Page 1

РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

KINGLIVING.COM | 1300 546 438


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Plaza


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

INTRODUCING

AEGEA BLOSSOM I ns p ir ed b y b lu e s e a s , c o o l b r ee z e s a n d pu r e lig h t.

Avai labl e at A ERIN .com, Myer and Davi d Jones . #AE RIN Beau ty


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

The Art of Living


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


Orange Avenue

vittinoAshe

Đ Đ•Đ›Đ˜Đ— Đ&#x;ĐžĐ”Đ“ĐžĐ˘ĐžĐ’Đ˜Đ›Đ? Đ“Đ ĐŁĐ&#x;Đ&#x;Đ? "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

.DWKHULQH$VKH 0DUFR9LWWLQRČ)RXQGHUV &UHDWLYH'LUHFWRUVYLWWLQR$VKH Katherine and Marco’s life work is making spaces work - for life. Every detail in their designs, as well as each iconic piece within them, is chosen to elevate living in every way.

livingedge.com.au


vittinoAshe

РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

18

Furniture for Urban life.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

F O O D

I S

A R T.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

P R E S E R V E

I T.

Professional cooking performance. Superior food preservation. Craftsmanship and technology without equal.

subzero-wolf.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

WAP36841

Featured brand:


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Be inspired! Take your wardrobe to the next level at Winning Appliances. Adopt the latest in fabric-care with exclusive design and technology from V-ZUG.

Shop in-store or online at winningappliances.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Contents

28 32 34 36

CONTRIBUTORS ONLINE NOW… vogueliving.com.au EDITOR’S LETTER VOGUE LIVING VIEW

VLoves

The look of the moment teams classic pieces in a contemporary light

challenge our perceptions of nature, culture and our way of life in exciting ways

72 DOUG MEYER

VLife 60 DUAL REALITY

Welcome to the weird and wonderful mind of this celebrated New York artist and designer, who has transformed his apartment into a magical portal to another world

41 SOFT TOUCH

These innovative duos share insight into how they work together and inspire each other

Pay tribute to the past with these design classics all fluffed up for the next generation

68 RENDER MOMENT

76 ASHWINI ASOKAN Meet the woman behind the artificial intelligence technology changing how we shop, style and design our homes

46 TECHNO COLOURS

Digital artists take 3D rendering into an immersive world of fantasy and tactility

79 AXEL VERVOORDT

70 FRESH POINTS OF VIEW Four visionary artists explore and

The Belgian designer is a master at rediscovering the forgotten and giving it a “better place”

New technology has opened up a palette of possibilities for Muller Van Severen’s functional, futuristic Alu chairs 20

50 THE FUTURE IS NOW

vogueliving.com.au

PH OT OG RA PH ER : V ICT OR IA Z SC HOM ML E R

Upfront


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

FURNITURE & HOMEWARES | INTERIOR DESIGN | PROPERTY STYLING | DESIGN SCHOOL WWW.COCOREPUBLIC.COM.AU


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

86

96

108

120

132

PH OT OG RA PH ER : A NSON SM ART

144

22

vogueliving.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Contents

152 NEW DESIGN HOTSPOTS These cities embrace innovation, delivering journeys that unite art, design and history

Kitchens & Bathrooms 163 101+ IDEAS

Vogue Living’s insider look into the homes of the new leading designers and creatives

Services 182 SUBSCRIBE …and receive a Stanley Rogers creamcoloured three-piece cheese knife set 24

vogueliving.com.au

184 SOURCES Contact details for the products, people and retailers featured in this issue

VLast look

On the cover

The salon of an 18th-century apartment in Paris’s Saint-Germain, designed by Californiaborn, Paris-based Ashley Maddox. Story, page 120. Photographed by Birgitta Wolfgang Subscribe to Vogue Living: page 182. Be part of the conversation: #VogueLiving #loveVL

192 SPECIAL DELIVERY This vase will make your head turn. 101+ IDEAS FOR

Luxury travel special TAKE AN ADVENTURE We journey to four spectacular destinations across the globe — desert, jungle, savannah and coastal bushland — that deliver unforgettable experiences

KITCHENS & BATHROOMS

Incredible homes of leading designers and creatives

THE FUTURE OF LUXURY Style inspiration from Paris, New York, Amsterdam, London and Sydney E XC LUS I V E

French chic

A fashion designer's glamorous home

PH OT OG RA PH ER : J E R E M Y SIMON S

VList

Maasai women at Hard Rock village, near Kenya’s &Beyond Bateleur Camp


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

ALESSIAUSTRALIA.COM.AU


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Rebecca Caratti EDITOR editor@vogueliving.com.au CREATIVE DIRECTOR Natasha Allen DEPUTY EDITOR Verity Magdalino STYLE EDITOR Joseph Gardner CHIEF COPY EDITOR Bonnie Vaughan SENIOR COPY EDITOR Virginia Jen DESIGNER Alicia Ridley MARKET EDITOR Anna Delprat MELBOURNE EDITOR & FEATURES WRITER Annemarie Kiely DIGITAL DIGITAL EDITOR Yeong Sassall CONTRIBUTORS CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Fiona McCarthy (London), Freya Herring, Jason Mowen, Lee Tulloch CONTRIBUTING COPY EDITOR Kasey Clark IMAGES Bartolomeo Celestino, Barbara Corsico, Jake Curtis, Michael De Pasquale and Martina Maffini/Living Inside, Eva Doncker, Kasia Gatkowska, Elise Hassey, Stephan Julliard, Honey Long & Prue Stent, Jeremy Simons, Michael Sinclair, Anson Smart, Hugh Stewart, Toby Lewis Thomas, Frederik Vercruysse, Taran Wilkhu, Saskia Wilson, Birgitta Wolfgang, Victoria Zschommler WORDS Claire Bingham, Noelle Faulkner, Joanne Gambale, Dana Tomic´ Hughes, Ian Phillips, Tara Stevens, Stephen Todd, Nikki Wallman INTERACTIVE EDITION PRODUCTION MANAGER Stuart McDowell DIGITAL ASSETS & RIGHTS MANAGER Trudy Biernat BUSINESS ANALYST Umair Khalid NATIONAL SALES AND STRATEGY DIRECTOR, STYLE Nicole Waudby (02) 8045 4661. HEAD OF BRAND STRATEGY, STYLE Merryn Dhami (02) 9288 1090. HEAD OF DIGITAL COMMERCIAL STRATEGY, STYLE Amanda Spackman (02) 8045 4658. NSW GROUP SALES MANAGER Cheyne Hall (02) 8045 4667. NSW KEY ACCOUNT MANAGERS Kate Corbett (02) 8045 4737, Kristina Karassoulis (02) 9288 1743, Catherine Patrick (02) 8045 4613. GROUP DIGITAL BRAND MANAGER Adriana Hooper (02) 8045 4655. BRAND STRATEGY MANAGER Tessa Dixon (02) 8045 4744. HEAD OF STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS Hannah David-Wright (02) 8045 4986. PROJECT MANAGER — PARTNERSHIPS Kate Dwyer (02) 9288 1009. SENIOR CAMPAIGN IMPLEMENTATION MANAGER Sophie Gallagher (02) 9288 3929. NSW ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES, STYLE Eliza Connor (02) 9288 1324, Garineh Torossian (02) 8045 4653. VICTORIA SALES DIRECTOR, STYLE Karen Clements (03) 9292 3202. VICTORIA GROUP BUSINESS MANAGER Nadine Denison (03) 9292 3224. VICTORIA HEAD OF DIRECT SALES & PARTNERSHIPS Jo Constable (03) 9292 3203. VICTORIA CAMPAIGN IMPLEMENTATION MANAGER Rebecca Rodell (03) 9292 1951. QUEENSLAND PRODUCT SPECIALIST Nicole Rogers (07) 3666 6903. VICTORIA ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Sarah-Jane Bacon (03) 9292 3208. CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Rebecca White 1300 139 305. ASIA: Kim Kenchington, Mediaworks Asia (852) 2882 1106. ADVERTISING CREATIVE DIRECTOR Richard McAuliffe ADVERTISING HEAD OF OPERATIONS Eva Chown ADVERTISING HEAD OF ART Caryn Isemann ADVERTISING HEAD OF CONTENT Brooke Lewis ADVERTISING SENIOR ART DIRECTORS Bev Douglas, Nicole Vonwiller ADVERTISING COPY EDITORS Rob Badman, Annette Farnsworth, Tiffany Pilcher ADVERTISING CREATIVE PRODUCERS Sarah Mury, Candice Shields NATIONAL PRINT SERVICES MANAGER Mark Moes PRODUCTION MANAGER Chrissy Fragkakis ADVERTISING PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Robynne Beavan MARKETING DIRECTOR Diana Kay MARKETING MANAGER — BRAND & SUBSCRIPTIONS Magdalena Zajac BRAND MANAGER Rachel Christian MARKETING MANAGER —PARTNERSHIPS & EVENTS Natalie Headland SENIOR EVENTS MANAGER Danielle Isenberg EVENTS MANAGER Genevieve McCaskill MARKETING COORDINATOR Shelby Allen GENERAL MANAGER, RETAIL SALES & CIRCULATION Brett Willis NATIONAL CIRCULATION MANAGER Danielle Stevenson SUBSCRIPTIONS RETENTION MANAGER Crystal Ewins SUBSCRIPTIONS ACQUISITION MANAGER Grant Durie PUBLISHER, NEWS PRESTIGE NETWORK Nicholas Gray EDITORIAL DIRECTOR CONDÉ NAST TITLES Edwina McCann MANAGING EDITOR CONDÉ NAST TITLES Louise Bryant DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Sharyn Whitten HEAD OF FINANCE Caspar Deman MANAGING DIRECTOR, NEWS DNA Julian Delany VOGUE LIVING is published by NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd, ACN 088 923 906. NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd is a wholly owned subsidiary of News Limited (ACN 007 871 178). Copyright 2019 by NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. ISSN 0042-8035. 2 Holt Street, Surry Hills, NSW 2010. Tel: (02) 9288 3000. Email: mail@vogueliving.com.au. Website: vogueliving.com.au. Postal address: Vogue Living, NewsLifeMedia, Level 1, Locked Bag 5030, Alexandria, NSW 2015. Melbourne: Level 5, HWT Tower, 40 City Road, Southbank 3006. Tel: (03) 9292 1673. Fax: (03) 9292 1695. Brisbane: 41 Campbell Street, Bowen Hills, Qld 4006. Tel: (07) 3666 6910. Fax: (07) 3666 6911.

SUBSCRIPTIONS within Australia, 1300 656 933; overseas (+61 2) 9282 8023. Website: magsonline.com.au. Email: subs@magsonline.com.au. Websites: vogueliving.com.au, facebook.com/vogueliving, twitter.com/vogueliving, voguelivingmagazine.tumblr.com, pinterest.com/vogueliving, instagram.com/vogueliving Reply Paid 1224, Queen Victoria Building, NSW 1229 (no stamp required). Printed by PMP Limited, Paper fibre is from sustainably managed forests and controlled sources. Distributed by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd, Tel: 1300 650 666


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

d e s i g n ‘b r u s s e l s’ s o f t m o o n l i g h t. a r o by n c o s g r ov e e x c l u s i v e d e s i g n. f i n e ly h a n d k n o t t e d i n n e pa l f r o m h i m a l aya n w o o l & b a m b o o s i l k. s t o c k s i z e s ava i l a b l e i n s t o r e. c u s t o m t o o r d e r.

16 8 q u e e n s t r e e t w o o l l a h r a n s w 2 0 2 5 t 61 2 9 3 28 76 92 r o b y n c o s g r o v e .c o m


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


MINOTTI.COM

РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

A U S T R A L I A

BY DEDECE 263 LIVERPOOL STREET - DARLINGHURST - SYDNEY NSW 2010 - T. 02 9360 2722 2 DALE STREET - CREMORNE - MELBOURNE 3121 - T. 03 9650 9600 INFO@DEDECE.COM

CUSTOMISED INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICE

LAWRENCE SEATING SYSTEM RODOLFO DORDONI DESIGN


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

CONDÉ NAST INTERNATIONAL Chairman and Chief Executive: Jonathan Newhouse President: Wolfgang Blau Executive Vice President: James Woolhouse THE CONDÉ NAST INTERNATIONAL GROUP OF BRANDS INCLUDES: UK Vogue, House & Garden, Brides, Tatler, The World of Interiors, GQ, Vanity Fair, Condé Nast Traveller, Glamour, Condé Nast Johansens, GQ Style, Love, Wired, Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design, Ars Technica FRANCE Vogue, Vogue Hommes, AD, Glamour, Vogue Collections, GQ, AD Collector, Vanity Fair, GQ Le Manuel du Style, Glamour Style ITALY Vogue, Glamour, AD, Condé Nast Traveller, GQ, Vanity Fair, Wired, La Cucina Italiana GERMANY Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Wired SPAIN Vogue, GQ, Vogue Novias, Vogue Niños, Condé Nast Traveler, Vogue Colecciones, Vogue Belleza, Glamour, AD, Vanity Fair JAPAN Vogue, GQ, Vogue Girl, Wired, Vogue Wedding TAIWAN Vogue, GQ, Interculture MEXICO AND LATIN AMERICA Vogue Mexico and Latin America, Glamour Mexico, AD Mexico, GQ Mexico and Latin America, Vanity Fair Mexico INDIA Vogue, GQ, Condé Nast Traveller, AD PUBLISHED UNDER JOINT VENTURE: BRAZIL Vogue, Casa Vogue, GQ, Glamour RUSSIA Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Tatler, Glamour Style Book PUBLISHED UNDER LICENSE OR COPYRIGHT COOPERATION: AUSTRALIA Vogue, Vogue Living, GQ BULGARIA Glamour CHINA Vogue, AD, Condé Nast Traveler, GQ, GQ Style, Brides, Condé Nast Center of Fashion & Design, Vogue Me CZECH REPUBLIC AND SLOVAKIA La Cucina Italiana HUNGARY Glamour ICELAND Glamour KOREA Vogue, GQ, Allure, W MIDDLE EAST Vogue, Condé Nast Traveller, AD, Vogue Café at The Dubai Mall POLAND Glamour PORTUGAL Vogue, GQ ROMANIA Glamour RUSSIA Vogue Café Moscow, Tatler Club Moscow SOUTH AFRICA House & Garden, GQ, Glamour, House & Garden Gourmet, GQ Style, Glamour Hair THE NETHERLANDS Vogue, Glamour, Vogue The Book, Vogue Man, Vogue Living THAILAND Vogue, GQ, Vogue Lounge Bangkok TURKEY Vogue, GQ UKRAINE Vogue, Vogue Café Kiev CONDÉ NAST USA President and Chief Executive Officer: Robert A Sauerberg, Jr Artistic Director: Anna Wintour Vogue, Vanity Fair, Glamour, Brides, Self, GQ, GQ Style, The New Yorker, Condé Nast Traveler, Allure, AD, Bon Appétit, Epicurious, Wired, W, Golf Digest, Golf World, Teen Vogue, Ars Technica, The Scene, Pitchfork, Backchannel VOGUE LIVING subscription rate for 6 issues (1 year) post-paid is $49.95 (within Australia). Copyright © 2019. Published by NewsLifeMedia. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is strictly prohibited. NewsLifeMedia is a licensed user in Australia of the registered trademarks VOGUE, VOGUE LIVING and GQ and has been granted the exclusive right to use those trademarks in relation to magazines published by NewsLifeMedia by the proprietor of the trademarks. Printed in Australia by PMP Limited. Distributed by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd, call 1300 650 666.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


Take the tour

ARTW OR KS, FR OM L EF T: UN TIT L ED B Y KIR STY B UDG E , D AIN E SIN G E R G ALL E RY; B AL A OP UN TI A B Y JA CKIE ST OCKD AL E , T HIS I S NO FAN TA SY; Y OUR MUM TH R E W AWAY Y OUR BE ST POR N O MA GS (20 1 8 ) B Y PAUL RYAN, JAM ES MAKIN GA LL ERY; M ASK II (2018) AN D M AS K V II (20 18) B Y PATR ICK DAGG, J AM E S M AK IN GAL LE RY

РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

T

his issue is a celebration of the future of design, exploring the cutting edge of technology and the next generation of creative talent. Autonomous technologies like articifial intelligence (AI) and advances in neuroscience represent a potential revolution in how we live — and this includes the spaces we inhabit and how we function within them. We open the issue with a pivotal essay on the science of design (page 36) by Bonnie Vaughan, which explains the notion of neuro-architecture and allows us to imagine living in a space that’s been devised to nurture our mental and physical wellbeing. And AI expert Ashwini Asokan (page 76) invites us to envision an app that can personally style our homes according to our tastes via an algorithm. But the future of interiors is of course always a mix between adopting the new and curating the timeless. We also celebrate the joy of collecting, recycling and fusing contemporary design with antique pieces. No one mixes old and new with a more contemporary eye than legendary designer Axel Vervoordt and we take a peek into his stylish life (page 79). We also take note of where new and future-focused centres of design talent are emerging across the globe, from Tel Aviv to Shanghai and Mexico City (page 151). This urban inspiration is juxtaposed beautifully with our luxury travel special this month, which tempts us back to nature with images of the most inspiring escapes — from luxurious safaris in Kenya to exquisite coastal lodges in Sri Lanka. And for those looking for inspiration closer to home, we have the ultimate kitchen and bathroom special (page 163). It is packed with advice for the most important and functional rooms in the house from leading designers and creatives. There’s so much to inspire and indulge in this month!

