded alternacigars from Estelí, grown from Cuban tobacco seeds OPPOSITE CLOCKWISE tive to Costa Rica. Visitors to Nicaragua can discover smuggled in ladies’ handbags when Castro came to power. FROM TOP LEFT lakes and volcanoes – there are 19 active cones to climb For top-notch coffee, I head to Espressionista. The Hiking on Mombacho volcano – beaches, wildlife-rich forests and historic cities. owners work directly with local farmers, who grow their near Granada. Morgan’s Rock Morgan’s Rock was the country’s first luxury eco coffee beans in special microclimates to produce the eco lodge. Masaya is one of lodge when it opened in 2004 and it is still one of a kind. best flavour. Espressionista’s ambitious food menu also Nicaragua’s 19 active volcanoes. Ensconced in tropical forest overlooking Playa Ocotal, focuses on local produce – mackerel ceviche, perhaps, or An aerial view of Mukul resort. my bungalow – fashioned by Managua-based British a succulent osso buco – rounded off with a smooth rum. Granada was founded by the Spanish in 1524. The pool architect Matthew Falkiner from sustainably sourced But nature is never far away in Nicaragua. I spend an at Granada’s Tribal Hotel. tropical woods – was designed to blend in. It is the evening peering into Masaya volcano’s crater as molten A surfer on the Paciic coast. epitome of eco-chic: there is no air conditioning, as the lava bubbles below. A morning hike through Mombacho Concepción volcano on walls are made from canvas and fine net to allow the volcano’s cloud forest, which brims with hummingbirds Ometepe. A spider monkey Pacific breeze to drift through; no television, just the and extravagant orchids, is followed by a boat trip on Isla de los Monos, an isleta rhythmic crash of the surf; and an outdoor shower – around the pocket-size isletas that were scattered in Lake Nicaragua (centre) perfect after a day at the beach. across Lake Nicaragua by an ancient eruption. You can hike, bike and horse ride through the forest in search of sloths, Legend has it that the Chorotega Indians left Mexico around 1000 BC in salute the sun from the open-air yoga studio, kayak through mangroves or search of their promised land and found it in Lake Nicaragua’s largest island try your hand at paddle-boarding – keen surfers can be whizzed by boat to Ometepe, a volcanic Eden, its twin cones rising out of the silver-flat water. more serious breaks – all without leaving the property. Almost half of it is a The island also captivated Mark Twain and, later, hippies, eco warriors and pioneering reforestation programme, along with an organic farm that expats searching for a simpler way of life, who have set up biodynamic farms, provides most of the restaurant’s ingredients. Or you can simply flop into a farm-to-fork cafés and rustic accommodation, such as Totoco eco lodge. hammock, with El Morgano – a crisp mix of rum, Prosecco and mint – in hand. I am enchanted by Ometepe’s views and volcanoes – one rocky and fiery, The newer kid on the Pacific coast is Mukul, the passion project of billionthe other verdant and dormant – its coffee fincas and banana plantations. aire Carlos Pellas, whose family has produced award-winning Flor de Caña It is like the mainland in microcosm. As I drive along its unpaved roads, rum for generations. Here the look is polished – hillside suites are dressed in dodging skittish horses, ambling pigs and, more surprisingly, a farmer riding neutral tones, there are four restaurants, two swimming pools, a spa and an home astride a Brahma bull, I realise that far from being like the Costa Rica 18-hole golf course – but everything has been custom-made by Nicaraguan of old, Nicaragua is very much its own country.

Ways and Means Sarah Gilbert visited Nicaragua as a guest of Journey Latin America (020-8600 1881; journeylatinamerica.co.uk), which offers a 14-day trip, including Granada, Ometepe island and the Pacific coast from £4,250 per person, including transfers and excursions, but excluding international flights, which start at £670 with American Airlines from London Heathrow 첸 132 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

KUBA OKON; PER SWANTESSON/STOCKSY; PAUL TAYLOR/GETTY IMAGES; ALLEN KENNEDY PHOTOGRAPHY; JULIEN CAPMEIL; PHILIP LEE HARVEY/4CORNERS IMAGES

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FOOD & TRAVEL | FRANCE

specialist holidays

Cookery course AT AN IDYLLIC FARMHOUSE IN THE LOIRE VALLEY, BETHAN HYATT ACQUIRES NEW CULINARY SKILLS AND IS REWARDED WITH FIVE DAYS OF FEASTING

‘S

top! What are you doing with that parsley? Using it as a garnish? Not in my kitchen.’ Chervil, on the other hand, is a different matter altogether, to be liberally sprinkled across everything from soup to fish. These are the rules of Chef Maynard’s kitchen, and his students would do well to follow them. It is the final day of four in the kitchen at Walnut Grove Cookery School near Laval, just east of Brittany. Along with my fellow students, I have been presented with a tray of ingredients and challenged to create dishes for that evening’s meal. It is a test designed to bring together everything we have learnt over the preceding days – from seasoning and butchery skills to complex sugar work and patisserie. Walnut Grove is run by British chef Maynard Harvey and his Kiwi wife Freya, who met while working in the restaurant business in the UK. Their focus is on dinner-party and restaurant-standard cooking, with a hands-on approach suitable for cooks of all levels. There is no qualification – the idea is to instil confidence and leave students brimming with ideas. It is a slickly run operation, with timings down to a tee and a thoughtfully economical use of ingredients. Everything prepared in lessons – from the bread baked on day one to the salmon we filleted to practise our knife skills – reappears in meals eaten throughout our stay. The menus are well-practised

and impressive, though fans of local, seasonal or ethical produce might find them wanting (foie gras, for example, is a regular feature). Accommodation is a mere 20 paces away in a farmhouse, with simply furnished rooms and the sound of the eponymous walnuts thudding to the ground in the distance. And while everything is on-site, there are reasons to explore further afield, including a visit to a nineteenth-century windmill owned and operated by a sprightly and charming octogenarian, Louis Lemoine. Course participants travel from all over the world – I was joined by foodies from Australia, the US and Ireland – and the eclectic mix of company is part of the appeal. There is a maximum of five students on each course, and all meals are eaten communally, so you soon get to know each other. Aside from cookery, the course is also something of an education in the art of eating – or rather, not overeating. Each day ends with a six-course meal, followed by cheese. My classmates and I retired to our beds stuffed to the gills every evening, vowing to exercise moderation the following day but, inevitably, failing. What skills have I taken home with me? While I confess I have not been whipping out a template to cut my smoked salmon into a perfect rectangle, I have a greater appreciation of flavour and approach new recipes with confidence. And I have mastered the macaron, thanks to an afternoon lesson from patissier Anthony Vancilli. For future students, take heed: pack a set of clothes at least one size bigger for the return journey home – you’ll need them 첸

WAYS AND MEANS Bethan Hyatt was a guest of Walnut Grove Cookery School (00-33-2 43 98 50 02; walnutgrovecookery.com). Courses run from April to November and cost from €1,695 per person, full board, including a transfer from Laval train station, excluding wine. FROM TOP Students learn to make macarons in an afternoon class with the patissier Anthony Vancilli. The cookery school (on left) and farmhouse accommodation

134 JULY 2018 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


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STOCKISTS Merchandise from these companies is featured editorially in this issue. Information is checked at the time of going to press, but House & Garden cannot guarantee that prices will not change or items will be in stock at the time of publication 1STDIBS 1stdibs.com

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Below are The List members who have appeared in this issue. Go to houseandgarden.co.uk/the-list to see their complete proiles AVERIL BLUNDELL INTERIOR DESIGN | BEATA HEUMAN BUTTER WAK EFIELD GARDEN DESIGN | CAMERON LANDSCAPES & GARDENS | JAMB | K ITESGROVE | OK A RITA KONIG | SUSSY CAZALET DESIGN | TH2 STUDIO

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SELF PORTRAIT I recently saw the Impressionists in London exhibition at Tate Britain. I found it very instructive and filled with marvellous paintings, particularly the portrait MONET painted of his wife in 1871. She sits demurely on a sofa upholstered in the most fabulous fabric, which, of course, is why I like it so much. My most prized possession is my archive of ANTIQUE TEXTILES. I have over 1,000 pieces, which I’ve been collecting for 35 years. When I was little, the walls and ceiling of my bedroom in France were covered in toile de Jouy. Before I went to sleep, I would create stories about the people in the pattern – they became my friends and I became hooked on fabric.

There is no greater landscape than the topiary sculptures at the MANOIR D’EYRIGNAC in France.

In the V&A, there is a beautiful, earlyeighteenth-century RED AND GOLD BOX. It is thought to have formed part of a toilet service (nécessaire de toilette) and would have been displayed in an elegantly furnished boudoir. I wish more than anything I could steal it and have it in my bedroom.

Nicole Fabre THE FABRIC DESIGNER PAINTS A PICTURE OF HER LIFE, WORK AND INSPIRATIONS

ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THE EXQUISITE: AN ANECDOTAL HISTORY OF ELEGANT DELIGHTS. It appeals to my love of

the extraordinary and is filled with stories on subjects as diverse as frilly lingerie, weekends and whistling.

RIFIFI BY JULES DASSIN

is the best film. It tells the story of a seemingly impossible theft and has the most fantastic half-hour heist scene that is shot in near silence, with no dialogue or music.

My favourite building is HOUGHTON HALL. It’s about a 10-minute drive from where I live in Norfolk, but it reminds me of a French chateau. It is absolutely gorgeous and appeals to my fascination with the eighteenth century.

I adore the colour INDIGO. I have about 25 pieces of eighteenth-century indigo ikat and there’s nothing I like more than opening my armoire and looking at them 첸

AS TOLD TO EMILY TOBIN. PHOTOGRAPHS: JEROME MOREL; ALAMY; CLAUDE MONET, MEDITATION, MRS MONET SITTING ON A SOFA, 1871, MUSÉE D’ORSAY, LEGS DE ME & MME RAYMOND KOECHLIN, 1931, © PHOTO RMN – GÉRARD BLOT; © VICTORIA & ALBERT MUSEUM, LONDON

On my bedside table is a book called


À

L A

R E C H E R C H E

D E

L ’ Œ U V R E


Chimneypieces | Lighting | Furniture 020 7730 2122 | jamb.co.uk


Please turn the page to view Supplement


PRODUCED BY HOUSE & GARDEN SPECIAL PROJECTS

Kitchens and Bathrooms


+44 (0) 20 7589 5998 smallbone.co.uk KITCHENS DRESSING ROOMS WINE ROOMS STUDIES A member of the Canburg Group


K-IN/K-OUT


SUMMER

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LONDON SHOWROOMS WATERLOO CHELSEA CHISWICK FULHAM NOTTING HILL MUSWELL HILL PRIMROSE HILL WIMBLEDON

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C o n te n ts 8

Editor’s letter

10

Contributors

108 Self portrait KITCHEN

21

News The latest trends and products from the Milan Furniture Fair

27

Shopping What’s new in appliances, taps and kitchen tiles

33

Kitchen design Expert advice on planning, storage and finishing details

47

Moodboard Three kitchen schemes to try at home

52

Working as one A stylish, functional, open-plan kitchen by Plain English

54

In good taste A dynamic business kitchen created by Neptune

56

Bright side Ben Pentreath brings a feeling of warmth and colour to a north London kitchen

58

The right recipe A well-balanced Oxfordshire kitchen by Martin Moore

60

Open options Smallbone’s design for a modern kitchen and living area

64

From the archives Inspiration from the magazine’s back catalogue

Produced by House & Garden Special Projects. For enquiries call 020-7152 3754. The Condé Nast Publications Ltd, Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU. All details correct at time of going to press, but subject to change.

