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New

year ’

bold summer style


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Introducing Jasper II At King Living we don’t design furniture just for show. We design for how you really live. Meet the stylish new Jasper II. Built on King Living’s superior steel frame, backed by a 25-year warranty, it features innovative Smart Pockets™ and clever hidden storage space. So you can relax and enjoy the comfortable silences. That’s King Living. Where living is King.

KINGLIVING.COM | 1300 546 438


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© AERIN Beauty, DIST.

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INTRODUCING

ÉCLAT DE VERT A l us h g r ee n w o r ld i ll um in at ed b y a b u r s t of li g h t . I ns pi r ed b y n a tu r e a n d th e s ou t h of F r a n ce .

Avail abl e at A ERIN .com, Myer and Davi d Jones . #AE RIN Beau ty


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Captain’s Choice A 21-Day Journey by Foot

THE CRUX OF THE CAMINO

Departing May, June & August 2019. Enquire now. 1300 163 517 captainschoice.com.au


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Following a path of ancient scallop shells, where adventure and the divine connect. Walk the most magnificent legs of the Camino Francés, with expert guides and the luxury of a vehicle to whisk you onwards at any point.

SAN SEBASTIÁN SAINT JEAN PIED DE PORT THE PYRÉNÉES RONCESVALLES PAMPLONA LA RIOJA BURGOS SARRIA SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA


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PHO TO GR A HY: J E R E MY SIM ON S

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N E W! EXPLORE NOW VO GU E LIV I N G.C OM . AU/ TR AVE L


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Featured products: 0MKRI6SWIX83+3½VIWMHIGLEMVERH seat settee with selected Ligne Roset accessories.

Explore the Ligne Roset collection at one of DOMO’s seven showrooms across NSW, VIC, SA and QLD or at Contempo Furniture in Perth.

www.domo.com.au


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Contents

32 The season’s latest loungers and seats to relax in the sun.

Upfront 20 CONTRIBUTORS 22 ONLINE NOW… vogueliving.com.au 24 EDITOR’S LETTER

VLoves 29 FRESH SERVE Dish up an artful display on the table or wall 32 SUNNY OUTLOOK

PH OTO GR A PHE R : V ICT OR IA Z SCH OM ML E R

These striking loungers and recliners will have you sitting pretty, soaking up the rays

40 OVER THE RAINBOW India Mahdavi’s vivid Don Giovanni lamps

VLife 44 FABRIZIO CASIRAGHI A look at the architect’s Ftelia Beach Club

48 AERIN LAUDER

68 MARTYN THOMPSON

The founder of lifestyle label Aerin takes us through her beloved New York City home

The Australian photographer trades the bustle of Manhattan for Woodstock

54 NICK CAVE

72 JACQUES GARCIA

Gun violence, racism and politics inform the expansive piece created by this artist

The French architect and designer embraces the grandeur of the past

58 WE ARE FAMILY

76 ROYAL COPENHAGEN

Designer Kit Kemp’s new Wedgwood range

A curated collection of the Danish porcelain maker’s pieces is now available in Australia

60 NOMADES LAND Louis Vuitton’s luxe take on life at home

78 WALK THIS WAY David Jones devotes an entire floor to shoes

62 OUT OF THE BOX These projects blur the indoors and out

80 MARJOLAINE LERAY

64 STUDIO MR SMITH

St Tropez arrives with this zesty watermelonhued shopping haven in Sydney’s Woollahra

Coco Republic’s fresh take on outdoor style

66 JANSEN & THE BEASTS Artist Theo Jansen and his Strandbeests still draw crowds nearly 30 years on

82 DARN RIGHT A love of experimentation and a unique approach to colour informs the work of Dutch design studio Scholten & Baijings Jan/Feb 2019

13


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88

124

100 134

PH OTO GR A PHE R : M ADS M OG E NSE N

112


AD Beatrice Rossetti - Photo Federico Cedrone

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Contents

145

The former Convento di San Francesco in Tuscany, Italy.

Services

145 UNDER THE TUSCAN SUN

164 SUBSCRIBE

Longtime friends and travel buddies, interior designer Tamsin Johnson and accessories designer Lucy Folk reveal their favourite must-visit spots in Tuscany

…and receive a bonus neoprene tote bag

154 DANISH DELIGHT

VLast look

Having pioneered the ‘shop the home’ concept, the woman behind The Apartment has now turned her eye to a homestay 16

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169 SOURCES Contact details for the products, people and retailers featured in this issue

176 TOP BRASS Set the mood with a sculptural oil burner

On the cover

The pink bedroom of a former shoe factory in northeast Italy; Multiple Sun installation by Alessandro Trentin. Photographer: Helenio Barbetta. Story, page 112. Subscribe to Vogue Living: page 164. Be part of the conversation: #VogueLiving #loveVL

New

year ’

bold

summer style

PH OTO GR A PHE R : J AM E S H ARVE Y KE L LY

VList


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ALEXANDER SEATING SYSTEM

|

RODOLFO DORDONI DESIGN

DISCOVER MORE AT MINOTTI.COM/ALEXANDER

A U S T R A L I A

BY DEDECE 263 LIVERPOOL STREET - DARLINGHURST - SYDNEY NSW 2010 - T. 02 9360 2722 2 DALE STREET - CREMORNE - MELBOURNE 3121 - T. 03 9650 9600 INFO'DEDECE.COM

CUSTOMISED INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICE


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Rebecca Caratti EDITOR editor@vogueliving.com.au CREATIVE DIRECTOR Natasha Allen DEPUTY EDITOR Verity Magdalino STYLE EDITOR Joseph Gardner CHIEF COPY EDITOR Bonnie Vaughan SENIOR COPY EDITOR Virginia Jen DESIGNER Alicia Ridley EDITORIAL & STYLE COORDINATOR Anna Delprat (02) 9288 3729 MELBOURNE EDITOR & FEATURES WRITER Annemarie Kiely DIGITAL DIGITAL EDITOR Yeong Sassall ASSISTANT DIGITAL EDITOR Francesca Wallace CONTRIBUTORS CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Fiona McCarthy (London), Freya Herring, Jason Mowen, Lee Tulloch CONTRIBUTING COPY EDITORS Darren Christison, Joanne Gambale IMAGES Bowen Anco, Helenio Barbetta, Simon Brown, Hallie Burton, Sharyn Cairns, Nigel Dickinson, James Harvey Kelly, Romain Laprade, Mads Mogensen, Inga Powilleit, Anson Smart, Valentina Sommariva, Martyn Thompson, Barbara Vergnano, Dave Wheeler, Victoria Zschommler WORDS Tiffany Bakker, Sara Dal Zotto, Lucy Folk, Tamsin Johnson, Dana Tomic´ Hughes, Martina Hunglinger STYLING Aja Coon, Claire Delmar, Michael Fisher INTERACTIVE EDITION PRODUCTION MANAGER Stuart McDowell DIGITAL ASSETS & RIGHTS MANAGER Trudy Biernat BUSINESS ANALYST Umair Khalid NATIONAL SALES AND STRATEGY DIRECTOR, STYLE Nicole Waudby (02) 8045 4661. HEAD OF BRAND STRATEGY, STYLE Merryn Dhami (02) 9288 1090. HEAD OF DIGITAL COMMERCIAL STRATEGY, STYLE Amanda Spackman (02) 8045 4658. NSW GROUP SALES MANAGER Cheyne Hall (02) 8045 4667. NSW KEY ACCOUNT MANAGERS Kate Corbett (02) 8045 4737, Kristina Karassoulis (02) 9288 1743, Catherine Patrick (02) 8045 4613. GROUP DIGITAL BRAND MANAGER Adriana Hooper (02) 8045 4655. BRAND STRATEGY MANAGER Tessa Dixon (02) 8045 4744. HEAD OF STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS Hannah David-Wright (02) 8045 4986. PROJECT MANAGER — PARTNERSHIPS Kate Dwyer (02) 9288 1009. SENIOR CAMPAIGN IMPLEMENTATION MANAGER Sophie Gallagher (02) 9288 3929. NSW ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES, STYLE Eliza Connor (02) 9288 1324, Garineh Torossian (02) 8045 4653. VICTORIA SALES DIRECTOR, STYLE Karen Clements (03) 9292 3202. VICTORIA HEAD OF SALES Elise De Santo (03) 9292 1621. VICTORIA GROUP BUSINESS MANAGER Nadine Denison (03) 9292 3224. VICTORIA HEAD OF DIRECT SALES & PARTNERSHIPS Jo Constable (03) 9292 3203. VICTORIA CAMPAIGN IMPLEMENTATION MANAGER Rebecca Rodell (03) 9292 1951. QUEENSLAND PRODUCT SPECIALIST Nicole Rogers (07) 3666 6903. VICTORIA ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Sarah-Jane Bacon (03) 9292 3208. CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Rebecca White 1300 139 305. ASIA: Kim Kenchington, Mediaworks Asia (852) 2882 1106. ADVERTISING CREATIVE DIRECTOR Richard McAuliffe ADVERTISING HEAD OF OPERATIONS Eva Chown ADVERTISING HEAD OF ART Caryn Isemann ADVERTISING HEAD OF CONTENT Brooke Lewis ADVERTISING SENIOR ART DIRECTORS Bev Douglas, Nicole Vonwiller ADVERTISING COPY EDITORS Rob Badman, Annette Farnsworth, Tiffany Pilcher ADVERTISING CREATIVE PRODUCERS Sarah Mury, Candice Shields NATIONAL PRINT SERVICES MANAGER Mark Moes PRODUCTION MANAGER Chrissy Fragkakis ADVERTISING PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Robynne Beavan MARKETING DIRECTOR Diana Kay DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER Shannon Wylie SENIOR BRAND MANAGER Magdalena Zajac BRAND MANAGER Rachel Christian EVENTS MARKETING MANAGER Natalie Headland EVENTS MANAGER Genevieve McCaskill EVENTS MANAGER Danielle Isenberg MARKETING COORDINATOR Shelby Allen GENERAL MANAGER, RETAIL SALES & CIRCULATION Brett Willis NATIONAL CIRCULATION MANAGER Danielle Stevenson SUBSCRIPTIONS RETENTION MANAGER Crystal Ewins SUBSCRIPTIONS ACQUISITION MANAGER Grant Durie PUBLISHER, NEWS PRESTIGE NETWORK Nicholas Gray EDITORIAL DIRECTOR CONDÉ NAST TITLES Edwina McCann MANAGING EDITOR CONDÉ NAST TITLES Louise Bryant DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Sharyn Whitten HEAD OF FINANCE Caspar Deman MANAGING DIRECTOR, NEWS DNA Julian Delany VOGUE LIVING is published by NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd, ACN 088 923 906. NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd is a wholly owned subsidiary of News Limited (ACN 007 871 178). Copyright 2018 by NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. ISSN 0042-8035. 2 Holt Street, Surry Hills, NSW 2010. Tel: (02) 9288 3000. Email: mail@vogueliving.com.au. Website: vogueliving.com.au. Postal address: Vogue Living, NewsLifeMedia, Level 1, Locked Bag 5030, Alexandria, NSW 2015. Melbourne: Level 5, HWT Tower, 40 City Road, Southbank 3006. Tel: (03) 9292 1673. Fax: (03) 9292 1695. Brisbane: 41 Campbell Street, Bowen Hills, Qld 4006. Tel: (07) 3666 6910. Fax: (07) 3666 6911.

SUBSCRIPTIONS within Australia, 1300 656 933; overseas (+61 2) 9282 8023. Website: magsonline.com.au. Email: subs@magsonline.com.au. Websites: vogueliving.com.au, facebook.com/vogueliving, twitter.com/vogueliving, voguelivingmagazine.tumblr.com, pinterest.com/vogueliving, instagram.com/vogueliving Reply Paid 1224, Queen Victoria Building, NSW 1229 (no stamp required). Printed by PMP Limited, Paper fibre is from sustainably managed forests and controlled sources. Distributed by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd, Tel: 1300 650 666


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d e s i g n ‘c l o u d - c i n d e r’ f r o m r o b y n c o s g r o v e’s e x c l u s i v e c o l l e c t i o n f i n e ly h a n d k n o t t e d i n n e p a l f r o m h i m a l aya n w o o l & p u r e s i l k , c u s t o m s i z e s a v a i l a b l e .

16 8 q u e e n s t r e e t w o o l l a h r a n s w 2 0 2 5 t 61 2 9 3 2 8 7 6 9 2 r o b y n c o s g r o v e . c o m


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Contributors

D ES I GNE R For this issue, Johnson takes us on her Tuscan holiday with longtime friend, designer Lucy Folk (page 145). With a background in fashion design in Melbourne and London, the Sydney-based interior designer finds her creative process fuelled through trips overseas. “I find that travelling really helps me to develop new ideas,” says Johnson. “It is an important part of my process. My eyes are more open so I am able to push myself into new territory.” Another source of inspiration for this talented creative? Her husband, fashion designer Patrick Johnson. “It’s tempting to replicate something you have done before, because it’s been a success, but there are so many exciting new ideas to explore,” Johnson says. “He’s forever pushing the envelope.”