EDITOR 34

vogueliving.com.au

PH OT OG RA PH ER : M IC HAE L N AUM OFF. H AI R & MAKE - UP : CL AIR E T H OMSON

Editor’s letter


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VL

The science of design Combining aesthetics with research, neuro-architecture is the next frontier. By Bonnie Vaughan

H

ow would you like to own a house that will make you live forever? Believe it or not, it’s possible — or at least, somebody was convinced it was. In 1999, avantgarde artist couple Madeline Gins and Arakawa designed the Bioscleave House, or ‘Lifespan Extending Villa’, in New York’s East Hampton, based on their belief in “reversible destiny”. The design of this four-bedroom house — completed in 2008 and currently on the market for US$2,495,000 — was inspired by the idea that creating an environment that stimulates the senses, challenges your perceptions and surprises you every day would energise, invigorate and boost the immune system, keeping anyone who dwells there young and healthy throughout their lives. So how did this idea translate? Bioscleave’s interior looks like a combination of funhouse and children’s playground, and its intention is deliberately to disorientate. It’s a riot of cartoon colours, lumpy earthen floors and off-kilter windows, with poles placed throughout to grab for balance. It’s like the Flintstones house got a yabba-dabba-do makeover by Pop artist Kenny Scharf. Gins and Arakawa did not live forever (both died in their early 70s), and by all accounts no one has ever actually inhabited the house. But the couple was definitely onto something. The fact that your living environment can impact your brain and body is a notion that scientists and architects are seriously starting to embrace. The terminology has been kicking around for a while now — wellbeing architecture, neuro-architecture, evidence-based people-centric design — but make no mistake, this thinking is definitively nextgen. Sustainable practices like using environmentally friendly materials and energy-efficient technologies are still fabulous, of course, and an integral part of the design future, but the primary focus has shifted to people, and its driving force is brain science.

36

vogueliving.com.au

The embers of this movement lie in research done by pioneering and visionary researchers. In the mid-20th century, US sociology professor Aaron Antonovsky wrote extensively on the concept of salutogenics, the relationships between health, stress and coping. In 1984, Sweden-based architecture professor Roger Ulrich published the landmark study ‘View Through a Window May Influence Recovery From Surgery’, which was one of the first to examine the impact of the healing powers of nature. And decades of analysis by US environmental psychologists Rachel and Stephen Kaplan has shown that the connection between the environment and people’s health, both mental and physical, is very real indeed. One major homegrown advocate of this new thinking is Kristen Whittle, director of the Melbourne-based Bates Smart architecture firm. A design architect at the Tate Modern in London back in the ’90s, he was struck by The Weather Project installation in the enormous Turbine Hall by Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson in 2003. It was a blazing artificial sun, comprising hundreds of monofrequency lamps, burning through a fine mist that permeated the whole area. “Families would go in and end up lying down on the concrete floor believing they were looking at the sunset,” Whittle marvels. “Even though it was an industrialised space, it transformed into a naturalised environment — it became a kind of beach.” Whittle’s interest in the way our bodies are wired to react to the environment around us was piqued, so he started to read up on research studies about the impact light and views into gardens has on people’s health. And when Bates Smart won the bid in 2007 to build Melbourne’s Royal Children’s Hospital, as its lead design architect, he immersed himself in those ideas. “As human beings, when we need to relax and engage at the same time, we go for a walk in a park,” Whittle says. “There’s a natural flow of energy that fulfils us and replenishes our energy. The Attention Restoration ››


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

years

65

Urban Danish Design

Products Shown: Copenhagen Bookcase | Milano Extendable Dining Table | Mariposa Dining Chair

COPENHAGEN BOOKCASE DESIGNED BY MORTEN GEORGSEN Morten’s design language rests on the Danish philosophy of simple and purposeful functionality. The designer skilfully creates designs that both look good and work effortlessly. Every element of his designs has a purpose, ensuring minimalist, functional and elegant pieces made for living. “Simplicity and functionality are BoConcept core design values. It’s often believed that functional design is created at the expense of beauty. Why, when you can have both? When you combine pleasing proportions with beautiful colours, materials and craftsmanship, you create a design that evokes a good feeling.” The Copenhagen wall unit is a stylish space saving solution. It can be customised with open and closed shelving units and drawers. It can also be used as a TV and media unit. It is available in 195.5cm and 227.5cm in height, along with your option of width and four colours.

Order your free 2019 catalogue online. Crows Nest Flagship Store - 575 Pacific Hwy Tel. (02) 9437 0066 Moore Park - Shop GA03 Moore Park Supa Centa Tel. (02) 9697 2886

www.boconcept.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLview

‹‹ Theory (ART) has been invented to capture that energy — it’s called a ‘soft fascination’.” A city built of concrete and brick with no greenery, he goes on to explain, is called a ‘hard fascination’, and when we’re exposed to all the noise, heat and abject monotony that atmosphere provokes, our brains and bodies are simply not ‘fed’. “Whereas gardens have been shown to engender activity in the brain — not the crescendo of energy you might get from a big light show, but soothing, calming and restorative. It’s creative energy.” When designing the interiors and surface treatments for the RCH, Whittle applied these findings. “We studied how light filters through trees, and the detail, even if it’s only a fine-grained one, of how natural light hits a leaf and transforms it,” he says. “Soft fascination is about layers of different hues that move at different rates on a different scale. So all that complexity generates a type of perception and a reaction. It’s about thinking of the neurological effects of that light hitting your eyes and grazing your face, and what that does to your emotional core.” To translate the theory, the glass window screens at RCH are screen-printed with patterns, turning the sunlight into an elaboration of texture and colour. “So when the children are looking through the window”, Whittle says, “they get the halo of green that you get when you’re looking through a tree in a park”. When applying colour, the architect eschewed the typical Disney primary colour blocks for something far more intricate, taking inspiration from the eucalypt flower. “If you look deep into the blossom,” Whittle explains, “you get different grades of colour that come together to reinforce a sense of saturation and echo more of the natural world.” Whittle and his team also addressed what he calls the “coherence” of the building — “this theory about knowing where you’re going in your life” — by skewing the layout to the sun. “This allowed us to wrap the whole building with gardens, but it also gave us a natural clock within the building, so that the circadian rhythms and overall perception of the time of day was stitched into the experience.” Bates Smart won more than 35 national and international awards for the RCH, including the 2012 World Health Building of the Year.

W

e can thank neuroscientists like Fred ‘Rusty’ Gage, a US pioneer in the research behind neurogenesis — or ‘brain plasticity’, the ability to make new neurons throughout our lifespan — for fanning the flames of the neuroarchitecture movement. A 2003 lecture to the American Institute of Architects, in which Gage insisted that the time was nigh for neuroscientists and architects to become better acquainted, led to the foundation of the Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture that year, and a slow but sure awareness shift globally. Jan Golembiewski, an architect and neuroscientist who codirects the Sydney-based practice Psychological Design, cites studies he’s conducted as well as those by others that demonstrate how the brain responds to, and can profoundly be shaped by, environmental stimuli. “When you’re engaging consciously and actively with the environment, you’re building neural mass in your frontal cortex, which gives you more ability to inhibit the negative,” he asserts. “It will protect you against anxiety, depression and psychosis.” And he should know: a fundamental component of Golembiewski’s practice is in health-care design, and one of his greatest goals is to change what has become the conventional approach to mental health and aged-care facilities — sterile, unwelcoming, unnerving environments. “We like to design spaces not just for aged and mentally ill people who live in them, but for the people who visit them,” he says. He references the Basin View Masonic Village in Nowra, NSW, an aged-care facility that features an integrated aquaponics garden, where residents, carers and visitors alike can

38

vogueliving.com.au

tend to fish, yabbies, flowers, fruit and vegetables. “It gives family a means to get involved, and they can go home with a bunch of carrots homegrown by their grandmother,” he says. “And it gives that grandmother a feeling that her family isn’t just visiting as a sacrifice to their own time. It creates meaningfulness in an older person’s life.” And, as numerous studies have shown, having a purpose in life promotes resilience and protects the brain.

GARDENS have been shown to engender activity in the brain — not the crescendo of energy you might get from a big light show, but soothing, calming and restorative. It’s CREATIVE energy.

KRISTEN WHITTLE

So how does all this trickle down to the level of the individual in a home? Is the day coming soon that an architect can deliver a living environment prescribed to our personal peccadillos and unique neurological and molecular profiles? Golembiewski says hell yeah. “I really believe in bespoke architecture,” he says. “I believe in designing for the person. Design speaks, and we need to make that language say all the right things to make people feel happy, comforted and content within themselves. This is not about us bloody architects saying, ‘Well this is my signature style… ’ It’s about the person you’re doing it for, because that person has an emotional life that you have to nurture with that architecture.” Whittle agrees; in fact, he has put this logic into practice for a friend, a high-end engineer, who lives in Olinda in Victoria. “He wanted a specific space in Melbourne to be designed just for him to write his algorithms. He had no idea what he wanted, but I suggested that what he loved about Olinda was the woodlands and the sense of removal from the city. So I designed a log cabin in the middle of Melbourne that effectively has two skins: the first skin, where you walk through the façade of the building, and the inner skin, where we’re able to filter out the noise and the energy of the surrounding city. We created a purity and light in the space, a certain smell and a sense of nature. And it works. He was so comfortable, his production of algorithms went off the charts.” Tapping into what is effectively a set of coordinates dictated by an individual’s psychological traits, and creating spaces that resonate within those coordinates, is the future, Whittle insists. Already, Bates Smart is in the planning stages of incorporating virtual reality linked to neuroimaging technology into the design process. The idea is to track people’s behaviours and emotions as they walk through a space, to get a feedback loop in real time. He also believes this approach puts a whole new spin on how we will come to perceive sustainability. “It’s about time we actually used our wisdom and intelligence to design things that are good for us,” Whittle says. “We want to build buildings to last — not just in terms of being robust, but because they bring joy to people’s lives for the long-term and they work for multiple occupiers. It’s to do with attaching wellness and humanism to sustainability, and doing it holistically. That’s starting to become absorbed within the world now as a concept, and I think it’s about to take over.” VL


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Featured products from the Ligne Roset TOGO collection include: TOGO Fireside Chair’s, Corner Sofa and Large Setee.

Explore the DOMO collection at one of our seven showrooms across New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia and Victoria or online at

www.domo.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

shop style

VLoves

Soft touch

.

Chifley

DO G S APPE A R W ITH TH AN KS T O DO GS PLAY.COM .AU

TH E WHEATEN TERRIER

Mar/Apr 2019

41


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLoves

Charlie

TH E L A B RA D O O D LE

Arflex Botolo high armchair (1973) by Cini Boeri, $5225, from Poliform. Swedese Lamino armchair (1956) by Yngve Ekström, $3770, from Fred International.

Mar/Apr 2019

43


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLoves Apollo

T H E AU S T R A L I A N B U L L D O G

44

vogueliving.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

TOPS ON TOP A product designed by Cosentino®

Cindy Crawford on Silestone Eternal Calacatta Gold

On Top Discover more at silestone.com

Feel the new velvety texture

Adelaide

|

| Follow Us F T ô

COSENTINO AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND Brisbane | Melbourne | Perth | Sydney

|

Auckland


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Valerie Objects Alu chair by Muller Van Severen, $1110 each, from Spence & Lyda. Details, last pages.

46


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLoves

SHOP

Techno colours

NEW TECHNOLOGY opened up a whole palette of possibilities for Muller Van Severen’s functional, FUTURISTIC Alu chairs.

I

Produced & styled by Joseph Gardner Photographed by Saskia Wilson

f such fuss is made of Pantone’s one annual colour prediction (Living Coral for 2019, in case you hadn’t heard), imagine the deliberating when two colour-loving designers have to choose from infinite combinations of shades for their latest chair. The duo behind Muller Van Severen had become accustomed to (after first being frustrated with) limited colour options for a series of products — including their ‘First chair’ (2012) — in polyethylene and lacquered steel. After all, this is the material used for those cutting boards in professional kitchens: green for vegetables, red for meat, blue for fish, yellow for chicken and so on. The thenbudding Belgian studio was quickly associated with quirky, clever colour, because once you combine these basic hues, they take on a new personality. Swap out polyethylene for powder-coated

aluminium a few years later and suddenly there are no limits. What’s more, the Alu chair, just like the First chair, encourages a contrasting seat and back, which confuses things even further. The pair finally settled on 16 colour combinations. “Choosing the colours was hard for this chair,” says Fien Muller. “You can actually create a landscape of colours,” Hannes Van Severen adds. “[They] really determine the atmosphere of the space: you can create a very playful or a rather serious environment.” Originally designed as an outdoor chair for Anne Holtrop’s Bahrain Pavilion for the World Expo 2015 in Milan, the Alu chair is not only lightweight but surprisingly hard-wearing due to its treatment of beeswax and a UV protective lacquer. Distributed by Valerie Objects, the chair is now available in Australia at Spence & Lyda. JOANNE GAMBALE Mar/Apr 2019

47


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

The FUTURE is now


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

TH I S PAGE

O N B U R E AU ,

ST Y LIN G ASSI STANT S: A NN A DE L PART, G E OR G IA HA RR IN G TON , B ILL I E PH IIL IP S

FROM LEFT

Mar/Apr 2019

51


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

The Frame television with walnut customisable frame, $2998, from Samsung; marble and oak commode, $5800, from Parterre; 1890 German gothic-style lidded urn, $895/pair, from Greene & Greene; Apollo chair, $3200, from Becker Minty; Miniforms Colony side table, $2001, from Café Culture + Insitu; 1950s Seguso Sommerso glass vase by Flavio Poli, $2600, and 1977 Curtis Jeré floor lamp, $3800, both from SJC Home; plaster bust, $6400, from Parterre; antique French four-fold mounted paper screen, $4800, from The Vault; Baby Bishop table in Mint by India Mahdavi, $1900, and Tree light (2017) by Joao Manardu, $4000, both from Alm.

A BOV E , F ROM L E F T

52

vogueliving.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

F RO M L E F T

Mar/Apr 2019

53


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

FRO M L E F T

54

vogueliving.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Mar/Apr 2019

55


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

E X CH ANG E R AT E AT TI ME OF PR IN T I S SUB J E CT TO C HAN G E

F RO M LEFT

56

vogueliving.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Make it yours ! Stylish media storage and shelving for every room in your home.

www.usm.com

Available at Anibou – www.anibou.com.au Sydney 726 Bourke St. Redfern NSW 2016, 02 9319 0655 Melbourne 32 Glasgow St. Collingwood VIC 3066, 03 9416 3671 info@anibou.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Julep Lounge, Soap Table and Rituale Rug for Tachinni

stylecraftHOME.com.au Sydney 100 William Street, Woolloomooloo

Melbourne 145 Flinders Lane, Melbourne CBD

Mon - Fri: 8:30am - 5:00pm, Sat: 10:00am - 4:00pm info@stylecraftHOME.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLife

PH OTOG R A PHE R : T OB Y LE W IS TH OMA S

art design people

Mar/Apr 2019

59


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLife As architects, the couple set about doing something different with the establishment of Chan + Eayrs in London in 2014. “A normal architect wouldn’t find the site or write the brief,” says Chan Eayrs. “They would just do the drawings and then hand it over to the contractor, who usually has a very different set of goals.” Instead, the pair finds and buys a site or existing building, then proceeds to design or redesign it, living onsite throughout the transformation. The couple completes one project at a time — four houses to date — and doesn’t have clients because their houses are not commissioned. “Our whole concept is about this idea of the home,” says Chan Eayrs. “It’s the most emotional and special connection that you can have with a physical place.” With each house, they create a new expression of just that: home. Undertaking the interior design, too, the pair works with makers and curates every detail down to the ceramics, then sells the house as a complete entity, forks and all. “Because we do all of the interior, there is no distinction between the architectural and interior elements,” says Eayrs. “There’s a seamlessness to the final composition.”