BATHROOM

69

News More trends and products from the Milan Furniture Fair

75

Shopping Baths, vanity units and wall lights to buy

81

Bathroom design Inspiration for creating your ideal space

93

Moodboard Three bathroom schemes to try at home

98

Soft glamour Inside a smart C P Hart bathroom designed for a teenage girl

100 Suite success An elegant en suite with Drummonds fittings 102 Set in stone A striking marble-clad bathroom by Hugh Leslie 106 From the archives Inspiration from the magazine’s back catalogue ON THE COVER The bathroom of a Suffolk house, photographed by Paul Massey EDITOR ARTA GHANBARI ART DIRECTOR JOAN HECKTERMANN ART EDITORS REBECCA GORDON-WATKINS, RICHARD SANAPO HEAD OF SPECIAL PROJECTS MELINDA CHANDLER SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER INDIA BARCLAY PROJECT MANAGER PHOEBE WOOD SPECIAL PROJECTS INTERN LISA WALDEN PUBLISHING DIRECTOR EMMA REDMAYNE ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SOPHIE FAIRCLOUGH ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER EUROPE CHRIS DAUNT REGIONAL OFFICE SALES DIRECTOR KAREN ALLGOOD ACCOUNT DIRECTORS LORNA CLANSEY-GRAMER, HEATHER MITCHELL ADVERTISING MANAGERS GEORGINA PENNEY, MARINA CONNOLLY SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER NICHOLE MIKA ACCOUNT MANAGERS OLIVIA MCHUGH, OLIVIA CAPALDI

KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS 2018 5


Matki EauZone Plus The epitome of luxury Beautifully engineered in the UK


F O R A M AT K I S H O W E R I N G B R O C H U R E A N D N E A R E S T B AT H R O O M S P E C I A L I S T C A L L 01 4 5 4 3 2 8 811 | W W W. M AT K I . C O. U K | M AT K I P L C , B R I S TO L B S 3 7 5 P L


P O R T E R

letter from TH E EDITOR

hen I first started to put this magazine together, I spent an afternoon looking through House & Garden’s archive spanning over 70 years, and found myself smiling uncontrollably at the ferocious kitchen and bathroom designs of the Fifties and Sixties. What fun they were, and when did it all become so tame? In the modern world, the kitchen and bathroom are ever more important spaces where everyday life happens between morning routines, homework, recipe triumphs, eating and entertaining. We have dedicated a whole magazine to inspire and help with the planning and decoration of these muchused rooms – and bring back their former glory. Within these pages, we address nitty-gritty and decorative details alike – from plumbing, bath weights, humidity-safe lighting and maximising kitchen storage to hanging art and shopping inspiration. There is also useful advice from specialists and the most exciting interior designers working today, as well as an in-depth look into beautiful kitchens and bathrooms around the world. This year’s Kitchens & Bathrooms has been reimagined with new sections and a new look to match, which I hope you enjoy. As with our wardrobes, the rooms we spend our lives in should be personal, above all.

115 QUEENSTOWN ROAD LONDON SW83RH +44 (0)20 3355 1817 P O R T E R B AT H R O O M . C O M

Arta Ghanbari Editor, Kitchens & Bathrooms

JOSHUA MONAGHAN

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CON T R I BU TOR S ALEXANDER JAMES Photographer Soon after working as an assistant photographer at British Vogue, Alexander James went on to photograph Condé Nast Britain chairman Nicholas Coleridge, capture an image of a Getty yacht on the Mediterranean and collaborate with brands such as Plain English, Bang & Olufsen and Heineken. One of his favourite early projects was ‘photographing a Rolling Stones concert at Slane Castle in Ireland’. Alexander’s home is situated in the heart of west London, where he lives with his four children and explains its decoration is ‘quite unlike many of the places he is asked to photograph’. For this issue, he has photographed a Smallbone kitchen (from page 60).

HUGH LESLIE Interior designer Hugh Leslie’s interest in the world of furniture design and interiors was first piqued by watching his mother paint when he was a young boy. He was raised on a farm in rural New Zealand and was encouraged by his sister to attend design school in Auckland (where he then went on to study interior design and architecture). Upon moving to London in 1987, he was introduced to people who further opened his eyes to everything concerning style, design and architecture. Before setting up his own practice in 2002, Hugh worked for Chester Jones, Mlinaric, Henry & Zervudachi and Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler. See the marble bathroom he designed in this issue (from page 102).

JENNIFER GOULDING Writer After finishing her degree in English

SERIES ‘S’ HANDPAINTED TILES New designs added

www.balineum.co.uk 020 7431 9364

literature, Jennifer went to work at House & Garden, where she stayed for nine years before going freelance. ‘I had not anticipated being involved in the world of architecture, interiors and design, but it turned out to be a wonderful fit,’ she says. Her career as a writer has given her the opportunity to work on a variety of different stories, but it was a lifestyle feature about Bonfield Block-Printers for House & Garden that was her favourite. ‘Cameron and Janet Tristram were fascinating to interview, their house full of character and their journey so inspiring.’ For this issue, Jennifer writes about a London kitchen designed by Plain English (from page 52) 첸


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News

KITCHEN | NEWS

More than just a space for cooking, the kitchen is where daily life takes place. House & Garden contributing editor Nonie Niesewand reports on the news from the Milan Furniture Fair

Schiffini’s ‘Lepic’ kitchen by British designer Jasper Morrison is crafted in wood and topped with Carrara marble 컄

KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS 2018 21


KITCHEN | NEWS

BOX IT With boxes to tick for cooling, cooking and storage, compact kitchens can be the hardest to design. In Japan, where houses are sold according to how many tatami mats fit onto the floor, space is at a premium. Japanese brand Sanwa’s boxed kitchens hide all manner of interesting gadgets for cooks behind inscrutable matt black façades. For Salone 2018, they broke out of the box with Italian maestro Alessandro Mendini’s design for the ‘AM 01’. Shaped like a tall fridge and coloured orange, lemon and grapefruit, its doors open to reveal a sink and hob side by side with a ventilator hood built into cupboards above and storage space in the base unit, as well as shelving in the double doors.

Mosaic mood

COOL COMBINATION Boffi’s ‘Combine’ kitchen, by Piero Lissone, allowed for complete freedom of configuration, with blocks, worktops and tables of different sizes designed to be mixed and matched to create separate areas for cooking, washing and preparation. 컄 22 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS

GIUSEPPE DE FRANCESCO

‘Let steam support your creativity in cooking’ was chalked on blackboards above a riotous farmers’ market set up by Neff to showcase its ovens. On the stand, units clad in mosaics, which were mirrored on the loor, created a dramatic efect alongside a great dining table, with carts of greens and hessian sacks of pulses.


plainenglishdesign.co.uk 020 3026 4782


KITCHEN | NEWS

Mean steel Keen to show the world that their appliances match MasterChef standards, manufacturers splashed out on their presentation of what are, in effect, steel or white boxes housing intriguing performances. They cook, clean, freeze and cool, dry and baste, roast, boil and steam. Gaggenau went so far as to build a whole house at EuroCucina to show how seamlessly its stainless-steel appliances fitted into the fabric of domesticity. Samsung’s ‘Dual Cook Flex’ oven has two individual ovens within one main one, with separate controls allowing dishes to cook at different temperatures at the same time.

INNOVATION STATIONS La Cornue’s ‘Kongo’ cooking range (above) landed in a covering of colourful graffiti like a Banksy mural, a neat example of art meeting science. Officine Gullo, whose kitchens begin at around £60,000, had an impressive pearlised finish on its units and range to show off new, burnished brass taps operating on a wheel connection like canal lock gates in miniature. Its cast iron wok reaches heats that far outstrip its rivals. Next best thing to an open fire is a Wolf barbecue, which can reach sizzling temperatures to sear spit-roasts. Cooling things down, its tall, handleless fridge-freezer self closes at the touch of a fingertip.

Minimal gains Schiini’s ‘Lepic’ kitchen by British designer Jasper Morrison is beautifully crated in wood and topped with Carrara marble. The simplicity of the design masks its power to house and store the many things that are needed without creating clutter. Schiini began manufacturing kitchens 50 years ago with another grand master of design, Vico Magistretti, and it still produces his classic ‘Cinqueterre’ kitchen with its corrugated aluminium surfaces. It recently found his plans dated 1995 for a shelving system which it produced for this year’s Salone del Mobile. Called ‘Triangle’, its Fenix shelves are both light and strong and so new that Schiini’s London showroom, which opened on Duke Street, W1, still awaits its arrival.

Going retro SMEG, a pioneer of the retro look with its chunky Fiftiesstyle fridges, got fashion designers Dolce & Gabbana to pattern its appliances, adding Sicilian pizazz in two colourways: orange and lemon, and blue and white. They brought the fun back to functional 첸 24 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS


Furniture makers - Redefining bespoke

Chelsea · Notting Hill · Wiltshire

enq@mccarronandco.com

HANDMADE IN ENGLAND

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Made in Britain, Built to Last www.roundhousedesign.com West End | Clapham | Fulham | Richmond | Cheltenham | Guildford | telephone 020 7297 6220 | sales@roundhousedesign.com


KITCHEN | SHOPPING

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hopping

LISA WALDEN PRESENTS TAPS, APPLIANCES, ACCESSORIES AND SURFACES TO SUIT A VARIETY OF KITCHEN DESIGNS

TOP ROW FROM LEFT ‘Callisto Three Hole Sink Mixer with U Spout and Lever Handles’ (nickel), £528.84, from Perrin & Rowe. perrinandrowe.co.uk. ‘Fairfield 2-Hole Kitchen Mixer’ (city bronze and ceramic), from £1,450.40, from Samuel Heath. samuel-heath.co.uk. ‘Kartell Tap’ (chrome), £658.62, from Laufen. laufen.co.uk. BOTTOM ROW FROM LEFT ‘Deck Mounted Single Lever Mixer’ (natural brass), £572.40, from Vola. vola.com. ‘Astonian Sink Mixer’ (rose gold), £254.40, from Aston Matthews. astonmatthews.co.uk. ‘Concetto Tap’ (yellow), from £359, from Grohe. grohe.co.uk. ‘La Fontaine Bib Taps on Risers’ (polished brass), £550, from Catchpole & Rye. catchpoleandrye.com 컄 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS 2018 27


