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Kings & Queens: Pinball, Imagists and Chicago Curated by Dan Nadel February 25 - May 7, 2017


Ethan D'Ercole, S-Curve, 2017, Silkscreen Print


PROG RAMS FEB 24

7pm Members Preview of Kings & Queens: Pinball, Imagists and Chicago

A preview of the exhibition Kings & Queens: Pinball, Imagists and Chicago. Open to members, donors and guests of exhibiting artists. Snacks and drinks will be provided.

FEB 25

1pm Panel Discussion "Kings & Queens: Pinball, Imagists and Chicago"

The panel will be moderated by Dan Nadel, Curator of Kings & Queens: Pinball, Imagists and Chicago. The participants are artists Suellen Rocca (also the Curator and Director of Exhibitions at Elmhurst College) and Karl Wirsum; and pinball curator Jim Schelberg, (also Publisher/ Editor of the PinGame Journal).

MARCH 18

1:30pm Kings & Queens Exhibition and Elmhurst College Collection Highlights tour with Suellen Rocca

Highlights tour will be held at the Elmhurst Art Museum and Elmhurst College A.C. Buehler Library

MARCH 31

6pm Film Screening "Hairy Who and the Chicago Imagists" at Elmhurst College

Film screening of the documentary "Hairy Who and the Chicago Imagists" at Illinois Hall at Elmhurst College. Suellen Rocca, Curator and Director of Exhibitions at Elmhurst College, will be providing a brief introduction and, following the screening, a tour of Elmhurst College Imagist Art Collection.

APRIL 21

6pm Talk with Suellen Rocca, Curator and Director of Exhibitions at Elmhurst College

APRIL 29

12pm TILT! Roger Brown eyeballs popular culture

Roger Brown Study Collection curator Lisa Stone will hop on the soap box and unfurl a cavalcade of Brown's paintings addressing aspects of popular culture: entertainments, distractions, wonders, and annoyances, in works from 1970 to 1997.

APRIL 29

1:30pm Kings & Queens Exhibition and Elmhurst College Collection Highlights tour with Suellen Rocca

Highlights tour will be held at the Elmhurst Art Museum & Elmhurst College A.C. Buehler Library


Karl Wirsum Click 1971, Acrylic on canvas, 24 x 36 in. Image Courtesy of Elmhurst College Art Collection


There is a bridge in New Jersey emblazoned with the words, “Trenton Makes, The World Takes.” This might as well be the motto of Chicago, given the debt of gratitude owed to Chicago for its many gifts. Walt Disney, Playboy, Bozo the Clown and pinball are just a few of Chicago’s contributions to the international pantheon of American popular culture. It makes all the sense in the world that the exuberant, irreverent art of the Hairy Who and the Chicago Imagists originated among the rich vernacular style of the city’s arcades, amusement parks and burlesque halls, which introduced the world to the striptease and the infamous Chicago G-String. The coasts have a large, Midwest-shaped blind spot. I first encountered the work of Jim Nutt in 2011 as an out-of-towner visiting the MCA’s Nutt retrospective, and I felt the way I imagined Darwin must upon landing in the Galapagos. How was it possible that this amazing work had existed since the 1960s, and yet I was completely unaware of it after decades in the arts. “Discovering” the work of the other members of the Hairy Who and the Chicago Imagists I was again dumbfounded that an entire movement had evolved on this inland archipelago outside the canons of 20th century art history. The acid colors, heavy outlines and in particular the use of reverse-painted Plexiglas as a support stuck with me like an unsolved mystery. Flash-forward to the summer of 2015 and a family trip to Las Vegas. It is 108 degrees in the shade and we retreat to the darkest, coolest family-friendly place we can find: the Pinball Hall of Fame. Who knew that Chicago was the epicenter of pinball in America!? I certainly did not, until that visit which was the site of an epiphany when I found myself surrounded by Gottlieb pinball machines while images of Jim Nutt’s reverse-painted Plexiglass wonders danced in my head. When I learned that the Gottlieb family was from Elmhurst(!) and that our neighbor, Elmhurst College, has a strong collection of work by the Hairy Who and the Chicago Imagists, the germ of an idea for an exhibition was planted. But how to explain the omission of the Hairy Who and the Chicago Imagists from the historical canon of modern art in America? Their longstanding and selfimposed outsider stance is certainly a factor, as is their headquarters in “the second city.” The New York artists who came to be known as Abstract Expressionists, Minimalists and Pop had as their champion the founder