Tamsin Johnson

Tamsin Johnson (left) and Lucy Folk.

D ES IG NE R A trained goldsmith, Folk established her flagship jewellery store in Melbourne back in 2010. Her creative output has now grown to include sunglasses, bags, accessories and apparel, and two concept stores, Playa and, most recently, Lucy Folk Salon. “They celebrate everything I love about summer and travel,” says Folk. The salon sees Folk’s own range alongside a capsule of fashion and lifestyle brands with a focus on resort style. A self-described nomad inspired by “art, interiors, architecture, food, colour, the writing on the wall, nature and travel”, Folk went on a trip to Tuscany with friend and creative collaborator, interior designer Tamsin Johnson for this issue (page 145). The designer is now based in Paris, but comes back home to Australia for the summer. “It’s always summer somewhere and I like to ride that wave.”

P HO T OG RA P HER With past experience as a menswear designer and creative director for premium men’s fashion brands, this London-based creative has now focused on photography, splitting his time between shooting fashion campaigns and travel and reportage work. For this issue, he travelled with friends and designers Lucy Folk and Tamsin Johnson to Tuscany (page 145). “I’m lucky that I get to shoot a lot of pretty fascinating people, and Lucy and Tamsin are a case in point,” says Harvey Kelly. “On shoots like this the process is very comfortable because you have time. I’m not particularly meticulous or prescriptive — I tend to just hang around and chat and try to take in bits and pieces, which feel beautiful or meaningful as they occur. Ultimately, I’m looking to create something that feels honest and hopefully optimistic.” VL

James Harvey Kelly D ES IGN ER , VO GUE LI VI N G Having worked in publishing for two years, the talented Australian-born graphic designer joins the Vogue Living team this issue. Her creative process “involves a lot of coffee mostly, but I like to keep it as collaborative as possible and believe that two creative minds are better than one. Seeing ideas come to life is inspiring in itself and I love being involved in the creative community and getting to work with some very talented people”. Ridley’s favourite story to design was the profile on contemporary artist Nick Cave (page 54). “I was lucky enough to be on location for this shoot and meet this inspiring artist,” she says. “That’s what I love about working on a magazine like Vogue Living — it brings together a mix of talented photographers, writers and designers from all over the world. And I’m very excited to be a part of it.”

Alicia Ridley

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PH OTO GR A PHE R S: J AM E S H ARVE Y KE L LY ( TAMS IN J OHN SON AN D L UCY FOL K) , DAVE W H E E LE R ( AL ICI A R IDL E Y )

Lucy Folk


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Take the tour

T HIS H OUSE WAS F IR ST PUBL I SHE D B Y AR CH IT E CT UR AL DIG E ST AN D OR IG I NA LLY W RI TT E N B Y M AYE R RU S

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A

s we ease into a new year, I just can’t help but feel excited for the holiday season and the long summer ahead. We Australians love summer so we’ve produced an issue that re-creates that warm summer feeling and the sense of freedom that comes from spending time with loved ones during this special time of year. It’s a season when we savour the outdoors, so on page 32 in ‘Sunny Outlook’ we round up the most sophisticated outdoor loungers and recliners, produced by our style editor Joseph Gardner. We’ve asked Anthony Spon-Smith, creative director of Australian furniture retailer-turned-maker Coco Republic, to give us an exclusive look at his new outdoor range in ‘Studio Mr Smith’ (page 64), which he describes as furniture with a “global influence” interpreted for the Australian lifestyle. We also take you on a journey to visit the hottest summer holiday destinations around the world — from Ftelia, the incredible Mykonos beach club designed by Italian architect Fabrizio Casiraghi (page 44), to designers Lucy Folk and Tamsin Johnson’s Tuscan holiday hot spots (page 145). ››

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PH OTO GR A PHE R : M ICH AE L N AUMOF F. HAI R & MAKE - UP : CL AIR E T HOM SON

Editor’s letter


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‹‹ And then there are the interiors. Each home in this issue has been chosen to evoke a feeling of summer — whether it’s the white-washed dream escape on the Aeolian islands, owned by Italian actor Luca Barbareschi and his interior designer wife, Elena Monorchino (page 134), or an exclusive tour of Hugh Jackman and Deborra Lee-Furness’s East Hampton retreat (page 100) — every location we’ve featured embodies a sense of lightness and sophisticated ease. I hope this issue will not only provide you with a wealth of summer interior inspiration but also an indulgent escape during the busy holiday season as we unwind and dip into the New Year. Happy holidays!

EDITOR 26

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PH OTO GR A PH: VAL E N TIN A SOM M AR IVA

Editors letter


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years

65

Urban Danish Design

Products Shown: Parma Motion Recliner | Lugo Coffee Table | Como Bookcase

COMFORT IN MOTION BY FRANS SCHROFER Frans Schrofer is an award-winning Dutch designer whose work contributes to over three generations of celebrated creativity. His early studies in electro-mechanics and mechanical engineering reflect a lifelong fascination with cars. His furniture blends that technical knowledge with the fluidity of his parents’ renowned artwork. The magic of that balance is embodied in the new Parma recliner sofa. Take a seat in this bold design, characterised by muscular lines, folded stitch details and sleek, sculptural legs. Then find your ideal seating position at the touch of elegantly concealed switches. It’s comfort in efforless motion. The Parma can be customised to your own personal style with over 100 leather and fabric options available.

Order your free 2019 catalogue online.

Crows Nest Flagship Store - 575 Pacific Hwy Tel. (02) 9437 0066 Moore Park - Shop GA03 Moore Park Supa Centa Tel. (02) 9697 2886

www.boconcept.com.au


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shop style

VLoves

A

E X CHA NG E R ATE AT TIM E OF PR IN T I S SUBJ E CT TO C HAN G E

SHOP

Fresh serve

Dish up an artful display on your table or wall with this selection of plates that exhibit graphic pattern, twists on tradition and heirloom appeal. Photographed by Victoria Zschommler Styled by Joseph Gardner

Jan/Feb 2019

29


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VLoves


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T H I S PAG E , C LOC K W I S E F RO M TO P LEF T

O PPO S I T E PAGE , C LOC KW IS E F RO M TO P


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VLoves

Sunny outlook

Whether you’re after seating for alfresco entertaining or soaking up the rays POOLSIDE, this collection of striking lounges and recliners will have you SITTING PRETTY. Produced & styled by Joseph Gardner Photographed by Victoria Zschommler


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FRO M TO P Omni daybed, $2499, from Eco Outdoor; Playa robe in Sottsass Stripe, $495, from Lucy Folk; Ichendorf Milano Colore tumbler in Amber & Clear, $32, from Jardan; Celine stool in White, $395, from Coco Republic; snorkel mask from Dive Centre Bondi. Details, last pages.

Jan/Feb 2019

33


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VLoves

T H IS PAG E

O P PO S I T E PAG E , C LO C K W IS E F ROM TO P R I GH T

34

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THI S PAGE , F RO M L E F T

O PP OSITE PAGE , F ROM L E F T

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VLoves

Jan/Feb 2019

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VLoves

C LO C K WI SE F RO M TOP L E F T

38

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SHOP

Over the rainbow

Look for the girl with the sun in her eyes. India Mahdavi (short of being in the sky) creates FANTASY enough on the ground. Produced & styled by Joseph Gardner Photographed by Dave Wheeler

S

he’s credited with bringing pink back into interiors via her heavily Instagrammed Sketch gallery-restaurant in London. But India Mahdavi is no one-Pantone pony. She used what an executive called “spinach green” all over the walls of a Ladurée tearoom, and her Chez Nina nightclub installation at Nilufar Gallery in Milan this year made rainbow velvet a thing to covet. She has said she wants to “bring sunshine into a space” and that is exactly what she does via her Don Giovanni lamps. Like the giant flowers on a Wizard of Oz set, they’re a bit ’30s, a bit Mod, but with jelly mould-like Murano glass globes and gelato scoop-stack colour mixes, they are mostly just Mahdavi. Luckily for us, the Don Giovanni lamp is now available in Australia via Alm. Invest in a little Mahdavi sunshine for your living space. JOANNE GAMBALE

India Mahdavi Don Giovanni table lamps in Murano glass and solid brass, in pink and olive green, and yellow and pink, $5000/ea, from Alm. Details, last pages. Shot on location at Royal Botanic Garden, Sydney.

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VLoves

Jan/Feb 2019

41


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art design people

VLife

PH OTO GR A PHE R : R OM AIN L APR A DE

Italian architect Fabrizio Casiraghi has infused the Ftelia Beach Club on the Greek island of Mykonos with a warm palette that glows against the stark white exteriors and the cool blues of the Aegean.

Jan/Feb 2019

43


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Fabrizio Casiraghi

DESIGN

Retro hues of ochre and burnt orange add a summery warmth to the Italian architect’s Ftelia Beach Club, on the Greek island of Mykonos. By Jason Mowen Photographed by Romain Laprade

FROM LEF T

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VLife

I

nspiration for the Ftelia Beach Club in Mykonos came to its designer, Paris-based Italian architect Fabrizio Casiraghi, the first time he flew over the island. He was surprised to see that the church rooftops were painted in a brick-like colour and not in blue, the colour usually associated with Greece. “I understood that this was the colour of the island and began imagining an atmosphere full of warm tonalities,” says Casiraghi, who describes the palette as the most powerful aspect of the project. It packs some subtle punch: varying shades of red, yellow and burnt orange play contrast against the stark white of the vernacular architecture and the cool, crisp colours of the Aegean. “The rest,” he says, “was inspired by the landscape: terraces and an amphitheatre to enjoy the view; simple but iconic furniture; and handmade fabrics.” Casiraghi, whose practice encompasses both architecture and interiors, describes his aesthetic as “generous” and enjoys mixing ages, origins and styles to achieve a harmonious equilibrium. That rows of shapely ’60s-era orange-framed armchairs by Gae Aulenti should look so at home at Ftelia’s classic Greek setting attests to his lightness of touch. Born in Milan, Casiraghi took Ancient Greek, Latin and Philosophy at school before moving on to architecture at the Politecnico di Milano. A certain ‘sensitivity’ is evident, as a result, throughout his work, which strikes a fascinating balance “I understood between the decorative that [the brick and the erudite but all rooftops were] the while grounded in the colour of his architect’s sense of space and form. the ISLAND and Moving to Paris began imagining years ago and an ATMOSPHERE three establishing a studio full of warm in the Haut Marais, Casiraghi has TONALITIES” seemingly thrived in FABRIZIO CASIRAGHI the French capital. “Milan is a northern city,” he explains, “more similar, perhaps to Paris than Naples in terms of lifestyle. I love living in Paris even if I miss, every day, some aspects of what makes the Italian way of life so wonderful.” His oeuvre reflects both his Milanese heritage and his love of the exotic. Oriental lanterns, bright-green velvet seating and gilded accents against burgundy-coloured walls make for a rich environment at the Café de l’Esplanade in Paris, while the bamboo-and-brass-clad bar and Fungo ›› Jan/Feb 2019

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C LOC K W I SE F RO M A BOV E L E F T

rattan chairs found at an antiques market on an island near Mykonos. Milanese designer Gae Aulenti’s ’60s-era armchairs complete the retro vibe. The cushion fabric and tabletop tiles reflect the red brick church rooftops of Mykonos that Casiraghi fell in love with.