“We’re very much into creating spaces that you feel and experience”

62

vogueliving.com.au

A BOV E , F RO M L E F T R I G H T

Merlin Eayrs and Zoe Chan Eayrs with daughter Max. In the dining area of The Weavers House, antique French farmhouse table; mid-century dining chairs reupholstered with Pierre Frey velvet; 1960s Semi brass pendant light by Claus Bonderup and Torsten Thorup for Gubi.

from the windows. “We’re very much into creating spaces that you feel and experience,” says Eayrs. The couple’s priorities have changed since having daughter Max, 2, and the pair has now bought a property in St Ives, Cornwall, right by the sea. “We started longing for greener, cleaner air,” says Chan Eayrs. “That led to wanting to build a completely green house, which is at one with the landscape both aesthetically and in terms of its performance,” Eayrs adds. It’s early days, but this project should offer this release.“Through technology, people feel both physically and psychologically more disconnected,” says Chan Eayrs. “There’s a longing for a bit more humanity in the objects we touch, even the food we eat. I think people seek comfort in knowing that something has been touched by a human hand. We’re doing that on an architectural scale — crafting it from the inside out.” ››

PH OTOG R A PHE R : T OB Y L EW I S TH OMAS ( PORT R AIT ) , MI CHA E L SIN CL AIR ( T HE W E AV E R S H OUSE )

W

orking together isn’t always plain sailing, though. “At the beginning, we would clash a lot,” says Chan Eayrs. “It took a while to figure out, what are we better at? What do we prefer?” The way each works is different. “I like to be using my hands," says Eayrs, “and evolving the design through touching and shaping materials.” Chan Eayrs describes her husband as “a people person; he likes to be out and about. I prefer to be at home, sketching, thinking, dreaming. It worked much better when we started playing to our strengths because we were also then happier. We got space from each other to be creative.” Their combined aesthetic is very natural and sumptuous, and deeply but subtly narrative. Textures are rich and refined, their palette muted and clean. For The Weavers House, an old Huguenot townhouse typical of London’s Spitalfields, the pair echoed the traditional wood panelling of these distinctive buildings with oak dados bedecked with unfinished lime plaster walls. For The Beldi, a converted loft in Shoreditch, a pale green tone lingers throughout, bathing you in its reflected light. It offers both a tonic for the urbanity of outside, and an empathy with the treetops visible

MERLIN EAYRS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

in The Weavers House, antique Peacock chair; antique Victorian table.

THI S PAGE

Mar/Apr 2019

63


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLife ART

F

or Honey Long and Prue Stent, friendship comes first and working together comes next. Perhaps that’s why their jointly created artworks work so seamlessly well — because they spring from the heart of a relationship that is intuitive and natural, rather than one built on skill and function. A woman’s best friend is one half of the H O N EY AND PR U E same coin; they read each other wordlessly. Now living together in Melbourne, they’ve been friends since Year 7, and at h on ey a n d p r ue .co m 25 years old apiece have been making art together for a decade. “Our work is the product of our friendship,” says Stent. “We’re constantly having this dialogue about things that interest us and that we’re attracted to, and a lot of the things that we do in our free time nurses our practice. We love going to markets and op shops. Ideas sometimes seem spontaneous, but I think they’ve actually been evolving over a long period of time in our conversations. Once it clicks, we will go out and shoot something in a very spontaneous manner, but it’s still very thought out in a subconscious way.” Much of Long and Stent’s recent work has focused on the relationship between the human body and landscape. Often solitary bodies are photographed in tangled poses, draped in various fabrics and positioned on rocks or sandy beaches, or engulfed in water. It’s hard not to think of Islamophobia and the plight of asylum seekers in images of women’s bodies wrapped from head-to-toe, emerging from the sand, or curled, foetal-like, around a rock on the beach. “We try to keep the work as open as possible so people can generate their own story,” says Long. “We want to connect with landscapes that we’re drawn to, using material as a medium between the body and landscape — it creates a bridge.” Perhaps, in these political times, nature and connection offer relief. “There is this idea that nature is passive; that it’s separate from us,” says Long. “We are trying to engage with landscape in a way that is inquisitive, trying to dissolve distinction.” They take turns in front of, and behind, the lens, and are moving into making their work more immersive by incorporating moving image B ELOW Best friends and and sound. “Being on location is so amazing,” says Stent. “We’re at a point where we artists Honey Long (left) don’t feel a photograph captures that experience.” Long adds, “Our work is about and Prue Stent in Self what emerges from our conversations, and we just trust that.” ›› Portrait (2018).

PH OT OG RA PH ER S: HON E Y L ON G AN D P R UE STE N T

Honey Long & Prue Stent

64

vogueliving.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

S P R I N G S U M M ER 2019 CA R R A R A G R A N D E T U B E R O S E WA L L PA P E R

1 2 6 . M OT H E R O F P E A R L PA I N T

FA B R I C | WA L L PA P E R | R U G S | A C C E S S O R I E S

DESIGNERSGUILD.COM

RADFORD 8S½RH]SYVPSGEPWXSGOMWXGEPP SVZMWMX[[[VEHJSVHJYVRMWLMRKWGSQEYWXSGOMWXW


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLife

C

harlotte De Geyter and Ben Sledsens both work in the creative realms of Antwerp, Belgium — 26-year-old De Geyter is a fashion designer while 27-year-old Sledsens is a painter. They’re also a couple. “Charlotte is my muse,” says Sledsens. “We are very inspired by each other,” says De Geyter. They met, as people do, on social media. “I didn’t know Charlotte, but I saw her drawings on Instagram and I thought to myself, ‘Her work is so close to mine; I need to get to know this girl’,” says Sledsens. “We were working in a similar way before we even met.” Sledsens often paints forests, lakes and animals. His style is what you might term ‘primitive’, in line with Henri Rousseau: there’s a flatness in his depiction, a graphic sense of shape and form. Almost with a designer’s eye, he uses bold, juxtaposed colours to help define his aesthetic — “I separate myself from

“Ben pushed me in my use of colour and changed the way I look at shapes” other Belgian artists by my use of colour,” he says. De Geyter cofounded Bernadette, a fashion line she runs with her mother (from whom the label takes its name). The clothes are designed for women of every age, with ornate depictions of nature, drawn by De Geyter, set against clean tailoring. “The way Ben combines colours is very inspiring for me,” she says. “If I visit his studio, something might pop up in a print or a drawing of mine a few days later without me realising that I saw it in one of Ben’s paintings. Even a few weeks ago, I drew a plant, and it turns out I saw it in one of his paintings months ago.” In turn, Sledsens depicts Geyter in his paintings, and often her clothing, too — currently De Geyter works from home, so her dresses pepper their apartment. In his celebrated 2018 work Girl in the Yellow Flower Dress, De Geyter appears wearing one of her own creations. He describes his portrayal as “the experience of Charlotte”. Perhaps it’s because their disciplines are different that they tend not to butt heads, because after three years together, they continue to relish each other’s advice. “Ben pushed me in my use of colour and changed the way I look at shapes,” says De Geyter. “Right now, I am obsessed with drawing flowers, and it was Ben who pushed me to take that further.” Call it young love — call it whatever you like — but what a fruitful response to adoration. VL

Artist Ben Sledsens and fashion designer Charlotte De Geyter. A floral-print dress from Bernadette.

FASHION AND ART

Charlotte De Geyter & Ben Sledsens B E R NA D E T T E; B EN S LE DS ENS be r nade ttea ntw erp.c o m @c harlott edg p @b ensle d se n s

66

vogueliving.com.au

PH OT OG RA PH ER : E VA DON CKE R S ( PORT R AI T)

F RO M L E F T


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


VLife

DESIGN

Render moment

Move over, hyperreality. A creative new breed of digital artists has taken 3D rendering into an immersive world of surrealism, fantasy and tactility. By Dana Tomic´ Hughes

A

Playground Pool by South African digital artist Alexis Christodoulou. A BOVE

68

vogueliving.com.au

s someone who’s deeply in love with the analog arts and the dying skill of hand-sketching, I never thought I’d be confessing that an emerging new cult of digital illustration and architectural renderings has me feeling giddy with excitement. I don’t mean your average CGI visuals — which, while serving an important purpose, usually pose as nothing more than developer or real estate porn. What I’m talking about is a new breed of digital artists who are adopting a less conventional, more painterly approach, evoking feelings of tactility and beautifully crafted atmospheres in the abstract scenes they create. Perhaps the real reason we see the rise of these fantastic and surreal digital realities is our collective desire for visual escape through a new kind of

immersive imagery, coupled with an insatiable appetite for what’s new and what’s next. One such digital artist is Alexis Christodoulou, who became frustrated with the lack of modern aesthetics represented in the digital world since playing video games as a child. Based in Cape Town in South Africa, Christodoulou turned to YouTube tutorials while working as a copywriter to learn the art of digital visualisations. His images bridge the concept of indoor and outdoor spaces, often featuring tiled surfaces, shallow pools of water, geometric shapes and generous proportions, all tinted in pastel colours. Having generated a cult following on Instagram, Christodoulou’s clean, modern aesthetic seems to have struck a universal chord. Over in Sweden, creative director Anders Brasch-Willumsen has been pursuing a personal project known as A Lucid Dream in Pink, Sleep Cycle No 1–7. True to its name, Brasch-Willumsen’s evocative series captures the idea of a lucid dream — a particular state in which one is aware they’re dreaming and can therefore control the narrative. His crisp and emotive images somehow manage to delicately bend the reality, manifesting as utterly sublime fantasies. Arguably one of the most established artists in this area is Copenhagen- and Malmö-based studio Wang & Söderström, led by spatial and furniture designer Anny Wang and architect Tim Söderström. The practice creates “mind tickling” (their description) moving and still images that maintain a high degree of lifelike tactility — in their talented hands, an object or an idea that’s ostensibly well-known and recognisable from the real world can suddenly appear warped. The pair’s ongoing Treasures series amalgamates imaginary materials and ambiguous shapes created onscreen that, through the use of cunning analog perspectives, appear as highly stylised still-life images. Their House Without Rules short film is a continuous vertical camera pan that travels through four floors of a building immune to the usual rules of gravity. Giant wobbly shapes varying in colours and textures satisfyingly squish and bounce around the rooms as tangible but hyperreal objects that make me wish I could reach into my computer screen and touch them. What all of these fictitious spaces have in common is an ability to cross multiple creative fields such as conceptual thinking, art direction, illustration, interior design and even architecture. Much like any other form of analog art, today’s digital artists are legitimising CGI as a new medium for creative self-expression. Through imagination and impeccable design sensibilities, they are rendering a world even more beautiful than our reality. VL @teaaalexis @studio_brasch @wangsoderstrom

IM AG E CO URTE SY AL E X IS C HR IST ODOU LO U

РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLife

Hicks

It’s easy to assume Sydney artist Petrina p e t rin a h ic ks .c om Hicks’s photography is sensuality in her depictions of women. the experience of being female. “I’m e identity,” she says. Works like 2013’s odel holds a pink conch shell in front of n misunderstood. “The conch shell nd the womb in many cultures,” says eally me asking, ‘Is my purpose in life ing? Am I just a vessel?’ The shell obscures her identity; e thought that work was about sexuality.” By seeing only it of a woman, the audience makes her point for her.

Fresh points of view ART

PHOTOGRAPHY has always captured the imagination. Images have the power to reflect, confront and resonate. Now, four VISIONARY ARTISTS are exploring and challenging our perceptions of nature, culture and our way of life in exciting and INSIGHTFUL ways. By Freya Herring Leatherwood Tree, Lake Chisholm by Craig Wall.

Craig Wall

Craig Wall’s commercial photography graces the pages of many of the world’s best magazines, but this Sydney-based artist’s personal work quietly crai g wall.co m.a u @ c ra i g w a llp ho t o encourages us to look beyond the material, and to see the value and importance of nature. “I’m not interested in hitting people over the head with an ideological sledgehammer,” he says. “I want to draw their eyes into the beauty inherent within things. By encouraging people to form an emotional connection to the beauty of the natural world, I hope that my work makes a small contribution to a growing movement that is rejecting mindless consumerism and destruction of our natural assets at the fastest rate the planet has ever seen.” 70

vogueliving.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Invasion (Telephone) (2017) by Michael Cook.

In the era of #MeToo, female artists like Melbourne-based Lilli Waters are shining a light on women. “I want my images to l il l iw a te r s.c o m @ li ll iw a t e r s move viewers to consider how we respond to the female body and to the environment,” she says. “We’re living in a time where the frustration and anger about the inequality of women’s rights in society and the destruction of the earth are bubbling to the surface.” Waters photographs women in a bid to understand her own femaleness. “It’s the conundrum of how to represent one’s individual beauty and the beauty within oneself without being constantly sexualised.” Waters’ latest exhibition, Others Dream, runs 20–30 June at Modern Times in Melbourne. VL

Lilli Waters

Michael Cook m ic hae lco ok.n et. a u

Sunshine Coast-based Indigenous Australian artist Michael Cook chooses to expose the world’s injustices through attraction rather than overt confrontation. “I approach each project to discover the colours between black and white, finding a little more empathy,” he says. His imagery is layered with concepts around colonisation and Indigenous identity, often employing role reversal, and when you look closely, the subject reveals itself in the details. There is an alluring sense of familiarity at first glance. “I make the pictures attractive, then I let the viewer’s emotions take over,” he says. “With my work, I have the power to change opinions.” Cook’s Broken Dreams (2010) series will be exhibited at Art Basel Hong Kong from 29–31 March. He is also featured in the show Points of View in Aboriginal Photography at the Art Gallery of NSW from 13 April–14 July.

Our Love Is Plastic (2017) by Lilli Waters from her Plastic Fish series.

Mar/Apr 2019

71


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


By Ian Phillips Photographed by Stephan Julliard

TH IS PAG E

Welcome to the weird and wonderful mind of this celebrated New York artist and designer, who has transformed his small Chelsea apartment into a magical portal to another world.

Doug Meyer

ART & DESIGN

РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLife


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLife

N

ew York-based artist Doug Meyer doesn’t consider himself to be a decorator. “For me, my interiors are more conceptual, more like a piece of art,” he asserts. They are certainly high-voltage, highly original and exquisitely bespoke. He hates repeating himself, avows a love of “things that are odd”, and couldn’t imagine a world without bright hues. “Colour is never shocking for me. I always find it so amazing.” Many of his projects to date have been equally amazing. Several years ago, he worked on a Manhattan apartment for fashion designer Sylvia Heisel, where he covered the walls of her kitchen-cum-living room with a crisscross pattern of black tape — there were nearly 2.2 kilometres of it in total. He also clad his own former flat with almost 3000 sheets of multicoloured paper. His seemingly boundless creative imagination is not limited to dreaming up eccentric interiors either. He also has his own homewares and accessories line, developed in tandem with his brother, Gene; has produced a book called Heroes: A Tribute, which pays homage to 50 figures in the arts who have died from AIDS; and is constantly busy making brightly toned cameos for the likes of New York socialite Amy Fine Collins and actress Mindy Kaling of The Office fame. Meyer was born in Louisville, Kentucky, to parents who were high on colour. He claims his mother was a Candice Bergen lookalike and recalls his father going off to play golf dressed in a fuchsia sweater and lime-green corduroy trousers. He moved to New York at the age of 15, studied Fine Art at Parsons School of Design, and spent an inordinate amount of time hanging out at Studio 54. After graduation, he worked for art dealer Holly Solomon and then decamped to Miami in the early ’90s, where he opened a glamorous newsstand on Washington Avenue called Beach News. His regular clients included Gianni Versace and Madonna. Meyer moved back to New York a decade ago and now shares an 80-square-metre apartment with his husband, lawyer Meade Ali. It is located in what could only be described as a nondescript brick high-rise in Chelsea. In true Meyer fashion, the flat itself is both wonderful and wacky. It features a pink wall partition christened Deep Space, whose inspirations include sci-fi films and topographical maps. There is also a blue library he compares to a fish tank, wall panels made from back-painted glass with microorganism-like motifs and a jewel-like console with multiple protrusions. There are quieter moments, too. The red oak veneer walls in part of the living space are a flashback to an Angelo Donghia-decorated flat at the United Nations Plaza, which he visited in the mid-1970s. Ali, meanwhile, insisted that the predominant tone in the bedroom was grey. “I call it ‘The Prison’,” quips Meyer. While almost everything in the f lat is custom, he also wanted it to be free and easy. He specifically chose the Warren McArthur chairs in the sitting room because they fold up. “I love that things are movable,” he states. “That way, it’s not that precious or permanent.” And he’s constantly bemused by reactions to his environment. “A lot of people say, ‘How do you live like this?’” he sighs. “But, for me, this is totally normal. It’s just how I think.” VL dougmeyerstudio.com @doug_meyer

74

vogueliving.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

TH I S PAGE OP P OS I TE PAGE


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLife PEOPLE

Ashwini Asokan Meet the woman behind the artificial intelligence technology changing how we shop, style and design our homes. By Noelle Faulkner

A

shwini Asokan is th founder of Mad Stre Francisco- and Chen company at the fore recognition technolo Vue.ai, has already been adopted b industry, including such retail giants as Net a Porter, Levi’s and Macy’s. The AI-based program can recognise style, fabric, colour, patterns, shape and size, and soon will be able to create a shopper’s avatar right down to every curve. And the more you browse, the more it learns. Vue.ai also has the ability to remember your previous purchases, helping to build on your already existing wardrobe — exactly like a stylist. So unlike the now-ancient algorithms of “someone else who bought this also bought this”, the experience is humanly intuitive. Now, Asokan has her eyes set on the interiors space. “The most powerful thing about AI is the way we’re slowly beginning to change the way we interact with the world around us,” she says. “Image recognition, in particular, lends itself to objects that have a distinct visceral and visual effect on us.” Technology has already changed how we see the world and never has design been more accessible. Consider the impact Pinterest, Instagram, social media and resources like Google Arts & Culture have had on our global knowledge and awareness, as well as our collective appetite for discovering, sharing and devouring imagery. Even in mainstream culture, with the popularity of television programs like Grand Designs and The Block, it seems that almost anyone can develop a traveller’s eye for contemporary design. “Suddenly, everyone with homes ranging from designer bungalows to the student living in a tiny dorm has become aware of design, organisation, aesthetics and more,” says Asokan. With Vue.ai, the entrepreneur intends to make interior styling as accessible as a Pinterest page, except the algorithm is completely personalised for an individual’s tastes. “Our machine-learning algorithms recognise different types of furniture — they understand style, colour, pattern, texture and more, and they curate these

76

vogueliving.com.au

Ashwini Asokan, CEO and founder of tech company Mad Street Den.