KITCHEN | SHOPPING

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Steel ‘Retro Fridge Freezer’ (blue), 189.9 x 59.5 x 64.5cm, £749.99, from Swan. swan-brand.co.uk. Stainless steel ‘Il Conico Kettle’, by Aldo Rossi, 22cm diameter, £150, from Alessi. alessi.com. ‘Smart Stick’ hand blender (red), $34.95, from Cuisinart. cuisinart.co.uk. Steel ‘2 Slice Toaster’ (pastel green), £119.95, from Smeg. smeguk.com. Cast iron ‘3-Oven Dual Control’ range cooker (blush), 91.3 x 98.7 x 69.8cm, £11,020, from Aga. agaliving.com. ‘Signature Cast Iron Round Casserole’ (marseille blue), from £149, from Le Creuset. lecreuset.co.uk 컄 28 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS


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KITCHEN | SHOPPING

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Ceramic ‘Stitch’ (soft pink/white, vintage blue/elderflower), €150 for 12, from Marrakech Design. marrakechdesign.se. Encaustic ‘Old Havana Palos’, £2.80 each; and glazed terracotta ‘Navajo Gad’, £13.45 each; both from Claybrook. claybrookstudio.co.uk. Porcelain ‘Caspian Cotto’, £82.75 a square metre; and marble ‘Rosso Levanto’, £142.74 a square metre; both from Mandarin Stone. mandarinstone.com. Enameled terracotta ‘4.1’ and ‘4.3’, 10cm square, €9 each, and ‘Kleurtjes’ (buisson blue), 20cm square, €30, from Emery & Cie. emeryetcie.com. Marble terrazzo ‘Marmoreal’ (black, white), by Max Lamb, £375 a square metre, from Dzek. dzekdzekdzek.com. Ceramic ‘Kimono B’ (peach/white), €155 for 12; ‘Dandelion’ (saffron/milk), €163 for 12; and ‘Lily’ (pea green/pure white), €155 for 12; all from Marrakech Design. marrakechdesign.se. Background, hand-painted ‘Fishes’ wallpaper (blue pearl), £925 a panel, from de Gournay. degournay.com 첸 30 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS


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KITCHEN | DESIGN

This west London kitchen by Seth Stein Architects combines natural materials such as walnut, marble and bronze. sethstein.com

K

SIMON BROWN

itchen design

TODAY, KITCHENS ARE THE BUSIEST ROOMS IN THE HOUSE, BEING USED NOT JUST FOR FOOD PREPARATION AND EATING BUT ALSO FOR ENTERTAINING. ELIZABETH METCALFE LOOKS AT SOME INSPIRING OPTIONS AND PRESENTS IDEAS FOR STORAGE, MATERIALS AND FINISHING DETAILS TO CREATE A KITCHEN THAT IS AS FUNCTIONAL AS IT IS STYLISH KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS 2018 33


KITCHEN | DESIGN

PLANNING A KITCHEN

‘CONSIDER THE SPACE AVAILABLE and think about how you will actually use your kitchen. If you have three walls available, a U-shape kitchen is a good one to go for: there will be plenty of space for storage and wall cabinets. If you would like your kitchen to be truly multi-functional, consider keeping the work area to an L-shape to free up the rest of the space.’ Nick Bell, design director at Mark Wilkinson. mwf.com ‘DON’T BE AFRAID TO ADD COLOUR. In many period properties, there is only one light source, so it is best to keep colours light. Darker colours work well below worktop height with light-coloured surfaces. One of my favourite ways to use colour is on an island (as in Henri Fitzwilliam-Lay’s kitchen, pictured) – it is aesthetically pleasing and also practical, because dents show up less on a darker surface.’ Charlie Kingham, owner of Charlie Kingham. charliekingham.co.uk ‘THINK OF A KITCHEN IN ZONES. The working triangle of fridge, sink and cooker is not so relevant to how we cook nowadays, so instead think of a breakfast zone, a food preparation area and a cooking zone to allow more than one person to be in a kitchen at a time 34 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS

without getting in each other’s way.’ Simon Richmond, managing director at Poggenpohl. poggenpohl.com ‘INVEST IN THE MORE VISIBLE ELEMENTS of a kitchen that receive heavy use, such as appliances, work surfaces and front panels on units. You can save money on the internal configurations, and I always suggest people don’t rush into choosing them. If you can, live with your kitchen for six months before making any major decisions.’ Niko Rasides, senior design consultant at Nicholas Anthony. nicholas-anthony.com ‘CREATE AMPLE STORAGE to prevent clutter. As well as making space for food, crockery, pots and pans, it is important to have space for objects that are only occasionally used, such as platters and formal tableware. Islands provide good storage – subdivide deep top drawers and for cutlery, towels and crockery.’ Chanda Pandya, brand director at Rossana. rossana.uk.com ‘TRY DIFFERENT LIGHT SOURCES to create distinct areas. Use task lighting for food preparation areas and something softer over an island or dining table.’ Tom Howley, creative design director at Tom Howley. tomhowley.co.uk 컄

LUCAS ALLEN

Six experts provide advice on some important elements to consider from the outset


KITCHEN | DESIGN

ST OR AG E Clever ideas to keep things neat, including larders and islands

ISLANDS It may have become a bit of a cliché, but an island is a good one, offering valuable storage and also creating a centrepiece for the room. This navy-painted one by deVol (top left) includes open storage for books and tableware and also provides a seating area. The open storage sections break the island up and prevent it from looking too solid. It is topped with a pale Silestone worktop – Cosentino’s ‘White Zeus Extreme’, from £350 a square metre, is a close match – which also helps soften the island. Additional storage has been created through glass-fronted wall units – ideal for pretty tableware – and floor-level units below this. devolkitchens.co.uk | cosentino.com LARDERS This tall, double-door larder by Humphrey Munson (top right) is an excellent and practical way to store dry goods. The internal configuration – a combination of integrated drawers, shelves and two sets of door-mounted shelves – ensures ingredients can be easily located. The units surrounding the larder take full advantage of the room’s height, with the three cupboards at the top providing extra storage. The pale paint colour prevents the floor-to-ceiling units from looking heavy. humphreymunson.co.uk CONCEALED STORAGE If you want to create a minimal kitchen, the key is clever storage. This one by Bulthaup (bottom) not only looks sleek, but also offers brilliant concealed storage. Glossy white floorto-ceiling units – which almost blend into the white walls – house the fridge, freezer and other storage, while the island, topped with white Corian and made from apple wood, provides further space for dry goods and the dishwasher. kitchenarchitecture.co.uk | bulthaup.com 컄 36 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS


We believe in a diferent perspective.

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KITCHEN | DESIGN

S T O R A G E continued MIXED SOLUTIONS A combination of floating shelves, an island, glass-fronted cabinets and tall larder cupboards provide smart storage in this kitchen by Naked Kitchens (top). If you have pretty crockery and glassware, open shelves and glass-fronted cabinets are an excellent option, though they obviously require more dusting than closed storage. The whitewashed oak forms a pleasing contrast with the grey-painted units. nakedkitchens.com NARROW SHELVES Cubby hole-style shelving and a grey-painted island provide storage and blend in well with the industrial-style walls of this kitchen (centre). The island contains the hob and the sink. A striking pendant light, red stool and graphic poster add interest and a decorated feel to the space. rossana.uk.com TRADITIONAL JOINERY This kitchen (bottom), with a large island and white-painted wall cabinets, is part of Tom Howley’s ‘Hartford Collection’. Note how the Silestone worktop on the island protrudes over the ends to create a comfortable seating area – this is a good design feature to incorporate, especially if you do not have space for a kitchen table. The wall units provide plenty of storage, but the white paint prevents them from dominating the space. It proves that you can create a serene and streamlined space that is still quite traditional. tomhowley.co.uk 컄 38 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS


Go with the times

CLASSIC IN A NEW COMPOSITION

KITCHEN FOR A NEW EPOCH

Composing is an art- and that also applies to interior design. With this in mind, SieMatic cooperates with renowned international designers to develop room planning concepts for the style collection Classic These concepts make it possible to play with styles and to utilise seemingly contradictory design elements to compose a harmonious whole, to the delight of all who seek to elegantly combine the old values and the new. Let yourself be inspired anew.

Competent kitchen consulting and professional planning: SieMatic UK 5300 Lakeside | Cheadle Royal Business Park | Cheshire | SK8 3GP | +44 (0)161 2466010 www.siematic.co.uk | info@siematic.co.uk


KITCHEN | DESIGN

M AT E R I A L S There is a wealth of materials available for surfaces – from Carrara marble and stainless steel to patterned tiles and stained woods

PATTERNED TILES To stop the marble work surfaces in this kitchen (top left) looking too grand, patterned tiles were used for the floor. They work especially well because they pick up the colour of the units. Fired Earth and Mandarin Stone are both good sources for hard-wearing patterned tiles. firedearth.com | mandarinstone.com MARBLE This is a great way to add drama and glamour to a kitchen, such as in this one by Mark Wilkinson (top right), where a bookmatched marble has been used for the splashback. It forms a nice visual contrast with the painted wood units and grey floor tiles. mwf.com WOOD Take inspiration from this kitchen by Linley (bottom) and experiment with materials in a way that may not usually be associated with the kitchen. Diamond patterned, quilted eucalyptus has been applied to the front of this island, which softens the dark dyed oak cabinets and provides a pleasing textural element. The island has been clad in marble, which also extends down the ends. davidlinley.com QUARTZ ‘Quartz lasts longer than almost all surface options – it is waterproof, easy to clean and doesn’t need sealing, treating or polishing. It also comes in an enormous variety of colours and patterns,’ says Jon Stanley of Caesarstone. Its ‘Rustic Concrete’ style is good for a more contemporary look and is a nice alternative to poured concrete, which can be messy and is easily stained. caesarstone.co.uk STAINLESS STEEL No longer is steel just a material used in industrial kitchens. ‘It is robust and can withstand most of what is thrown at it, so it is a great option for family kitchens,’ says Sam Hart, a designer at Roundhouse. Consider using it for a splashback where it won’t experience the same amount of wear and tear. roundhousedesign.com 컄 40 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS


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KITCHEN | DESIGN

FINISHING TOUCHES

CHRIS TUBBS; TODD SUTHERLAND

Handles and other fittings can easily become an afterthought, but they can completely transform the look of a kitchen and require careful consideration

BRASS PULL HANDLES look smart alongside the dark green Plain English units in this kitchen by designer Adam Bray (top left). The Beardmore Collection’s ‘HM1003’ handle, £28, is almost identical, and the company is a great source for hardware, including some more elaborate options. The ‘Easton’ tap from Waterworks, which is available in brass and costs from £1,328.40, is another great option for a similar look. plainenglishdesign.co.uk | beardmore.co.uk | waterworks.com HARDWARE The enamelled metal cabinets in this kitchen by Officine Gullo (top right) feature chunky burnished brass fittings and exposed hinges, which tie in with the work surface. officinegullo.com HANDLELESS UNITS This contemporary kitchen by Poliform (bottom), in a house by Broseley, has units that are opened by simply pushing the corner of the door, creating an uncluttered, minimalist look. poliform.com | broseley.com THREE TIPS FOR CHOOSING HANDLES, by Andy Barrette of McCarron & Co 1 Think about the look you want. A Shaker-style kitchen can look fairly traditional with decorative handles, while minimal handles create a more contemporary feel. 2 Hold handles up next to the units to consider what works best, thinking about the cabinet finish and worktop. 3 Some styles are more hard-wearing than others. Lots of people like the look of leather handles, but they are not the most practical, especially around wet areas. mccarronandco.com 첸 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS 2018 43


Family units DesignSpace London creates bespoke modular kitchens, which can be customised to suit any set-up, with modern living in mind

ver the past century, the family home has evolved. Where once rooms were segregated and had single functions, now we see open, multi-purpose areas. Gone are the days of the cook being confined to the kitchen, of eating only taking place at a laid dining table; open-plan living allows for all aspects of domestic life to intersect seamlessly. However, the fine balance between sleek, sophisticated design and practical, architectural solutions is not always easy to achieve – unless you employ the specialists at DesignSpace London. As one of the most innovative interior companies, DesignSpace London is a leading expert in creating modern living areas. Working with Italian brand Modulnova, the company creates beautiful household environments and provides clients with practical modular furniture that maximises on space. The results are always of both the highest quality and functionality.