‹‹ formed table lamps reference the iconic Rising Sun collection from the early ’70s by Gabriella Crespi — a fellow Milanese Francophile and favourite of the architect — at restaurant Cassio in Hong Kong. At the other end of the spectrum is the Paris boutique he conceived for French jewellery designer Aurélie Bidermann, which, with its arched niches, off-white walls and terracotta floor, teeters in spirit between an old French residence and the Parisian jewellery shops of the 1930s. And then there’s the exquisite Venice pied-à-terre crafted for his agent, Julien Desselle. Far in shape from the city’s typical Baroque palaces, richness comes via dark terrazzo floors paired with pale pink walls, with doors and half-metre-high skirting lines in sang de boeuf (oxblood). A sparse arrangement of exquisite furniture, art and objects speaks to the haute-bourgeois style of 20th-century Milan but also the more exotic, gateway-to-Asia heritage of the Venetian city-state of centuries past. Forthcoming projects, both commercial and residential, are equally layered: a hotel in Switzerland; a private home in the US; and a new Kenzo flagship store in Paris. Whatever the project, Casiraghi’s Milanese roots are sure to hew closely to his craft. “Milan’s understated charm and design culture has always inf luenced my aesthetic,” he says. “When I was a child, I spent my holidays between my grandparents’ place at Lake Como and my parents’ holiday house in Cinque Terre — two of my favourite places, so full of beauty. The house in Cinque Terre is all white but with a massive parquet floor, and full of objects that my parents collected on their travels — this has influenced me a lot.” VL fabriziocasiraghi.com @fabriziocasiraghi 46

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Aerin Lauder, wearing a Johanna Ortiz dress. In the library, Jacques Adnet lamps; custom paint by Donald Kaufman Colour and Taffy Dahl; Meat Cove (1966) artwork by Richard Serra. OPP OS I TE PAGE in the hallway, antique console; Armand Albert Reteau chair; 18th-century Beauvais tapestry from France. TH I S PAGE


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PEOPLE

Aerin Lauder Wit art, c an crea Aerin he

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or Aerin Lauder, scion to her grandmother Estée’s empire and fortune, home is where the heart is. “This is where I can entertain and be with family and friends, or sit on the couch, lie back and relax,” Lauder says, gliding in her favourite signature ballet flats around the generously proportioned apartment, overlooking Park Avenue in Manhattan. Not much has changed in the 19 years since Lauder and her financier husband, Eric Zinterhofer, teenage sons Jack and Will, and the family’s three dogs, Biscuit, Schatzi and Disco, moved in. Interior designer Jacques Grange helped to transform the space into a multi-tasking, happy family home. She was drawn immediately to the apartment’s shadow play of sunlight streaming through the tall steel casement windows, which reminded her of New York’s glamorous Gilded Age. “Light brings warmth and life,” she says. Lauder has worked with Grange on many projects, but here she likes his eclectic sense of mixing things like sisal with beautiful velvets, and the way “he structures a room to feel clean and inviting, and then builds on it with colours, fabrics and textures to make it feel personal and warm, yet elegant”. It suits Lauder’s own effortless style for mixing high and low. An elaborate 18th-century Beauvais tapestry from France and early-20th-century Jean-Michel Frank armchairs happily sit alongside pieces from her eponymous lifestyle collection, launched in 2012, such as shagreen

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Aerin Lauder with one of her dogs, Schatzi. In the living room, sofa based on a Jean-Michel Frank design; Paul Dupré-Lafon coffee table and leopardprint armchair; Achrome (1960) artwork by Piero Manzoni. In the library, Maison Baguès chandelier; Adele Bloch-Bauer I (1907) artwork by Gustav Klimt.

serving trays and velvet jewellery boxes. “I like the energy that comes from something traditional next to something contemporary,” she says. Through the tapestry-lined hallway, the living room opens to a library on one side and a dining room on the other. “It’s a very gracious layout, the kind you’d find in a Parisian apartment, with no space wasted,” Lauder says. “We really use every room. Kids and dogs are welcome to hang out on the sofas and my desk is by the window so I can enjoy the light and the space while I work.” In the dining room, the table is purposefully round, inviting more casual conversation because, says Lauder, “there is no head, everybody is equal”.” A harmonious colour palette of chocolate, green and gold is enlivened with a deep slate blue here and a bright white there. A frisson of excitement comes with leopard print that graces living room armchairs and powder room walls (the wallpaper is one of Lauder’s own designs for Lee Jofa). For Lauder, it acts almost “like a neutral,” helping to create rooms that feel both stylish and comfortable. “A clash of pattern and colour brings character. I don’t believe in pulling a colour from a painting to find a fabric to match. To me, art is a thing apart, it has its own reality.” Contemporary art punctuates each space, the legacy of parents with “an amazing eye” and a childhood of Saturday afternoons spent traipsing around New York’s finest art galleries and museums with her former diplomat father,


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“I’m passionate about CHANDELIERS — they’re glamorous and captivating. I have one in almost every room, EMBODYING light and shooting it all back to you”

Ronald (Estée’s youngest son). Pops of colour in the otherwise sophisticated living room come from works by Yves Klein and Lucio Fontana; humour comes from Jeff Koons’ porcelain Puppy vase in the kitchen; Calder and Giacometti sculptures grace tabletops. Lauder’s dressing room is a grown-up girl’s dream. “Surrounded by boys, I needed a place to retreat,” she says of her sanctuary with hand-painted Chinese wallpaper from Gracie (“just like Estée had”), the tassel-trimmed curtains, falling in silky puddles like ball-gown skirts onto the floor, and the cornflowerblue velvet chaise lounge, where Lauder likes to read and scroll through Instagram. The main bedroom is an oasis of calm, too, with velvet-covered walls, crisp white bed linen and a vintage chandelier, with the feel almost of a sophisticated disco ball, which once graced a coffee shop in Vienna (it has also inspired the Renwick crystal sphere chandelier in Lauder’s own lighting collection). “I’m passionate about chandeliers — they’re glamorous and captivating,” she says. “I have one in almost every room, embodying light and shooting it all back to you.” Personal mementoes are dotted everywhere, including family photographs, an early pair of one of her son’s sneakers boxed in Perspex (“it’s my version of the bronzed baby shoe”) and favourite books. ›› Jan/Feb 2019

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‹‹ The effect is of a welcoming space for her family that’s feminine but not girlie. “Femininity is very important to me, it feels authentic and familiar,” she says of a lifetime immersed in lipsticks and fragrances, first at her grandmother’s knee and now as both creative director of Aerin and style and image director at Estée Lauder. 52

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In the powder room, Benit medium sculpted pendant lights, from Aerin; Marcel wallpaper by Aerin for Lee Jofa.

“My idea of beauty goes way beyond what sits on my vanity,” she says. “Living beautifully, for me, is about dinner around the kitchen table at home with a great group of friends on Saturday night, a bike ride in the country with my boys, or a quiet walk along the beach picking up seashells.” VL aerin.com @aerin


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e are living in challenging times, and that’s putting things mildly. Trump in America, Brexit in the UK, Nauru in — or rather, conveniently outside of — Australia. These are the times when the world needs art. It needs art to elevate and educate, to expose and to provoke discussion. African-American artist Nick Cave is not afraid to confront the cultural discourse; in fact, he has made it his life’s work. Right now at Carriageworks in Sydney’s Eveleigh, he has populated the expansive space with his celebrated work Until. It’s heaven and hell and all the brutal truth that lies between, and it’s never been more relevant. When Until first launched into the world at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art in 2016, the delicate equilibrium of American culture was showing signs of momentous strain. “Freddie Gray had just happened — he was an unarmed black youth shot down by police [in Baltimore] — and that was the trigger,” says Cave. “I was trying to wrap my head around another heinous incident, and a thought came to mind: ‘Is there racism in heaven?’ That was the catalyst for the project, and then I proceeded to think about what that would look like.”

Until is a visually compelling, richly constructed, all-encompassing installation that fuses found objects with new, beauty with repugnance, hatred with nostalgia. A plethora of garden wind-spinners depicting guns, bullets and teardrops are suspended in the air on the ground level. “Gun violence is right in our backyard,” says Cave. Five local artists have contributed to the piece, too, placing Until among the context of Australia’s Indigenous plight.

“It’s all based on these extraordinary ARTEFACTS, these personal belongings that were once someone else’s. With the lawn jockeys, the team had to go to people’s HOMES and pick them up, which was very interesting — the shame and the DISPARITY around that moment; the awkwardness”

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lackface lawn jockeys — a familiar, uncomfortably comfortable form of racism — greet you as you climb one of four ladders. Objects of miscellany lie around — ceramic birds, fake flowers and gramophones. It’s hectic and busy, nauseating. Is this hell, or real life? In between, a giant celestial sculpture looms in the air, “a decadent iceberg made of hanging crystals,” says Cave. From a distance it resembles mould, and is vaguely, disturbingly kinetic. Video art intervenes, and then there is what Cave calls a “beaded landscape: beaded cargo nets created in the studio and forming cascading mountain ranges”. In a culture of security supported by weaponry, “they speak of a militant, trapping sensation, and yet they’re also very alluring and seductive”. It look 25 people a year-and-a-half to build the nets alone. “From a distance it may look like this field of cloth — this draping, vast abundance of material,” he says. “But they are all constructed of pony beads.” Children’s toys, then. Sourcing the found objects for Until took Cave across America — to markets, thrift stores, even private houses. “It’s all based on these extraordinary artefacts, personal belongings that were once someone else’s,” he says. “With the lawn jockeys, the team had to go to people’s homes and pick them up, which was very interesting — the shame and the disparity around that moment; the awkwardness.” Cave’s work is his response to politics; his method of coping. “We have to keep making and putting work out there that keeps the conversation going,” he says. “I’m trying to seek a way to understand.” VL Until runs at Carriageworks until 3 March, 2019. carriageworks.com.au; nickcaveart.com

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SHO T ON L OC AT ION AT C AR R IAG E W OR KS, SY DN E Y

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VLife Kit Kemp with her daughters Min (left) and Willow in the designer’s London home. Various pieces from Sailor’s Farewell, Kemp’s second collection for Wedgwood.

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otel life has always been a family affair for Kit Kemp, the award-winning design director of Firmdale Hotels. For three decades, with her cofounder husband, Tim, she has blazed a revolutionary trail across the London and New York boutique hotel scene since opening Dorset Square Hotel in 1985. Now, their youngest daughters, Willow, 31, and Min, 28, have joined the family foray (eldest daughter Tiffany, 32, is based near the family home in Hampshire). With backgrounds in art and design, architectural graduate Willow, working with her mother since 2012, has an innate feel “for scale and dimension”, says Kemp; Min, a graphic

DESIGN

We are family

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designer, on the team since 2014, “is fiery and colourful, often much more than me”, she laughs. Both daughters contribute in myriad ways: Min loves to seek out exciting young artists, while Willow works on many of the finer details of Kemp’s designs, including Sailor’s Farewell, the pattern now gracing the designer’s second fine bone china collection for Wedgwood launched recently (available in Australia in early 2019). Based on the pattern for a hand-embroidered fabric originally designed for London-based Chelsea Textiles, Kemp says the idea first came to her after admiring a John Craxton painting of a lady on a rock waving goodbye to her sailor husband. Kemp has applied seafaring motifs, from lighthouses and whale tails to sailing ships and seagulls, to the edges and centres of teacups and saucers, milk jugs and egg cups, plates, platters and bowls —all set against a blue linen-effect backdrop. Like Mythical Creatures, Kemp’s first Wedgwood collection in 2014, each piece will be handfinished with gold. A folkloric playfulness has long been a theme in Kemp’s work, from the fabrics and wallpapers she designs with British textile brand Christopher Farr to the hand-embroidered headboards and cushions she has created in collaboration with the prison charity Fine Cell Work. For the five wallpapers and six fabrics Kemp launched recently with London design emporium Andrew Martin, she worked with British artist Melissa White. Previously the pair had created Mythical Land, a three-metre-repeat mural wallpaper, for the private events spaces at Manhattan’s The Whitby Hotel. With this new collection, they’ve brought patterns like Friendly Folk, Hedgerow and Wychwood to life by teaming tapestry-inspired mythical creatures (dragons, foxes, lions and birds) with pared-back pastoral scenes. In early 2019, Kemp will publish her third book, Design Thread (Hardie Grant), filled with stories about the things the designer loves most — a richness of colour and exuberant pattern, tactile textures and the soul of pieces handcrafted and finished. “[It exemplifies] all those whimsical details that make guests look twice,” Kemp says. “When someone wants to know more about what we’ve done, when their curiosity is piqued, that’s when I know we’ve achieved something.” VL firmdale.com; wedgwood.com.au


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T H I S PAG E , CLO C KWI S E F RO M TOP

Objets Nomades lounge chair by Marcel Wanders. Vivienne doll. Bell lamp by Barber & Osgerby; Petit Diamond mirror by Marcel Wanders. Totem Floral by Damien Langlois-Meurinne. O PPOS I TE PAGE Hammock by Atelier Oï. LEFT

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f Louis Vuitton designed an Australian home, a modernist dream of open spaces, light-washed timber floors and floor-to-ceiling glass overlooking the diamond sparkle of Sydney Harbour is perhaps just what you’d imagine. And this scene was exactly what guests took in as the French luxury lifestyle house celebrated the arrival of designs from its Objets Nomades collection, as well as the new Les Petits Nomades line of decorative objets and accessories, to Australian shores recently. In a highly exclusive, invitation-only curated installation, the maison presented its refined take on life at home, from furniture and artworks to jewellery and exceptional handbags, in the particularly contemporary and evocatively Australian setting of a Sydney waterfront mansion. Titled the Louis Vuitton Beach House, this concept has been translated into similarly localised, immersive experiences in Miami, Beverly Hills and Singapore. Guests at the Sydney installation were able to wander through a multitude of living areas to discover pieces like the new Marcel Wanders Diamond mirrors, launched at the most recent Milan Design Week, in their natural habitat — within the context of a luxurious home. The Campana Brothers’ forestgreen Cocoon chair, hanging delicately in the entry hall, greeted visitors upon arrival; Marcel Wanders’ portable leather Lounge Chair took pride of place in a sitting room sluiced with sunshine, while the woven leather Hammock, designed by Swiss trio Atelier Oï, swung invitingly in the sea breeze on a balcony open to that spectacular harbour view. Pieces from the new Les Petits Nomades collection, such as Atelier Oï’s handcrafted folded-leather Flower Field cushions, completed the mise en scène, exemplifying a unique kind of laid-back glamour inherent to a very Australian take on luxury. VL au.louisvuitton.com Jan/Feb 2019

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DESIGN

Out of the box Blurring the boundaries between indoors and out goes next level with these clever takes on form and function. Los Terrenos, a holiday home in Mexico, blends seamlessly with the surrounding forest due to its mirrored glass façade.

