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With a Capital P:

Selections by Six Painters May 11 - August 25, 2019

ELMHURST A R T MUSEUM


With a Capital P: Selections by Six Painters This group exhibition curated by six local painters Leslie Baum, Magalie Guérin, José Lerma, Nancy Mladenoff, Suellen Rocca, and Kay Rosen, consists of an impressive 100 artists in six distinct sections. The title With a Capital P refers to an artistic approach that doesn’t always use paint or brush. Each of the six painters was asked to curate a separate gallery space and include at least one work of their own for context but was not limited in any other way. These six artist/curators chose a variety of other artists for their sections and interpreted the show’s framework in very different ways. From room to room, each of their curatorial endeavors differ, providing numerous layers of engagement. The resulting segmented exhibition is a wide-ranging conversation about process and media by artists in the Midwest and beyond. Leslie Baum curated an exhibition including twelve other painters with interests in abstraction and landscape. Magalie Guérin chose six artists whose work in sculpture complements some of her own shape-oriented process and sensibilities. José Lerma invited 60 artists to make work on paper napkins inspired by an installation piece by Jim Hodges from the museum’s collection. Nancy Mladenoff exhibits her own work along with her personal art collection. Suellen Rocca chose to focus on multiple works by two other artists she admires. Kay Rosen dedicated her gallery solely to the work of the artist and teacher Kevin Wolff, who passed away in 2018.

Front cover images: Leslie Baum, shaping the day: l.b.,j.m., 2019 | Magalie Guérin, Untitled, 2017 | José Lerma, 215 AIC, 2019 (detail) | Nancy Mladenoff, Me and You, 2018 | Suellen Rocca, Departure, 2012 | Kay Rosen, IOU, 2017

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something about shapes

Happier hours

THINKING KEVIN WOLFF

curated by Magalie Guérin

curated by José Lerma

curated by Kay Rosen

Another Country

Frankel and Trankina

Private Worlds

curated by Leslie Baum

curated by Suellen Rocca

curated by Nancy Mladenoff

Intro Text

Front Desk & Hostetler Gallery

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Leslie Baum, shaping of the day: d.c,k.g,a.y., 2019

Another Country curated by Leslie Baum “At some times from the margin of the day I can hear birds of another country not the whole song but a brief phrase of it that I may have heard once in a moment…” W. S. Merwin What is the landscape? The home of birds and animals and plants; a view out the window of a car as you drive a ribbon of road; a scene framed by a rectangle of canvas on some museum wall you once visited; a site for our sight. Here is what I do know. There are less kinds of birds and bugs and plants living in this thing called a landscape. And yet, the land, sky, and the water in the oceans, rivers, and lakes will be here when we are gone. In this moment, we are still here and the landscape surrounds and inhabits us. It is a real place and an emotional space. One that I experience in Tim Nickodemus’ spare ink drawings of New Mexican vistas and I palpably 4


feel in James Kao’s and Mel Cooks evocative paintings. An encounter with the landscape can penetrate beyond appearance and offer communion with mystery as is the case with Michelle Wasson’s and Olivia Schreiner’s luminous works. Landscapes can be an intimate affair as well, as seen in Carrie Gunderstorf’s watercolors, mesmerizing with the patterns found on seashells or in Brian Kapernekas’s small scale paintings that speak in the expansive language of color and light. Scott Wolniak’s, Melissa Oresky’s, Portia Hein’s and Christy Matson’s works revel in one of landscape’s most charismatic features, vegetation. These artists celebrate the endless variation of observed, invented, and remembered plants forms. With rigor and gentle humor, Mari Eastman contemporizes and affirms the historical genre of landscape painting with her work, “ My Position.” Each artist in this exhibition shares a meaningful encounter with the landscape, the nature that defines it, and its intersection with us. In these works are moments that have the potential to take us into that humming liminal space “on the margin of the day “ where a bird song from another country opens up a new view. Addendum

Brian Kapernekas, Search, 2018

Another Country curated by Leslie Baum

A confession. I have embraced the patently uncool practice of plein air painting. For the past two years I have invited friends, peers, and really anyone who is interested to join me on painting dates. We sit together, often side by side on a park bench, and paint. Over the long Chicago winter, we paint in the Garfield Park Conservatory. In the milder seasons, the Chicago lakefront and its rich parks are a frequent destination as are backyards and even a few grand national parks. My works that are included in this exhibition are an outgrowth of this practice and project. They sample from and celebrate those intimate watercolors and shared painting moments.