“We’re going to see the rise of the CONSUMER as the CREATOR and it’s going to be very exciting”

pieces for you,” she explains. “If you’re a home and lifestyle brand, you can personalise the experience for each and every shopper looking for something that defines them.” Beyond that, the algorithms intuit every shopper’s style from the pieces they look at online, the trends they tap into, their mood boards, inspirational images and more. “Imagine no two shoppers having the same experience because there’s an AI interior designer curating an app that fits your aesthetics and needs,” says Asokan. Add augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR), import your room’s dimensions and existing pieces, and you may never need to set foot in a showroom again.

T

he next step, says Asokan, is AI-generated bespoke furniture. “We’re going to see the rise of the consumer as the creator and it’s going to be very exciting,” she says. This doesn’t necessarily mean the role of the designer is dead — but it certainly changes accessibility. “There will always be people who want their choices curated and handed over to them,” Asokan notes. “Time is a resource that will never go out of fashion. But the presence of different types of I/O control devices [programs or hardware that can transfer data back and forth to a computer, like a mouse or an external hard drive], AI and VR allow you to reimagine creation across mediums we can’t even begin to envision today.” There is an argument, particularly in creative industries, that warns against AI, stating that it won’t be long until robots will be doing the work of the designer and taking jobs. But Asokan counters that. She believes that we should think of AI as an artistic tool, not a replacement for creative thinking. “We’re here to create a new category that never existed before. And we’ve barely started,” she says. “The possibilities are endless.” VL vue.ai @vue.ai


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLife ART & DESIGN

Axel Vervoordt

The BELGIAN DESIGNER is a master at rediscovering the forgotten and giving it a “better place” — a philosophy that’s drawn a devoted A-list clientele including KANYE, DE NIRO AND STING. By Jason Mowen

PHO T OGRAPHER: JAKE CUR TIS

Axel Vervoordt in the Oriental Salon at Kasteel van ’s-Gravenwezel, the 12th-century castle where the designer lives with his wife, May.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLife

W BE LOW Axel Vervoordt’s 2007 exhibition, Artempo: Where Time Becomes Art, at Palazzo Fortuny in Venice.

80

vogueliving.com.au

hat is greatness? For Eleanor Roosevelt, it was the discussion of ideas rather than people or events that led to greatness of mind. It’s a wonderful sentiment, and a reminder that we can always cultivate our minds by exploring, and remaining open to ideas. I recently spent an hour with Axel Vervoordt at Kanaal, the epicentre of his art and design empire outside of Antwerp, Belgium, and knew with every fibre of my being that I was in the presence of someone truly great. It wasn’t just that as a novice creative, I was finally meeting the grand master of the ‘mix’ — Vervoordt has been bringing together disparate ages and styles since the 1970s — whose now well-thumbed books on interiors, and so much more, I’d been collecting for decades. Nor was it the sublime, almost templeeqsue nature of Kanaal (more on that later), or my visit to the Kasteel van ’s-Gravenwezel, the 12th-century castle that Vervoordt and his wife, May ‘rescued’ in 1984 and have since called home.

(Replete with a moat, wildly romantic outbuildings and a park-like garden, not to mention an interior that shifts between Italian Renaissance and Japanese Zen, the castle is one of the most magical homes on the planet.) What was extraordinary about Vervoordt was none of this — and all of this — but the profound depth of feeling with which he does, well, everything. Eleanor would have approved; here was the very definition of an ideas man. “The old world inspires me to create a new world,” Vervoordt tells me as we sit in one of Kanaal’s Artist Studios. “Every day I discover something new: a piece of wood, furniture or a great artist. You make yourself vulnerable, to be receptive, but it’s so important to always look at things with open eyes and an open heart.” His philosophy, put simply, is rediscovering the forgotten and giving it a “better place”, whether a fine piece of Huguenot silver, a weathered antique timber panel or a simple found object such as a stone. And it’s a philosophy that resonates with his clients — Robert De Niro, Sting, Calvin Klein and Kanye West, to name a few. ››


PHO T OGRAPHERS: JEAN-PIERRE GABRIEL ( AR TEMPO ), FREDERIK VERCRUY SSE

РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Mar/Apr 2019

81


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLife

the living room of a private apartment in one of the ‘cubes’ of Kanaal, with architecture by Bogdan & Van Broeck and interior design by Axel Vervoordt. The Wabi interior of a private residence in the Belgian countryside.

“I think that in every object we have, there is a silence — a sense of peace and HARMONY that embraces you” AXEL VERVOORDT

‹‹ Much like the castle, Kanaal is a good example of Vervoordt rediscovering the forgotten. Originally a gin distillery from the 19th century, the rambling canal-side industrial complex has been resuscitated — over the course of more than a decade — by Vervoordt and May, who runs the interior design department, as well as their sons, Boris and Dick, who oversee art and architecture. Kanaal houses the Axel Vervoordt Gallery and a part of the collection of Axel & May Vervoordt Foundation; offices and apartments; and restoration and research facilities for his 100-plus staff (there’s even a French bakery and a Japanese restaurant). The ‘dialogue’ between 82

vogueliving.com.au

the architecture and the Foundation’s art collection makes for a thought-provoking environment. Monumental installations by James Turrell and Anish Kapoor are interspersed with works by Lucio Fontana, Jef Verheyen and Antoni Tàpies, not to mention Vervoordt’s extensive collection of German Zero movement artists as well as those of the Gutai from Japan. What really takes it to the next level, however, is the pairing of these works with antiquities from the various cradles of civilisation, such as a tiny Cycladic head, almost 5000 years old, or the seated Lohan, a 13th-century Chinese wooden figure of a monk in meditation that sits on his own within a circular, almost cave-like space. “I think that in every object we have, there is a silence — a sense of peace and harmony that involves you and embraces you,” he says. Eastern philosophies have long informed Vervoordt and he cites his personal concept of Wabi — from the spirit of the values of Zen monks in Japan, who sought contentment in simplicity, purity and restraint — as his greatest inspiration. “It’s the celebration of beauty in humble things.” But giving the old and the forgotten that “better place” is never far from his mind. “I see living with antiques as very modern; they tell us as much about the present and future as they do about the past,” he says. “The 21st century must be a century of recuperation. As we become more conscious of the natural resources we use, we must find creative ways to reuse what has been discarded.” VL kanaal.be; axel-vervoordt.com

PHO T OGRAPHER: JAN LIÉGEOIS

F RO M LEFT


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

The Eighth by Crema Designed by Elenberg Fraser and Mim Design

Artist impression

YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO LIVE WITHOUT COMPROMISE. The Eighth by Crema is a cutting-edge building concept which has been carefully curated for those with a curious mind who value freedom of movement, enhanced lifestyle experiences, a sense of belonging and the ability to transition effortlessly between live, work and play. Comprising of curated offices, a café and wine bar, a European-inspired day spa and a limited collection of 36 private residences offering quarter, half and full floor options, The Eighth sets a new benchmark for integrated living. Secure your place at The Eighth, today. 8 Palmerston Crescent, South Melbourne. TheEighth.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

PH OT OG RA PH ER S: MICH AE L DE PASQ UA LE AN D M ART IN A MAF FI NI

homes

VLiving

in the dining area of this apartment on Paris’s Right Bank, dining table by Diego Delgado-Elias; Niels Otto Møller chair upholstered by Maison Pierre Frey; Consorzio Sedie Friuli wicker chair; 1970s Italian mirror. TH I S PAGE

Mar/Apr 2019

85


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

With curvaceous Art Deco pieces and clever use of textures and colours, Paris-based AUSTRALIAN fashion entrepreneur Vanessa Cocchiaro has created a sensual FEMININE HAVEN in the uber-chic 19th arrondissement.

French polish


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

THIS PAGE homeowner Vanessa Cocchiaro and architect Diego Delgado-Elias. OPPOSITE PAGE in the lounge area, Diego DelgadoElias sofa made by Maison Pierre Frey; coffee table by Willy Rizzo; chair by Geoffrey Harcourt for Artifort; wall sconce by Diego Delgado-Elias; rug by Diego Delgado-Elias for Objects For.

Mar/Apr 2019

87


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

in another view of the lounge area, Kandya Jason chair; coffee table by Willy Rizzo; Diego Delgado-Elias sofa made by Maison Pierre Frey; vintage vases and accessories; candle by L’Officiné Universelle Buly à Paris. THI S PAGE

V

anessa Cocchiaro is a globetrotting Australian stylist turned founder and creative director of the Paris-based contemporary bridesmaid and evening wear label Les Héroïnes. Passionate about design, Cocchiaro, who grew up in Adelaide, worked as a stylist in Sydney for 10 years before moving to Milan and then to Paris, where she finessed fashion shoots as a contributing editor for the influential French glossy L’Officiel. “I made the move to Paris because I love the city and have a lot of friends here,” she says. “I think it reflects my personal style much more than Italy.” The Right Bank apartment Cocchiaro has just finished renovating is, like the design-savvy owner, a clever blend of Parisian elegance, Milanese sophistication and Australian pragmatism. Classic Haussmann in style, the intimate 80-square-metre home is located in the leafy northern 19th arrondissement, a cultural hub that includes the spectacular Jean Nouvel-designed Philharmonie de Paris among its highlights, as well as two of the city’s most magical parks, Parc des Buttes-Chaumont and Parc de la Villette. For this renovation, Cocchiaro worked in tandem with her good friend, architect Diego Delgado-Elias, who founded his practice in Paris in 2014 after a decade of working on projects in both his native Peru and the US. Describing his style as alternating between the authentic and the audacious, DelgadoElias has not only refreshed the interiors of the 19thcentury space with raw, textured walls, oxblood marble, accents of brass and Art Deco finds, he has also custom-designed key furnishings. Here, Cocchiaro reveals the joys of their collaboration. What appealed to me the most about this apartment, which I found and bought at the end of 2017, was the natural light. It’s located in a corner building, so the windows go from the front all the way down the side. And it has two bedrooms — one that I use as an office. I started working on the interiors with Diego “I am obsessed soon after I bought it. It with the pink was such a pleasure velvet sofa, working with him on which Diego such a personal project. Delgado-Elias He knows me very well, and I told him he could designed and do whatever he wanted was made by to. I fully trust his vision Pierre Frey” and know he has VANESSA COCCHIARO impeccable style. ››


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

THIS PAGE in the kitchen, Roso Levanto marble splashback and benchtop; vintage dining table and pendant light. OPPOSITE PAGE in another view of the kitchen, Smeg stovetop and oven; vintage sconce.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

THIS PAGE in another view of the dining area, Diego Delgado-Elias dining table; Consorzio Sedie Friuli wicker chairs; Niels Otto Møller chairs upholstered by Maison Pierre Frey; ’70s Italian mirror; artwork by Paris-based artist Sélim Saiah.

‹‹ My personal style is quite simple, but I also like to take risks. Diego and I didn’t shy away from colour, which I love. Before Paris, I lived in Milan for quite a few years, and I think this also comes through in the design. The kitchen is one of my favourite spaces. This is a heritage building, so it wasn’t possible to move or take down specific walls. The kitchen is quite small with very little light, so we decided to play on that. Instead of painting it white, we wanted to keep it dark and make it feel cosy. The burgundy fireplace in the living room inspired the colour. I also think the mirrors on the cupboard doors are such a great design feature. They open up the space and reflect the colour of the

B]b]gmlar walls and marble. ZpZr_khf The overall style we \hehnk%pab\a wanted for the interior Beho^';^_hk^ was Art Deco. We IZkbl%Bebo^]bg would go to vintage FbeZg_hkjnbm^ markets together, where found a lot of Z_^pr^Zkl%Zg] we stunning pieces — BmabgdmablZelh especially Italian and \hf^lmakhn`a Belgian design in places like the Marché aux bgma^]^lb`g Puces de Saint-Ouen, VANESSA COCCHIARO a huge market with a lot of design stores. It’s also a great source of inspiration. One of the wonderful things about living in Paris is that you are always exposed to creativity. The light feature on the wall in the living room is a very special piece and one of my favourites. It’s 1920s Art Deco and was originally a ceiling light. Diego altered it so it could be placed onto the wall as a sconce. The 18th-century fireplaces were a big inspiration for the colour scheme, and the walls in the living room. Originally there was wallpaper on them, and we ripped it off to reveal the raw texture of the original plaster wall. I am obsessed with the pink velvet sofa in the living room, which Diego designed and was made by Pierre Frey. All of the fabric in the apartment is by Pierre Frey. I also love the wardrobe in my bedroom, which is made from cane webbing. Every morning when I wake up, I have to pinch myself because I can’t believe I am in such a beautiful apartment. I honestly love everything about it. The moment I moved in, it felt like home. VL diegodelgadoelias.com; lesheroines.com


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

96


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

By Tara Stevens Photographed by Kasia Gatkowska

Frame of mind

The revival of a classic canal house in AMSTERDAM showcases the owners’ distinctive style and out-of-the-box thinking.