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By Dana Tomic´ Hughes

he idea of blurring indoor and outdoor spaces has been a recurring theme in architecture and interiors. Having the comfort of the indoors while being immersed in the great outdoors is the stuff dreams are made of. I mean, who doesn’t want to have their cake and eat it too? Perhaps it’s our collective fatigue from the fast pace of urban living, the saturation of screen culture, infinite new technologies or a combination of all three, but we’re definitely seeing a rise in projects that really push these boundaries. A superb example comes in the shape of a holiday house in a forest at the foothills of a mountain in Monterrey, Mexico. Designed by acclaimed Mexico-city architect Tatiana Bilbao, Los Terrenos (The Terrain) appears as a mesmerising illusion made up of three

fragmented volumes based on function. The living room pavilion is encased in mirrored glass and rendered almost invisible among the trees. The second pavilion incorporates two bedrooms with rammed earth walls. Each room features a retractable wall that opens to the outdoors. The final, yet-to-be-built pavilion will be the main bedroom contained in a timber house on stilts, with views across the treetops. Yes, please. Also in Mexico is Casa La Quinta by architects Pérez Palacios and Alfonso de la Concha Rojas. This blissful sanctuary is located within San Miguel de Allende’s urban context. The house is squeezed into a site surrounded by walls, so the architects had to be exceptionally resourceful in creating an illusion of openness and space. The team designed a home with no internal boundaries, with all rooms facing three inner courtyards, flowing outdoors through generous openings and sliding glass panels. Closer to home, Austin Maynard Architects has conceived one of its latest projects, King Bill, as a love letter to Fitzroy in Melbourne’s inner-city. The architects were commissioned to design a family of four’s “forever house” by renovating a two-storey terrace, an old stable to the rear, and incorporating an adjacent empty garden site. Austin Maynard flipped the terrace concept on its head. The entry was moved to the side, becoming a corridor that links the old house with the stable and the new pavilion. “With the entry moved, the original terrace entry porch is now a garden, and the corridor is now a bathroom, which brings delight to the owners as they watch visitors scratch their heads while they figure out how to find their way inside,” says Maynard. Although many of us may crave exceptional architecture to live in, it’s often the un-designed outdoor spaces that tap into our basic instincts for being immersed in nature, for spending time in uncomplicated settings that support and enhance the concept of ‘togetherness’ — an essential element of any home. VL tatianabilbao.com; perezpalacios.mx; maynardarchitects.com

PH OTO GR A PHE R : R ORY G A R DIN E R/ OTT O/ R AV E N & SN OW

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don’t settle for cool make it extraordinary

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VLife DESIGN

Studio Mr Smith The debut collection from Coco Republic’s new design offshoot is an international cocktail of coastal Californian living and Italian style. By Verity Magdalino Photographed by Anson Smart

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esign is in the DNA of Anthony Spon-Smith, creative director at Australian furniture company Coco Republic. Sleekly groomed and sipping a coffee at his instore cafe in Sydney’s Alexandria, Spon-Smith effusively describes his lifelong obsession with design and the consequent launch of Coco Republic’s Studio Mr Smith. Named after his father’s original business, Mr

collection is named Riviera L’Americano and comprises more than 200 pieces, including statement stools, concrete planters, dining tables and chairs, and outdoor cushions and rugs. Its low, modular teak lounges are reminiscent, says Spon-Smith, of Californian coastal living. “California and Italy are two of my favourite places and design-wise I wanted to take the best from both these worlds to create a relaxed, comfortable line

“I want to introduce a global INFLUENCE and interpret it for the Australian LIFESTYLE” Smith Interiors, the studio satisfies Spon-Smith’s long-held wish to expand into product design. He was, after all, born into a family business that specialised in furniture. This might be the last frontier for a company already offering interior design services and a popular design school along with its 16 stores nationwide. “Studio Mr Smith’s ethos is based on heritage and rebirth,” says Spon-Smith. “It’s a throwback to the family history. The new designs for the debut collection draw from my father’s 40 years in the business, and the 20 years I’ve been involved. It’s important to have provenance in design.” It’s this experience and enthusiasm — SponSmith studied industrial design “just for fun” after completing an economics degree — combined with a deep understanding of the industry that has led him to focus on luxury outdoor furniture. “Outdoor areas used to be an afterthought,” says Spon-Smith. “But this is changing. People are spending more time outside and we now want our outdoor spaces to look as good as our interiors.” This rising demand for stylish exteriors is one of the biggest changes to everyday living Spon-Smith says he’s witnessed in recent years, which made Studio Mr Smith’s outdoor range a no-brainer. Inspired by Californian modernism and contemporary Italian design, the debut 64

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with contemporary styling,” he says. “It’s all about American comfort with Italian silhouettes and an international flavour.” Spon-Smith intends to follow the debut collection with more interior pieces, starting with a focus on dining. And in the not-toodistant future he wants to see it expand internationally. “I’m open-minded about collaborations, especially with international designers,” he says. “I want to introduce a global influence and interpret it for the Australian lifestyle. I also want to design product that is sold around the world and design for my contemporaries in Europe and America. “I think we have a great way of living in Australia that’s reflected in our designs,” he continues. “I’d like to bottle that up and sell it overseas… And I’d love to be designing when I retire. For me it’s a long journey. It’s what I really love doing.” VL cocorepublic.com.au @cocorepublic

T H I S PAGE, FRO M FAR LEFT

Architect lounge chair in white; Milton modular sofa; Celine concrete stool; and Breu lounge chair, all from Coco Republic’s Studio Mr Smith outdoor collection. O PP O SITE PAGE Coco Republic creative director Anthony Spon-Smith, beside the Poho outdoor occasional chair.


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ART & DESIGN

Jansen and the Beasts Dutch artist THEO JANSEN and his beloved Strandbeests still draw crowds nearly 30 years after they first set foot on a beach. By Bonnie Vaughan

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heo Jansen loves to fool people. Back in 1980, not long after the Dutch artist quit his physics degree studies in search of more creative pursuits, he launched a four-metre-high, helium-powered flying saucer into the hazy skies over the Delft (near the North Sea, where he was born and lives to this day). Much like Orson Welles’s War of the Worlds radio broadcast over 40 years before, Jansen’s project caused a local sensation: the public, the police and the press all swallowed the bait; ‘UFO SPOTTED OVER DELFT ’, one newspaper headline blared. “People really believed there were aliens landing on the earth,” Jansen muses now, “which is of course worrying, but at the same time it’s a relief to find out it’s not really true. That’s the funny thing about jokes — we need them to see life in the right perspective. It’s the same with art — we need the balance between imagination and reality to make life bearable.” Jansen applied this sanguine philosophy to his next big project, to which he has dedicated the past 28 years of his life. Inspired to save the eroding sand dunes along the Netherlands beaches from the threat of rising sea levels, he began building Strandbeests (Dutch for ‘beach beasts’), colossal stick-figure structures made of cheap PVC plastic tubes and nylon zip ties. Devising computer algorithms to fine-tune the beasts’ mechanics, Jansen grew determined to create a species that mimicked the movements of real animals as they strut across the sand — kicking up displaced grains and pushing them back to the dunes where they belonged — propelled by nothing but the wind. Over the years, Jansen has become world-famous. Strandbeests have long been a viral phenomenon online — usually described as kinetic, or moving, sculptures — and the artist even got a cameo on The Simpsons. (“Is this science,” ponders Homer, “or garbage?”) He also became less obsessed with saving the planet and more fixated on the evolution of his creatures. Indeed, the language Jansen uses when he talks about his beasts is deliberately anthropomorphic: the algorithms that enable them to walk are “DNA codes”; the beasts have “muscles”, “nerve cells”, “stomachs” and “brains”; defunct Strandbeests are referred to as “fossils”. Working from his headquarters in Ypenburg, near Delft, Jansen creates a new species every two to three years. Experiments on the beach at Scheveningen each summer teach him which iterations will survive and which need to ‘die’ and donate their DNA to the next, presumably superior, generation. “It’s a constant evolution process,” he says. “They are mutants, you could say, and the

winning mutant gives me a lot of hope — and information — to continue.” The artist invites the public to witness his process during beach sessions at Scheveningen, with bookings available each February via his website. He prefers, however, to exhibit his Strandbeests at museums, where audiences can actually engage with his work — and with him, as he shares his creatures’ backstories. Earlier this year, Jansen brought his beasts to the people at Wind Walkers: Theo Jansen’s Strandbeests, an exhibition at Singapore’s ArtScience Museum in collaboration with Audemars Piguet. (It’s not hard to see the link between the Strandbeests’ masterful engineering and the Swiss luxury watchmakers, which began sponsoring Jansen in 2014 at Art Basel Miami Beach.) Wind Walkers featured 13 Strandbeests, ranging from the very first — the Animarus Vulgaris, now just a sad tangle of tubes and Sellotape — to the 13-metre-long Animaris Suspendisse — a multi-legged contraption powered by pistons that squeeze air into plastic bottles, or ‘wind stomachs’. The beasts make a whimsical sound when they move, like rain splashing on a fibreglass roof. Conducting a tour of his past and present creations, Jansen is a passionate, hands-on storyteller; he confesses, “I still get a kick out of demonstrating my beasts.” A tall, softly spoken man, he speaks earnestly about creating herds of Strandbeests that could survive on the beaches, and perhaps even swim, without his help at all. He says things like: “The tubes advise me all the time. Sometimes I can’t believe how beautiful they get”, or, “I have the feeling the Strandbeests already existed before 1990. They were in the air looking for brains to land in. I was lucky they landed in mine; they used my brain to affect the rest of the world.” When he speaks like this, it’s tempting to wonder if Theo Jansen is more Dr Frankenstein than Dr Dolittle. But remember, this is a man who loves to fool people. It’s no accident his Strandbeests provoke a specific human reaction. “Our eyes are sensitive to animal movement, because an animal could be something to run away from or something to eat,” he explains. “But still you see just a bunch of tubes. That contradiction somehow throws off a switch in our brain and we are surprised at what we see. “You can see my beasts are fairytales,” Jansen continues, smiling. “But everything I talk about is based on reality. I like to sketch a world that is not real, but that people believe in.” VL Theo Jansen. Amazing Creatures runs through 24 January, 2019, at the Espacio Fundación Telefónica in Quito, Ecuador. espacio. fundaciontelefonica.com.ec; strandbeest.com

“We need the balance between imagination and reality to make life bearable”

Jan/Feb 2019

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A Renaissance-era rotunda came with the house in Woodstock, New York, now owned by photographer Martyn Thompson.

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DESIGN

Martyn Thompson The Australian photographer trades the bustle of Manhattan for Woodstock, the tranquil mountain hamlet made famous during the Summer of Love. By Annemarie Kiely Photographed by Martyn Thompson

Jan/Feb 2019

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VLife Thompson outside his multi-purpose Woodstock studio.