O

DesignSpace London understands that every family and its needs are unique. Consequently, using a wide palette of materials and a choice of ranges, the firm’s highly experienced team offers clients a full and completely individual design service, focused on creating a kitchen and multi-purpose living space perfectly suited to their needs. To provide such a service requires technical and aesthetic skill, which the experts at DesignSpace London have in abundance. As everything is purpose-designed, the interior of each unit is just as remarkable as its exterior, with a place for everything and everything in its place. Should you order a DesignSpace London kitchen, you can expect flawless detailing that marries utility with beauty. Every detail is considered and created using the most luxurious and high-tech materials – from marble to metallics, kerlite to wood – and rounded-off with specialist finishes. Invest in a living space that’s as unique as your family, with your lifestyle in mind and in which style is never compromised. designspacelondon.com 첸


HOUSE & GARDEN PROMOTION

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT The ‘Twenty’ kitchen collection with tall and base unit doors in raw oak veneer in the carbone colourway. Doors to island base units in ‘MH6’ design in vein matched Carrara marble. Worktops and island detailing in Carrara marble


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KITCHEN | MOODBOARD

JAMES MERRELL

RUTH SLEIGHTHOLME presents three inspiring looks for kitchens

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Ash and maple ‘Athenaeum Settee’ (black), by O&G Studio, 106 x 219.5 x 70cm, £7,500, from Stafan Tollgard. tollgard.co.uk. ‘Penny’ (antarctic) porcelain tile, £18.72 a 30cm square sheet, from Waterworks. waterworks.com. ‘1965’ brass pendant, by Paavo Tynell, 26 x 46cm diameter, from Gubi. gubi.com. ‘Emil’ (puddleduck) oak dresser, 210 x 125 x 42cm, £7,250, from Pinch. pinchdesign.com. Cast iron casserole dish, by Richard Sapper, 11 x 32 x 23cm, £150, from SCP. scp.co.uk .‘Pasta Pasta’ kitchen scale, by Paola Navone, €72.82, from Serax. serax.com. ‘Verona’ hand-painted ceramic tiles, 20cm square, £22.36 each, from Balineum. balineum.co.uk 컄

KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS 2018 47


KITCHEN | MOODBOARD

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT ‘Small Chattered Skullcap’ porcelain pendant, 5.5 x 18cm diameter, £100, from deVol. devolkitchens.co.uk. Glass spoons, by Max Frommeld, €30 each, from Makers & Brothers. makersandbrothers.com. ‘Oak and Green’ oak cabinet, 220 x 230 x 60cm, £9,675, from Edward Collinson. edwardcollinson.co.uk. ‘Loop’ concrete tiles, 20cm square, £110.40 a square metre, from Indigenous. indigenous.co.uk. ‘No 10’ (ochre/brown, dark blue, of white) terracotta baking dishes, by Serax for Merci, 5.5 x 30 x 22cm, £73, from Amara. amara.com. ‘010’ marble and concrete terrazzo, £102 a square metre, from Diespeker & Co. diespeker.co.uk. Stoneware ‘Donabe Clay Pot’ with clay trivet and wooden spatula, 21 x 32.5 x 26cm, £225, from Native & Co. nativeandco. com. Cotton dishcloth (ochre), by Hay, £9, from The Goodhood Store. goodhoodstore.com 컄

48 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS


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KITCHEN | MOODBOARD

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Tumbled Calacatta and bluestone marble floor tiles, 40cm square (main tile), £95.70 a square metre, from Mandarin Stone. mandarinstone.com. ‘Woodland Canopy’ print on Japanese paper, by Superfolk, 100 x 64.5cm, €240, from Makers & Brothers. makersandbrothers. com. Porcelain baking dish (milk), 7 x 28 x 25cm, £135, from Mud Australia. mudaustralia.com. Zip-closed plastic storage bags, €5 each, from Merci. merci-merci.com. Linen cocktail napkins (green), by Los Encajeros, 16 x 20cm, £150 for four, from Moda Operandi. modaoperandi.com. ‘Belge’ (lapis) wallpaper, by Barron & Larcher, 141cm wide, £70 a metre, from Christopher Farr Cloth. christopherfarrcloth.com. ‘Paon’ metal and rattan wall light (pink and natural), 50 x 36 x 15cm, €335, from Colonel. moncolonel.fr. ‘Industriell’ pine chair (green-black), by Piet Hein Eek, 82 x 40 x 54cm, £80, from Ikea. ikea.com 첸

50 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS


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WORKING AS ONE THIS LONDON KITCHEN BY PLAIN ENGLISH CLEVERLY UNITES THREE DISTINCT AREAS FOR FOOD PREPARATION, STORAGE AND ENTERTAINING, IMBUING THE OPEN-PLAN SPACE WITH A SENSE OF CONTINUITY, HARMONY AND STYLE

TEXT JENNIFER GOULDING | PHOTOGRAPHS ANTONY CROLLA

52 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS


L

ondon has many small streets and easy-to-miss passages. One such passage, near the centre of the city, opens onto a magical, lushly planted courtyard and this grade-II listed Victorian schoolhouse. The owners originally used it as an office. When they sold their business, they asked their architect to transform the building into a home while respecting its character and integrity. To celebrate its grand proportions, the architect has made the ground floor an imposing open-plan kitchen, dining and sitting area. However, to increase the floor space and utilise the high ceilings, he has added a small mezzanine, and it is under this area that Emma Milne of Plain English has positioned the main section of the kitchen. It has an L-shape form and everything required for cooking and preparing food. ‘The wife is an accomplished cook, so it had to be extremely practical. She is also a very sociable cook, so I have ensured she can work at the top of the L when they have friends round or throw parties,’ explains Emma, who has chosen the ‘Osea’ cabinets, but softened their clean lines with elegantly veined Carrara marble worktops and cladding. Adjacent to the mezzanine is an area devoted to food storage. There is a wall-hung larder cupboard in raw, unpainted rolled steel that echoes old-fashioned school lockers, plus built-in cupboards for a fridge and freezer. Emma has created a separate drinks area comprising a row of cabinets in the same style as the larder with an integrated wine fridge, plus open shelves for glassware. ‘Because it is a large space, the owners wanted a place to prepare drinks close to the dining table,’ she notes. It includes an extra sink with a Quooker tap, which is concealed by a sliding, opaque glass screen. ‘It is a nice extra detail and adds a vertical element to the design.’ Like all Plain English kitchens, it is an aesthetic triumph: quietly striking and timeless. What is more notable is how each part has a distinct purpose and personality, yet they work as a harmonious whole and in sympathy with the architecture 첸 020-7486 2674; plainenglishdesign.co.uk

MAIN SECTION (opposite) This L-shape food preparation area is positioned under the new mezzanine. The paint is a Plain English colour called ‘Boiled Dishcloth’, while the handles are the ‘Weymouth’ design. DRINKS AREA (this page top) Open shelving for glasses sits above a row of cupboards. The sliding glass screen conceals an extra sink. FOOD STORAGE AREA (this page bottom) This area houses a wall-hung larder cupboard and built-in ‘Longhouse’ cupboards for a fridge and freezer

KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS 2018 53


IN GOOD TASTE IN NEED OF A STYLISH TASTING KITCHEN, KETTYLE IRISH FOODS IN NORTHERN IRELAND BROUGHT IN THE TEAM AT NEPTUNE TO CREATE A DYNAMIC SPACE IN A FORMER COTTON FACTORY TEXT ROSE DAHLSEN | PHOTOGRAPHS RORY CORRIGAN

FROM LEFT A tiled wall behind hanging pans gives the feel of a traditional butcher’s shop. Three bespoke stacked ‘Sufolk’ cabinets provide storage

mid the rolling countryside setting of Lisnaskea in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland, is the tasting kitchen of Kettyle Irish Foods. The company, a specialist meat seller, called upon the expertise of Neptune’s kitchen-design service to create a stylish space. Owner of Neptune Belfast, Fearghal McAdam, worked alongside the architect Darren McCaffrey at an early stage of the design process to create a kitchen that mostly uses Neptune’s ‘Chichester’ range. Originally a cotton textile factory built in the Sixties, ‘this kitchen worked

A

54 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS

really well in the context of the building,’ says Fearghal. The reclaimed parquet floors and 1.45-metre-wide sliding barn doors were installed to tie in with the exposed oak shelves, adding warmth and texture, while cabinets painted in Neptune’s ‘Charcoal’ and ‘Paprika’ shades inject some colour and contrast. High ceilings and an extraction fan give an industrial, New York-style element, while copper pendant lights blend harmoniously with the copper cabinet handles. Managing director Maurice Kettyle asked Fearghal and Darren to create a deli-style look where he was able


PA R Q U E T F L O O R S , S L I D I N G B A R N D O O R S A N D E X P O S E D O A K S H E L V E S A D D WA R M T H A N D T E XT U R E , W H I L E T H E PA I N T E D U N I T S INJECT COLOUR AND CONTRAST

A central island, painted in Neptune’s ‘Charcoal’ shade, serves as a demo area for clients, and has a built-in cooker, fridge and cupboard

to prepare and cook local produce in front of clients. The island unit, which features a cleverly built-in cooker, takes centre stage. It allows guests to watch Maurice cook different cuts of meat from the seating area opposite. Pigeonholes provide easy access to chopping boards, while a fridge and cupboard for storage were also built in. A decorative backdrop of hanging pots and pans in front of the white tiled wall gives the feel of an open-kitchen restaurant. The decision to fully tile the back wall reminded Fearghal of old butcher’s shops found in surrounding County Fermanagh.