Mar/Apr 2019

97


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

W

hen interior design firm Framework Studio cofounder Thomas Geerlings and his wife Danielle first met, they dreamt of living in one of Amsterdam’s canal houses near the Amstelveld square. They finally realised that dream early in 2017 when the pair stumbled upon a ruinous property that proved irresistible. “When you do projects for yourself, your first decisions are emotionally driven,” Geerlings says. “We saw the place for five minutes, fell in love with it and decided to buy it without having any real technical knowledge behind it. We assumed we’d manage to keep the beams, for example, but they turned out to be completely rotten along with pretty much everything else spread over all five floors — we basically had to go back to the beginning.” Luckily, Amsterdam’s archive holds almost all the original drawings of listed buildings, providing a comprehensive map for the pair to work from. After scrutinising these plans, they set about renovating the house in their own way, combining contrasting styles that cleverly manage to trick the eye while seeking “beautiful imperfections” in everything. Geerlings explains how the design process developed based on two key factors. First, he wanted to conserve this historic relic, a former warehouse dating back to 1896 with all its idiosyncrasies — not least its tall and narrow structure with a footprint of little more than 50 square metres spread across five storeys. Second, he had to assess how to turn the dilapidated warehouse into a comfortable family home for two boisterous young children. “I don’t like industrial or loft spaces. They just don’t do it for me,” Geerlings says. “I like unfussy, unfinished details, and I wanted the outer shell to be true to the original building, adding the bare minimum of technical detailing inside and doorways to make it a comfortable environment. Inside, I kept it in tone-on-tone with greens and greys, layering colours and textures and rounding off the angles. I see design as like the composition of a painting — all these components have to talk to each other. Then you have something really interesting going on.” Inside, the house is arrestingly elegant but with an easygoing, unaffected atmosphere. The floors mix warm oak boards with emerald-hued slabs of marble; varying shades of green combine seamlessly with raw cement walls while curvaceous edges add softness to the space. ››


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

T H I S PAGE in another view of the living room, Pierre Chapo chair by Morentz; Framework Studio custom sofa; Atmospheric Particulate Matter artwork (2017) by Italian artist Lamberto Teotino; framed charcoal drawing (in the hall) by German artist Iris Schomaker. O PPO S IT E PAGE in the main salon, Framework Studio cofounder Thomas Geerlings and his wife, Danielle; Moooi standing lamp; Zaha Hadid photograph by Patrik Grijalvo above workbench.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

TH I S PAGE

O P PO S I T E PAGE


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

“It’s so important to leave some aspects open-ended. This is why I find real life much more interesting than Instagram” THOMAS GEERLINGS

‹‹ If you had to pin Geerlings down to a signature style, a ‘postmodern approach to playful inclusiveness’ might fit the bill. “Detailing is a very important thing for us at the studio, but when everything is finished perfectly you don’t have a dream anymore,” he says. “It’s so important to leave some aspects open-ended. This is why I find real life much more interesting than Instagram. I don’t care about perfect pictures, but I like stuff that is useful and when technology and art come into the mix giving depth and meaning to a space. That’s when the magic happens.” Take the main salon, where Geerlings ingeniously brings together a five-metre long craft bench for the kids with a more intimate, German-inspired stube, or lounge area, for the grown-ups, separated by a supporting wall that couldn’t be moved. “After years of designing homes in Amsterdam, we realised playrooms were never used,” he says. “Kids always stay reasonably close to wherever their parents are. So, in this very awkward, long and narrow space, we decided to create something amazing that suited all of us. They can leave their pencils and pens and toys scattered on the bench, it doesn’t matter; we have a space that’s a bit tidier and more private where we can have time with our friends, too.” This was also the case in the kitchen, which had formerly been an art gallery. The couple talked about their respective wishes for the space — she wanted a garden; he didn’t want to lose any valuable living area — and met in the middle by adding a retractable glass roof that has become an indoor-outdoor space. “My philosophy is it’s better to integrate your needs into your spaces from the start, especially when it comes to family homes,” Geerlings says. The kids’ bedroom is painted a peachy pink, spiced up with the addition of a vintage Pluto bench from a collection of children’s furniture produced by Disney in the 1980s. Morentz, a large furniture dealer in The Netherlands where Geerlings sources many designs, gifted the piece to him. “I really liked it,” he says. “It’s just such a strange object!” Art has been a big influence. In the first-floor living room, his obsession with imperfection is celebrated in works such as Lamberto Teotino’s Atmospheric Particulate Matter, a scan of a 19th-century Dutch master with a reworked, blurred face. In the hallway, there’s a piece by Paul Citroen, a charcoal drawing of a woman whose face is also obscured. “It’s unfinished, mysterious, dark and fascinating,” Geerlings muses, “but also leaves space for your own imagination, which I think is hugely important in both art and design.” VL framework.eu @ frmwrkstudio


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

in the kitchen, Framework Studio custom skylight and marble splashback; Zoffany Paint paint in Paris Grey. O PPOS I T E PAGE in another view of the kitchen, Framework Studio custom table, benches and cupboards; vintage wall light by Morentz; Framework Studio custom green panel mural conceals wine cabinets. T H I S PAGE


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

in the children’s bedroom, Nilson Beds bedhead; vintage Knoll desk from Morentz; Pulpo pink stool; puppet (on desk), origin unknown; Kreon Esprit black double ceiling light; Entler light (over desk); Farrow & Ball paint in Setting Plaster; artwork over bed by Dutch designer Dirk Vander Kooij. O P PO S IT E PAGE in the kids’ bedroom, vintage Pluto bench by The Walt Disney Company, from Morentz; Framework Studio custom curtains. Details, last pages. THI S PAG E


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

“My philosophy is it’s better to integrate your needs into your spaces from the start, especially when it comes to family homes” THOMAS GEERLINGS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

T H IS PAG E

OPPOSITE PAGE


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Artistic licence By Stephen Todd Photographed by Anson Smart Styled by Claire Delmar

HAIR & MAKE-UP: ALLISON BOYLE. FASHION S T YLIS T: ANN A DELPRAT. SUS AN WEARS DRIES VAN NO TEN SHIR T FROM POEPKE, POEPKE.COM

A creative FAMILY turn to a renowned interior architect to REIMAGINE their inner-Sydney home.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

W

le Susan Hipgrave aring mentioned to t Brian Keirnan that e to renovate their ded, “Well, I’ve been pened the sketchpad him, as always, Sydney’s Redfern. ‘We’ll make a hole put in a big skylight, down that big wall embers Waring. s renowned for his for the clarity with exude nuance, exist d always have been never liking that big mself who’d designed ars earlier. Hipgrave g in TV production. he grip of the worst on, and desperately mble-down cottage in ticks,” Waring quips. new how to do.” et and bonded with as absolute, platonic amazing, you’ve got , which he knew at nthusing about the


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

T H I S PAGE

O PPOS I TE PAGE


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

“It was a ho sticks beyong anything TH I S PAGE in the living area, Buds 2 table lamp by Rodolfo Dordoni for Foscarini from Space Furniture; Kati Watson marbled bowl from Utopia Art Sydney. In the dining area, dining table by Brian Keirnan; Cassina Cab dining chairs from Space Furniture; Omni bench from Rory Unite; Buyku (2017) sculpture by Gunybi Ganambarr from Buku-Larrngay Mulka Centre; Skull Rorschach (2007) artwork by Ben Quilty from Tolarno Galleries; Lonnie L ceramic dog sculpture by Nina Waring. In the kitchen, Rina Menardi Totem 6 vase from Ondene; flowers by Samambia Flowers; Detresse and Secours (1880) figures by Arthur Waagen.

terrified


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

version

home

warehouse


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

T H I S PAGE

OP PO S ITE PAGE


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

In the living area of the secondary residence, Stockholm sofa from IKEA; Maxalto Kalos armchair from Space Furniture; Michael Aram Enchanted Forest Collection coffee table from Shapiro; cane chair and side table from Raffan Kelaher & Thomas; Dim 333 lamp by Vico Magistretti for Oluce from Radar; Academy of Red Herrings (1993) sculpture by Antonio Colangelo from Artpark; Neville and Cecil dog sculptures by Edward Waring; (artworks near stairs, from left) Circles Passing (Page 21) (2007) and Circles Passing (Page 28) (2007) artworks by Stuart Ringholt; Queen (HJ) (2017) artwork by Hugo Rose from National Art School Graduate Show 2017; Let’s Hope They’re Friendly (2013) and Palmerston St, Westport (2004) artworks by Derek Henderson; (artworks near sofa, from left) Women in Children in Crowd (2003) artwork by Selina Ou from Sophie Gannon Gallery; Treescape (2008) artwork by Susan Hipgrave from Arthouse Gallery; Japanese Girl (2008) artwork by Nina Waring; Everything I Cannot See (2009) artwork by Heidi Yardley; Moreton Bay Fig at Night (1980) artwork by Gordon Fitchett; Diamond Harbour 1962 artwork by Nina Waring.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

‹‹ The trio reconvened at the recently opened Bills cafe in Darlinghurst, which Keirnan designed. In that immaculate, sunlit interior for which Bills quickly became acclaimed, Keirnan pulled out a pen and began sketching (this time on a napkin) more than a house but a compound, a fortress. A secluded place in the middle of what was once among Sydney’s grittiest inner-city precincts. The floor plate of that initial plan — a tall volume at the front, a paved courtyard and then a secondary volume at the rear — was perfect. But 25 years on, the owners, who both gave up their jobs some time back to concentrate on their art practice, wanted to get more light in, to aerate both spaces and make it perfect for the next phase of their lives. They’d been thinking that a lick of paint and some newfangled LEDs might do the trick. Keirnan had a bigger vision. Orchestrated in tandem with architect Mark Pearse, who had worked with Keirnan since he was a student and now runs his own practice, the new light well spans the width of the building, allowing the open-plan dining and living areas to read vertically as well as horizontally. Removing the fireplace that had occupied the centre of the glass wall to the garden effectively extends sightlines right through to the back of the block. And that big wall Keirnan never liked? It’s become a monumental storage unit — a stack of elegantly discombobulated volumes crafted from rich yellow oak and honeycomb marble. Cantilevered from the wall and illuminated from below, the cupboards hover above the timber floor. At one end, a rogue oblong drawer protrudes to form a display shelf; at the other, a steel-and-glass cabinet floats out into space. “It’s got something of an Escher feel to it,” says Hipgrave as we ascend the narrow stairway concealed behind it. The main bedroom occupies the first floor and gives onto a private terrace. It’s here Hipgrave works at a small round table, painting exotic flora and fauna onto porcelain plates using sable brushes from Japan. Supremely delicate, her fluid linear work references 19th-century scientific drawing. More Joseph Banks than Banksy, it’s fine work that revels in the decorative. Daughter Nina, 22, also an artist, has her bedroom (and impressive sneaker collection) on the next floor up. Waring’s studio is out the back, past a stand of mature bamboo. The original singlestorey bungalow has been endowed with a second floor, making it dialogue more eloquently with the main house. It’s up here that Waring creates sculptural assemblages of cut crystal and glass vessels. From his eyrie, a rustic timber door opens out onto the roof, where he picks perfectly ripe avocados from a towering tree. Looking back towards the main house, the rigorous composition is evident in the bank of full-height louvres that form the garden wall. The dropped ceiling over the dining area delineates it from the living space and the semi-enclosed kitchen reads like a theatre set. The robust structural program is offset by moments of whimsy — a bespoke barrel-and-pin metal balustrade that leads the way to the upper floors, undulating gossamer curtains, jewel-hued furniture in plush velvets that absorb and then emanate light. “The first version of the house was like a warehouse,” says Hipgrave, “but this is more like a home.” Hipgrave and Waring have decided to call their home the Brian Keirnan House in honour of one Sydney’s most remarkable interior architects. VL Susan Hipgrave’s exhibition It’s a Jungle Out There opens at Sydney’s Arthouse Gallery on 7 March; arthousegallery.com.au; susanhipgrave.com TH IS PAGE , F ROM TO P in Edward’s upstairs studio in the secondary residence, side tables and centrepieces by Edward Waring; Still Life With Crucible (1997) artwork by Peter Tilley. Tio chairs from Massproduction; outdoor table designed by Brian Keirnan; Infinity bowl from Lightly. Details, last pages.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

an american in paris T H I S PA G E O P PO S I TE PAGE

120

vogueliving.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

ASHLEY MADDOX

And where was the American in this corner of Paris? In the glossy blue-painted window seat, for one, inspired by a Paris cafe. Maddox says she likes to anticipate nice places to sit; it’s about comfort and a moth-like search for the utmost light. “We knew the blue would be a nice visual focus,” adds the designer, who’s known for favouring saturated colour palettes. “Colour actually makes these classical rooms feel taller, as well as giving them a good graphic punch.” The blue also ties in with the bottom half of the kitchen, which relates to the blue bedroom and the Toro salon chairs. American comfort is most commonly sought in the (Frenchnamed) ensuite, so there is now a bathroom for each bedroom. Not to mention an ample new kitchen sink: “In America, we always have a big sink,” says Maddox. “When you have friends over for drinks, you can put everything in it and you can’t see a thing.” The decor itself is hardly American. Like Paris, it is a melting pot of designs behind which lie stories of travel. The burled wood kitchen table is Italian, found in Holland, and combines with the Marcel Breuer chairs (German, but found in Italy). Picked up from a flea market, the Murano chandelier in the kitchen hangs above Austrian Thonet chairs sourced in Marrakech. But the game is given away by the colour scheme of Californian Gold Coast-warm rather than grey or stark white, a tale of tonality that best demonstrates the culture clash. “There’s a funny reality when I work with architects in Paris,” Maddox muses. “Often, when we think of a colour scheme, a range will be presented. I’ll choose the warm colours, whereas they’ll go towards the cool. We’re using brass throughout, for the lighting and taps, which is not typical at all in France or Paris.” It’s almost as if Gene Kelly just performed a pirouette across the apartment’s pale oak parquet floor, and whatever he touched assumed a gossamer Hollywood filter. “I grew up in California in the sunshine,” explains Maddox. “In Paris, the sky is already grey. We don’t need any more.” VL laurenashleymaddox.com @laurenashleymaddox.com

T H I S PAGE Ashley Maddox. OPP OS I TE PAGE in the hallway, bergère matches the bench by Double G, upholstered with Tulip Sway and Iris Bloom linen by Idarica Gazzoni; wedding cake architraves, relocated with the help of construction company WITO; pendants by Caravane.

122

vogueliving.com.au

PO RTR AI T PH OT OG R APH ER : ZOE F ID J I. AD DIT ION AL TE X T: J OAN NE G A MB AL E

G

eorge Gershwin composed An American in Paris to convey his own first impressions of the City of Lights. In the sumptuous 1951 film version, Gene Kelly famously pliéd through a ballet sequence to that song with a similar sense of naive optimism. Here, Ashley Maddox has decoratively danced her way through an 18th-century apartment in SaintGermain with a Californian-style joie de vivre. Maddox — a West Coast-born property developer — has been buying and renovating homes in historic buildings since she arrived in Paris with a newborn and toddler in 2008, and now makes it her business to search out neglected Paris apartments — “ugly ducklings”, she calls them — and wave her magic wand over the 1970s decor. The formerly dowdy bird in question is the first floor of a building on Rue Jacob, built in 1710. “There are many designers in Paris who are removing the original elements,” says Maddox. “For me, it’s like, noooo! I’m American. To have a marble chimney that’s practically older than the United States — it’s such a joy.” The ornate period details are all the more ‘wow’ in a revamped interior with a modern layout and an easy flow. “It’s about adding personality, but personality in a way that’s not overbearing,” says Maddox, who collaborated with Paris-based GCG Architects and contracting team WITO on the project. It was also about reconfiguring the layout; repurposing the period features; and injecting some colour, a dose of American practicality and an eclectic selection of furniture, including the 1970s Azucena Toro sofas and chairs in their original blue and tomato-soup velvets. “The joy of doing this in Paris,” says Maddox, “is that you have these amazing spaces that have been neglected for a long time.” The team started by ripping up the linoleum floors and knocking out the lowered ceiling. In the hallway, architraves from the salon were repositioned. Previously enclosed, the salon was opened up to make the whole space feel brighter.

“We knew the blue would be a nice visual focus. Colour makes these classical rooms feel taller, as well as giving them a good graphic punch”


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

T H IS PAGE


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

TH I S PAGE in a bedroom, black Bikini table lamp by Barbieri and Marianelli for Tronconi; white Spike table lamp by Dokter and Misses; Caravene linen; plaid throw from a souk in Marrakech; Vert de Terre paint by Farrow & Ball; India Mahdavi rug; iris artwork by Rachel Lévy. O PPOS I TE PAGE in the bathroom, Artichoke tiles by Popham Design.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

TH IS PAGE OP PO S I T E PAG E


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

in the informal living room, B&B Italia Charles sofa from Space Furniture; Pecorelle chair (left) by Cini Boeri for Arflex from Poliform; Memory chair (right) by Tokujin Yoshioka for Moroso from Hub Furniture Lighting Living; Tom Dixon Spun coffee table from Dedece; Snoopy table lamp by Achille & Piers Giacomo Castiglioni for Flos from Euroluce; Davide Groppi Sampei floor lamp, from Dedece; Adeph collection rug from Cadrys; True North artwork by Isaac Julien. TH IS PAGE


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

T HI S PAGE in the kitchen, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe Four Seasons bar stools for Knoll Studio from Dedece; Memphis-style objects from owner’s own collection; Pietro Russo Hubble Space hanging lamp for Baxter from Criteria; granite in Arabescato, Amazonite, Norwegian Rose and Viscount White. OPPO S IT E PAGE in another view of the kitchen, appliances by Gaggenau and Sub-Zero; Tom Dixon mortar and pestle from Dedece.

‹‹ Noting that he was single when living at No 99, Hargrave admits that he can somehow zero in on the impending zeitgeist but is prone to boredom. “I mean, while they were working on that apartment, the guys from Colliers [real estate] told me I had to look at this.” He recalls his first visit to the display suite, where a scale model of the 44-floor Bates Smart tower showed permit-compliant setbacks on level 19 and the penthouse peak. These recessions in the building profile created atypically large outdoor spaces — a bonus that the 19th floor further rewarded with nearly four-metre ceiling heights (thanks to the corner siting of a service core). This built allusion to the Big Apple had Hargrave at “huge terrace and high ceilings”, so he bought the entire 19th level, negotiating the cost down to compensate for the fit-out of the five apartments intended for its floor plate. He then commissioned KPDO to create a ‘house’ within the Bates Smart construct and briefed landscape designer Myles Baldwin to build a Roman-style rooftop garden. During the four-year design and construct, Hargrave met and married Storm, a striking brunette whose name belies her nature and the serene effect she has had on Hargrave’s expletive-edged decorative world — polished plaster walls, leathered stone and rough-sawn oak boards being more recuperative than revolutionary.