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he magical, mystical, multi-faceted Martyn Thompson is taking breakfast in a Collingwood cafe and recounting how he came to own a garden in the Catskills wilds of upstate New York. Divulging its charms from the long distance of Melbourne, where the National Gallery of Victoria recently invited him to compete in their triennial Rigg Design prize, the expat Aussie photographer effuses about the “openness” of Australia’s southern city and his want to spend more time working there. This desire, explains Thompson — who is famous for investing imagery and interiors with an emotional resonance — is both a function of his age and lack of family moorings in Manhattan, where he has lived for the last two decades. “New York started drumming into me that it was not my place,” he says. “Suddenly, I didn’t feel rooted in anything. I was grinding away in a city with a changing culture I wasn’t relating to anymore and wondering why.” Speaking with a weariness that belies his workaholic nature, Thompson informs that his antidote to this alienation was to take the two-and-a-half-hour bus trip from New York City to visit friends in Woodstock. It is the mountain enclave made legend in 1969, when it hosted three days of peace and music, marketed as An Aquarius Exposition. “There was something about this town that reminded me of Barlaston, the little village near Stoke-on-Trent in England, where my grandparents lived in a black-tarred house,” says London-born Thompson. “I think I was searching for some deeper connection and could feel it in this place; a deeply earthed

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spot where billionaires and blue-collar workers shared hippie sympathies.” Idealising himself as a commune dweller subsisting on the toil of soil, Thompson recalls doing the rounds of co-op-type properties with a real estate agent who advised that winter snows made it tough to plough out in certain parts. “But I don’t even drive,” he says in shrill repeat of his response to the agent’s remark. “I asked if a taxi could get me out, to which she politely replied that we should look at something closer to town.” Laughing at his naivety, Thompson says that he was then returned to the village and toured through the home of an artist — a century-old abode with ramshackle plan, proportions and ceiling pitches and a garden in which wild nature had trumped the conceit of man. “Within three days I had signed the contract of sale.” On possession of the property, Thompson blacked out the building’s exterior with Barlaston-like pitch and dissolved the rambling interiors in Farrow & Ball’s Pigeon grey paint. He also laid a ring of logs around the garden’s rotunda (a Renaissance relic from Italy), to contain the wild growth. But for one who affects the air of a woodland satyr, this circle pulses with the magic of pagan ceremony — the sort that might sacrifice a virgin under a blood red moon. “Oh, you won’t find any in Woodstock,” roars Thompson, reminding that these are Summer of Love lands. He is seeking a sense of nature ringed with myths in creaking canopies of trees that open, grow and fade over beds of Black-eyed Susan, peony and weed — “all with their own charm”. But he concedes little knowledge of horticulture, admitting that he shoulder-tapped an ex-boyfriend’s botanically savvy mother, Maureen Drury, to instruct in the ‘why’ of plants. “Within one season they were flourishing,” he says. “It was absolutely amazing to observe that first cycle of nature, the way plants willfully transport themselves and regenerate regardless of the best-laid plans. In the three years that I’ve had the garden, I’ve lost all fear of dying.” Luxuriating in the therapeutic properties of his patch — a quality he is keen to explore in wider work — Thompson extended his house into a wire-veiled outdoor room for deeper immersion in landscape. “It is where I take photos, where I eat and where I think,” he says of its sanctuary. “I am there a lot, sitting, working, looking, centering and drawing emotional comfort.” As a self-declared Aquarian, living in the Age of Aquarius in a patch that famously staged the Aquarius Exposition nearly 50 years ago, Thompson thrills to the astrological rightness of it all. “It was written in the stars.” VL martynthompsonstudio.com @martynthompsonstudio


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Wild blooms plucked from the garden stoke Thompson’s inspiration.


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s an aspiring aesthete and latent Francophile, one of the most unforgettable memories from my younger, globetrotting days was arriving at the Hotel Costes in Paris in the summer of 1997. It was the era of minimalism: fashion-wise, the heyday of Prada and Jil Sander — think Tilda Swinton in I Am Love — and the cleanlined interiors of Philippe Starck, Andrée Putman and Christian Liaigre. (Even Anouska Hempel, queen of the ‘boutique’ hotel, was abandoning the extravagance of Blakes for her new, white brand of Zen at The Hempel.) Passing through the front doors of the Costes, however, was an altogether different experience. As my eyes adjusted to the low-lit interior, I was immersed in the buttoned and bullion-fringed world of Napoleon III. A series of small but opulent salons and conservatory-like galleries exuded personal style as they wrapped around a Neo-Renaissance courtyard. The cool tunes of emerging French DJs were played in this courtyard for which, among a plethora of other attributes, the establishment became internationally renowned. I didn’t know it at the time but I’d just had my first beguiling brush with the work of French architect and interior designer Jacques Garcia. His illustrious career was already decades long but the Costes was a seminal project. Not only had he taken Napoleon III, what is essentially a French version of high Victorian, and made it sexy and cool, his opulent crafting of its interiors sparked a style revolution that has reverberated across the design of luxury hotels, restaurants and private homes ever since. Steeped in the French tradition, Garcia’s aesthetic moves back and forth between the evolving grandeur of the 18th century (he is the go-to person when the furniture needs to be rearranged at Versailles) and the Belle Époque. His sophisticated palette, of course, involves forays into the exotic. One example is the ancient world, as evidenced in his recent restoration of the Pompeii-inspired Villa Astor on the Amalfi Coast. Another is Orientalism, at Paris’s opium den-like Maison Souquet — touted as the most romantic hotel in the world — and in his redesign of the iconic La Mamounia in Marrakech. There are even pared back (for Garcia) touches of Art Deco and ’30s modern at the NoMad Hotel in New York, and another version, albeit more Italian, at its recently opened sister property in Los Angeles. The most typical version of Garcia’s eclectically cultivated style, R I G HT French however, usually architect and interior designer Jacques Garcia embraces, in varying with his mother, Jeanne measures, all Garcia, and their dogs of the above. ›› Olymph and Leon.

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VLife ICONIC STYLE

Jacques Garcia With a penchant for the ORNATE and OPULENT, this FRENCH architect and designer embraces the GRANDEUR of the past. By Jason Mowen Portrait photographed by Nigel Dickinson

Jan/Feb 2019

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ther recent projects include his first London hotel, L’oscar, a tribute to Oscar Wilde; hotel Selman Marrakech; and his reworking of Monte Carlo grand dame the Hotel Metropole where, according to Garcia, the “rocker and the duchess” are thrown together. And then there’s the legendary brasserie Le Fouquet’s — home of the César Awards gala dinner — and Hotel Barrière Le Fouquet’s, on the Champs-Elysées, neither of which required much work as Garcia had ‘done’ them before. “Interiors are similar to human beings,” he says. “The better they are, the less we need to touch them.” The ‘personal style’ of the Costes is a running theme throughout Garcia’s oeuvre but two projects seem especially close to the designer’s heart: Château du Champ de Bataille, the grand 17th-century country house he bought in a state of virtual ruin in 1992, now so lovingly restored it gives Vaux-leVicomte a run for its money; and his more recently developed and self-named ‘resort’ in Noto, Sicily. The château is Garcia’s masterpiece. Rarely, if ever, is the restoration of so extensive a historic property done with such passion and finesse, including his complete rehabilitation of the garden, according to original sketches attributed to King Louis XIV’s landscape architect André Le Nôtre. There is, of course, a twist: the garden hides an exquisite Mogul Empire folly — an entire second, pavilionlike palace made up of a multitude of architectural components, some from 16th- and 17th-century temples that Garcia salvaged in the years following an earthquake in Rajasthan. Noto, on the other hand, is lighter and quintessentially Mediterranean, albeit ever so slightly more erudite — and always romantic, à la Garcia. The great news is it’s available to rent, and sure to elicit the same wonderment as the Costes, all those years ago. VL studiojacquesgarcia.com @jacquesgarciaofficiel

PH OTO GR A PHE R : B E NO IT LIN E R O ( N OMAD HOT E L )

Château du Champ de Bataille in the upper Normandy region of France. The NoMad Hotel in downtown Los Angeles. Selman Marrakech.

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Minimalism reigns supreme with the exclusive LG SIGNATURE line. Design your home around your distinguished lifestyle with televisions, refrigerators and washers that stand out by blending into almost any interior space. Make your space a reflection of your style with LG SIGNATURE.

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DESIGN

VLife

Royal Copenhagen A curated collection of the beloved Danish porcelain maker’s HANDCRAFTED pieces is now available in Australia. By Verity Magdalino

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t makes sense that Copenhagen, one of the happiest cities in the world, is also the source of some of the most renowned feel-good designs. Porcelain maker Royal Copenhagen is a leading light in Denmark’s long history of design perfection — and it’s now available in Australia. The basics For lovers of heritage, hygge and all things Danish, Royal Copenhagen is the ultimate in handcrafted porcelain. Founded by Denmark’s Queen Juliane Marie around the same time Captain Cook was traversing Botany Bay, the 244-year-old company is officially setting up shop in Australia — thanks to a new partnership with department store David Jones.

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lia? Apparently Australians than most about Danish Blame our love affair with dernist furniture and lighting (thank you Arne Jacobsen and Poul Henningsen), Australian girl-next-door turned Crown Princess Mary of Denmark, or Jørn Utzon and his Opera House. “There’s no one in the world who doesn’t know that one building,” says Tom Nørring, Denmark’s ambassador to Australia. “That in itself is a good platform for Australians to understand Danish design, which is centred on simplicity but also sophistication.” A Danish love affair Prized by collectors across the globe, Royal Copenhagen is as intrinsic to Danish culture as Uluru is synonymous with Australia. Niels Bastrup, creative director of Royal Copenhagen, says affection runs high for the pieces on home ground. “Either you’ve seen it at your grandmother’s home or maybe your mother handed it down to the next generation who loves it. It is something that we, as Danes, are very familiar with.” What makes it unique? The craftsperson who’s painted each piece has also signed it. “You don’t just buy a piece of Royal Copenhagen. “It’s an investment, something you really cherish. You use it every day and although each piece may look the same, with the same blue colour, you’ll find individual nuances. You’re buying something with a person behind it. It’s not just machine-made.” Happiness in a cup Now instore is a curated collection of original 18th-century designs, including the famous Blue Fluted Plain. “It’s the very first pattern we produced back in 1775, when Europeans first cracked how to produce porcelain,” says Bastrup. “Our biggest asset is the loveliness of some of the old Royal Copenhagen products that still fit beautifully with designs we make today.” A new generation A younger fan base is also embracing Royal Copenhagen, says Bastrup. “Instead of buying something for daily use and having something else for special occasions, we’re finding both men and women are collecting at a very early age,” says Bastrup. “They’re buying Royal Copenhagen and daring to use it every day. Like a pair of jeans, it can be dressed up for a party, or it can be very basic and used just for coffee. I think that’s what a lot of people enjoy.” What’s coming next? For the first time ever, Royal Copenhagen will be showing at Milan’s Salone del Mobile in April 2019 to launch a yet-to-be-revealed collaboration with a world-renowned designer. “We strongly believe in keeping the brand relevant,” says Sjoerd Leeflang, vice president of business. “We’ve been here for 244 years but it’s our responsibility that we will also be here in another 244.” VL royalcopenhagen.com.au

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F RO M A BOV E L E F T

Niels Bastrup, creative director of Royal Copenhagen. Blue Fluted Mega and Blue Elements plates.


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VLife SHOP

Walk this way How does a Sydney icon reinvigorate itself for the NEXT GENERATION? For David Jones, it starts from the feet up. By Yeong Sassall Photographed by Bowen Anco

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n a city that’s been dug up, redrawn and redeveloped as often as Sydney has, there are few landmarks that have survived to tell their tale. Certainly, in the highly volatile bricks-and-mortar retail market, there’s even less longevity and certainty, which is why David Jones’s celebration of 180 years of trade is such an achievement. And with 91 of those years established at the brand’s beloved Elizabeth Street address, what better way to future-proof one if its most iconic stores than by giving it a grand old facelift? The international interdisciplinary design firm Benoy was granted the mammoth task, and they were acutely aware the job meant tinkering with a living artefact. “David Jones Elizabeth Street is an architectural and social icon of Sydney that holds wonderful memories for countless Australians,” says Benoy director Terence Seah. “Constructed around 1927, David Jones was an architectural and engineering tour de force. Very modern with state-of-the-art vertical transportation systems, it was an extremely robust and well-constructed building that befits one of the most forwardthinking department stores in the world.” Enhancing the customer experience while retaining the spirit of the sprawling, multi-level Sydney CBD store was Benoy’s chief concern, and it began with the introduction of Level 7, an entire floor dedicated to shoes, which was unveiled in last October. “The new luxury shoe world is the beginning of the David Jones transformation,” says Seah. “Once the great restaurant that hosted Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip’s visit to Australia in 1954, we sought to bring back the wow factor with a design that emphasises the seven-metre high ceiling.” Complete with brass-finished stainless steel shelving, gold- and marble-accented display tables and velvet armchairs, the new floor is further

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Level 7, an entire floor dedicated to luxury shoes, is the first of many glamorous new additions to a revamped David Jones Elizabeth Street, Sydney.

highlighted by million-dollar views of Hyde Park and Sydney Harbour, which can be seen through the original arched windows. Welcoming luxury footwear collections from Louis Vuitton, Dior and Chanel for the first time, the formerly underused Level 7 space has been transformed into a naturally well-lit mecca that will happily accommodate even the fussiest shoe aficionado. This glamorous addition to the well-loved shopping haven is the first of many exciting developments for David Jones Elizabeth Street, with the whole project set to even the playing field between DJs and the world’s best department stores. Next up? A champagne bar on the mezzanine above Level 7, and later in 2019, the unveiling of the beauty and accessories floor on Level 1 as well as new and improved womenswear floors across Levels 2, 3 and 4. VL davidjones.com


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F RO M L E F T Vessel lamp (2018) by Joao Manardu; Sweet Down (2018) macarons by Jakos; Oceans (2015) artwork by Moises Esquenazi; Pelican (2018) sculpture by Capri; Scallops (2015) by Tamar Mogendorff; Oracle (2018) mirrors by Kiko Lopez; Apnea (2018) artwork (on floor) by Gabriele Corni; Horse (2015) sculpture by Jürgen Lingl-Rebetez.