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Carrie Gundersdorf, Many-Plaited Olive, 2018

Mel Cook, The Night My Father Came to Me, 2018

Checklist Leslie Baum shaping the day: l.b.,j.m., 2019, oil and acrylic on canvas, 25 1/2 x 34 in. shaping of the day: d.c.k.g.a.y., 2019, acrylic on canvas, 27 x 36 in. Courtesy of the artist Mel Cook The Night My Father Came to Me, 2018, oil on canvas, 14 x 11 in. Forget Me Not, 2018, acrylic, oil and graphite on canvas, 24 x 18 in. Courtesy of the artist Mari Eastman My Position, 2014-2018, flashe, oil, glitter, and prismacolor, on canvas, 60 x 40 in. Courtesy of a Private Collection Carrie Gundersdorf Many-Plaited Olive, 2018, watercolor on paper, 15 x 11 1/2 in. Splendid Olive #1, 2018 watercolor on paper, 15 x 11 1/2 in. Courtesy of the artist 6


Portia Hein Essential Landscape (Hot pink), 2011, oil on canvas, 24 x 18 in. Putty Moon, 2011, oil on canvas, 24 x 18 in. Courtesy of the artist and Traywick Contemporary James Kao Starlight, 2018, oil and spray paint on canvas, 65 x 70 in. Courtesy of the artist Brian Kapernekas Double Vision, 2018, oil and acrylic on linen wrapped panel, 10 x 12 in. Search, 2018, oil and acrylic on linen wrapped panel, 9 x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist Christy Matson Protea, 2018, cotton, wool, paper, acrylic, spray paint, 44 x 23 1/2 in. Courtesy of the artist and Volume Gallery Tim Nickodemus Dust Up, 2018, ink on paper, 14 x 11 in. In To Out Of The Canyon, 2018, ink on paper, 14 x 11 in. Courtesy of the artist

Olivia Schreiner Untitled (fireworks), 2018, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20 in. From the collection of Kristin Hollinden Untitled (downtown), 2019, acrylic on canvas, 20 x 16 in. Courtesy of the artist Michelle Wasson Chiba City, 2018, acrylic on raw canvas, 73 x 49 in. Courtesy of the artist Scott Wolniak Common/Spacious Plant, 2018, acrylic, colored pencil, soft and oil pastels, 13 x 17 in. Leaf Like Light (Arrow), 2018, ink, acrylic, graphite & pumice on paper, 24 x 18 in. Courtesy of the artist

Another Country curated by Leslie Baum

Melissa Oresky Vegetal Entity no. 4, 2018, acrylic, oil, and collage on canvas, 24 x 18 in. Vegetal Entity no. 10, 2018, acrylic, oil, and collage on canvas, 24 x 18 in. Courtesy of the artist

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Magalie Guérin, Untitled, 2017

something about shapes curated by Magalie Guérin Something about shapes. Their factness, their individuality. Their materiality. They are what they are—thingness Forms have boundaries, whether flatly on a two dimensional plane or in real space. Psychologically, even. Oil paint being sculptural in its application, it is not a far stretch to think about sculpture when painting. It is a joy to mold a medium into what one wants to see. 8


Nazafarin Lotfi, Solar Universe, 2017

something about shapes curated by Magalie GuĂŠrin

Marie Herwald Hermann, Dawn, 2018

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Dan Gunn, The Ungrateful Son, No.3, 2017