The biggest issue for KPDO, aside from redesigning around changing circumstance, was the balance of diametrically opposed requirements for both intimacy and a city outlook in a glass box scaled to contain five residences — a challenge further exacerbated by the arrival of baby Goldie. Planning the L-shape apartment with deference to the downbelow city — a rational layout with connecting laneways provoking surprise encounters — architect Stephen Javens and interior designer Kerry Phelan (coprincipals of KPDO) contrived a series of sliding wall sections and a palace-worthy enfilade of doors. These openings control the wraparound reward of Melbourne from every compass point in a compound that sequences main wing, formal living and family wing. Long, low slabs of neutral sofa seating and a generous 12-seat stretch of dining table discreetly fill formal rooms, deferring all colour and contrast to interior art (persistently at the anti-modernist end) and outer Treasury Gardens. “Greg wanted more of a family home,” says Javens. “But this place still had to facilitate his legendary parties. It’s a little-known secret, but we will share it with the world: Greg is a great dancer.” VL kpdo.com @kpdo_studio


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

For the ages

An 18th-century dwelling serves as a designer’s OPPORTUNITY to indulge in playful COLOUR and contrasting MATERIALS.

By Fiona McCarthy Photographed by Barbara Corsico

TH I S PAGE in the dining area of this home just outside Dublin, Ireland, designed by Róisín Lafferty, Eero Saarinen Tulip dining table with marble top; Edizioni Design 46 suspension lamps, from Artemest; custommade steel-framed ribbed glass partitions. O P PO S I T E PAGE in the sitting nook, bespoke sofa upholstered in pink felt designed by Róisín Lafferty; Object of Discussion pendant lights by Maison Dada; Cone wall lights from Areti. Details, last pages.

Mar/Apr 2019

145


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

“When people first walk in, they feel slightly giddy with exploring the space, each in their own different way”

RÓISÍN LAFFERTY


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

TH IS PAGE in the kitchen, By Lassen ML42 stools in Brown Oiled Oak from Skandium; Nero Marquina marble kitchen island; polished concrete floor. O P P OS I TE PAGE , F ROM L E F T in the main bedroom, headboard made from custom Moroccan tiles; Chinese paper lanterns. In the hallway, custom-made brass-rimmed mirrors and skirting; Arrangements Round and Line suspension lights by Michael Anastassiades for Flos; custom-made Spanish floor tiles. Details, last pages.

‹‹ Customisation has always played a vital role in the way Lafferty designs. From the sofas and beds to the long elliptical mirrors trimmed in brass that line the entrance hallway, almost every detail here is unique. “We also design as much as possible ourselves because it ensures we get the proportions right, so each piece works better in the space,” she says. The design of the freestanding bed in the main bedroom, for example, lined in bespoke tiles from Spain — “designed to look old and worn” — somehow makes the generous proportions of the room more intimate. Far from shying away from the old mill’s preserved stone barrel vaults, Lafferty has boldly married them with new threemetre-high ceilings. Instead of walls, she has used elements such as a marble kitchen island and customised ribbed glass and steelframed doors (their shapes echoing the vaulted ceilings) to help divide the large open-plan areas into specific zones.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Details such as furniture and lighting have been otherwise kept to an absolute minimum and further demarcate each zone. “I wanted as little as possible to detract from the elegant simplicity of the space,” the designer says. To soften the steel, marble and polished plaster elements, Lafferty has opted for the sensual curves of classic mid-century furniture pieces, such as Eero Saarinen’s Tulip table, as well as playful and sculptural lighting with the bright red Maison Dada ceiling lamps in the sitting nook. “I also love the large scale of the Edizioni Design circular pendants hanging above the dining table,” Lafferty says. “They’re still fine enough so as not to block the eyeline when looking through the space from, say, the dining room to the garden.” There are other clever touches, too. Brass skirting unexpectedly frames the entrance hall, and Lafferty has cleverly transitioned one room to the next through the use of different floor finishes, from

smoked oak and geometric tile to concrete. The use of mirrors throughout the house also helps “to trick the eye so it’s not quite sure what it’s seeing”. A cantilevered table, magically merging the inside of the house to the outside terrace, is lined with the same deep blue zellige tiles as the walls and a long bench, creating the sense of a cohesive whole. “I wanted the space to read as one colour, as if all growing up and out of the same thing.” The result is a harmonious balance of gutsy, masculine textures with sculptural, sensual sophistication. “I wanted to challenge how to showcase the traditional character and charm of the original architecture against a memorable modern backdrop,” says Lafferty. “When people first walk in, they feel slightly giddy with exploring the space, each in their own different way — for kids, the pink nook is always their first stop — but there’s a wonderful sense of serenity being here. It’s such a beautiful space to be in.” VL kingstonlaffertydesign.com @roisinlaffertykld


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

new design

The NEXT WAVE of travel destinations draws on the past to INFORM THE FUTURE. These four cities embrace INNOVATION AND CREATIVITY, delivering cultural journeys that bring together art, design and history. By Annemarie Kiely

152

hotspots

vogueliving.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VList

D E S T I N AT I O N

Shanghai An appetite for creativity and innovation has breathed new life into China’s second city.

T

he Shanghai-born English novelist JG Ballard, famous for fictionalising dystopian modernity, once described his birthplace as “a waking dream where everything I could imagine had already been taken to its extreme”. That depiction of a hyperbolic fantasy holds firm today, as sci-fi futuristic developments peer down on the vestiges of a past that still pulses with decadence, romance, political ideology and pure randomness. What other city in the world will you find Beaux-Arts beauty bumping up against stone Shikumen architecture? In this ‘wicked old Paris of the Orient’, all theatre plays out on the street, where the locals unashamedly walk around in their pyjamas, foxtrot in Fuxing Park and conduct a marriage market on Saturdays in the People’s Square. Shanghai may be called a second city, but this megalopolis blows Beijing away for elegance, idiosyncratic edge and the incubation of creativity in every corner.

EXPERIENCE While the focus on modern art was myopically western during the 20th century, contemporary culture in the 21st millennium is tilting towards the East. Pearl Lam is the powerhouse gallerist who gets major credit for pushing Chinese art into the frame. Visit her fabulous outpost on Middle Jiangxi Road to preview the new players and see the creative results of her artist-inresidence programs — all part of an agenda to pitch international art and design talent at Chinese tradition. pearllam.com/city/shanghai

artworks in the Capsule Shanghai stand at West Bund Art and Design: Flasher (2017) and Bust (2018) by Douglas Rieger; The Birth of the Word, to the Demise of the Bird (2014–2018) by Wang Haiyang (including monitor on right wall); Adaptive Tool (2018), Fist (2018), Cement Head (2016) and Part Indefinitely (2018), all by Douglas Rieger.

Sitting smack-bang in the middle of Shanghai, the Museum of Contemporary Art Shanghai (MoCA) is a glass-walled wonderland — designed by Atelier Liu Yuyang Architects — that rises with ice-block cool above the gardens of the People’s Square. See contemporary Chinese art exhibiting in provocative adjacency to international offerings, underneath MoCA on the Park, the gallery’s restaurant with rooftop bar and an outdoor terrace that sporadically hosts Silent

Disco, the headphonewearing event backdropped by the city’s night lights. mocashanghai.org Carved from the space of a former police headquarters by local architecture studio, Neri&Hu, Design Republic Commune is a gallery, shop and event venue in Shanghai’s Jing’an district that seeks to uncover meaning through discourse and the exchange of objects and ideas. Look out for the Festival of Design, an in-house talk-fest that lures the world’s best, while also hosting exhibitions and workshops. thedesignrepublic.com With China’s share of the international art market multiplying at a pace, the annual West Bund Art and Design fair has, in less than five years, evolved from a boutique event for cashed-up local collectors into a calendar highlight for the contemporary art world. Visit 8–10 November to view blue-chip offerings from big-note gallerists (Gagosian and Hauser & Wirth participated last year) and hear the art-smarts talk in a refurbished expo centre

that has stimulated further development — David Chipperfield’s newly minted West Bund Art Museum serves as the Chinese outpost for France’s Centre Pompidou. westbundshanghai.com

STAY

Rich Shanghainese marries muted Milanese in the new Middle House Hotel, an upscale hotel revealing Piero Lissoni’s restrained design hand across 111 rooms and 102 serviced apartments. Located in Shanghai’s historic Dazhongli neighbourhood, it is an oasis of calm (served by an in-house spa) amidst the dense urban craziness. themiddlehousehotel.com/en Hospitality heavyweight Ian Schrager has brought his brand to the Bund, commissioning Neri&Hu to convert the old Shanghai Power Company head office into a luxury hotel with 145 guest rooms. The Shanghai Edition nods to its Art Deco origins with a futuristic deference that is very Shanghai. editionhotels.com/ shanghai/ ›› Mar/Apr 2019

153


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Pujol restaurant in Mexico City.

Mar/Apr 2019

155


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VList

D E S T I N AT I O N

Chicago

The visionary city has always been on the design radar, but a thriving food scene has made it a must-visit.

A

sk any fan of architecture to nominate their holiday destination of choice and the Windy City will score every time. Especially in 2019, when the birthplace of the modern skyscraper plays host to the third edition of the Chicago Biennial of Architecture — the event running 19 September 2019 to 5 January 2020 that trains the spotlight on emerging talent across art, architecture and design. Inviting a global spread of next-gen studios to exhibit across Chicago’s idiosyncratic ’hoods (running the widespread gamut from artsy grit to upscale scholarly), this year’s Biennale is but one reason to book flights right now. Other big incentives include the city’s reputation for boundary-pushing dining, a brilliant raft of old and new museums, great shopping and a music culture that continues to play a seminal role in innovating sound — the city’s roots in jazz and soul still resonate in countless clubs.

EXPERIENCE

Formerly known as the Chicago Architecture Foundation, the not-forprofit Chicago Architecture Centre (CAC) has moved into new headquarters on East Wacker Drive, where it continues to deliver on a fabulous array of exhibitions, architecture tours and field trips. Highlights include an excursion out to Farnsworth House, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Modernist masterpiece, and a tour of Frank Lloyd Wright’s home and private studio in Oak Park. architecture.org Founded by artist Theaster Gates, the Rebuild Foundation focuses on and showcases three core values across art, culture and informing the local community: black people matter, black spaces matter, and black objects matter. It’s no surprise then that groundbreaking projects and exhibitions seed in its space. rebuild-foundation.org Located in a once gritty neighbourhood, the Bridgeport Art Centre is a creative hub for artists and designers working across a

diversity of forms and fields. Housed in the former Spiegel catalogue warehouse and incorporating three art galleries, studios, a fashion design centre and ceramic centre, it is a great hunting ground for next-gen talent and one-of-a-kind souvenirs. bridgeportart.com See the first Art Institute exhibition devoted to Édouard Manet in over 50 years at The Art Institute of Chicago (25 May–8 September). Featuring the gallery’s 20th- and 21st- century collections, the Modern Wing designed by architect Renzo Piano is a rigorous steel, glass and limestone box that sits in sharp dialogue with the steel ribbons of Frank Gehry’s Jay Pritzker Pavilion in Millennium Park. artic.edu According to the critics, Chicago is the epicentre of fine dining in America. The buzzy new bloods are Elske (Anna Posey’s desserts are eulogised about), Parachute (crazy beautiful KoreanAmerican creativity), Giant (big on taste but the name belies the small venue size), Proxi (audacious Asian and Mexican flavours presented

in an old printing house redesigned by Meyer Davis) and the Bellemore (luxury layerings of both flavour and aesthetics). But if three-star Michelin magnificence is your thing, make it to the more established Alinea, the ‘emotive’ science-meets-art eatery that is a winner of five James Beard Foundation Awards, the Oscars of the food industry.

STAY

Reserved for the city’s elite for 122 years, the Chicago Athletic Association has been sensitively redesigned by Hartshorne Plunkard Architecture and refreshed by New York-based designers Roman and Williams into a 240-room luxury hotel that celebrates both the club’s heritage and its highly extravagant Venetian-Gothic style. But don’t read fusty into that form; this is history poured through the hippest of hospitality filters. The only athleticism required here now is a sprint to Cindy’s, the rooftop restaurant and bar where the seats overlooking Millennium Park and Lake Michigan beyond fill fast. chicagoathletichotel.com ›› Mar/Apr 2019

157


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Mar/Apr 2019

159


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

TRAVEL

PHO T OGRAPHER: JEREMY SIMONS

ta k e a n a dv entu r e

Maasai women at Hard Rock village, near &Beyond Bateleur Camp in Kenya, dressed in traditional clothing and performing a local song for visitors.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Jeremy Simons

Elise Hassey Nikki Wallman

Photographer Elise Hassey (left) and writer Nikki Wallman.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

PHO T OGRAPHER: ELISE HASSEY

I

The central dining and bar space at Wild Coast Tented Lodge in Sri Lanka.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Warming sunlit hues at dawn. Regular run-ins with elephants and giraffes during the day. Calming herb-scented baths by night. This is safari in Kenya, the BATELEUR CAMP way. By Freya Herring Photographed by Jeremy Simons

Into the wild

TH I S PAGE the view from a hot-air balloon safari of the plains of the Maasai Mara National Reserve. O PP O SITE PAGE local lions are known for climbing trees.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

TH IS PAG E

O P PO SITE PAGE


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

TH I S PAGE


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

A


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

T H IS PAGE

O PPO S ITE PAGE, C LO C KWISE FRO M TO P LEFT


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

TH I S PAG E OPPO S IT E PAGE, FRO M LEFT

‹‹ to four-course feasts of dishes such as Kenyan crushed vegetables (called irio) with smoky grilled steak, or crème caramel dusted with coconut and served with passionfruit (the Bateleur team grow much of the produce in their kitchen garden). Drinks, laundry, meals… everything is included here. “Welcome home,” we are told each time we return from safari. There’s no need to worry about those animals, either. They are one of the reasons you come to Bateleur. Around 70 per cent of the staff here are Maasai — “the most courageous tribe in Africa,” our (nonMaasai) driver tells us. From a young age, the Maasai are trained to protect themselves against the wild animals they encounter day-to-day in this

dangerous part of Africa, and so they travel with you from the restaurant down a starlit path, across a stream, to your room at night. They are armed with spears, in case any hippos (extremely dangerous beasts, it turns out) have decided to wander in. You couldn’t feel more protected. At the onsite spa, we are scrubbed with herbs, our bodies tenderly massaged for hours — as if we weren’t already relaxed enough. An optional hot-air balloon ride over the savannah at dawn is the stuff of fantasy. The sun rises and we land on top of a mountain to laid tables set in the long grass, where we are served Champagne and hot waffles with honey and butter. On game drives, a pride of lions circles our jeep. Staring up at us, the two dazzlingly

Around 70 per cent of the staff here are Maasai — “The MOST courageous tribe in AFRICA”


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

maned males laze as the lionesses saunter past, their babies trotting along by their mothers’ heels. There are elephants, zebras, buffalos and cheery warthogs at every turn, and cumbersome rhinos trudge up to our jeep. A journey of some 18 giraffes surrounds us right after we’ve stopped for our sundowner cocktails, overlooking a river full of hippos, bobbing up and down, in and out of the murky water. Unlike many camps, &Beyond has its own range, the Kichwa Tembo private concession, so there are fewer rules here — we can go off-road and right up to the animals. Akatch knows where to find them. One day, we watch lions heave themselves up into tall, spindly trees, their paws dangling down from the branches, tails twitching. With another sundowner (drinks in the bush are daily events at Bateleur, each evening in a different spot), a team of Maasai warriors surprises us to demonstrate their adumu dance, jumping and singing hauntingly. It’s an honour to watch

the continuance of this ancient culture, which has remained largely unchanged for centuries. All of this is exhilarating and exciting, but it’s also tiring. “Safari is actually quite hard,” says Fox. “You’re out early, your hair is dusty, you feel hot and sweaty.” Bateleur offers relief, a balm for the thrill. “It needed to feel like a sanctuary when you came home — an oasis where you can recover.” On our final night, we return from our game drive to a hot run bath. Herbs scent the water. We don’t play music. We barely talk. It’s hard to take in — and to put into words — what a pleasure and a privilege it is to be here in this special, spectacular place. The staff sings as our jeep leaves for the plane that will take us away from here, their welcoming voices filtering through the jungle as we trundle down the hill. VL Vogue Living experienced Bateleur Camp as a guest of Travel Associates Virtuoso. travel-associates.com.au/virtuoso andbeyond.com


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

TH I S PAGE O PPOS I TE PAGE

Living luxe on safari

Sri Lanka’s Wild Coast Tented Lodge combines a romantic reverence for old-world exploration with locally influenced, considered design. By Nikki Wallman Photographed by Elise Hassey


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

SRI LANKA


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

In the bar, the bamboo shell ceiling structure is a focal point; the bamboo chandelier is inspired by stalactite formations in caves. Campaign-style furniture, including leather and mahogany chairs, sit atop a sandy quartz pebble floor.