Space was essential, so creative design solutions were implemented to work with the kitchen’s relatively small dimensions. Beside the door, three bespoke wall cabinets from Neptune’s ‘Suffolk’ range were stacked on top of one another to create tall, elegant storage. The oak shelf includes strong built-in magnets to hang butchers knives at each end. ‘It was a really fun, quirky thing to do,’ says Fearghal. ‘The functionality of it is great.’ The result is a carefully considered, characterful space that blends texture with colour, and style with function 첸 neptune.com KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS 2018 55


THIS PAGE An orange Lacanche range replaced a ireplace, adding a bolt of colour that contrasts with the apple green cabinets. OPPOSITE FROM TOP The patterned wallpaper is William Morris’ ‘Blackthorn’ design and the stick chair was made by Chris Williams, a traditional chair maker who lives and works in Carmarthenshire. The new York stone flooring and butler’s sink tick two traditional country kitchen boxes


BRIGHT SIDE USING COLOUR, PATTERN AND TRADITIONAL MATERIALS, DESIGNER BEN PENTREATH HAS BROUGHT THE FEELING OF A WARM, WELCOMING COUNTRY KITCHEN TO THIS FAMILY HOUSE IN NORTH LONDON

TEXT EMILY TOBIN | PHOTOGRAPHS CATHERINE GRATWICKE

ou would be forgiven for thinking this kitchen was at the heart of a house nestled in the English countryside. All the recognisable country cottage tropes are in place: a satisfyingly beaten up table, flanked by a set of Windsor chairs, handsome York stone flooring, William Morris wallpaper and a practical butler’s sink. In fact, your assumption wouldn’t be entirely wrong. When this Georgian house in Highgate, north London, was built, it would indeed have been surrounded by rolling fields, but over the years the city has sprawled, swallowing up villages like Highgate in the process. However, the room that now houses the kitchen was a later, somewhat awkward, addition tacked on in the Eighties. The owners, who have a young family, wanted ‘a warm, cosy feel’ and brought on board Ben Pentreath – a connoisseur of country house style, to oversee the entire project. Ben decided to convert the room into a new kitchen ‘with a pair of generous double doors onto the handkerchief-size garden’, he says. ‘We added a stone floor for durability but also because this was such a characteristic material for the basement floors of old townhouses. We designed all the new joinery in a humble but elegant style and raised the lintel of the existing fireplace so that a new range could be installed in this space.’ Happily, this kitchen doesn’t take itself too seriously. There are dashes of modernity – the cupboard doors are painted a zingy shade of ‘Granny Smith’ green and the orange range is from Lacanche – touches that prevent the room from being remotely fusty and suggest a distinctly British wit. ‘Only a couple of days after they had moved in, I popped in for a visit,’ recalls Ben. ‘Everything was unpacked, the three young boys were having their supper around the table, and it felt as if this room had been there forever. There’s an alchemy that happens like this in decoration – not all the time, but when it does, it is magical’ 첸 benpentreath.com

Y

KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS 2018 57


THE RIGHT

RECIPE COMBINING MODERN APPLIANCES WITH CLASSIC DESIGN, THIS OXFORDSHIRE KITCHEN HAS ACHIEVED A SENSE OF BALANCE AND CALMNESS THAT SITS WELL WITHIN THE WHOLE OF THE RENOVATED HOUSE TEXT LOUISA PARKER BOWLES | PHOTOGRAPHS DARREN CHUNG

or anyone who has taken on the complete rebuild of a house, this may sound familiar: the kitchen, the heart of the home, is being mastermind by a specialist kitchen designer, in isolation from the rest of the house. You want the design to look beautiful and function seamlessly. You are mindful that it must be in keeping with the rest of the house. It should ideally reflect the charm of the original property, but also needs to adhere to modern standards of living. It is a considerable feat that Alex Hughes, a designer at kitchen company Martin Moore, has managed here with great finesse. The recipe for successful kitchen design may have evolved over time, but key ingredients remain the same. ‘Over the past decade, technology has moved kitchen functionality and design forward, but essentially what a kitchen really needs is good storage, good work surface areas and appliances that suit the client,’ explains Alex. ‘I liked the fact that the owners took into account how a Victorian or Georgian house would have been built,’ he says. Traditional design elements sit comfortably alongside contemporary appliances, such as integrated fridge freezers by Gaggenau, a boiling water tap by Quooker and a steam oven from Miele. ‘A kitchen is a big investment and needs to stand the test of time,’ Alex adds.

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Part of the ‘English Kitchen’ collection by Martin Moore, the design combines traditional joinery with clean, contemporary lines. It includes a large island and cook’s table, a dining area and a seating area. The bucolic views beyond are framed by floor-to-ceiling windows. ‘The design route I usually follow is: design the perfect ergonomic kitchen, add balance and proportion, followed by colour and texture,’ explains Alex. The client and her interior designer, Steph Hill, chose the fabrics for the upholstery and blinds, as well as the paint colours for the cabinetry to ensure continuity throughout the house. The kitchen is peppered with clever design solutions. A dual-control electric Aga was paired with a steam oven for a variety of cooking options. The capacity of the fridge, freezer and larder were all calculated based on how often the client shopped and how she likes to cook – plenty of room for fresh ingredients was a must. Practical elements blend in with the cabinets. A fridge drawer faces the main sink and there are vertical dividers for chopping boards, big enough to store Aga trays, under the prep sink. By building up a detailed profile of the family, Alex could design a beautiful kitchen that supports their routine and complements the rest of the house in a very pleasing way 첸 martinmoore.com | stephhilldesigns.com

TOP A prep sink in the island serves the cooking zone; the paint colours for the butler’s cupboard and cook’s table, from Paint & Paper Library, were chosen to chime with the rest of the house. Beyond the dining area are full-length windows that frame the bucolic view. BOTTOM FROM LEFT Plenty of storage has been included in the separate walk-in pantry. Traditional joinery is combined with clean, contemporary lines

KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS 2018 59


A large piece of statuary marble is the focus of the cooking area, which has appliances from Gaggenau. The preparation area on the island is kept free of appliances. The back of the island has open shelving for cookbooks and decorative objects


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PEN OPTIONS THE OWNERS OF THIS LONDON HOUSE CALLED UPON SMALLBONE OF DEVIZES TO CREATE AN IMPACTFUL, MODERN AND BRIGHT KITCHEN AND LIVING AREA THAT CAN TRANSITION SEAMLESSLY FROM A COOKING SPACE TO SOMEWHERE TO ENTERTAIN TEXT LAURA HOULDSWORTH | PHOTOGRAPHS ALEXANDER JAMES | LOCATIONS EDITOR ARTA GHANBARI


LEFT Designer Vincent Glue chose Smallbone’s ‘Original Hand Painted’ units for the kitchen. RIGHT American black walnut on the island reflects accents of the same wood in the rest of the house

t is hard to believe that this modern, bright kitchen was originally part of 13 bedsits. Located in a smart residential area of south-west London, the property was remodelled into a five-bedroom house, and designer Vincent Glue of the kitchen company Smallbone of Devizes was brought in to create an open-plan family kitchen and living space. ‘The brief was to design an upmarket kitchen with a crafted, hand-built element,’ says Vincent. He chose Smallbone’s ‘Original Hand Painted’ collection for its traditional but also clean, modern look, which works well within the urban space. ‘We wanted to create maximum impact with simple methods,’ explains Vincent. ‘Large cabinets and a wide, simple mantel above the hobs achieved this.’ The pared-back design means that the focus of the cooking area remains firmly on a beautiful piece of Statuary marble, which was hand-selected by the client and sits like a piece of art on the wall. The layout of the kitchen is harmonious, achieved through symmetry and repeated proportions: the width of the bar is the same as that of the window and the mantel, while a concealed fridge mirrors the bank of ovens on the side nearest the window. This is a working kitchen for a busy family, so within the relatively contained cooking area, everything is at hand, and a

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62 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS

big preparation area on the island is free of any appliance, sink or tap. ‘The cooking area is tucked away, so no one is going to walk through, which can be a problem with open-plan spaces,’ says Vincent. Different worktop levels create a transition between working areas of the kitchen, and raised seating at the bar is a nice place to perch for breakfast and look out to the garden. The same Statuary marble features on the island and eating area, which you see when you walk into the room, but quartz from Caesarstone was used on the main worktops as it is more affordable, durable and doesn’t stain. Luxurious dark American black walnut was used on the island to complement other accents of walnut around the house. It also features on the interior of the dovetail drawers, creating a cohesive, unified design. The family likes to entertain, so there is lots of space, with bi-fold doors opening seamlessly onto the garden. The cooking area is separated from the living, dining and entertaining spaces by an open shelving unit. The back of the island has open shelving for cookbooks and decorative objects, providing some colour and visual interest when seen from the dining area. The result is a versatile kitchen that is suitable for a busy family and their many guests 첸 020-7838 3658; smallbone.co.uk


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ARCHIVES A DESIGNER TAKES INSPIRATION FROM HOUSE & GARDEN’S BACK CATALOGUE, WHICH SPANS MORE THAN 70 YEARS

‘I absolutely love the strength of the tomato-orange, spider-legged structure spanning and dominating this late-Sixties, ultra-modern, achingly cool kitchen. The joy and sheer glossiness of these graphic beams confidently distract from the Georgian envelope. This is combined with the simplicity of the other, relatively inexpensive materials: classic, light-reflective travertine, practical stainless-steel rectilinear tiles and cork. You can almost smell the dark, cork-clad doors, which are acoustically helpful as well as doubling up as a pinboard for the ‘please buy milk’ and ‘who’s babysitting tonight?’ notes. And what a brilliant reminder of how an island should be (it genuinely floats) with plenty of foot room when washing up – even for the most clown-like of feet. Angled corners subtly delineate an expansive area to spread out dishes to dry. I could go on, but I am now fantasising about the inevitable spaghetti bolognese that would be rustled up in this kitchen!’ retrouvius.com 첸

64 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS

MICHAEL WICKHAM

BY MARIA SPEAKE OF RETROUVIUS


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B AT H R O O M S N E W S | S HOPPI N G | D E S IG N | MO OD B OA R D | CA S E S T U D I E S

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LUCAS ALLEN

The main bathroom of decorator Edward Bulmer’s house in Herefordshire


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News

BATHROOM | NEWS

House & Garden contributing editor Nonie Niesewand reports on the latest news and trends for bathrooms as seen at the Milan Furniture Fair

The ‘BetteLoft Ornament’ bath, by Bette (£7,408), will be available at C P Hart and West One Bathrooms. It has a geometric pattern embossed in titanium steel 컄

KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS 2018 69


BATHROOM | NEWS

HEAVY METAL x With burnished metal finishes that are silky to the touch, some of the new taps are less streamlined and more fluted, like Dornbracht’s ‘Vaia’ on a trumpet-shape base with cross-head controls (right). Axor’s ‘Montreux’ tap by Phoenix Design revived the chunky detailing of Edwardian candlestick holders with cross handles and ceramic inlays. The company introduced 13 inishes across its taps, including brushed nickel, gold and brass, as well as leather, in its Axor M.E (My Edition) range (above let). Maintaining a streamlined approach is the bronze Axor ‘Uno’ (above right).