of the eponymous mega-gallery, Leo Castelli, regarded by many as the single most influential figure in 20th century art. The Hairy Who and the Imagists original champion was artist-curator, Don Baum, at the not-forprofit Hyde Park Art Center, a beloved institution littleknown outside Chicago. Baum was a fierce proponent of Chicago and its artists, yet a belief in the city’s regional exceptionalism in some ways held back the advancement of Chicago artists. More recently, filmmaker Leslie Buchbinder’s documentary, “Hairy Who and the the Chicago Imagists” (to be screened at Elmhurst College on Friday, March 31st) and exhibitions curated by Dan Nadel at the Rhode Island School of Design Museum and Matthew Marks Gallery in New York have introduced this work to new audiences. Artist-curator Jeff Koons has also helped revive the work of Ed Paschke with shows at Gagosian Gallery and others. Koons came to Chicago for a year (1974-5) to attend the SAIC and to work in Paschke’s studio, a time frame explored by the Museum of Contemporary Art’s 2008 exhibition, “Everything’s Here: Jeff Koons and His Experience of Chicago.” There are many to thank for bringing this exhibition to fruition: Jim Schellberg, our intrepid pinball wrangler and historian; Robert Sill, Curator of the Illinois State Museum; Lal Bahcecioglu for herding cats; Ethan D’Ercole for his inspired exhibition design; artistcurator Suellen Rocca and Elmhurst College; the great Contsantino Mitchell for providing heart as well as art; curator of the Roger Brown Study Collection Lisa Stone; pinball wizard Roger Sharpe; Nathan Lilley and the guys at Logan Arcade; the Kavi Gupta Gallery, Sharon Paschke; and the private collectors who have generously shared their treasures with us so that we can bring you this story. Above all, special thanks to the brilliant Dan Nadel for sharing my enthusiasm for this exhibition, for embracing it, researching the heck out of it and making it his own.

Jenny Gibbs, Executive Director Elmhurst Art Museum


Ed Paschke Hairy Shoes 1971, Silkscreen, 10 1/8 x 13 1/4 in. Courtesy of the Illinois State Museum Fine Art Collection


Kings & Queens: Pinball, Imagists and Chicago Dan Nadel Chicago art, like most, tends to function best via relationships — collaborative, pedagogical, competitive. And in Chicago in particular, a city with so many geographic and aesthetic nooks and crannies, a guide of some sort was often sought and gratefully accepted. King and Queens begins with one of those relationships: This one between Ed Paschke (1939-2004) and Constantino Mitchell. Together they would mount a definitive exhibition on pinball, and the inspiration for the present show, Flip! Flash! Pinball Art, in 1982 at the Chicago Cultural Center. But before that, in the mid 1970s, Ed Paschke was a successful and well-respected painter in Chicago. He had exhibited in some of the famed group shows the city, including Non-Plussed Some, Marriage Chicago Style, and Don Baum Sez “Chicago Needs Famous Artists” alongside all of the painters in the present exhibition: Karl Wirsum, Barbara Rossi, Ed Flood, Suellen Rocca, Jim Nutt, Gladys Nilsson, Christina Ramberg, Ray Yoshida, and Roger Brown. Mitchell was a painting student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago possessed of unusually tight drafting abilities and an imagination that veered to the fantastic. Mitchell’s instructor, the artist, collector, and mentor to numerous painters, Yoshida, suggested that Paschke meet the young artist. The two shared a love of comic books, pinball, and, as Mitchell put it, “the gritty, the ugly, the outrageous soul of the City of Chicago. We would go to the Green Mill, EXIT nightclub, CrowBar nightclub etc. We were night people.”. Paschke gave the younger artist suggestions for what to look at and how to build on his ideas. Mitchell was headed for life in painting when, in 1976, he got word that Williams Electronics, one of the big three local pinball companies, was looking for a new direction. His neighbor was a vice-president and took Mitchell to meet the boss. The young artist drew his ideas on the spot and Williams offered him a job. With Paschke’s encouragement, Mitchell accepted, and that was the beginning of a long and illustrious career in game design. The pinball world Mitchell entered was a booming business with a history stretching back half century. Chicago was at the center of it all, as it was, not coincidentally, for the printing business. The city had the advantage of being not only a central shipping point for the rest of the United States, but an industrial and cultural hub as well. It was the perfect place to, say, publish and distribute children’s books, manufacture and package chewing gum, and of course, to produce and sell games. In the second part of the 20th century the two biggest pinball companies were Gottlieb, considered the “Cadillac of pinball” and Williams, which began smaller but eventually equalled its rival. There were other companies, including Chicago Coin, and Bally, but only Bally would really compete in the 1970s. The artwork on the pinball machines veered toward the racy and the macho because, in the days before it became popular with kids, the machines were set up at bars for the mostly male patrons. Gottlieb employed the services of an commercial art agency called, appropriately enough, Advertising Posters to provide the visuals, and it in turn brought pinball some if the game’s defining artists, including Roy Parker, who, before his death in 1966, drew 290