Carol Jackson, Almost There, 2015

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Checklist Paul Erschen Rust Belt Solids, 2019, cast hydrocal, latex, iron filings, construction adhesive, MDF, dimensions variable Courtesy of the artist Magalie Guérin Untitled, 2017, oil on canvas on panel, 30 x 24 in. Courtesy of the artist and Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago Dan Gunn Rigging, 2015, plaster and latex paint, dimensions variable The Ungrateful Son, No.3, 2017, glazed stoneware, marbles, light fixture, 13 x 16 x 20 in. Courtesy of the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago Marie Herwald Hermann Dawn, 2018, porcelain, stoneware, 18 x 19 x 8 in. Courtesy of the artist and Reyes | Finn, Detroit

Nazafarin Lotfi Solar Universe, 2017, papier-mâché, found objects, ceramic, panel, and paint, 18 x 16 x 8 1/2 in. Courtesy of the artist and Regards, Chicago Arlene Shechet Above and Beyond, 2015, glazed ceramic, painted steel, concrete and hardwood, 36 1/2 x 13 1/2 x 13 1/2 in. Courtesy the of the artist, Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago and Pace Gallery, New York

something about shapes curated by Magalie Guérin

Carol Jackson Almost There, 2015, papier-mâché polymer, acrylic, enamel, digital print, 37 x 23 x 17 in. Courtesy of the artist and Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago

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José Lerma, 215 AIC, 2019 (detail)

Happier hours curated by José Lerma When I was asked to be part of this exhibition, John McKinnon mentioned the Museum had a series of napkins by artist Jim Hodges. He wondered if I would be interested in presenting them for my section of the exhibition. Initially, I thought I wanted to do something closer to the original spirit of the show and pick a few paintings from artists I admired. But the idea of the napkins stuck with me and eventually, I gave up on the paintings, and the show became only napkins. For this show, I asked a large, geographically diverse, group of artists at various stages of their careers to participate. Because napkins are by design relatively small in size, I knew I wanted a large selection of works to have a satisfying visual impact. No themes or materials were imposed. I was interested in how some artists take advantage of the napkin's immediacy by creating fragmentary, quick sketches or "drunk" doodles— while others subvert the ephemeral material’s traditional role as an idea generator by presenting fully formed finished works. 12


Jim Hodges, A Diary of Flowers (Carolyn), 1992 (detail) Gift of Carole and Dick Cline

Sahand Afshar Samuel Beattie Cecilia Beaven José Bernardy Brigette Borders Chris Bradley Danny Bredar Ethan Brown Hanna Buddig Ben Cabral Chris Capoyanes Kevin Carr Io Carrión Yoo Hee Chang Ryan Travis Christian Decheng Cui Nicole Doran Jessica Du Preez Magdalena Dudziak Matthew Dupont Cassidy Early Liza Eilers Jeni Emery Nathan Engel Peter Fagundo Andrew Falkowski

Radames Juni Figueroa Sean Gannon Griffin Goodman Mary Griffin Evan Gruzis Yasmine Hadni Efrat Hakimi Francisco Herrero Elizabeth Heying Jim Hodges Cody Hudson Richard Hull Caroline Jacobson Leasho Johnson Leah Ke Alex Keller Dominique Knowles Michael David Kozlowski Eric Lebofsky Renata Cruz Lara Madeline Leplaie José Lerma Elizabeth Loftus Alin Lu Katherine Marra Deanna Miera

Yae Jee Min Amadeo Morelos Judith Mullen Ed Oh Angel Otero Ricardo Partida Josue Pellot Guzzo Pinc Ruth Poor Mike Rea Scott Reeder Tyson Reeder Yongxuan Shao Wei Shen Woo Jin Shin Geoffrey Todd Smith Tl Solien Sumire Skye Taniai Lucas Thomas B’Rael Ali Thunder Christine Elisa Turner Erin Washington Irene Wassner Omar Velazquez

Happier hours curated by José Lerma

Participating Artists

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Suellen Rocca, Ocean Ladies, 1988