“It x

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t bou c i m r e g u s o e n

e n


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VLife PEOPLE

Marjolaine Leray This French interior designer has brought a burst of St Tropez to Sydney’s WOOLLAHRA in the form of Alm, a zesty watermelon-hued shopping haven. By Verity Magdalino Photographed by Dave Wheeler

HA IR & M AKE - UP: GI L LIA N C AMP B EL L

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t’s a kind of love story, the way I found Sydney,” says Marjolaine Leray, the French-born owner of Alm, Sydney’s newest and arguably most colourful destination for inspirational one-off art and homewares. “My daughter wanted to study here and after visiting I fell in love with the city.” It wasn’t too long after that initial visit that Leray took a lease on a retail space in leafy Woollahra, had it painted watermelon pink — a reference to the Wes Anderson film The Grand Budapest Hotel — and moved, along with her daughter, from her home in the South of France. She’s now on the lookout to buy a house in the neighbourhood surrounding the store, which first opened its doors last August. An ex-art gallery owner and investment bankerturned-interior designer, Leray says her foray into interiors started almost by chance. “I studied forestry and wildlife, then mechanical engineering,” she says. “I looked for a job and couldn’t find one so did an MBA. Then I ran out of money, which is why I went into investment banking. At the same time I had art galleries in Paris and New York. I was always interested in art but I definitely didn’t think I was creative.” After 18 years working in finance Leray made a sea change and moved with her then seven-year-old daughter from Paris to the South of France, back to the village where she grew up. It was here, in the hilltop town of Ramateulle, just a few minutes’ drive from St Tropez, that Leray realised her dream of making a 17th-century chateau her home, restoring its decaying grandeur and transforming the atmospheric cellar, historically used to press olive oil, into her first gallery-meets-retail space in 2005. In the years that followed, Leray’s business organically evolved into three concept spaces, all within walking distance from each other — the original cellar, or Le Pressoir, filled with new and vintage furniture, art and homewares; a pocketsized boutique in the centre of Ramateulle offering smaller objets such as paintings and ceramics, with Leray’s interior design agency housed just next door; and an expansive threestorey, 400-square-metre space, which integrates quirky furnishings and art with a fabric workshop. There’s a sense of provenance, poetry and high-low charm in Leray’s curatorial approach

to retail — from India Mahdavi’s Cap Martin rattan chairs, made just an hour away from Ramateulle, to Piet Hein Eek’s renowned Waste Table in Scrapwood, and Mabeo, a line of bespoke, sustainable furniture by Botswana-based designer Peter Mabeo. “It’s not about a certain pricepoint, luxury materials or designer names,” she says. “It just has to be unique.” Since moving to Sydney and opening a fourth store in her newly adopted home, Leray has also become a champion of Australian art and design. Recently, in Ramateulle, she hosted an exhibition of recent works by Australian artists Alicia Taylor, James King, Kerry Armstrong and Antonia Mrljak. Right now visitors to her Woollahra store can see the surreal photography by Sydney-Melbourne duo Honey Long and Prue Stent. She’s also a fan of designer Trent Jansen, stocking pieces from his limited-edition Broached Monsters collection now on show at the National Gallery of Victoria. “He’s truly wonderful,” says Leray. “I mentioned him to [the Milanese gallerist] Rossana Orlandi and I’m hoping for both of them that his work will be shown in Milan in 2019.” Back in her French hometown, Leray has quietly and humbly built up an impressive international design business with projects spanning restaurants, stores and private homes in France, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the UK and the US. Here in Australia she says her focus will be mostly to source unique objets, furnishings and art — including her own creations, such as repurposed mirrors, furniture and textiles — for the local interiors industry. “I’m also thinking of introducing fashion to the store, which I’ve not done before. I’m in love with the work of a designer called Adjara, and also Franck Sorbier,” she says, referencing one of the few independent couturiers in Paris whose latest collection was made entirely from plantderived materials. “His work is original, he goes beyond his comfort zone and is an environmental activist in his own way. He heckles traditional rules and adds a little humour in a universe of poetry.” Not unlike the talented Leray herself. VL Alm, 84 Queen Street, Woollahra. studioalm.com @studio.alm Jan/Feb 2019

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VLife DESIGN

Darn right A love of experimentation and a unique approach to colour informs the work of Dutch design studio Scholten & Baijings. Vogue Living speaks with studio cofounder Carole Baijings on the duo’s latest project. By Verity Magdalino Photographed by Inga Powilleit

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ur focus on colour started as a sort of surprise,” says Carole Baijings, one half of design duo Scholten & Baijings. The Dutch practice is celebrated for an oeuvre that spans concept cars for BMW, porcelain for Japanese firm Arita and, most recently, a line of modular furniture for Herman Miller and a new textile range for US-based textiles company Maharam. Baijings and her partner in design and life, Stefan Scholten, launched their practice in 2000; since then, the Amsterdam-based couple has built a reputation for a highly individual take on colour. It’s a signature that began with a failed textile sample, which, after compliments from friends, was developed into a blanket that today remains a bestseller. “It taught us that something that in our eyes was a total failure could, in another context, be a great success,” says Baijings. The pair’s flair for hands-on experimentation is captured in their latest collaboration with Maharam, a heritageinspired range of three individual fabric designs and the duo’s fourth collection for the company. Here, Baijings describes her inspiration. Our new textile collection is based on Dutch darning samplers from the 17th century. Mary Murphy, the vice president of design for Maharam, knows Dutch culture very well. She suggested we look at our own textile history and in particular, darning samplers. It’s a Dutch tradition, used as a teaching tool to help young girls learn how to sew. Some are elaborate works showing the methods of repair on various fabrics using different yarn types and colours. They eventually became like works of art and are now bought by collectors and museums in Japan and America. It’s important to us to create new forms that you cannot possibly design on a computer. We mix our own formulas, make our own materials and even colours that are just right, and not just chosen from Pantone. If we send a Pantone colour to a manufacturer then they don’t use their own knowledge anymore — and we need them to really create the colour we’re aiming for.

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F RO M TO P

a co p Baij A g Sampler Large, one of the duo’s newest textile designs for Maharam, shown on B&B Italia’s Andy ’13 sofa.

small leaves in different colours and connected them so it feels like a fabric. It’s a sustainable material — made from rice and corn — so, like leaves in nature, it will eventually dissolve. Our Dutch heritage has really influenced the way we work… from artists such as Mondrian, Van Gogh and Rembrandt to the way our country is so flat with linear landscapes and horizons. It mirrors the characteristics of Dutch design, which is very minimal but also experimental, innovative, unconventional with a sense of humour. That’s in our DNA — although sometimes our work is described as being quite un-Dutch. I think maybe in the layering and detailing and the way we work, almost like an artist, but still working with industry. In our opinion it’s extremely important to work with industry — that’s where the greatest restrictions lie but also the greatest opportunities. VL scholtenbaijings.com @scholtenbaijings livingedge.com.au


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Speakers announced at:

CNILuxury.com

10-11 April 2019 • Cape Town, South Africa

THE PREMIER EVENT FOR LUXURY LEADERS

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Decision-makers, innovators, and creatives will all converge on Cape Town to discuss the topics that matter for the global luxury and fashion industry.

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The conference programme will explore what “luxury” really means to consumers, sustainable consumerism, and how brands can maintain relevance in a world of constant change.

• Exploring Afrocentric luxury

• Defining “luxury” in an environment of constant change • Conscious consumerism and sustainable luxury • The power, value and potential of the African continent • What the evolution of the digital world means for the luxury industry

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VLiving

PH OTO GR A PHE R : VAL E NT IN A SOM MA RI VA

homes

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T H I S PAGE OPPOSITE PAGE

A newarch


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in the ‘transept’ of the Latin cross floor plan, Up5_6 armchair and Up7 foot, both by Gaetano Pesce for B&B Italia; Naviglio pendant lamps by Piero Lissoni for Boffi. O PPO S IT E PAGE in the dining area, table by Marina Home Interiors; vintage Tulip chairs by Eero Saarinen and Verner Panton chairs; limestone bowl by Renzo Buttazzo; glass bowl by Massimo Maci; on the floor, Yang Touch lamp for Artemide. T HIS PAGE


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In the living area, Tufty-Time sofas by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia; vintage Soriana chairs by Afra and Tobia Scarpa for Cassina; vintage Demetrio side tables by Vico Magistretti for Artemide.


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he search for a small holiday home in Puglia, Italy, was scratched at the sight of a multifaceted former tobacco factory with Gothic-like interiors. Italian diplomat Giovanni Favilli and his Vietnamese wife, Giang, were looking for a modest retreat for their family of five when they got a tip-off from a friend. “I’d read about Salento — that you could find charming and well-priced places compared to Tuscany,” says Giovanni. The couple felt the 400-square-metre property at Masseria Diso farm was too good an opportunity to miss. A low-rise, rectangular stone building at the end of an avenue of tall Mediterranean pines, its front walls are sun-bleached peachy pink featuring faded signage that gives away its previous life. Originally built in the 1930s under the Mussolini administration, the tobacco factory once housed around 100 mostly female workers. It later became the temporary residence for Polish soldiers and Italian insurgents during World War II, before being used as an agricultural distribution warehouse in the 1960s. The Favilli family’s home life has been almost as diverse: Giovanni’s diplomatic engagements have meant that he, Giang and their three children, Alessandro, 12, Lila, 10, and Anna, 8, have moved house every four to eight years. For this particular move, a renovation was needed to make the place habitable for the family, though particular care was taken to retain its original character. “The idea was to keep as much as possible of the building’s industrial look,” says architect Raffaele Centonze, “combining it to create a relaxed, open plan with a design-imprinted interior.” To this end, the original shell of the building was retained but its timber doors and window frames were replaced with metal and glass to reference its industrial past (rather than its rural present). Behind these oversize doors is an expansive white space, open but for a series of areas assigned by thick square columns connected by 36 star-shaped ribbed vaults and arches. Looking through it, the structure appears as a surreal white forest, echoing the real arching trees that lead to the front door, but the architecture most accurately

resembles a church. Indeed, architect Centonze christened the project ‘La Grande Chiesa’ or ‘The Big Church’. Even the floor plan has a cathedral’s traditional Latin cross shape, with naves, transept and apse, around which lie the six ensuite bathrooms. The scale of the place is amplified by a monastic interior of white paint and stone floors. “We wanted an open, light and uncluttered home, which is kept at its most simple,” says owner Giovanni, quoting Leonardo da Vinci: “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” White forest, big church — Masseria Diso is also compared to an Italian piazza by both the architect and the lady of the house. “And just like in a large piazza, the children are always tempted to run around it,” says Giang with a smile. Centonze explains that the open space, with its arches and vaults, determines the public meeting point, while each room and suite that leads away from this hub promises privacy. This idea that the building’s architecture graciously paves the way is echoed in one of the most notable structural changes; the opening of the back wall onto a newly built pool. Inspired by architect Renzo Piano and his use of axes, Centonze wanted to create an axis from the gated entrance, towards the front door, continuing in a direct line towards the pool at the end. “The rationale is that it adds a feeling of flow,” he explains, “and creates lines of light in the space.” Filling the light-filled space is an eclectic mix of mid-20thcentury furniture, family heirlooms and contemporary designs, along with Giovanni’s collection of vintage design pieces and miniature car models, what Giang calls “Dad’s untouchable toys”. The vintage of their home is just as significant. There is something in this building’s quiet juxtapositions: its humble, rural exterior in contrast to the grander interior for instance. “We wanted to keep the soul of the building,” says Giovanni. “We wanted to preserve its architectural imprint and add a contemporary feel to the tobacco factory without forgetting its past.” The result is bound to entice the Favillis to stay a little longer at this home. VL raffaelecentonze.it


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T H IS PAGE

O PPO S ITE PAG E


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T HI S PAGE Large metal-framed glass doors reflect the pine trees at the entrance; Ussari Bay lamps from Artplayfactory. O PPO S I T E PAG E in the main bedroom, vintage bed and wardrobe; Tulip chair by Eero Saarinen; vintage Viscontea pendant lamp by Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni for Flos.