Ed Paschke Cobmaster 1975, Oil on canvas, 74 x 50 in. Image Courtesy of Elmhurst College Art Collection


Gottlieb machines. His gloriously stiff, highly detailed scenes of gamblers (Kings & Queens, 1965), beautiful women, cowboys, baseball, and every other conceivable topic imprinted themselves on two generations of players. Parker had a flair for narrative, and had no trouble arranging multiple figures, each with its own glaring color, in a historical setting of his choice. Parker and his colleagues’ artwork looked so bold partly as a result of its printing process. The artwork on the pinball machines was silkscreened on the back of the glass, a technique fairly common in the advertising world, but unknown to the gaming companies. This enabled the artists to make crisp, extremely colorful images with an emphasis on strong holding lines delineating complex forms. That aesthetic was part of what Paschke and his peers became known for in the 1960s. The artists, Wirsum, Rossi, Flood, Rocca, Nutt, Nilsson, Ramberg, Yoshida, Paschke and Brown, who all became known, for better or worse, as the Chicago Imagists, had all studied at the School of the Art Institute and shared aesthetic inspirations and interests, including Mesoamerican pottery, comic books, Northwestern Native American art, paintings by Miró and Max Beckmann, Nazca and Oceania objects, hand-painted signs, and, of course, pinball. The fact that the industry itself was in Chicago was not lost on the artists. It, along with so much else, was the subject of obsessive collecting and documentation by many of them. Ramberg, Brown, and Whitney Halstead (who taught art history to most of these artists and incorporated the vernacular into his lectures) also photographed their urban environs wth great passion, leaving behind a stunning record of mid-20th century Chicago.

Top: Jim Nutt Officer Doodit 1968, Acrylic on Plexiglass, aluminum, rubber, enamel on wood frame, 24 5/8 x 21 x 1 1/4 in. Image Courtesy of Roger Brown Study Collection Bottom: Gladys Nilsson Star Bird 1968, Mixed media on Plexiglass, 17 1/2 x 13 in. Courtesy of Lawrence & Evelyn Aronson

Beginning in 1966 the Imagists gradually exhibited in focused shows at the Hyde Park Art Center under the auspices of the curator and impresario Don Baum. They adopted group monikers including Hairy Who and The False Image, and some were included in exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art, among other institutions. Jim Nutt’s Officer Doodit, 1968, which is backpainted on plexi-glass, could double as a pinball backglass and a surreal mug shot. Ed Flood’s Silver Crown, 1969 is a direct homage to pinball, employing the artist’s signature palm trees and waves as the language of his own private game. Roger Brown’s Cosmic Contraction, 1989 is like a vibrant take on both the cosmos and the commercial language used to depict it. Barbara Rossi and Gladys Nilsson’s paintings are extraordinary in the way they seem to depict figures in animated gamesmanship, with all the flat graphic flare of pinball. Karl Wirsum’s Click, which is an affectionate portrait of his wife, Lorri Gunn, has the flash that Paschke so valued in the games, his Oh My Milo That Ain’t No Horse Fly, 1979, has all the humor and precision of a game board, and Public Squeker #1 could well be a mascot. Suellen Rocca’s triptych, Cho Cone, seen here for the first time since its creation in 1966, employs the motifs and languages of kindergarten pre-readers and game boards to create a monument to youthful perceptions. Christina Ramberg has a darker vision, and produces nearly devotional paintings of bodies and bodily forms. Darker still, and glorying in it, is Ed Paschke. Green Ava, 1977, is a character who wants out of the canvas and onto the floor, while Cobmaster, 1975 appears to be the master of ceremonies, his colors screaming to let us all in on the fun. And the fun was happening in pinball in the 1970s. The artwork on the machines was growing ever more elaborate. Christian Marche (Spanish Eyes, 1972) brought a near-Cubist flair to his figuration, freely employing geometric distortions. Dave Christensen (Fireball, 1971) had a fluid line and sense of epic forms and actions — ideally suited to the game. Gordon Morison (Sheriff, 1971; Duotron, 1974) could to the old west as well as he could render robotic futures.