COPPER BATHS A fall in the price of copper recently saw free-standing copper bathtubs like Waterworks’ ‘Clothilde’ and William Holland’s oval bathtubs (left) putting in an appearance in hotels and homes worldwide. The weight of the bathtub filled with water and a person bathing in it requires heavy-duty installation with a reinforced steel joist support beneath it.

POWER SHOWERS Power showers make water flow in new directions, with Dornbracht’s ‘Aquamoon’ possessing four programmes. The first, falling from a dome in the ceiling, massages head and shoulders in a semi-circular cascade of water called ‘Queen’s Collar’. ‘Embrace’ envelops the entire body while leaving the head and shoulders dry. ‘Aqua Circle’ regulates the volume of water falling from the dome so the more water pressure, the smaller the tunnel effect for a powerful jet; and ‘Tempest’ makes showering more like experiencing a monsoon than gentle rain. 70 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS

CLASSIC REVIVAL New York architect David Rockwell used a chisel to create a diamond pattern around his ‘Inciso’ taps for Gessi. And Vola, 50 years after Scandinavian architect Arne Jacobsen (above) designed its bestselling classic, turned on the tap to finish his ‘KV1’ in matt black (left), brushed brass, copper, bronze and nickel. 컄


BATHROOM | NEWS

SURREAL CERAMICS Celebrated international designer Patricia Urquiola designed her ‘Sonar’ bathroom collection for Laufen with little wavy patterns pulsating around the outside of the sink and bath. Ceramic pieces in white are joined by counters and cabinets in wood, and mirrors with ceramic frames. Laufen’s SaphirKeramik is a super-strength, waferthin product made from corundum, a colourless mineral found in sapphires. As an alternative to traditional ceramics, this wonder product gives a tighter curve than the vitreous china and fine clays of more conventional baths, which is why Patricia wanted to emphasise them. ‘As a metaphor, the name “Sonar” is linked to water, its acoustic pulses emitted to identify items underwater,’ she says. ‘I like the idea of using the little waves generated by sound.’

NEW NORDIC X Those Scandinavian colours that Duravit uses for a range of bathroom fittings – Nordic white, light blue, night blue and stone grey – are found in the new collection of furniture and above-counter basins called ‘Luv’ by Cecilie Manz. ‘There is a piece of nature within “Luv”,’ she says. Its contemporary lines recall a Shaker simplicity.

SHADES OF STONE Alape achieves the almost impossible by putting what looks like hand-crafted ceramics into industrial production, as seen in its new line of ‘Aqua’ basins, in deep blue, deep green and deep indigo. Meanwhile its ‘Terra’ enamelled basins replicate the stone and putty colours of Scandinavia (left), and the ‘Metallic’ collection is very Iron Age.

Floral code

INDUSTRIAL CHIC x Nowhere was the chunky, industrial look of the New York loft scene better staged than in Scavolini’s bathroom designed with the Diesel Creative team in warm hues, dark colours, matt materials and mirrored surfaces. Its bronze backlit ‘Lunar’ mirrors with bevelled edges still bring a touch of glamour to solid surfaces. 72 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS

A single sculptural pedestal basin, ‘Intreccio’ by Paolo Ulian, has an intricate, filigreed floral pattern emitting light through layers. It looks like lace but is completely watertight in a feat of engineering by Antonio Lupi. It proposes for its bath fittings a new Pantone colour – ‘the colour of a mountain seen from a distance, or the sea in winter at dusk’, which poetically describes a silvery grey with a hint of blue 첸


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BATHROOM | SHOPPING

S

hopping

LISA WALDEN SELECTS FREE-STANDING BATHS, VANITY UNITS AND WALL LIGHTS IN A RANGE OF STYLES

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Stone ‘Napoli’, 50.3 x 190 x 84.5cm, from £2,885, from Victoria + Albert. vandabaths.com. Iso-enamel ‘Tubby Too’, 92 x 147 x 69cm, £2,061, from The Albion Bath Company. albionbathco.com. Marble ‘Kora’, 47 x 170 x 84cm, £58,908, from West One Bathrooms. westonebathrooms. com. Marble ‘Portman’, 60 x 184.5 x 88cm, from £4,740, from Porter. porterbathroom.com. Tin ‘Aequs’, 60 x 175 x 75cm, £5,334, from William Holland. williamholland.com. Cast iron ‘Humber’ painted in ‘Mister David’ by Little Greene, 60 x 170 x 77.5cm, from £3,570, from Drummonds. drummonds-uk.com 컄 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS 2018 75


BATHROOM | SHOPPING

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT ‘Monograph’ (light clay), 54 x 60 x 37.5cm, £1,081.50, from Laura Ashley. lauraashleybathroomcollection.com. Brass and marble ‘Gotham’ (brass finish), 84 x 101.2 x 50.7cm, £1,703.89, from Balineum. balineum.co.uk. Walnut ‘Plural’, by Terri Pecora, 100cm wide, price on request, from VitrA. vitra.co.uk. Oak ‘Arden’, 75.6 x 167.6 x 47.6cm, £1,613, from Waterworks. uk.waterworks.com. Wood ‘Harry Junior’, 92 x 53 x 40cm, £2,515, from Devon & Devon. devon-devon.com. (centre) Oak ‘Cavendish’, 91 x 60 x 43cm, from £2,520, from Porter. porterbathroom.com 컄 76 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS


Design Centre | Chelsea Harbour | landmark-collection.co.uk | Made in England


BATHROOM | SHOPPING

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT ‘Scallop Shell’ (antiqued plaster), 59 x 51.5 x 19cm, £1,146, from Porta Romana. portaromana.com. Brass ‘Bedford Swing Arm’, 15.4cm shade diameter, £910.80, from Balineum. balineum.co.uk. ‘Beverley’, 33 x 10.8 x 8.9cm, £396, from Vaughan. vaughandesigns.com. Ceramic ‘Lucia L’ (arancio/antique brass), 23.5 x 25cm shade diameter, from £270, from Hector Finch. hectorfinch.com. ‘Scoop Small’, by Michael Amato, 45.1 x 15.24 x 24.13cm, from $1,276, from The Urban Electric Co. urbanelectricco.com. (centre) ‘Swan’ with glass ‘Classic Traditional’ shade (turkish blue), 15.5cm arm height, £445, from Curiousa & Curiousa. curiousa.co.uk. Background, print from the National Maritime Museum collection, from £70, from Surface View. surfaceview.co.uk 첸 78 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS


What the best dressed bathrooms are wearing this year.

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BATHROOM | DESIGN

An impressive shower mosaic by Pierre Mesguich Mosaik enlivens this bathroom, which belongs to designer Sophie Hale. mesguichmosaik. co.uk sophiehale.com

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MICHAEL SINCLAIR

athroom design

WHEN IT COMES TO BATHROOMS, IT IS NOT ONLY THE SANITARYWARE THAT IS IMPORTANT, BUT ALSO HOW YOU ORGANISE AND DECORATE THE SPACE – IT NEED NOT ALL BE WHITE. ELIZABETH METCALFE CONSULTS THE EXPERTS ON HOW TO CREATE THE IDEAL BATHROOM AND PRESENTS SOME INSPIRING EXAMPLES KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS 2018 81


BATHROOM | DESIGN

P L A N N I N G A B AT H R O O M

‘CONSIDER THE FUNCTION OF YOUR BATHROOM and your priorities. Is it intended to be a family space or a sanctuary to relax in? Think about whether you will actually need a bath in there. Once you have worked out the most valuable use of the space, you can focus on the key items and the rest of the design will fall into place.’ Marc Howlett, sales manager at William Holland. williamholland.com ‘CLASSIC, NATURAL MATERIALS ARE ALWAYS BEST in bathrooms, such as ceramic, stone, wood, marble and cork. You can add colour by layering with wallpaper, paint or art (see above left, in a bathroom by Edward Bulmer).’ Sarah Watson, owner of Balineum. balineum.co.uk ‘LOOK AT THE PROPORTIONS OF THE SPACE you actually have available. Bathrooms can often be in unconventionally shaped rooms with angled ceilings (see above right, in a bathroom by Adam Bray), so you should choose furniture and sanitaryware carefully. A wall-hung loo with a reduced-height frame, 82 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS

for example, would fit well within an area with a lower ceiling.’ Margaret Talbot, marketing manager at VitrA. vitra.co.uk ‘THINK ABOUT STORAGE AT THE DESIGN STAGE so that you can allow sufficient space for free-standing units or a mirrored cabinet that is set into the wall. Often it is an afterthought and this results in a cluttered bathroom.’ Howard Birch, director at Aston Matthews. astonmatthews.co.uk ‘EXISTING PLUMBING IS ONE OF THE KEY ELEMENTS that you must consider when planning the layout. Most of the time, a competent installer will be able to reposition plumbing to suit your desired design, but sometimes this is not possible. If you live in a listed property, it may restrict external plumbing and it is worth knowing if this is the case from the start. It is also important to consider your water volume when planning a new bathroom – some shower heads can use up to 50 litres of water a minute and some baths take in excess of 300 litres.’ Louise Ashdown, head of design at West One Bathrooms. westonebathrooms.com 컄

LUCAS ALLEN; CHRIS TUBBS

Expert advice on where to start and what to think about


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D E C O R AT I N G

WALLCOVERINGS Wallpaper is an excellent way to give a bathroom a bit more character and depth. In this bathroom (top left), designer Gavin Houghton has combined a pretty ivy-adorned wallpaper with a wall of white metro tiles. ‘I wanted to create a vintage feel,’ says Gavin. The wallpaper is now discontinued, but Sanderson’s ‘Hedera’ (£53 for a 10-metre roll) is a close match. The striped curtains soften the space, and wall lights from Hector Finch illuminate the bath. gavinhoughton.co.uk | stylelibrary.com | hectorfinch.com MIXED MATERIALS This bathroom by design company Maddux Creative (top right) shows just how much fun you can have decorating the space. The bath – a vintage piece from The Water Monopoly – sits beneath an elaborate Fifties Murano glass chandelier, and the shower is concealed by a bespoke screen. The walls surrounding the shower are clad in a striking pink marble. madduxcreative.com thewatermonopoly.com TILING AND ARTWORK To give a bathroom a decorated feel, add layers to the space with coloured tiles and artwork. Here, Fired Earth’s green ‘Retro Metro’ tiles (£79.20 a square metre) line the walls (bottom). If you’re worried about the moisture in bathrooms damaging art, it is worth sticking to inexpensive pieces. If you keep the space well ventilated and open windows when possible, moisture should not cause too much of a problem. A patterned tile has been used for the floor – Fired Earth’s ‘Boulangerie’, £74.70 a square metre – which adds another layer. firedearth.com 컄 84 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS

JAMES MCDONALD; RICARDO LABOUGLE

Treat the bathroom like any other room in the house, adding colour and pattern with wallpaper and tiles, and thinking about the furniture and lighting


         