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T HIS PAG E in the ensuite bathroom, an electrical cable coming out from the ground floor and hidden within an industrial water pipe now functions as lighting for the bathtub. O PPO S IT E PAGE in the children’s bedroom, two large canopy beds; child’s Eames RAR rocking chair; vintage Efebo stool by Stacy Dukes for Artemide; sculpture by Renzo Buttazzo. Details, last pages.


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Worth the wait

The approach and entry to the Hamptons home of Deborra-lee Furness and Hugh Jackman, a collaboration between Furness, Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects and LaGuardia Design Group landscapers. Details, last pages.

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in the gazebo, linen drapery from Australia’s Hale Mercantile Co. in the pavilion, bespoke built-in sofas by Deborra-lee Furness with Eleanor Donnelly of Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects; upholstery by Upholstery of the Hamptons, in fabric by Holland & Sherry; Furness wears a Bonnie Young navy tunic and an Élu necklace.

TH IS PAGE

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ST YL IST: M ICH AE L FISH E R . MA KE - UP: SA RA H PAT CH. ST Y LI NG A SSISTAN TS: A JA COON , AM B E R SIMI RI G L IA

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f you’re an architect looking to work with Deborra-lee Furness, you’re going to need nerves of steel. “I’m a bit of a perfectionist and a commitment-phobe, which is not a great combination,” she smiles over a grilled chicken salad and a Diet Coke — “my one vice” — at the Kit Kemp-designed Crosby Street Hotel in New York’s SoHo. That suite of personality traits might explain why the East Hampton holiday home that Furness and her husband, Hollywood megastar Hugh Jackman, had bought for the summer months remains in the design phase almost four years on. The couple and their children, Oscar, 18, and Ava, 13, along with pooches Dali and Allegra have all cosied up in the property’s guesthouse instead. “[The main house] has taken so long to build because I keep changing my mind,” confides Furness, who has designed the entire retreat in conjunction with Bridgehampton-based architecture firm Stelle Lomont Rouhani. (She also collaborated closely with the architects on key furnishings and pieces.) “And then we’d travel to Greece or Japan or Morocco, and I would get inspired by my surroundings, so I’d come back and go to the architect and say, ‘I’ve got a great idea!’ And the architect would be like, ‘Oh my God, here she goes again.’” The unexpected upside of Furness’s indecision has been the restoration of the 435-square-metre wooden cabin they’re currently inhabiting. Previously occupied by an artist, it has sat on the land since the 1970s. “I’m a complete modernist, and the shack was tan tiles and a lot of tan wood,” Furness says, “which wasn’t my usual design style.” Still, she conceded it had great bones, so she and Jackman — along with architect Viola Rouhani and interior designer Eleanor Donnelly — decided to honour the shack’s history by going entirely with wood, painting the exterior black and bleaching out wooden floorboards. “I love opposites — I’m very into black and white,” Furness says. “All the interiors are neutral tones and I think the architects were pushing me towards doing the main house black, but it will be white — the Jungian, the yin and the yang.” She adds: “I’m not usually a wood girl — I’m more of a stone girl — but when you transition something completely, what’s the point?” Furness charts her passion for design back to two key influences in her life: her late mother, Fay Duncan — who was awarded an Order of Australia medal for her tireless charity work — and her profession. “We moved 12 times,” recalls the Sydney-born Furness of her peripatetic childhood. “People would say, ‘Is your mother a diplomat?’ And I’d say, ‘No, she just likes to decorate.” ››


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T HIS PAGE , F RO M L E F T in a hallway, woven stool by Sylvester and Co in New York; sculptures by Rogan Gregory; driftwood found by Furness on a mountain in Morocco; walls in bespoke tadelakt finish by Chet Mitrani. Kitchen by Scavolini USA with Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects; By Lassen ML42 oak stools, from Horne. O P PO S ITE PAG E looking into the house from the pool area, sofa by James Perse Furniture; stool by Tina Frey Designs; custom bunk bed arrangement by Deborra-lee Furness with Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects; stairs to bunk beds by Lucas Cowart/Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects; fireplace in tadelakt finish with steel log storage insert by Deborralee Furness with Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects; Berber rug from Morocco.


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THIS PAGE, FROM LEFT in the bathroom, indoor/outdoor shower with pocket Fleetwood door by Deborra-lee Furness with Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects. In the bedroom, custom platform bed with integrated lighting, headboard and night table by Deborra-lee Furness with Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects; bed linen by Hale Mercantile Co; Summit Grande pendant light by Tech Lighting. OPPOSITE PAGE in the bathroom, indoor/outdoor shower by Deborra-lee Furness with Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects; bespoke vanity in Corian and tadelakt finish by Deborra-lee Furness with Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects; towel hooks by Tina Frey Designs.

“I need order because there’s chaos outside and our lives are chaotic, so I like our home lives to be peaceful” DEBORRA LEE FURNESS


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in the bathroom, bespoke vanity in Corian and tadelakt finish by Deborra-lee Furness with Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects; walls in tadelakt finish by Chet Mitrani; tap by Graff. O PPO S I TE PAGE looking out from the dining area to the pool, table and sofa by James Perse Furniture; Fleetwood custom glass wall by Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects; flowers by Ovando, New York. Details, last pages. T HIS PAG E

‹‹ That nomadic upbringing proved a useful precursor for an acting career. “As an actor, I always lived out of a suitcase. Then I married an actor, so we lived on the road. Even when the kids were little and we were both filming, we’d live location to location,” Furness recalls. A sense of permanency proved elusive for the clan until relatively recently, and is the reason why, according to Furness, she likes order in her homes now. “Because I lived on the road and out of suitcases, I could never find anything, so now everything is labelled in my house,” she says. Beyond simply being more practical, she finds it soothing. “I need order because there’s chaos outside and our lives are chaotic, so I like our home lives to be peaceful.” These days the family, who also has homes in Sydney’s Bondi and downtown Manhattan in New York, decamp to their East Hampton shack as much as possible. For Furness, the exclusive beachside enclave — which sits at the east end of New York’s Long Island, and where the likes of Scarlett Johansson, Gwyneth Paltrow and Sarah Jessica Parker also have houses — feels like a spiritual home. She first visited the area in her 20s while studying drama in New York and had a strong sense she would one day have a house there. A summer spent renting the East Hampton home of fashion designer and close friend Donna Karan on the quieter bayside — away from the glitz and glamour of the beachfront — and Furness was sold. So, when two adjoining pieces of land sprawled across half a hectare and overlooking a dramatic bluff became available, the couple jumped at the opportunity. “It’s private. That’s why we love it. I thought, ‘Why isn’t this more popular?’ People don’t want to build there because it’s off the beaten track but that’s what appeals to us.” The main summer home won’t be completed until at least November 2019, but for now, the family is managing in the close quarters just fine. And with just one bedroom and bunk beds in the main living area, they don’t have much choice. “With the small space, I notice Oscar will be on the top bunk bed, Hugh and I will be watching TV, and Ava will be over at the dining table, so we are all in together,” Furness says. “I like the way we dance as a family in this space, as opposed to our New York home, which is three floors and you can just not see each other. Once we started staying in the shack, Hugh was like, ‘Well, why are we even building the main house? I love it here.’ But then in the mornings we’re creeping around trying not to wake up sleeping teenagers, and I’m like, ‘Hugh, this is exactly why we’re building the other house,’” she says, laughing. “As long as I don’t change my mind again.” VL stelleco.com; @stellelomontrouhaniarchitects


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An inimitable creative pair push the boundaries of design and friendship while transforming a former shoe factory in Italy.

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ADD ITI ONA L TE X T: J OAN N E G AMB AL E

By Sara Dal Zotto Photographed by Helenio Barbetta


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In the first-floor living area, sofa from Manuel Gazzola; Margherita rattan armchair (1950) by Franco Albini for Bonacina; marble side table by Giacomo Totti; ’50s glass table by Cesare Lacca; ceramic vase by Cristina Celestino for BottegaNove; artwork (1978) by Alberto Caregnato; rug by Matteo Pala; ’60s velvet bench (foreground).


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two other rooms that were previously part of the factory itself. f it weren’t for a shared love of ’60s music and ’50s furniture, On the ground floor is a large atrium-cum-lounge area from fashion photographer Andrea Maino and his friend, interior which ascends an imposing marble staircase. Three French doors architect Giacomo Totti, might not have survived their with leaded glass — the frames as wavy as the lead’s fish-shaped otherwise impassioned collaboration in northeast Italy. patterns — open onto Maino’s studio, which he uses for both The old journey-destination adage is infinitely more true photographic work and to host events, openings and concerts. for creative souls, so when Maino chose his good friend Totti to help him transform an old shoe factory into his Upstairs is all his own, a living and sleeping area that is no less home, he ensured a roller coaster ride. Says Totti: “Andrea and steadfast in its singularity. I chose all the furnishings and artworks together, and every single “It all aimed at creating a sense of exoticism, with references to piece was a motive for endless dialogues and comparisons, psychedelia, which we both love,” says Totti. “The mix of the sometimes even arguments.” artworks and objects were at the same Maino knew this place was worth time in dialogue and in contrast with fighting for. Built around 1910, it had each other and with the environment.” been restored by a local architect in the There’s a predominance here of Italian ’50s and exemplifies the retro’50s design, space-age shapes on layers industrial aesthetic that characterises of bold rugs, contemporary artworks, Maino’s personal taste. “I’ve been exotic plants and “flowers everywhere”. observing this factory for a long time,” Original structural elements enhance he says. “I knew it had been restored the eccentricity of the decor. Bohemian and that its interiors were wonderful.” French windows are left with the patina After years of negotiations with the of peeling paint, pink marble skirtings previous owners, he was allowed to and architraves rise splendidly from transform a portion of it into his home marble tiled floors. Minimal renovations and art studio. He’s done more than include a bathroom transformed into a that, as it happens. “It’s now also a walk-in wardrobe, and two of the studio for other creative people; the factory’s archive rooms, now the kitchen entire former shoe factory is very and utility space. The light touch of the lively,” he says. “We aim to make it the restoration honours the vintage and soul creative hub of the area.” of the place. GIACOMO TOTTI Indeed, the offbeat backdrop Maino and Totti were keen to showcase local artists; pieces by Lino Bettanin, establishes a creative environment in Alberto Caregnato, Gian Battista itself, partly fuelled by the pair’s mutual Sperotto and Alessandro Trentin can all be found here. But their ideas on mid-century culture and contemporary art, partly by their distinct ones. insatiable appetite for design also saw the pair hunt out highly “The mood of the house was played on contrasts,” says Totti. sought-after pieces by such great masters as Lucio Fontana and Gio “It had to be a dialogue between my taste and Andrea’s, as he Ponti, as well as cult designs signed by Nanda Vigo, Angelo Lelli, has a more harsh and formal aesthetic criteria than me and loves Carlo Hauner and Giuseppe Pagano, to name a few. the dark side of things. My thought was to preserve this dark A collaborative curation verging on obsessive, the collective mood and at the same time to hide it with a sequence of contents of this artfully industrial home and studio represent the conflict and ultimate harmony that happens when great unconventional colours and combinations.” tastes collide. VL The area that encompasses Maino’s home runs over two giacomototti.com @giacomototti levels and is made up of the former factory owner’s apartment plus

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“The mood of the house was played on contrasts... It had to be a DIALOGUE between my taste and Andrea’s as he has a more formal aesthetic criteria”


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Andrea Maino and Giacomo Totti (seated) in the first-floor living area of a former shoe factory in Thiene. On the ’50s bookcase, artworks by David Aaron Angeli, Alessio Tasca and Alberto Caregnato; pink buttoned mixed media work by Alessandro Trentin; Black Flowers collage (on wall) by Donald Baechler; ’50s pendant lamp by Max Ingrand for Fontana Arte.


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In the entrance hall/ lounge area on the ground floor, ’30s Giuseppe Pagano armchairs; Totem pink methacrylate armchair by Rossi Molinari (1968); Meret Oppenheim Traccia silver leaf and gold leaf Bird Leg tables (1939), from Cassina; Plumage vase by Cristina Celestino for BottegaNove; Matteo Pala rug; ’60s floor lamp by Nanda Vigo. Maino’s studio lies beyond the three doors.


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T H IS PAGE in the kitchen, Angelo Lelli for Arredoluce ’50s pendant light; Medea chairs by Vittorio Nobili for Tagliabue Fratelli (1955); ’60s walnut table by Silvio Coppola for Bernini; Nove ceramics. O PPO S ITE PAGE in the dining area, Carrara marble table and Stilnovo chandelier, both circa ’50s; Josef Hoffman for Bieffeplast ’70s vase; ’50s ceramics.