These were masters of a form that required fluency not just in a variety of visual languages, but in the ability to know what the work would look like backlit and in play. Mitchell, meanwhile, often working in collaboration with his wife, Jeanine brought an imagist’s sense of the world to the game, created pulsing, bodycentric images replete with hat-tips to other artists. His paintings for Thunderball, 1982, are as vivid and complex as much of what was hanging on gallery walls at the time, and very much of a piece with Paschke’s in-your-face volumetric rendering. One of finest works, Gorgar, 1979, featured a blood red and bulging demon, ready to burst. It became Ed Paschke’s favorite pinball game, and Mitchell ultimately gave it to him. Paschke kept at it in his home, and it remains with his family. In 1980, Mitchell asked Williams to commission Ed Paschke, to design a back-glass image for a new game called Black Out. The painting Black Out was an homage to the cover of Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. no. 6, 1968 by Jim Steranko, who both artists admired. The Williams executives found the painting a little too far out and so Mitchell, in collaboration with Paschke, who took the news in stride, adjusted the composition to bring it a little closer to a “normal” pinball look. Around the same time, Gregory Knight was the Coordinator of Exhibition at The Chicago Cultural Center. He remembers: “[Flip! Flash!] came together pretty quickly, as most of our projects did way back then. Janet Carl Smith [Director of Programs] and I invited Ed Paschke to come in and discuss being a guest curator for a more conventional show of Chicago painting and sculpture. He was completely non-plussed, but quickly suggested his desire to realize a show about Pinball Art. This was pretty near the advent of the video game, and Ed also had a long history and knowledge of the pinball industry as based in Chicago over decades.” Mitchell picks up the story: “Ed came to me with the idea of [Flip! Flash!]. Williams Electronics, Bally and Gottlieb were all behind it with everything Ed needed for the show. Remember at the time of the show Video Games were a massive hit. I was on a morning show promoting the Pinball Exhibition and I said “ Video Games will be big, but Pinball is mechanically more fun.” You use your whole body to play pinball. I arranged for the Pinball machines. I introduced Ed to the artists I thought would be great. Ed picked who he wanted to show in the Exhibition. He had a lot of fun.” The opening, in typical Paschke style, featured a belly dancer, a clown, and even Big Bird, as well as the local pinball artists and executives. It was a true Chicago affair. What it lacked was any of Paschke’s own art, or that of his colleagues. He kept it focused on pinball, and it remains one of the only serious institutional exhibitions devoted to the art form. In bringing to light an influence on his and his peer’s artwork and treating is not as a secondary “pop culture” inspiration, but rather as a serious art form deserving of study in its own right, Paschke was very much in line with the Imagist’s non-hierarchical vision of art. Everything was the same, and everything was fair game. King and Queens has attempted to honor that vision by including many of Paschke’s selections alongside his own work and that of his peers. Mitchell and Paschke would collaborate one more time — on the artwork for Bad Girls, 1988. This time it was a photograph (shot by Lorne Bidak), meticulously styled and arranged by Paschke, featuring two women playing pool while a sundry cast of outsiders, artists and nightflys look on. It’s a gloriously seedy image, encapsulating the two friend’s love of their city, its people, and the game it nurtured.

Top: Constantino Mitchell Female ThunderBall 1982, Acrylic on board, 33 x 35 x 2.5 in. Courtesy of Constantino Mitchell Middle: Constantino Mitchell ThunderBall Backglass 1982, Acrylic on board, 33 x 35 x 2.5 in. Courtesy of Constantino Mitchell Bottom: Constantino Mitchell, Ed Paschke, & Lorne Bidak Bad Girls Backglass 1988