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BATHROOM | DESIGN

B AT H I N G

HOW TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT BATH 1 ‘A free-standing bath is better in a larger space where it takes centre stage with plenty of space surrounding it. For smaller spaces, a built-in bath can be a good choice (as seen top left, in a bathroom by William Smalley). It is also a much better option if you plan to have a shower over the bath, too.’ Leanne Robey, designer at Ripples. ripplesbathrooms.com 2 ‘Think about the scale of your bath so that it is proportional to the room. There are now many compact baths to choose from if you have limited space. Consider where taps will go – a double-ended bath is rendered single-ended if a tap is mounted at the end. Instead, choose to mount the taps in the centre.’ Jonathan Carter, marketing director at Victoria + Albert Baths. vandabaths.com 3 ‘Weight can prove an issue with some free-standing baths. Acrylic and cast stone resin composites are both good lighter options, but be careful when choosing because cheaper alternatives may not provide sufficient strength. We recommend Iso-enamel baths – they weigh a third of an equivalent cast-iron bath so there is no need to reinforce your floors.’ Phil Etherden, managing director at The Albion Bath Company. albionbathco.com HOW TO COMBINE A BATH AND SHOWER In this sophisticated bathroom by Peter Mikic (top right), the bath – clad in white marble – is positioned at the end of the room, allowing space for a shower at the opposite end. Note how the washbasins and shower tray have also been made from marble, to tie the elements together. petermikic.com HOW TO MAKE A STAND-ALONE SHOWER A FEATURE 1 ‘Your shower enclosure needs to be able to withstand everyday wear and tear. A tiled interior (as seen right, in a bathroom by Harriet Anstruther) is an excellent option, and choose thick glass doors that slide easily for longevity.’ Nicholas Cunild, managing director at Matki. matki.co.uk 2 ‘Choose your showerhead carefully. Look for multiple spray options – from an intense jet to a relaxing massage spray – and make sure the head comes in a finish that ties in with the rest of the materials.’ Michael Gray, product manager at Grohe. grohe.co.uk 컄 86 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS

ALEXANDER JAMES; KATE MARTIN; PAUL MASSEY

Space often dictates whether you have a shower or bath – or both. Consider these tips to ensure you make the right choice


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VA N I T I E S Not just a functional item, the vanity unit can dictate the tone, from sleek and streamlined wood in a minimalist space to striking marble in a more opulent bathroom

FURNITURE If it wasn’t for the brass taps, you could easily mistake this ‘Carlton’ vanity unit by Porter, from £2,634 (top left), for a piece of furniture. Pieces such as this give bathrooms a bit more personality and prevent them from feeling clinical. It is topped with Carrara marble and provides various storage options through three drawers and two cupboards. porterbathroom.com DOUBLE WASHSTANDS A washstand by Catchpole & Rye – the ‘La Parisienne Double Arabascato’, which costs from £5,400 – is an elegant choice for this bathroom (top right). It is proof that washbasins can be as decorative as they are practical. Double washstands are excellent for couples, and are especially good in en suite bathrooms. catchpoleandrye.com WALL-MOUNTED Laufen’s wall-mounted unit is a great option if you are looking to create a streamlined bathroom, which has plenty of storage (left). It would also work well in small bathrooms – keeping the floor space free makes the room feel larger than it in fact is. The tall cabinet to the right contains four shelves and further storage is provided by the deep drawer to the right of the sink. laufen.co.uk

FOUR CONSIDERATIONS WHEN LIGHTING A BATHROOM 1 Think about lighting early on when planning a bathroom. Each zone – the showering area, the vanity area, the loo – may require different types and intensities of light, so it takes time to get the lighting right for each area. 2 Make sure lights are Ingress 88 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS

Protection (IP) rated. There are different suggested IP ratings, depending on how close you are to water, but in wet areas lights should be rated IP65 or higher. 3 Layer lighting and use two or three different circuits. This way you will have more

control over how the space is lit at different times of day. You need good task lighting in vanity mirror areas, and it is best to light from both the left and right rather than above – this reduces shadows and you will get a more even light across the face.

4 Indirect lighting, such as in recesses or steps, is great in bathrooms. It creates a lovely ambience and doubles as a handy night light when fitted on a different circuit. By Yousef Mansuri, head of retail design at C P Hart. cphart.co.uk 첸


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FROM TOP The Plural collection by Terri Pecora. Outline collection by VitrA’s in-house design team. The Scandinavian-inspired Sento collection. OPPOSITE Water Jewels bath by Matteo Thun; Suit brassware by VitrA’s in-house design team; and Eternity accessories by Sebastian Conran

istorically, the bathroom was rarely given the same consideration in terms of its design and decoration as other rooms in the home. However, when the influences of Turkish bathing rituals made their way to Britain and its empire in the Victorian era, bathing as a method of cleansing and relaxing became well practised and as a result, bathroom design quickly gained more significance. Fast forward to the present and leading bathroom brand VitrA is continuing to bring these influences into the twenty-first century with their designs. Founded in 1966, VitrA is now one of the world’s leading sanitaryware manufacturers, and at the heart of the brand is a commitment to design – so much so that it employs a large in-house studio, as well as collaborating with a roster of cutting-edge designers. The latest of these collaborations is with Milan-based American designer Terri Pecora, who has created the Plural collection that positions the bathroom at the heart of the home. Plural reimagines bathing as a ritual that reconnects people with themselves and those close to them. And, of course, each piece is a testament to VitrA’s design commitment, with a neutral colour palette and wood finishes that bring a sense of domesticity rarely felt in a bathroom. The talented in-house design team has also created three new beautiful product ranges. The Frame collection consists of basins and bathroom furniture combining warm hues in a variety of matte finishes. The furniture consists of wall hung storage units, open-front units and mirror cabinets, offering ample storage space that’s perfect for smaller bathrooms. Wall-hung furniture is also a feature of the new range in the Sento collection. Scandinavian design lends to rounded profiles and a cosy, intimate feel that’s finished in light oak, ideal for both a full-size family bathroom or small cloakroom. Finally, the piece-de-resistance comes with Outline, a collection of ultra-fine, elegantly shaped wash basins made using Cerafine, a new material in bathroom production which is easy to clean and resistant to erosion. The material also allows a beautifully slim design not possibly achieved using more traditional materials, without compromising on strength. Visit vitra.co.uk for more information, or vitra-showrooms.co.uk to find a showroom near you 첸

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HOUSE & GARDEN PROMOTION

Details in design Design is at the core of the Turkish bathroom company VitrA’s philosophy, as showcased in four new innovative collections of bathroom furniture, bathtubs, brassware and accessories


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Moodboard

BATHROOM | MOODBOARD

RUTH SLEIGHTHOLME presents three inspiring looks for bathrooms

CARL WHITHAM; GYORGY KOROSSY; SIMON UPTON

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Linen towel, (yellow ochre), 30cm square, €65, from Merci. merci-merci.com. ‘Clyde’ brass, marble, oak and birch vanity (polished chrome), 88 x 160 x 55cm, £6,210 excluding taps, from Porter. porterbathroom.com. ‘Rockwell’ brass shower head (powder), 10cm diameter, £377, from The Water Monopoly. thewatermonopoly.com. ‘Jigsaw Hopscotch’ ceramic tiles (turmeric), by Neisha Crosland, 20 x 30cm, £10.20 each, from Artisans of Devizes. artisansofdevizes. com. ‘Dome’ terracotta vases, by Kristina Dam, 26 x 14.5cm diameter, £72; and 20 x 14cm diameter, £58; both from Goodhood. goodhoodstore.com. Pine and cane ‘Jelks Cabinet’, 209 x 95 x 45cm, £1,795, from Jelks. jelksengland.co.uk. 컄

KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS 2018 93


BATHROOM | MOODBOARD

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT ‘C3’ and ‘C2’ terracotta tiles, 10cm square, €450 a square metre, from Ateliers Zelij. zelij.com. Lacquered wood ‘Flora Wall Mirror’ (white), 100cm diameter, £1,100, from Balineum. balineum.co.uk. ‘Peggy’ ash chair, by Sue Skeen and Sitting Firm Chairmakers, 86.5 x 38.5 x 38.5cm, £500, from The New Cratsmen. thenewcratsmen.com. ‘C7’ terracotta tile, 10cm square, €450 a square metre, from Ateliers Zelij, as before. Cotton waffle hand towel (camel), 50 x 90cm, £9.99; and bath towel (camel), 90 x 150cm, £25.99; both from Zara Home. zarahome.com. ‘Broadway’ ceramic basin and chrome stand, 120 x 90 x 42cm, £6,384, from West One Bathrooms. westonebathrooms.com. Urushi-lacquered cherry wood dish, by Takashi Tomii, 18cm diameter, £135, from The Cold Press. thecoldpress.com. ‘Nuage Goutte Light Bille’ (black) brass door handle, 10.5cm projection, €427, from Bonnemazou Cambus. bonnemazou-cambus.fr 컄

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Put down the roller and the ‘safe’ white paint. Step back. Imagine. Turn tiles this way and that, play with colour, patterns, light. Choose taps that glitter like jewels, showers that drench, a bath born for bubbles (and bubbly). Create something bold, beautiful and...

Distinctively Individual

What will you create with Heritage Bathrooms? Find out more at heritagebathrooms.co.uk


BATHROOM | MOODBOARD

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT ‘Parure I’ brass and glass bowl, by Cristina Celestino, 22 x 25cm diameter, €421, from Paola C. paolac.com. Marble, from let: ‘Elegant Grey’, £330 a square metre; and ‘Calacatta Delicato’, £714 a square metre; both from Lapicida. lapicida.com. Steel and velvet ‘Stay Dining Armchair’ (acier), by Nika Zupanc, 100 x 65 x 57cm, £1,458, from Sé. se-collections.com. Organza and brass ‘Guinea Wall Lamp’ (pink), 33 x 30 x 20cm, €1,025, from Servomuto. servomuto.com. ‘Ruth’ brass cupboard pull, 3.5cm high, €46, from Van Cronenburg. petervancronenburg.com. ‘Plouf ’ lacquered ibreglass bath (strawberry), by India Mahdavi, 76 x 53 x 178cm, £9,016, from Bisazza. bisazza. it. ‘3D Rombo’ clay tiles, 20 x 10cm, €380 a square metre, from File Under Pop. fileunderpop.com 첸

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What’s missing from an Albion bath? Excessive Weight. Our unique material is strong and durable, yet weighs around 1/3 of the cast iron equivalent. Shown is our brand new Torre Dee bath with a Polished Pewter exterior.