Frankel and Trankina curated by Suellen Rocca I am exhibiting the work of Susan Frankel and Frank Trankina, two artists who I greatly admire. Each of these artists has a very different approach to their art making. Frank Trankina’s trompe l’oeil (fool the eye) still life paintings are populated with his treasures of cast-off toys and idiosyncratic vintage objects. These he lovingly represents in dramatic scenarios filled with humor and irony. The bizarre becomes ‘gorgeous’ under his brush. Susan Frankel’s paintings are inspired by influences as diverse as the patterns in Balkan folk dancing, the repeated shapes in bridges and the shadows of Gingko leaves. Her paintings depict various kinetic, auditory, and visual experiences as shapes and patterns rhythmically progress across the surface. 14


Susan Frankel, PM20 Mixed Pickles – ‘3 way 2’, 2018

Frankel and Trankina curated by Suellen Rocca

Frank Trankina, Dream Cabinet, 2010

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Susan Frankel, PM10 Three, 2016

Checklist Susan Frankel HTT29 equal pressures, 2012, acrylic on panel, 24 x 24 in. PM 1, 2015, acrylic on panel, 24 x 30 in. PM6 Kick, 2014, acrylic on paper, 30 x 22 in. PM10 Three, 2016, acrylic on panel, 30 x 40 in. PM19, 2018, acrylic on paper, 26 x 40 in. PM20 Mixed Pickles – ‘3 way 2’, 2018, acrylic on panel, 30 x 40 in. Courtesy of the artist Suellen Rocca Ocean Ladies, 1988, oil on canvas, 38 x 44 in. Courtesy of the artist and Matthew Marks Gallery, New York 16


Frank Trankina Dream Cabinet, 2010, oil on linen, 62 x 48 in. Courtesy of the artist Homage to Ray Yoshida Or ‘Frank, Why Are You Doing This?’, 2010, oil on linen, 20 x 16 in. Collection of Leslie Buchbinder Old Painter or The Oval Portrait, 2017, oil on linen, 42 x 24 in. Courtesy of the artist Potface, 2019, oil on linen, 40 x 40 in. Courtesy of the artist Superhero Pothead No. 1, 2013, oil on linen, 24 x 18 in. Collection of John Clement & Lauren Moltz Superhero Pothead No. 2, 2013, oil on linen, 40 x 30 in. Courtesy of the artist Well,…Hello There!, 2017, oil on linen, 20 x 30 in. Collection of Dr. Charles & Camille Baum

Frankel and Trankina curated by Suellen Rocca

Frank Trankina, Superhero Pothead No. 2, 2013

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Kay Rosen, IOU, 2017

THINKING KEVIN WOLFF curated by Kay Rosen I first met Kevin Wolff at Feature Gallery in Chicago in 1983. He had just joined the gallery, as had I. We bonded immediately and remained friends for thirty-five years. Art was Kevin’s passion from an early age growing up in Buffalo, New York. He read art books, spent his free time at the Albright Knox Museum, and drew and painted, all from the time he was a child. So it was not unexpected that he would get his BFA from The Rochester Institute of Art and his MFA from The Art Institute of Chicago, become an artist, and work for thirty years with one of the most respected and cutting edge galleries in Chicago and New York, Feature, run by the eccentric visionary known as Hudson. When Kevin died in 2018 at the age of sixty-three, his obituary in Artforum cited Hudson’s explanation of that longevity by stating simply: “I’m in love with the way he paints.” The only 18


thing that Kevin loved as much as painting and drawing was teaching, for over two decades: first at the Herron School of Art and Design in Indianapolis and later at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Mark Pascale, the curator of prints and drawings at The Art Institute of Chicago wrote, “In the museum, we miss his astute and hilarious lectures to figure drawing classes in the Art Institute's Goldman Study Center, where he interned as a student in the early-1980s, and fell in love with scrutinizing art up close…”

Kevin Wolff, Clay Structure With Flower, 2015

THINKING KEVIN WOLFF curated by Kay Rosen

"Kevin expected a lot out of himself as an artist, and he delivered,” noted former student and friends Ben Murray and Jenny Buffington. Kevin was a rigorous painter, but he was also very funny. His humor and wit, tinged with a contrariness, mischievousness, and sabotage, infuses most of his works. Others, beautiful and elegant on the surface, carry haunting and subversive subtexts. About his drawings, Julia Fish and Richard Rezac said, “In his hands, graphite became silver -- and reflected on most everything.” Graphite, paint, clay, collage, prints: Kevin explored them all with endless excitement and curiosity.