Art (Not Only) For Art's Sake! Jim Schelberg It’s been over 25 years since my writing and publishing pinball journey began. Collecting was the start. My wife, Marilyn, is the culprit who started the trip when she devised an amazing 40th birthday gift for me: A vintage 1959 Gottlieb Straight Shooter, featuring art by Roy Parker and a trip from Detroit to Pinball Expo ‘89 in Chicago to pick it up. As an unexpected bonus we found that designer, Wayne Neyens was in attendance and he graciously consented to sign my game! It was then that I found pinball, at least for me, was more fun to look at than to play. Marilyn and I met in 1975 while I was attending the Illinois College of Podiatric Medicine when it was in the Gold Coast at Dearborn and Oak. I lived two blocks north at 14 West Elm. It was an amazing time in an amazing area with the Playboy Mansion just a block or two north, Mr. Kelly’s on Rush just a block or two south and Second City a little West … there were more people on State and Division at 3am then at 3pm. One could have a drink at 14 individual places on my block, without crossing the street! One could and I did, sleep all night on the Oak Street Beach and … wake up, again. Nearly every place on my block and just across Division all had pinball machines but there was a new kid in town, as video games were about to attack. It was the 70s and I was in Chicago and I really was not into pinball. So it was great to come back to ChiTown to get my present, be blown away by Pinball Expo and spend some extra time visiting friends and family. But the pinball bug had bit so while there I fired off a letter to the Detroit News classified section offering to buy any pinballs, in any condition and then we both enjoyed a few days seeing the old city as well as old friends and family. When I returned home my answering machine on my phone was full. It was full with messages asking me to take their games. I spent the better part of the next three months following them up. I remember being proud that I could fit two full games in my Bonneville, with the heads on the back seat and the bodies, side by side, sticking out of the trunk. I would go to buy one game but then told there are a couple more in the other room that I could have for just the “cost” of getting them out of basement. The Bally Fireball in this exhibit is one of those games. I soon had a collection of nearly 80 games. Some, as shown here, in nearly perfect condition and some that were too far gone to bring back … and it was around that time that I learned an important lesson about the classic games that caught my eye: The focus of collecting is not really the “game.” The mechanics can be repaired or replaced but It’s the graphics, the designs, the art that is most important and the most fragile and irreplaceable. Kings & Queens 1965 D. Gottlieb & Company courtesy of Mark Weyna.

Being a fairly “big fish” in the very small pond that is pinball, people presume that I know everything, can fix anything and most of all that I am not a person to challenge to a game of pinball. Shhhhh! Don’t tell them but I’m not really good at any of those things.


I’m often invited to deliver a presentation at pinball shows. I’m there the whole weekend, interviewing people, taking photos and hanging out with friends. More often than not, I don’t play one game. Journalism takes my time but my attention is on the physical game. It has been that way since I first saw my Straight Shooter. The attractions for me are the wood, the bright backlit plastics on the playfield and the art on the backglass. More recently as the art changed to “licensed” themes and is produced digitally my focus has shifted. The games became more and more intricate and the art more and more involved. It became more of a complete package. While I’m still no pinball wizard, I started to play more if for no other reason than to see what the game did. For most players, the cool part of pinball art is that it is NOT just art for art’s sake. It has a goal, a purpose beyond appreciation of the image. I’m reminded of the virtual reality goggles I recently tried which were running a program that allowed you to feel you were actually stepping INTO a work of art. While that technology, as amazing as it is, is still in its infancy, pinball, in a way, pinball has done that all along. As Pete Townshend wrote of his character Tommy, “… (he) becomes part of the machine.” That is the goal of pinball art; to entice the player to start a game and then hold their attention so they are immersed in the experience. So whether it’s in this exhibit or out at a location or even if you are lucky enough to own one of these marvels, remember that pinball art is just the start. Allow yourself to be taken INTO the game as you play and like Tommy, let the art help you to become part of the machine!


ARTWOR KS 1. Barbara Rossi, Day for Divers, 1982 Acrylic on canvas 31 5/8 x 41 5/8 in. Courtesy of the Illinois State Museum Fine Art Collection 2. Barbara Rossi, Two Lights, 1982 Acrylic on canvas 48 x 30 in. Courtesy of the Illinois % for Art Program / James R. Thompson Center 3. Christina Ramberg, Black Widow, 1971 Acrylic on canvas 30 x 17 in. Courtesy of the Illinois State Museum Fine Art Collection 4. Christina Ramberg, O.H. #2, 1976 Acrylic on canvas 33 x 28 1/4 in. Courtesy of the Illinois State Museum Fine Art Collection 5. Constantino Mitchell, Deadly Weapon, 1990 Acrylic on board. 37 x 39 x 2 in. Courtesy of the Sharon Paschke Collection 6.