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soft glamour IN A RURAL NEWBUILD JUST OUTSIDE ST PETERSBURG, TOLKO INTERIORS AND C P HART HAVE CREATED A RELAXING BATHROOM FOR A TEENAGE GIRL, REFERENCING HER LOVE OF FASHION WITH ELEGANT ADDITIONS

TEXT DAMIAN THOMPSON | PHOTOGRAPHS IGOR FINISIMOV

n the febrile, competitive world of Russian interior design, Tolko Interiors, which launched just two years ago, has already created quite a stir. The young company, co-founded by Denis Gorokhov and Nikolay Koloskov, will soon be unveiling images of the central London home they’ve decorated for a French television presenter. Recently, however, the duo have been commissioned to design the interior of a three-storey newbuild in a village just outside St Petersburg – a slice of rural serenity for well-heeled commuters. ‘Our client completely trusts our taste,’ says Denis, ‘and the only brief was his wish for functionality and convenience for the whole family.’ The commitment to open-plan living, and the lack of internal walls, is the most striking thing about the place as a whole. The bathrooms are intended to feel like a natural extension of the living space. The one shown on these pages is on the third (children’s) level and was designed specifically

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for the client’s teenage daughter. Reclining in her freestanding C P Hart bath, she is gifted with wonderful views down to a landscaped lake in the middle of the complex. Smart glass technology ensures her privacy. Acknowledging her love of fashion, Nikolay and Denis have made the bathroom’s centrepiece a large vertical plinth with recessed storage behind, which incorporates a vanity unit and a floor-to-ceiling mirror, from which the mixer tap emerges. It is a space of contrasting effects: the ‘Supernova’ track lights from Delta Light, muted terracotta tiles and the understated glamour of the velvet ottoman all offer a sense of calm. These relaxing effects are almost overturned in the shower stall, which looks as though Jackson Pollock has been let loose with a loaded paintbrush. The ‘Artwork’ tiles from Italian company Ornamenta add a dynamism and drama that seems fitting for an energetic young person rushing to get ready for a busy day in the city 첸 cphart.co.uk | tolkointeriors.ru


I T I S A S PAC E O F C O N T R A S T I N G E F F E C T S , W I T H U N D E R S TAT E D G L A M O U R A N D A S E N S E O F CA L M

OPPOSITE FROM LEFT A free-standing ‘Ex.t Stand’ bath from C P Hart is positioned to look out over the view, with smart glass ensuring privacy. The shower is lined with ‘Artwork’ tiles from Ornamenta. THIS PAGE A vanity unit with a circular ‘Ex.t Round Countertop Washbasin’ from C P Hart sits in front of a floor-to-ceiling mirror, from which the tap emerges


here are bathrooms that repel with cold floors and soulless features, then there are those that welcome like the warmth of an old friend. Combining classical proportions and traditional architectural features with warm colours and textures, the en suite in this Palladian-style Georgian mansion house is certainly welcoming. The owners of the property called on the interior designer Vanessa Van Reyk to create a highly original space full of charming features. ‘I wanted to design a striking room that looked like an alteration, rather than a completely new design,’ says Vanessa. ‘We added in coving and panelling and focused on creating a historically appropriate scheme.’ She sourced sanitaryware from Drummonds, including a large, free-standing ‘Wye’ cast-iron bath. ‘Drummonds was the perfect choice to use throughout the bathroom as its designs and shapes are classic, simple, elegant and timeless,’ explains Vanessa. Practicality underpins the entire design. The loo and shower are tucked around the corner, effectively hidden for privacy and to create a relaxing bathing space. As well as downlights, there are very subtle uplighters by the bath, the rims of which are colour-coded so they are effectively hidden in the wood floor. Storage is hidden in the side panelling and a five-bar floor-mounted towel rail provides warmth. The design is enhanced by quality materials. Pelmets made from historical French Tassinari & Chatel fabric are outline quilted, the hint of rust in the fabric providing a pleasing contrast with the Arabescato marble of the double ‘Lowther’ vanity basin unit. The colours complement, rather than match, the teal blue accents of the bedroom. ‘An en suite should ideally feel like a living space in its own right,’ says Vanessa. Large ‘Derwent’ vanity mirrors, framed by lights with fluted shades, create space and add light, while a glamorous antique chandelier completes the bold look. This very inviting bathroom scene champions design successes of the past in a charming and contemporary way 첸 drummonds-uk.com | vvrdesign.com

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100 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS


OPPOSITE The en suite adjoining this bedroom continues the warm, historically appropriate decoration scheme. THIS PAGE A chandelier illuminates the ‘Wye’ bath from Drummonds; the double vanity basin unit is the ‘Lowther’

suite success INTERIOR DESIGNER VANESSA VAN REYK HAS CREATED AN ELEGANT EN SUITE THAT REMAINS TRUE TO THE DECORATION AND ARCHITECTURE OF THIS GEORGIAN HOUSE, COMBINING STRIKING YET TIMELESS SANITARYWARE WITH LUXURIOUS TOUCHES TEXT LOUISA PARKER BOWLES | PHOTOGRAPHS DARREN CHUNG


The floor and part of the wall is lined with a dramatically striéd marble, sourced by McMarmilloyd. To give the bathroom a furnished feel, Hugh chose Soane’s ‘Upholstered Venus’ chair and a custom cherry, cracked lacquer and nickel chest of drawers. All the ixtures and ittings for the bath and shower are from Lefroy Brooks

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et in stone

THE OWNERS OF THIS STRIKING BATHROOM ON NEW YORK’S UPPER EAST SIDE ASKED DESIGNER HUGH LESLIE TO RECREATE THE BATHROOM FROM THEIR PREVIOUS HOUSE, USING A STRIKING ITALIAN MARBLE AS THE FOUNDATION

TEXT MIEKE TEN HAVE | PHOTOGRAPHS LUCAS ALLEN


‘MARBLE IS A P R A C T I C A L S U R FA C E , OF COURSE, BUT IT I S A L S O B E AU T I F U L AND ENGAGING T O L O O K AT ’

or designer Hugh Leslie, this marble-swathed Upper East Side bathroom offered a second chance to improve upon an already much-loved room. The clients, who had called on Hugh to design their previous Notting Hill home, relocated to Manhattan not long after he had completed the project. ‘When we moved, we had only been in the finished house for two years,’ says the owner. ‘It was not enough. I told my husband I wanted to redo London in New York.’ That included her clean but dramatically striéd bathroom. To accomplish this, Hugh went straight back to the Italian quarry where the original stone came from, which he had sourced through McMarmilloyd. ‘It has wonderful, unique marbles,’ he says. Fortunately, it was able to find the same type of marble once again, though this time the patterning was much more ‘strident and vigorous’. It covers the floor and extends up the bathroom walls, which serves several purposes, according to the designer. ‘The owner wanted the room to feel clean,’ he says. ‘Marble is a practical surface, of course, but you add interest with it – it is both beautiful and engaging to look at.’ Hugh linked the wife’s side of the bathroom and dressing room with her husband’s through the shower, which he also cloaked

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from floor to ceiling in the deeply veined marble. ‘This way the shower provides a visual link between the two bathrooms,’ says Hugh, who added a bench to the shower so that it could double up as a steam room. The designer’s other objective was to ‘make it impactful, but not too bathroom-y’, he says. ‘We tried to create a furnished room, rather than just a bathroom.’ Hugh achieved this with a set of late-eighteenth-century Company School watercolours of botanical prints, which he found at James Graham-Stewart, alongside Soane’s whimsical scalloped ‘Upholstered Venus’ chair, and a custom chest of drawers made of polished cherry with cracked lacquer fronts and nickel detailing. ‘The chest links the bathroom to the dressing room next door,’ he says. The elegant, stand-alone bathtub from The Water Monopoly lends a monumental, sculptural appeal to the room. The bathroom’s high ceilings and generous proportions, which Hugh configured by swapping the locations of the original bedroom and bathroom, offer a definitive improvement on the Notting Hill bathroom, which was quite a bit smaller. ‘Ever ask a woman if she has enough dressing room space?’ he asks, without needing a reply 첸 hughleslie.com

A shower, lined from loor to ceiling in the same Italian marble, links the wife’s side of the bathroom to her husband’s 104 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS


BATHROOM | ARCHIVE

from the

ARCHIVES A DESIGNER TAKES INSPIRATION FROM HOUSE & GARDEN’S BACK CATALOGUE, WHICH SPANS MORE THAN 70 YEARS

BY BEATA HEUMAN ‘The perspective of the Canaletto-style mural over the sunken bath adds real depth and, let’s face it, who wouldn’t want to take a shower in the middle of an ancient Roman square? I love a tiled bath, and it can double up as a shower when you can’t fit in a separate one. I’m using that very idea for a project at the moment. The shower curtain is not merely functional but the golden diamonds – and what I’m hoping is a gold fringe – add glamour to the otherwise beautifully pale scheme, with some Yves Klein blue thrown in for good measure. Indoor plants and cool furniture make it feel inviting. The designer has treated this room just like any other in the house; this is how bathrooms from this time and before were done (think fitted carpets, fireplaces, armchairs). To me, bathrooms are the jewel in the crown and, as they tend to be quite standardised these days, an original approach like this has even more of an impact.’ beataheuman.com 첸 106 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS


RDEN O F OP ET

D OW STR L I U N SEY

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Aston Matthews bathrooms

The List DIRECTORY 2019

Calling all design professionals House & Garden will be publishing a print edition of The List with the January 2019 issue. Are you an interior designer, architect or a garden designer? Do you provide a brilliant design service?

photography Jill Tate

Sign up now or renew your existing membership to be a part of it. Visit houseandgarden.co.uk/the-list

SIGN UP BEFORE AUGUST 24 FOR GUARANTEED INCLUSION IN THE LIST DIRECTORY 2019

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SELF PORTRAIT I believe that GOOD DESIGN has meaning; the things we surround ourselves with everyday should move us and make us feel alive. It is these qualities that I am inspired by and seek to bring out in an interior – ultimately it is a soulfulness that allows people to connect to the spaces that they inhabit.

The catchphrase of my life is my mother in my head saying ‘you go, girl’.

I am in a book club with my sister and my best friends. We’ve just read IN COLD BLOOD

by Truman Capote and it got rave reviews from all.

I just launched my own FURNITURE COLLECTION

called Piece By Piece with The Invisible Collection. It is a celebration of craft and a showcase of unusual, stunning materials. My favourite piece is the ‘Leopard Foot Dressing Table’, below, because I love that it has all the attitude of a little animal but is also very graceful and elegant because of the colour palette and materials.

I believe there is a poetry in the tension of combining art, antiques, craft, colour, pattern and texture; the careful layering brings character, atmosphere and feeling to a home. 108 2018 KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS

Sophie Ashby

THE INTERIOR DESIGNER BEHIND STUDIO ASHBY DISCUSSES HER WORK AND INSPIRATIONS

At the moment I am focused on contemporary African art: there are some wonderful galleries in South Africa that I regularly buy from, including SMITH GALLERY

and WHAT IF THE WORLD. Art has been a constant love of my life 첸

AS TOLD TO LISA WALDEN. PHOTOGRAPHS: JON GORRIGAN; PHILIP DURRANT; LAKIN OGUNBANWO, UNCOVER, 2016, COURTESY OF LAKIN OGUNBANWO/WHATIFTHEWORLD; JEANNE GAIGHER, LIVING ROOM SET (I), 2016, COURTESY OF SMITH GALLERY/JEANNE GAIGHER

My favourite piece of art is a portrait my husband Charlie did at school. It’s an oil painting, in the style of Jenny Saville, and it makes me smile to think of him as a teenager. Second place is a large photograph by RUBEN BRULAT called Patiences (Goreme, Turkey, 2011), above, from his stunning series Paths.


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