T

ucked away like a precious secret between the dense green fringes of Yala National Park and a boulder-strewn beach overlooking the Indian Ocean, Wild Coast Tented Lodge in Sri Lanka is an extraordinary confluence of glamour and grit. Imbued with a frontier-like sense of luxury, a thrilling sense of surrender to nature hums beneath every surface. A sign reads: “Elephants, leopard, crocodiles, wild boar, sloth bears & other denizens of Yala could enter the area around the Lodge, as there is no physical impediment to stop them...” Yes, this place is alive. Being here feels like dancing at the very edge of the world. This striking lodge is the newest star in a small but bright constellation of luxury hotels being nurtured into an upscale travel circuit by Malik J Fernando, managing director of Resplendent Ceylon, the hospitality offshoot of his family’s Dilmah Tea business. The passionate hotelier has kept each of his Relais & Châteaux-accredited properties — Cape Weligama, Ceylon Tea Trails

BEING HERE FEELS LIKE DANCING AT THE VERY EDGE OF THE WORLD and a new project underway in Sigiriya — deliberately intimate. “I believe small is beautiful,” says Fernando. It feels like the right approach on this teardrop of an island, which is blessed with the sort of abundant, nostalgic natural beauty that elicits whispered insider tips from the welltravelled set, but which is still finding its feet after the long and brutal civil war ended in 2009. Fernando’s latest project was conjured into being by interdisciplinary company Nomadic Resorts, with interiors by Amsterdam-based Bo Reudler Studio. Twenty-eight Cocoon Suites (eight of which have ‘Urchin tents’ for children) are clustered around watering holes and scattered across the bush in the shape of leopards’ paws. Four privatepool, beachfront suites are often visited by monkeys and, occasionally, thirsty elephants. Spa treatments such as a sandalwood and turmeric-accented Island Spice Scrub await those able to tear themselves away from the central bar, dining and pool area. The dining is relaxed, with highlights including coconut-driven Sri Lankan curries, fresh local seafood and bright salads. Sundowners are seabreeze-addled, pastel-skied ››


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

SRI LANKA

‹‹ affairs, with the arches of the glowing pavilion creating a hypnotic sequence of vistas — saltwashed foliage, a mirror-like pool, the whiteplumed exhalations of the Indian Ocean beyond. Yala is known for the density of its leopard population, and safaris here can feel overwhelmed by other jeeps in search of the area’s most famous resident. Besides the option of heading into quieter blocks of the park, Wild Coast plans to open a leopard conservation station for valuable research in the first half of 2019. Fernando has also gained approval for an 810-hectare conservancy with strict ecological guidelines on access and activity. The creative concept for the domed buildings unfurled organically, says Louis Thompson, Nomadic’s CEO, from the fantastic boulders dropped like a careless giant’s marbles along the shore. Local fishermen took over construction after an overseas contractor dropped out, and worked tirelessly under the tutelage of experts in steel and bamboo construction, as well as tensile membrane tensioning. The lodge uses solar power, recycles water for landscaping, and features local materials such as teak and mudbrick bound

with elephant dung. “If you use noble materials, you don’t need to finish them that much, really,” says Thompson. A tree that had to be felled has been cast in copper and suspended in the dining pavilion like an offering to the gods. “It’s a piece of solid local poetry,” says designer Bo Reudler. While communal spaces clad in reclaimed teak shingles look almost to have emerged from the earth, the Cocoon Suites — all stretched membrane and porthole windows — appear to have floated down from some other exotic frontier. The interiors are a romantic marriage of safari style with what Reudler calls a “steampunk touch”, featuring four-poster beds, soaking tubs and bespoke military-campaign-style furniture that “references an era in which there were still worlds left to discover”. The humble, bodice-like beauty of the stitching joining the tents’ interior membrane pieces fittingly echoes the fishermen’s artistry in threading their lines. “It’s not perfect,” says Thompson, with quiet pride. “If you look carefully, it’s full of imperfections all over the place.” Just like nature, really. VL resplendentceylon.com/wildcoastlodge-yala


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

TH I S PAGE O PPOS I TE PAGE, FROM TO P


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

K A NGA ROO ISL A N D

Southern star

Blending glamour with the rugged terrain off the South Australian coast, SOUTHERN OCEAN LODGE is the ideal base for exploring Kangaroo Island.

a fur seal pup from the colony near Admiral’s Arch. The coastal walk and guided visit to the Remarkable Rocks are part of the Southern Ocean Lodge’s signature tour, Wonders of KI. O PP O SIT E PAGE Southern Ocean Lodge from above. TH IS PAGE

T

By Lee Tulloch Photographed by Jeremy Simons

he pavilions of Southern Ocean Lodge stretch along the sea cliffs as if they’re embracing the silver-green coastal scrub. Enormous waves with opulent whitecaps batter the shore and fill underground caves, making the foundations tremble. This is the Australian landscape at its most powerful and, in the true sense of the word, awesome. It’s midwinter on Kangaroo Island, when tourists are few and scattered but when the island’s raw beauty is showcased spectacularly. On the quick 25-minute flight from Adelaide to Kingscote, the island’s largest town, we bump through the clouds until golf courses, farmsteads, emeraldgreen grazing land and wetlands are revealed below. It’s an additional hour’s drive to Southern Ocean Lodge in the south-west, where the landscape becomes considerably wilder, the forests denser and the cliffs dramatically vertiginous. Australia’s thirdlargest island lies 112 kilometres south-west of Adelaide, across

Investigator Strait — named after the ship of English explorer Matthew Flinders, who was the first European to discover it back in 1802. Kangaroo Island’s original Indigenous inhabitants, abandoning it about 2000 years before that, named it ‘Island of the Dead’. In the 19th century, the first white settlers were sealers and salt harvesters, clearing some of the land for farming. A century later, in 1919, the Flinders Chase National Park was established on the western end, conserving the bushland as a sanctuary for endangered species, some of which, such as koalas and platypuses, were introduced from the mainland and surrounding islands. The island is now often referred to as ‘Australia’s Galapagos’ for the diversity of its wildlife and plant species and for its pristine coves. Anyone wanting to see kangaroos, wallabies and koalas in their native habitat won’t be disappointed. It’s teeming with roos while koalas prop, just out of reach, in the forks of eucalyptus trees. In winter, the first joeys appear, as well as platypuses, echidnas, Cape Barren geese, maritime birds, seals, wild pigs and Australia’s third-largest colony of sea lions. When Southern Ocean Lodge opened in 2008, it brought a welcome touch of glamour to the remote island. The bold concept from James Baillie was sensitively designed by architect Max Pritchard. The resort has been repeatedly recognised in international hotel awards. It is arguably Australia’s most luxurious ‘base camp’ for exploring the wild southern coast and its singular flora and fauna. The lodge is situated on limestone cliffs overlooking Hanson Bay, a location that lies roughly between the island’s two major attractions — the Remarkable Rocks and ››


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

K A NGA ROO ISL A N D The Osprey Pavilion features panoramic views of the Southern Ocean. A granite bath in the Osprey Pavilion open bathroom. Sustainably produced local barramundi, charred onion, confit pumpkin and Kangaroo Island marron bisque.

C LO C K WI S E F ROM TO P

‹‹ the sea lion colony at Seal Bay. The architecture has been designed to bring the outside in, so that when guests arrive in the curvaceous Great Room, which serves as lounge, lobby and restaurant, the view of the coast is undisturbed through 180 degrees of floor-to-ceiling glass. The 21 suites, all facing the ocean, run along a breezeway, culminating in the very sexy Osprey Pavilion, a private suite with sunken lounge and an exclusive vantage point along the coast. All the suites, other than the Osprey Pavilion, are named after the historic shipwrecks that regularly occurred in these dangerous waters. While it’s tempting to stay around the fireplace and explore the carefully assembled wine cellar, the lodge encourages guests to get into nature, with a varied collection of daily bespoke experiences and tours with guides who know and love the terrain, as well as self-guided hikes and walks. Kangas & Kanapés is one of the most popular excursions, where guests can mingle with grazing kangaroos while sipping cocktails. A dawn visit to the sea lion colony is exhilarating, followed by a breakfast barbecue at nearby Bales Beach with chef Asher Blackford — his inventive menus for the lodge reflect the natural environment by using, wherever possible, intensely flavourful produce from South Australia and what can be foraged on the island. (“Good, honest food”, as he calls it.) Guests are greeted with homemade lamingtons when they arrive and chocolate koalas on turndown at night. The synergy between the natural world outside and the lodge interior is carried through to the Southern Spa, which sits on a cliff at the end of a boardwalk. One of its signature treatments is a delightfully sticky Ligurian Honey and Almond Wrap, using honey from the Ligurian bees that inhabit the island, the world’s only purebred and disease-free colony of these bees. Digital detoxers will be pleased to note there are TVs only in selected suites, and the telephone reception is poor. But the view of the pounding ocean through the lodge’s panoramic windows is more cinematic than anything you’d find on the small screen. Rates at Southern Ocean Lodge start at $1200 per person per night twin-share and include all dining, open bar with premium wines and spirits (Cellarmasters List additional), in-suite bar, signature experiences, island airport transfers and use of the comfortable new guest lounge at Kingscote airport. VL southernoceanlodge.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

MOROCCO

Dreaming in the sands

Glamping in the Sahara has become a phenomenon, but this thoughtful take on luxe camping is a one-of-a-kind experience. By Lee Tulloch

A AT NIGHT, LANTERNS LIGHT OUR WAY TO A BRAZIER UNDER THE STARS the Abercrombie & Kent mobile camp, made up of traditional Arabic military tents, in the Moroccan Sahara desert.

ABOVE

VL Vogue Living was a guest of Abercrombie & Kent. abercrombiekent.com.au Vogue Living flew to Morocco with Etihad Airways, on the new 787 Dreamliner service non-stop from Abu Dhabi to Casablanca daily; etihad.com


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

W H AT’S N EW I N TOU RS

Choose your own

ADVENTURE Discover six thrilling new journeys on offer from trusted tour designers. By Lee Tulloch

1

V E N T U R I N G D O W N S O U T H We’re excited by an amazing new adventure from Australian-owned, ultra-luxury private tour operator Captain’s Choice — Antarctic Frontiers with Eric Philips, an acclaimed guide and veteran of more than 20 polar voyages, including a recent charity initiative with Prince Harry. Guests on the 13-day journey will travel from Cape Town by private jet to Antarctica, where they’ll sleep on top of the ice in luxury domes, viewing seldom-seen Emperor penguin colonies in the magical landscape and then travelling to the South Pole, a region where only the likes of Bear Grylls and Buzz Aldrin have ventured. The journey Slow-travel — which departs 26 November 2019 — specialists Butterfield & is reserved for only Robinson have been creating 12 guests and starts EXHILARATING walking and cycling from $162,800 per person twin-share. itineraries for 50 years. In 2019, the captainschoice.com.au

2

GO SLOW

company is adding an eight-day LUXURY walking tour through the beautiful natural landscapes of Rwanda, taking in the best of this emerging destination, exploring lakes and WILDERNESS, tea and coffee plantations, and the mountain forests — home to silverback gorillas. There are off-the-rack small group tours, or the ADVENTURE can be tailored for individuals. butterfield.com

3

F E M A L E F R I E N D L Y As the #MeToo movement makes inroads through society, it’s also influencing the way some women want to travel. According to adventure tour specialists Intrepid Travel, increasingly there’s a demand for curated itineraries that offer women the opportunity to step outside their comfort zones and experience the day-to-day lives of women in developing countries. In 2019, Intrepid’s female-led, female-only 12-day excursions through Iran provide an extraordinary opportunity to discover the culture and challenges in the lives of Iranian women without the limitations of a mixed-gender group. Guests will visit a local beauty parlour, learn how to tie various styles of headscarves, eat in a private home in Tehran and experience hijab-free home life. Beyond the city, guests will experience a remote homestay with the nomadic Qashqai people and visit Shiraz and the ancient city of Persepolis. They had us at ‘beauty salon’. intrepidtravel.com

4

INSIDE SECRET

The Classic Safari Company has put together the Secret Women’s Series, a tailored collection of personalised escorted journeys EXCLUSIVELY for FEMALE travellers to inspirational, ADVENTUROUS and EXOTIC destinations, including a trip to the Kingdom of Bhutan in 2020, a journey that incorporates the stimulating Mountain Echoes literary festival in Thimphu. classicsafaricompany.com.au

5

A N A U T H E N T I C I N S I G H T Jamshyd Sethna of New Delhi-based Banyan Tours is something of a legend expert travellers in the know trust with creating sensational itineraries in the remote reaches of India’s Kumaon, Ladakh and Sikkim. In 2004, he founded his passion project Shakti, a luxury holiday tour provider specialising in village walks in the Himalayas through some of the most picturesque and hard-to-reach places on the planet. Guests take guided walks between beautifully renovated houses in three villages — a genuine, life-affirming experience with a strong sense of community. There’s so much more to this transcendent journey, but the good news is there will be a new house in Ladakh slated to be completed in 2019, giving walkers the option of an extended stay. shaktihimalaya.com

6

GET OFF THE GRID Mongolia

is one destination that certainly provides for a TRANSFORMATIONAL journey. According to Nathan Wedding, founder of Seven Skies, an Australian luxury travel company focused on EXPERIENTIAL and ACTIVE travel, Mongolia is so much more than just the famous Gobi Desert, with its pristine rivers and mountains on the northern Russian border, the Ikh Nart Nature Reserve, the vast steppes, and the amazing wildlife and nature experiences. Seven Skies can take guests completely OFF THE GRID, chartering light aircraft to travel across the different landscapes, with guests staying in luxury yurts. HANDCRAFTED TOURS allow travellers to select their own departure dates. VL sevenskies.com


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Escape with Vogue Living anytime, anywhere

SUBSCRIBE NOW! Subscribe to our print + digital subscription package for just $59.95 for 12 months and receive a BONUS gift from Stanley Rogers. To subscribe, visit magsonline.com.au/vl/m1903vli or call 1300 656 933 *Offer ends 10 April, 2019. Please allow up to 6 weeks for separate delivery of your gift. A standard one-year subscription consists of 6 issues. Our App is available on all Apple iPad and iPhone devices with iOS8 or greater. Also available on all Android Tablet or Smartphone devices using Android version 4.4 or greater. Apple and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Google Play is a trademark of Google Inc.


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

EXPERIENCE LUXURY reece.com.au/bathrooms


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

PH OT OG RA PH ER : S IMO N WATSON

Honed Breccia Paonazzo marble vanity, wall and bathtub from SMC Stone; Barber Wilsons & Co unlacquered brass tapware. Details, last pages.

VLiving

Kitchens & Bathrooms Mar/Apr 2019

163


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

By Anna Delprat Photographed by Simon Watson


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Mar/Apr 2019

171


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Kitchens & Bathrooms

T

thehaasbrothers.com; djunabel.com

LEFT


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Kitchens & Bathrooms

Into the mix

T

flackstudio.com.au

6

7 5

3 1

2 4


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Kitchens & Bathrooms

SHOP

Tapping in


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Kitchens & Bathrooms

SHOP

Take a seat

VL


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

S U B S C R I B E N O W Stanley Rogers’ iconic Pistol Grip design is reminiscent of heirloom bone-handled cutlery. These cheese knives are perfect to suit any occasion and include a mini cleaver, a soft cheese knife and a pâté/ cheese spreader. Each set comes packaged in a timber storage tray that can easily be used as a mini cheese board. To view the full range, visit stanleyrogers.com.au or find Stanley Rogers on social media @stanley.rogers #stanleyrogers #styledwithstanley.

VALUED AT

$59.95 D O N ’ T

M I S S

O U T !

VISIT magsonline.com.au/vl/m1903vli CALL 1300 656 933 and quote m1903vli


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

& R E C E I V E A B O N U S G I F T Subscribe to Vogue Living for $45.95* for 1 year (6 issues) and receive a BONUS Stanley Rogers 3-piece cheese knife set.

madly

truly

101+ IDEAS FOR

KITCHENS & BATHROOMS

Incredible homes of leading designers and creatives

THE FUTURE OF LUXURY Style inspiration from Paris, New York, Amsterdam, London and Sydney

year

E XC LUS I V E

bold

summer style

French chic

PH OTO GR A PHE R : SASKIA WI LS ON. ST YL I ST: AN N A D E L PR AT

A fashion designer's glamorous home

*Offer ends 10 April 2019 and is available for delivery to Australian addresses only. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery of your bonus gift. A standard one-year subscription consists of 6 bi-monthly issues. For print subscriptions on Auto-Renewal, your subscription will continue at $45.95 every 6 issues (1 year) thereafter. Your selection of Auto-Renewal ensures your subscription will continue with automatic payments unless otherwise advised by you, or until the nominated credit card expires. You can cancel any time. Our Privacy Policy can be found at www.newscorpaustraliaprivacy.com and includes important information about our collection, use and disclosure of your personal information.