Constantino Mitchell, Female ThunderBall, 1982 Acrylic on board 33 x 35 x 2 1/2 in. Courtesy of Constantino Mitchell

7. Constantino Mitchell, Robo Wars Backglass, 1988 Acrylic on board 32 x 45 x 2 1/2 in. Courtesy of Constantino Mitchell 8. Constantino Mitchell, ThunderBall Backglass, 1982 Acrylic on board 26 x 29 x 1 in. Courtesy of Constantino Mitchell 9. Ed Flood, Silver Crown, 1969 Acrylic on wood, plexiglass 21 9/16 x 31 10/16 x 5 10/16 in. Courtesy of the Roger Brown Study Collection

10. Ed Flood, Two Palms Menaced By a Wave, 1971 Color lithograph 17 x 20 in. Courtesy of Elmhurst College Art Collection 11. Ed Paschke, Blackout, 1980 Oil on canvas 30 x 36 in. Private collection 12. Ed Paschke, Chicaucus, 1983 Oil on canvas 80 x 96 in. Courtesy of the Illinois % for Art Program / James R. Thompson Center 13. Ed Paschke, Cobmaster, 1975 Oil on canvas 74 x 50 in. Courtesy of Elmhurst College Art Collection 14. Ed Paschke, Green Ava, 1977 Oil on canvas 22 x 17 in. Courtesy of the Illinois State Museum Fine Art Collection 15. Ed Paschke, Hairy Shoes, 1971 Silkscreen 10 1/8 x 13 1/4 in. Courtesy of the Illinois State Museum Fine Art Collection 16. Gladys Nilsson, Star Bird, 1968 Mixed media on Plexi-glass 17 1/2 x 13 in. Courtesy of Lawrence & Evelyn Aronson 17. Gladys Nilsson, The Dayly Upsen Downs, 1982 Watercolor on paper 44 x 66 in. Courtesy of the Illinois % for Art Program / James R. Thompson Center 18. Jim Nutt, Officer Doodit, 1968 Acrylic on Plexiglas, aluminum, rubber, enamel on wood frame 24 5/8 x 21 x 1 1/4 in. Courtesy of the Roger Brown Study Collection


19. Karl Wirsum, Click, 1971 Acrylic on canvas 24 x 36 in. Courtesy of Elmhurst College Art Collection 20. Karl Wirsum, Oh My Milo! That Ain’t No Horse Fly, 1979 Acrylic on canvas 48 1/2 x 34 1/2 in. Courtesy of the Illinois State Museum Fine Art Collection 21. Karl Wirsum, Public Squeaker #1, c. 1985 Acrylic on canvas 3 x 3 ft Courtesy of the Illinois % for Art Program / James R. Thompson Center 22. Karl Wirsum, Untitled, 1985 Graphite, colored pencil and pastel 22 3/4 x 17 in. Courtesy of the Illinois State Museum Fine Art Collection 23. Karl Wirsum, Untitled, 1985 Graphite, colored pencil and pastel 28 x 22 in. Courtesy of the Illinois State Museum Fine Art Collection 24. Karl Wirsum, Zing Zing Zip Zip, 2003 Acrylic on wood 2 1/4 x 24 x 22(H) in. Courtesy of the Illinois State Museum Fine Art Collection 25. Ray Yoshida, Arbitrary Approach, 1983 Acrylic on canvas 38 x 49 5/8 in. Courtesy of Elmhurst College Art Collection 26. Roger Brown, American Buffalo—An Imaginary View of Chicago the Prairie, 1982 Oil on canvas 82 x 120 in. Courtesy of the Illinois % for Art Program / James R. Thompson Center

27. Roger Brown, Cathedrals of Space, 1983 Lithograph 46 x 36 in. Courtesy of the Illinois State Museum Fine Art Collection 28. Roger Brown, The Cosmic Contraction, 1989 Oil on canvas 72 x 54 in. Courtesy of Kavi Gupta 29. Suellen Rocca, Cho Cone, c. 1966 Oil on canvas, three-panel triptych left and right panels (each): 71 1/2 x 24 in., center panel with triangular top: 83 x 23 3/4 in. Courtesy of Richard A. Born, Chicago


PI N BALL MACH I N ES 1.