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Kevin Wolff, Arm, 1986

Checklist Kay Rosen David and Kevin, 2017, acrylic gouache on paper, 12 ½ x 15 in. Courtesy of David Scott Kevin Wolff Arm, 1986, acrylic on canvas 60 x 48 in. Bodybuilder, 2011, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 60 in. Clay Structure With Flower, 2015, oil on canvas 27 x 24 in. Figure, 2015, oil on canvas, 36 1/4 x 31 1/4 in. First Position, 1987, graphite on paper, 23 x 20 in. Giacometti Base, 1998, acrylic on canvas 34 x 41 in. Hanging Roses, 1995, graphite on paper, 14 x 17 in. Head on a Stick, 1987, india ink on paper, 15 x 13 in. Man On a Stick, 1987, acrylic on canvas 72 x 60 in. Maquette for Painter, 2015, clay and wood, 10½ x 9 ½ x 13 in. Wall, 2005, india ink on paper, 19 1/2 x 15 1/2 in. All works from the estate of Kevin Wolff 20


Kevin Wolff, Giacometti Base, 1998

THINKING KEVIN WOLFF curated by Kay Rosen

Kevin Wolff, Man On a Stick, 1987

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Nancy Mladenoff, Moves, 2018

Private Worlds curated by Nancy Mladenoff This body of work represents a fictional narrative of myself, paired with my personal frog avatar that connects me to the natural world. In this series, I depict various everyday experiences between myself and my avatar such as humorous situations, acts of contemplation, engagement with social media, and physical activities. The pairing suggests a shared psychological, metaphysical, and imaginary connection between the two entities. In common allegories found in places such as children’s fairytales and even paintings by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, creatures are personified or made as symbolic storytelling elements. My intention is similar. I hope to present an opportunity for the viewer to see the everyday world in a new and fresh manner. The artworks chosen for With a Capital P all come from my personal collection. I chose nine works by eight different artists. Although it was 22


in no way a prerequisite for choosing them, all of the works are figurative or at least representational. These are artworks that I am inspired by and live with on a daily basis. A private collection of art is really just that for the most part. I see the curatorial opportunity to share my collection with the public as an exciting prospect. I like to think that my art collection represents my world view to some extent, and therefore brings out another aspect of myself for the viewer.

Sophie von Hellermann, The Fearful, 2008

Private Worlds curated by Nancy Mladenoff

Ella Kruglyanskaya, Untitled (Negative vibes), 2012

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Christina Ramberg, Untitled (Cross-section), 1968

Checklist Zoe Charlton Untitled (Flooded), 2005, watercolor, graphite, gold leaf 11 3/4 x 12 in. Collection of Nancy Mladenoff Julie Doucet I'm a professional cartoonist..., unknown, gouache, 6 x 7 in. Collection of Nancy Mladenoff Drawn & Quarterly, unknown, gouache, 10 x 16 1/2 in Collection of Nancy Mladenoff Sophie von Hellermann The Fearful, 2008, acrylic on canvas, 25 1/2 x 21 1/2 in. Collection of Nancy Mladenoff Ella Kruglyanskaya Untitled (Negative vibes), 2012, graphite, 16 1/4 x 14 in. Collection of Nancy Mladenoff 24


Julie Doucet, I'm a professional cartoonist...

Christina Ramberg Untitled (Cross-section), 1968, pen & colored pencil, 7 3/4 x 9 7/8 in. Collection of Nancy Mladenoff Clare Rojas Bring Me My Boat, 2001, gouache on panel, 10 x 8 in. Collection of Nancy Mladenoff Lisa Sanditz Santa Sludge II, 2007, acrylic on paper, 12 1/2 x 15 1/2 in. Collection of Nancy Mladenoff Carolyn Swiszcz Maxwell Market, 1999, acrylic on paper 21 1/2 x 26 in. Collection of Nancy Mladenoff