AL READY A SUB SCRI B E R? Simply extend your subscription with this offer to receive your bonus gift. F O R P RINT + DI GITAL AND O VER SEAS OR DE RS, visit magsonline.com.au/vl


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

Sources to Mizuma Gallery; mizuma.sg Dyson dyson.com.au Dzek dzekdzekdzek.com eBay ebay.com.au Edizioni Design edizionidesign.com Edward Waring @ edwardwaring Elina Brotherus elinabrotherus.com Euroluce euroluce.com.au Fibonacci Stone fibonaccistone.com.au Fisher & Paykel fisherandpaykel.com Flos flos.com Fred International fredinternational.com.au Gaggenau gaggenau. com.au Gagprojects gagprojects.com Gallery 9 gallery9.com.au Garden Life gardenlife.com.au Gordon Fitchett gordonfitchett.com Graphis Art + Framing graphis.net.au Grazia and Co graziaandco.com.au Greene & Greene greeneandgreene.com.au Greg Natale gregnatale.com Gubi gubi.com Habitat habitat.co.uk Halcyon Lake halcyonlake.com Harlequin stylelibrary.com Hay hayshop.com.au Heidi Yardley heidiyardley.com Hicken Lighting hickenlighting.com Hub Furniture Lighting Living hubfurniture.com.au IKEA ikea.com.au Ilve ilve.com.au In Bed Flagship inbedstore.com India Mahdavi india-mahdavi.com Isaac Julien isaacjulien.com Ivan Anthony ivananthony.com Judy Millar judymillar.com Karen Woodbury Fine Art karenwoodbury.com.au Karin Merchez @karinmerchez Kate Rohde katerohde.com.au Ke-zu kezu.com. au Ken Neale Twentieth Century Modern 0410 463 121 Kravet kravet.com Kronenberg Wright Artists Projects kronenbergwrightartistsprojects.com Lamberto Teotino lambertoteotino.com Laura Kincade laurakincade.com LG lg.com Lightly lightly.com.au Lisa Roet lisaroet.com Living Edge livingedge. com.au Loom loomrugs.com Lost Profile lostprofile.net Lyndell Brown and Charles Green lyndellbrownandcharlesgreen.com MadeMeasure mademeasure. com Maison Dada maisondada.com Maizon Balzac maisonbalzac.com Martyn Cook Antiques martyncook.com Marzia Migliora marziamigliora.com Patrik Grijalvo patrikgrijalvo.net Massproductions massproductions.se May Space mayspace.com.au Mecca mecca.com.au Michael Reid michaelreid.com.au MoMA moma.org Murray Fredericks murrayfredericks.com Myles Baldwin mylesbaldwin.com National Art School nas.edu.au Nicholas & Alistair nicholasandalistair.com Nina Waring ninawaring.com Nood Co noodco.com.au Ochre ochre.net Ondene ondene.com.au One Simple Concept onesimpleconcept. com Page Blackie Gallery pageblackiegallery.co.nz Parterre parterre.com.au Peraway Marble perawaymarble.com.au Peter Tilley petertilley.com.au Phoenix Tapware phoenixtapware.com.au Pierre Frey pierrefrey.com Planet Furniture planetfurniture.com.au Poliform poliformaustralia.com.au Quip getquip.com Rachel Lévy rachellevyflowers.com Radar radarfitzroy.com.au Raffan Kelaher & Thomas rkta.com.au Reece reece.com.au Remodern remodern.com.au Rhys Lee enquiries to Nicholas Thompson Gallery; nicholasthompsongallery.com.au Ricky Swallow rickyswallow.com Robyn Cosgrove robyncosgrove.com Rogerseller rogerseller.com.au Rory Unite roryunite.com Roslyn Oxley9 roslynoxley9.com.au Sally Smart sallysmart.com Sam Shmith samshmith.com Samambia Flowers @samamabiaflowers Samsung samsung.com.au Sara Wright sarawright.space Sarah O’Sullivan sarahosullivan.com.au Sarah S Robson sarahrobson.com.au Sarah Scout Presents sarahscoutpresents.com Seeho Su seehosu.com.au Sélim Saiah selimsaiah.com Selina Ou selinaou.com Shapiro shapiro.com.au Signorino signorino.com.au SJC Home @s.j.c.h Skandium skandium.com Smeg smeg.com.au Sophie Gannon Gallery sophiegannongallery.com.au Space Furniture spacefurniture.com.au Spence & Lyda spenceandlyda.com.au Spitalfields Antiques Market oldspitalfieldsmarket. com Stephen Wright stephenwrightartist.com Sub-Zero au.subzero-wolf.com Sullivan+Strumpf sullivanstrumpf.com Surface Gallery surfacegallery.com.au Susan Hipgrave susanhipgrave.com Sussex sussextaps.com.au Tamsin Johnson tamsinjohnson.com The English Tapware Company englishtapware.com.au The New Craftsmen thenewcraftsmen.com The Vault thevaultsydney.com Tolarno Galleries tolarnogalleries.com Top3 By Design top3.com.au Trade Me trademe.co.nz Troy Emery troyemery.net Urban Edge Ceramics urbanedgeceramics.com.au Utopia Art Sydney utopiaartsydney.com.au Valentina Palonen valentinapalonen.com Valerie Objects valerie-objects.com VBO Australia vboaustralia.com Vintage Luggage Company vintageluggage.com.au Vitra vitra.com Vola vola.com Volker Haug volkerhaug.com Wayne Haiyang enquiries to whiterabbitcollection.org Whitecliffe Imports (02) 8595 1111 Winspear Group winspear.com.au Yuill/Crowley yuillcrowley.com L E F T In the TV room/library of Greg Hargrave’s Melbourne home (page 132), Marechiaro XIII sofa by Arflex from Poliform; custom Kvadrat Maharam velvet cushions by KPDO; B&B Italian Button large side table from Space Furniture; Ellis small side table by Minotti from Dedece; USM Haller bookcase from Anibou; Paola Lenti rug from Dedece; Rhys Lee artwork.

184

vogueliving.com.au

PH OT OG RA PH ED B Y ANSO N SM ART

E D ITO RIA L 1stdibs 1stdibs.com.au Aando Fine Art aandofineart.com Abey Australia abey.com.au Adriane Wachholz adrianewachholz.de Alessandro Menini alessandromenini.it Alm studioalm.com Anastasia Belous anastasiabelous.com Anchor Ceramics anchorceramics.com Anibou anibou.com. au Anna Charlesworth annacharlesworth.com.au Anna Schwartz Gallery annaschwartzgallery.com Anthony Lister anthonylister.com Apaiser apaiser.com Areti atelierareti.com Artedomus artedomus.com Artemest artemest.com Arthouse Gallery arthousegallery.com.au Artpark artpark.com.au Ascraft ascraft.com.au Astra Walker astrawalker.com.au Bang & Olufsen bang-olufsen. com Bathe bathe.net.au Becker Minty beckerminty.com Ben Quilty @benquilty Béton Brut betonbrut.co.uk Bisazza bisazza-australia.com.au Boyac boyac.com. au Bridget Kennedy bridgetkennedy.com.au Brodware brodware.com BukuLarr gay Mulka Centre yirrkala.com By Lassen bylassen.com Cadrys cadrys.com. au Caesarstone caesarstone.com.au Café Culture + Insitu cafecultureinsitu.com. au Caroline Rothwell carolinerothwell.net Chanel chanel.com Coco’s Soft Furnishings cocos.net.au Coming Soon comingsoonnewyork.com Cosentino cosentino.com Criteria criteriacollection.com.au Cult cultdesign.com.au Damon Moon damonmoon.design Darren Knight Gallery darrenknightgallery.com Dedece dedece.com Derek Henderson derekhenderson.net Dirk Vander Kooij dirkvanderkooij.com Domo domo.com.au Doug & Gene Meyer dougandgenemeyer.com Douglas Rieger douglasrieger.com Du Kun enquiries


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

* G E T FA S H I O N AT YO U R FI N G ERT I P S A N D R EC EIV E B OT H T H E D I G I TA L A N D PRINT EDITION OF VOGUE AUSTRALIA DELIVERED FOR JUST $7* PER MONTH.

OAD D O W N LE TH O V G U EL D I G ITA N EDITIO NOW

Lily-Rose Depp Model, actress & ingenue on the rise BILL CUNNINGHAM

Exclusive images by the street style pioneer

CHRISSY TEIGEN

The woman we all want to be

THE RIGHT SWIPE Where next for online dating?

modern love FASHION TO FALL FOR & TREASURE


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

ART & FURNITURE

NORTHERN TERRITORY LIMITED EDITION AERIAL ART

FLUIDIT Y 10 Av ai lab le

W W W. PAU L A R N O L D . C O M . AU

THE ART OF GLASS

BELINDA CARTER ART

distinctive handcrafted and original mosaics

Acrylic and Ink Artist. Commissions. Workshops.

The beautiful Seagram Chest by Julian Chichester is completely wrapped in a vibrant high }ÃÃÌi>6iÕ­wi}>Ìà ®>`ÃÌ>`Ã>Ì LÀ>Ãë Ì °Ƃ iÜiiÀÞ iÌi à added with brass capped Perspex rod handles. Drawers are lined in Sycamore. The curves of the large Countess Mirror are a perfect foil for the straight lines of the chest.

80 O’Riordan Street, Alexandria P: 02 9667 4415 Open Monday to Saturday 10am to 5pm

artofglass.com.au | 0416 007 630

belindacarterart.com

Yo u d r e a m i t ,

we create it.

Furniture I Decor I Interior Design thefurnituregallery.com.au

Website: laurakincade.com E: sales@laurakincade.com


HOME & FURNITURE

Đ Đ•Đ›Đ˜Đ— Đ&#x;ĐžĐ”Đ“ĐžĐ˘ĐžĐ’Đ˜Đ›Đ? Đ“Đ ĐŁĐ&#x;Đ&#x;Đ? "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

%5,1*,1*<28b/8;85,286385(6,/. 72:($56/((321$1'*,)7b b)25758(%($87<6/((3b6:,7&+726,/.

100% Pure Silk 100% Pure Luxury www.silkmagnolia.com.au

Soy Wax Candles Handmade in Sydney

ruglove.com.au

www.frenchaccent.com.au

use

lovevogue

634 Willoughby Road, Willoughby, NSW. 02 9958 6099

for an extra

10% NƤ

10% off code; VOGUELIVING10

all rugs

www.rusoy.com

600-602 Parramatta Road, Croydon, NSW. 02 9716 4012

Create your own slice of

Hamptons Elegance "r;1b-Ń´@;uÄş 20% o@

A beautiful day starts from here

To advertise call 1300 139 305

Use code VOGUELIVING IRURƨ

04 2202 2262 sales@vanitychic.com.au vanitychicmirrors Vanity Chic

nmpliving.com.au

hamptonselegance.com

vanitychic.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

15%off pendant lighting Use Code: VOGUELIV Free fast delivery in AU Free 30-day returns 3 year warranty *website for terms

“where quality matters”

custom design specialists

Gladesville 9817 6999 | Stanmore 9557 7770

www.wildwooddesigns.com.au

Phone: (07) 4088 6699 www.missionbeachholidays.com.au

NE W DES IGNS JUS T A RRIVED BISTRO CANE CHAIRS AND BARSTOOLS

Gerard Lane Furniture Traditional craftsmanship in forged steel, hand woven cane and rattan for Commercial and Residential use

info@leforge.com.au +61 468 759 200 www.leforge.com.au

smithandsmithlightingcom.au

HOME, FURNITURE & TRAVEL

Vogue Living Reader Special:


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

POSTSCRIPT From the living room to the kitchen, dress your home in supreme style with these must-haves.

SILK MAGNOLIA When you consider how much time we spend sleeping, it makes sense to wrap ourselves in luxurious pyjamas — and extend that indulgence to the sheets we dress the bed in. Silk Magnolia’s 100 per cent silk range includes pyjamas, nightgowns and kimonos, as well as bedding. You’ll find sheets, pillowcases, doona covers and even a nursery range. Just add an eye mask and enjoy your beauty sleep. silkmagnolia.com.au

ARTIFEX INTERIORS With increased awareness of sustainability, it’s comforting to know that master-craftsmen are upholding the quality and artistry of fine pieces that are made to last. Formed by Anthony Sergas and Scott Lander, Artifex Interiors has been designing and crafting furniture on Sydney’s Northern Beaches for 20 years. Available in American walnut, white ash or American white oak, the Alhambra credenza features detailing inspired by classic Islamic art. artifex.com.au

REECE It’s the little, oh-so-smart details that can help get your day off to a perfect start. A refreshing shower becomes a resort-like experience with the SmartControl concealed thermostatic mixer from Grohe. Push-and-turn technology allows for control of the water flow and the thermostatic mixer ensures the water temperature stays exactly the same for the duration of the shower. reece.com.au

APAISER There’s no need to reinvent the wheel when you’re an award-winning bathware designer and manufacturer with a host of original, bestselling designs. Apaiser’s Sól Collection of bath, stool and conical and elliptical basins is based on one of the Australian-owned company’s earlier designs. This new collection features the tailored detail Apaiser is renowned for and is set to launch in April. apaiser.com

MAX SPARROW Is your living space missing that one fabulous piece? Max Sparrow’s Kagney Lattice Design chair could be just what you’re looking for. The bold combination of coloured upholstery, delicate lattice detailing and touches of gold combine for maximum impact. maxsparrow.com.au

LIVING EDGE Choosing the right sofa can confound even the most design-savvy of us. Fast-track the process by opting for the Mariposa, an understated, super-comfortable sofa by Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby, shown here upholstered in Harald, a cotton velour fabric. The sumptuous soft cushions and adjustable armrests and backrests allow for various seating or reclining positions. livingedge.com.au


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VO G U E L I V IN G P R OMOT I O N

DOMO Established as a contemporary range of outdoor furniture and accessories that combines deluxe materials with European design aesthetics, all at an affordable price, Kun Design is now available here at Domo. Pictured is the striking Nest high-back lounge chair, which is the perfect poolside statement piece. domo.com.au

BOCONCEPT Renowned Danish designer Anders Nørgaard is behind many of the stylish armchairs and sofas available at BoConcept, including the Carlton sofa. With a nod to the 1960s and ’70s, the sofa has a timeless look married with modern comfort while the soft, large cushions create an inviting look. The Carlton sofa can be customised to suit with more than 100 leather and fabric options, as well as two leg options, and it comes in different seating modules. boconcept.com.au

HARROLDS

MILANO FURNITURE The latest collection from international

Good design is important when it comes to furniture and homewares — and also for all things fashion. Founded by Giovanni Fontana, Valextra specialises in fine leather handbags. Each piece, such as this Valextra Iside micro bag, is handcrafted by one of 60 master-craftsmen; available exclusively at Harrolds Melbourne, Sydney and Gold Coast. harrolds.com.au

brand Cattelan Italia has landed at Sydney’s Milano Furniture. A leader in Italian furniture design and manufacturing since 1979, Cattelan Italia is known for its innovative and elegant designs. One of the stand-out pieces in the new range is the Planer glass dining table that would work in most dining rooms. The glass top is laid on the base, which comes in a range of finishes, including brushed bronze. milanofurniture.com.au

VBO AUSTRALIA Italian brand Henry Timi is known for its minimalist designs and the HT112 Cerchia is no exception. The chair is crafted out of solid wood, in either natural ash, beech, iroko or black walnut wood and is available in two heights so it can work as a dining chair or armchair. See the range at VBO Australia’s showroom in inner-city Sydney. vboaustralia.com henrytimi.com

FANULI The Leda armchair, designed by Antonio Citterio for Flexform, is described as being a neat balance between tradition and modernity. The wood base has a Scandinavian-style motif, the seat is luxuriously padded and comfortable, and the fabric or leather upholstery is removable. The armchairs also come with either a low- or high-seat back with the option of adding a headrest cushion. Available exclusively at Fanuli in Sydney and Melbourne. fanuli.com.au; flexform.it


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

VLast look

E X CH ANG E R AT E AT TI ME OF PR IN T I S SUB J E CT TO C HAN G E

Special delivery


РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА "What's News" VK.COM/WSNWS

meet you at

SYDNEY THE ROCKS | MANLY | DOUBLE BAY MELBOURNE FLINDERS LANE | HAMER HALL BRISBANE EAGLE STREET PIER

sakerestaurant.com.au

Profile for El loco1919

Jjkkkkkkkkkkklkiô  

Jjkkkkkkkkkkklkiô  

Advertisement