Apollo, 1967 Manufacturer: Williams Electronics Design by: Norm Clark Art by: Art Stenholm Courtesy of Jim Schelberg, www.pingamejournal.com

9.

Firepower, 1980 Manufacturer: Williams Electronics Design by: Steve Ritchie Art by: Constantino Mitchell, Jeanine Mitchell Courtesy of Logan Tavern Group, LLC, www.loganarcade.com

2.

Atlantis, 1975 Manufacturer: D. Gottlieb & Company Design by: Jeff Brenner Art by: Gordon Morison Courtesy of Scott Sheridan

10. Gorgar, 1979 Manufacturer: Williams Electronics Design by: Barry Oursler Art by: Constantino Mitchell, Jeanine Mitchell Courtesy of the Sharon Paschke Collection

3.

Black Knight, 1980 Manufacturer: Williams Electronics Design by: Steve Ritchie Art by: Tony Ramunni Courtesy of Jim Schelberg, www.pingamejournal.com

11. Kings & Queens, 1965 Manufacturer: D. Gottlieb & Company Design by: Wayne Neyens Art by: Roy Parker Courtesy of Mark Weyna

4.

Black Knight 2000, 1989 Manufacturer: Williams Electronics Design by: Steve Ritchie Art by: Doug Watson Courtesy of Vince "Korn" Giovannone

5.

Blackout, 1980 Manufacturer: Williams Electronics Design by: Claude Fernandez Art by: Constantino Mitchell, Jeanine Mitchell Courtesy of Logan Tavern Group, LLC, www. loganarcade.com

6.

Duotron, 1974 Manufacturer: D. Gottlieb & Company Design by: Ed Krynski Art by: Gordon Morison Courtesy of Scott Sheridan

7.

Expressway, 1970 Manufacturer: D. Gottlieb & Company Design by: Ed Krynski Art by: Gordon Morison Courtesy of Scott Sheridan

8.

Fireball, 1971 Manufacturer: Bally Manufacturing Corporation Design by: Ted Zale Art by: Dave Christensen Courtesy of Steven Malach

12. Nip It, 1972 Manufacturer: Bally Manufacturing Corporation Design by: Ted Zale Art by: Dick White Courtesy of Jim Schelberg, www.pingamejournal.com 13. Old Chicago, 1975 Manufacturer: Bally Manufacturing Corporation Design by: Greg Kmiec Art by: Dave Christensen, John Youssi Courtesy of Dr. Fred Huss 14. Sheriff, 1971 Manufacturer: D. Gottlieb & Company Design by: Ed Krynski Art by: Gordon Morison Courtesy of Scott Sheridan 15. Spanish Eyes, 1972 Manufacturer: Williams Electronics Design by: Norm Clark Art by: John Craig Courtesy of Jim Schelberg, www.pingamejournal.com 16. Time Warp, 1979 Manufacturer: Williams Electronics Design by: Barry Oursler Art by: Constantino Mitchell, Jeanine Mitchell Courtesy of Logan Tavern Group, LLC, www.loganarcade.com


EXH I B ITION AN D POSTE R DESIG N Ethan D’Ercole

ARTWOR K LE N DE R S Larry & Evy Aronson Richard A. Born Kavi Gupta Gallery Constantino Mitchell Sharon Paschke The Elmhurst College Art Collection; Suellen Rocca, Curator and Director The Illinois State Museum, Robert Sill, Acting Director of Art and History The Roger Brown Study Collection, Lisa Stone, Curator James R. Thompson Center Private collector

PI N BALL MACH I N E LE N DE R S Dr. Fred Huss John Kosmil Steven Malach Sharon Paschke Jim Schelberg, PinGame Journal, www.pingamejournal.com Scott Sheridan Mark Weyna James Zespy & Nathan Lilley, Logan Arcade, www.loganarcade.com

PI N BALL PARTS SU PPLI E R Nancy Mandeltort, Marco Specialties Inc www.marcospecialties.com 1-803-957-5500 Everything Pinball™ for the pinball enthusiast. Vast selection of game-matched pinball parts, electronics, supplies, and more.


150 S Cottage Hill Ave, Elmhurst, IL 60126 630.834.0202 | elmhurstartmuseum.org

Kings & Queens: Pinball, Imagists and Chicago  

Elmhurst Art Museum proudly presents the World Premiere of Kings & Queens: Pinball, Imagists and Chicago, an examination of the intertwined...

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