Private Worlds curated by Nancy Mladenoff

Nancy Mladenoff After Robert Frank’s Sin of Jesus, 1961, 2018, ink on panel, 16 x 20 in. Arabesque, 2018, ink on panel, 20 x 16 in. Beach Yoga, 2018, ink on panel, 16 x 20 in. Block Shot, 2019, ink on panel, 20 x 16 in. Break, 2018, ink on panel, 16 x 20 in. Conversation, 2018, ink on panel, 16 x 20 in. Fall Clean Up, 2018, ink on panel, 20 x 16 in. Me and You, 2018, ink on panel, 20 x 16 in. Moves, 2018, ink on panel, 16 x 20 in. Courtesy of the artist

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Public Programs

All public programs are free with museum admission or current membership unless otherwise indicated.

Saturday, May 11 | 1:30 PM Panel Discussion Artists Leslie Baum, Magalie Guérin, José Lerma, Nancy Mladenoff, and Suellen Rocca will discuss the galleries they curated for the exhibition With a Capital P. The dialogue will explore contemporary practices in painting and curation as a means of art production. Saturday, May 18 | 1:30 PM Director’s Tour Join Executive Director John McKinnon for an exclusive tour of our current exhibitions With a Capital P: Selections by Six Painters and Luftwerk: Parallel Perspectives. Sunday, May 19 | 1-5 PM Museum Day FREE admission at all 3 Elmhurst Museums. Join in the fun for the 23rd Annual Museum Day in Elmhurst, a special event commemorating the important cultural value of museums to communities. Jump on board the Explore Elmhurst trolley to visit all three Elmhurst museums for free admission, family-friendly activities, exhibit tours, refreshments, and more. Limited complimentary parking available at each location and at City of Elmhurst parking decks. Sunday, June 2 | 1:30 PM Saturday, June 15, July 13, July 27 | 1:30 PM McCormick House Tour These docent-led tours explore the history and unique design of the McCormick House (1952) by Mies van der Rohe, including the color and light exhibition by the artist duo Luftwerk. Saturday, June 8 | 1-4 PM Family Day Workshop We invite you and your family to participate in hands-on STEAM activities about color and light inspired by Luftwerk's current exhibition.

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Saturday, June 29 | 1:30 PM Architecture Walking Tour Join us for a walking tour that explores modern architecture in Elmhurst including the Henderson House by Frank Lloyd Wright and McCormick House by Mies van der Rohe. Fee: $20 (Nonmembers)/ $15 (Members) Tickets can either be purchased at the museum or online. Saturday, July 20 | 1:30 PM Artists Talk: Luftwerk Join us for an in-depth conversation about the exhibition Parallel Perspectives and the perceptions of color by the collaborative duo Luftwerk and color specialist Michael Rossi. Tuesday, August 13 | 6:30 - 8:00 PM EAM/EPL Book Discussion Join us for a fun, light summer read of "The Five Red Herrings," by Dorothy L. Sayers. This 1931 murder mystery novel is set in Galloway, where Sandy Campbell, a talented painter, is found dead in a stream. It's then up to Lord Peter Wimsey and his manservant Bunter to discover who forged Campbell's painting and solve the murderous crime. Co-organized with the Elmhurst Public Library. Please register in advance by calling (630) 834-0202. Saturday, August 24 | 1:30 PM Exhibition Tour Join us for an in-depth look at the current exhibitions With a Capital P: Selections by Six Painters and Parallel Perspectives.

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ELMHURST A R T MUSEUM 150 S Cottage Hill Ave, Elmhurst, IL 60126 | 630.834.0202 | elmhurstartmuseum.org

Museum Hours: Tuesdays-Sundays: 11am - 5pm, Mondays: CLOSED

Profile for Elmhurst Art Museum

With a Capital P: Selections by Six Painters  

The group exhibition With a Capital P, curated by six local painters Leslie Baum, Magalie Guérin, José Lerma, Nancy Mladenoff, Suellen Rocca...

With a Capital P: Selections by Six Painters  

The group exhibition With a Capital P, curated by six local painters Leslie Baum, Magalie Guérin, José Lerma, Nancy Mladenoff, Suellen Rocca...

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