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THI S PAGE

O PP O S ITE PAGE


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from the vestibule into the central living space, PP225 Flag Halyard armchair by Hans J Wegner for PP Møbler, from Cult; black brushed oak B&B Italia cabinet; Man in Overalls artwork (2006) by McLean Edwards; Abstract Forms sculpture (circa ’50s) from Alm. O PPO S ITE PAGE entrance to the stuccoed Spanish mission-style building in Sydney’s Bellevue Hill. Details, last pages. TH IS PAGE

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HA IR & M AKE - UP: A L LISON B OY L E

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here is more than a single story of metamorphosis to be told here. One is that of the home. The other is that of the home’s unsuspecting mistress, who had not entered into this agreement expecting to find a new love. Over the years, plenty have experienced real estate romance; they fall in love at first sight, are swept off their feet, just have to have the home in question. Not so Kim McKay. She was a stranger to the notion of ‘home’ and what it meant when she first viewed the top-floor apartment named in a Spanish mission-style building in Sydney’s Bellevue Hill, and so shrugged contentedly at it as a potential investment. It wasn’t until the engagement of interior designers Juliette Arent and Sarah-Jane Pyke, their excitement at the romance of the architecture, and their enthusiastic sharing of potential aesthetic directions that McKay’s soul began to lift. “I was happy to keep living in my terribly tiny two-bedroom apartment in Bondi,” she

says. “I didn’t know this feeling I have now because I’d never experienced it. If I had I’d have done this thing sooner.” McKay, a PR and marketing entrepreneur, and her husband of 14 years, film executive Karl Wissler, have known a married life of high-flying travel. Among her clients are the Santa Monica and Hawaii tourism boards and lots of upmarket hotels. He frequents the film festivals of Toronto, Berlin, Cannes and Los Angeles. She’s overseas for up to four months of the year, he for three. Hotels make them happy. “Room service is the most wonderful thing in the world — I can’t even!” she says. The motivation to ease off a little on the travel came from Wissler. The search for an investment property was on and off but when he sent her a link to the apartment’s listing while in Australia, she just happened to be sitting with a friend of the property’s real estate agent, in South Africa. Fate? She wasn’t about to get carried away. “We didn’t go in [to the viewing] together as we couldn’t find a park. It wasn’t romantic,” she says. “The Spanish mission ››

KIM MCKAY, HOMEOWNER


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ng area with arland friezes way that leads unroom and A pair of pink dondo lounge el for Moroso fa from Hub; offee table niture; black B&B Italia drys rug; 018) artwork ad; Autumn artwork by kard, from Gallery.


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T H I S PAG E O PPO S IT E PAGE


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“It was a very special property that deserved soft intervention. Keeping all the grace and beauty of it would require a delicate touch” , SARAH JANE PYKE DESIGNER


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‹‹ style was something we’d always loved from our early days staying at the Beverly Hills Hotel, but the offer wasn’t emotional, it was logical. It became romantic as we started to make it a home.” Sydney-based design studio Arent & Pyke came highly recommended. McKay looked at the company’s website “and didn’t hate it. I had no idea about the journey I was about to take,” she says. “Last time I bought furniture shabby chic was a thing”. Confident in their fine-tuned approach, a decade on from their inception, the design duo was exactly what McKay needed. “She was so open from the start,” says Arent, “and she freely admitted she didn’t have a vision for it. They’d never really made a home or built a collection before.” The circa-1928 building has an apartment on each of its four floors. McKay and Wissler found theirs, at the top, relatively untouched but for a ’90s kitchen, still with lots of little quirks including a French-style garland frieze and fluted archways. “It was a very special property that deserved soft intervention,” says Pyke.

“Keeping all the grace and beauty of it would require a delicate touch. We’ve actually intervened quite a lot, and yet it feels modest.” Those interventions include a new fireplace, removal of a wall and the addition of a large arched opening between the kitchen and sitting room, in keeping with the others but for its glass cavity sliding doors. Otherwise the floor plan, it was agreed, worked well already, and Arent & Pyke’s design aids the progression of volumes from the classic vestibule to the central living space with its vaulted ceiling (which conceals all the room’s lighting) through to the dining room — a sunroom that’s like a box seat to the theatre that is Sydney’s picturesque harbour. Wings either side take this home beyond typical apartment living. One side is a grand master of walk-in wardrobe, large ensuite, yoga studio and bedroom replete with a “princess and the pea bed” requested by McKay, and the other is for guests and gathering. Both Arent and Pyke have an affinity with this style of home after living in 1930s apartments in Darling Point, Edgecliff and Double


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Bay for years. Their reaction to this one centred around the charm and Parisian style of its heritage details and elevated appointment. “We’ve always used an eclectic mix of styles,” explains Pyke, “but the French decorative style has also always been about mixing eras and antiques and chinoiserie. The mix also means clients can keep adding to it and not have to worry, ‘Does this match… ?’” It was during the curation of this “mix” that McKay’s metamorphosis began. Initial briefs had reflected mostly on her hotel obsession: she needed “an abundance of the little things — to never run out of fluffy towels, and a hair dryer in a cabinet that’s always plugged in”. Now she was obsessing over tiles and textiles, for the first time in her life. “How much her eyes have been opened,” Arent marvels. “Some people don’t know the transformative power of an interior. Until you’re in it: that’s when you have the heart moment.” She agonised over every choice they brought to the table. “Every day in my work I make a million decisions and make them quickly...

but to figure out what I liked and didn’t like took a long time.” After years of hardly noticing art she was “open to learning” and going to all the galleries. Says Arent: “We’ve received so many emails saying, ‘You’ve transformed the way I feel about it all.’” McKay says she’s fallen in love with art and beautiful things, and she’s fallen in love with the whole notion of ‘home’. “I was in Sydney from May to September,” she says, just moments after arriving TH I S PAGE in the bedroom, bedhead by CK Upholsterers; back from LA (while making her Society bed linen, from mandatory homecoming cup of tea). Ondene; Caravane bed linen, “That’s a bit of a record.” from Montmartre Store. Gubi Wissler is around more, too. “Our Bestlite BL6 lamp; Dulux Hildegard paint. O PPO SITE work had taken us away from each PAGE in the ensuite, Melange other but this home has brought us Pill Form sconce by Kelly back together. There’s nowhere else Wearstler; Turkish Bathing we’d rather be.” VL Women artwork by David Hamilton. Details, last pages. arentpyke.com @arentpykestudio


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Scene change Pared-back mise en scènes let the location provide the drama in an Italian actor’s AEOLIAN ISLAND getaway. Photographed by Valentina Sommariva Written & produced by Barbara Vergnano


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a Caltagirone designer ble designed by ippe Starck.

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I

t figures that the holiday home of Italian actor Luca Barbareschi and his interior designer wife, Elena Monorchio, is likened to a theatrical production. Located on the Aeolian island of Filicudi, geographically near yet distinctly removed from Sicily, the combined houses on the couple’s property tell a story of historical and local intrigue, set against a cinematic backdrop. Throughout Monorchio has created areas of mise en scène, but never to the point of upstaging. “I was careful to show off the scenography as discreetly as possible,” she says, “because here nature is the real protagonist.” Monorchio’s mind was full of theatrics when she arrived in Filicudi to project-manage the interiors of their newly renovated house. She and Barbareschi had just completed “the most exhilarating and emotion-packed experience of [her] life” — the five-month restoration of Rome’s Eliseo theatres, which the couple have bought after four years of management. Despite Barbareschi’s associations with celluloid (he starred in the notorious 1980 horror film Cannibal Holocaust and is producing an upcoming Roman Polanski film), he has spent his life on stage. He played Salieri in Polanski’s stage version of Amadeus in Milan, and just finished portraying Cyrano de Bergerac at his newly acquired Eliseo theatre. Between productions (he also owns a multimedia company), Barbareschi has frequented Filicudi for 30 years, with his first wife and their three daughters, and now with Monorchio and their children, Maddalena, 8, and Francesco, 6. The island and its traditional cubetti homes — modular cubes of local stone — have long been a source of fascination for the actor, and he managed to buy a group of three cubettis 13 years ago. ››


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in th beds. O P P O SI T E by Elena Mon carts as chair family heirlo pendan

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PAGE F ROM TOP


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norchio has them which has been ation for a large rge and the long a and sky. tre stage. The sea rom green to blue and wild, roughly ilt for the passage ful, as are capers, atic explosion of en have come to — albeit creative re they are based. ng changes,” says ives but also the alising. It’s a very m of this hidden weekend.” e orchestra begins an idyllic scene… Bravo! VL teatroeliseo.com deliverhome.org


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Chinese headb on

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“I was careful to show off the scenography as discreetly as


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possible because here nature is the real protagonist”

ELENA MONORCHIO


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Australia’s supermodel

ADUT AKECH takes us home for the holidays

shine T H E C E L E B R AT I O N I S S U E ON SALE NOW


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travel restaurants

VList

PH OTO GR A PHE R : J AM E S H ARVE Y KE L LY

The hot springs of Saturnia are just one of the highlights of designers Tamsin Johnson and Lucy Folk’s guide to Tuscany. See page 146 for the full story.

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T R AV E L

Under the Tuscan sun

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Tamsin Johnson and Lucy Folk at their Tuscan holiday villa, the former Convento di San Francesco. O PPO S ITE PAG E The villa’s 18-metre pool and surrounding gardens.

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eptember is the perfect time to visit Tuscany,” says interior designer Tamsin Johnson, who, with her longtime friend and creative collaborator, accessories designer Lucy Folk, took time out from recent work trips spanning London, Paris and Morocco to holiday with friends and family in the Italian locale famed for its idyllic rolling landscape, heritage hilltop villages and insanely good food and wine. “Tuscany is about spending quality time with dear friends and eating our way through the day,” says Folk. “Tam and I love to challenge each other creatively and talk business while drinking spritzes, making pasta and walking through the historic towns of Tuscany. It’s the ultimate work-life balance.” Here, the creative duo share their favourite finds from this quintessential of Italian regions. S LE E P IN TH E V I LL A OF YO UR D R EA MS

Ex Convento di San Francesco We were lucky enough to stay at a restored convent just outside the town of Pitigliano. One of the most beautiful villas we’ve ever seen, it was a monastery for monks until 1910. Mother-daughter design team Holly Lueders and Venetia Sacret Young transformed the interior in 2005, introducing special touches such as handpainted walls and carefully curated furniture. You can feel how much love has been injected into the interiors, and it’s beyond charming. exconventodisanfrancesco.com

VList SH OP A NTI QUES IN A M EDIE VAL V IL LAGE

Perched atop dramatic cliffs, Sorano is a small medieval village and on the outskirts are antique shops filled with ceramics, art and furniture. Casa Antica di Becagli Alessandro was a favourite — we found an amazing wall sconce and an abstract still-life painting. Rich in history and visually stunning, this town was a highlight of the trip. Casa Antica di Becagli Alessandro, Piazza Municipio 27, 58010 Sorano Pitigliano One of the most incredible towns we have ever visited, Pitigliano sits high up on an ancient plateau and appears as if it were carved from the rocky outcrop. Surrounded by cascading green hills and hidden caves, it’s located only 10 minutes from our villa and for one week was our local town. Providores from the area sell meats, cheese and wines and craftspeople peddle hand-woven wares. On our stay we got to know the wine and fresh pasta store very well. Pitigliano’s beautiful at any time but truly magic at night when illuminated by spotlights. 58017 Province of Grosseto E AT FR ESH F ROM THE FAR M

L’Ottava Rima A fantastic little restaurant with a cave-like feel, L’Ottava Rima specialises in seasonal and regional produce with farm-to-table principles. The menu is small but the flavours are powerful. The service is very friendly and the staff are happy to recommend good local wines and explain where all of the produce is sourced. cantinaottavarima.com

IND U L G E LI KE A L O C A L TH I S PAGE

At Agriturismo Aia del Tufo, an organic farmstay and restaurant in San Valentino, visitors can stroll among the animals and pick their own fruit and vegetables. O P PO SI TE PAGE

inside the atmospheric Ex Convento di San Francesco near Pitigliano.

Cascate del Mulino hot springs Fed by 37.5-degrees Celsius water, these natural, pale-blue springs in the Maremma region of Tuscany cascade down the hills in a series of waterfalls. It’s a scene straight out of a Massimo Vitali photograph: very local and very entertaining. Via della Follonata, 58014 Saturnia Agriturismo Aia del Tufo An organic farmhouse stay with an incredible farm-to-table restaurant. On our visit we frolicked in the fields and picked vegetables, which we then ate in the restaurant for lunch. aiadeltufo.com

Trattoria Il Nibbio A family-run restaurant, Il Nibbio grills everything on hot stones, which makes the food incredibly delicious. We recommend the tagliata [sliced steak]. ristoranteilnibbio.it DISCO VER THE PA RK OF THE MO NSTER S AND THE BIRTH PL ACE OF ARTE POV ER A

Gardens of Bomarzo Known locally as the Park of the Monsters, this 16th-century garden in the town of Bomarzo just outside the borders of Tuscany sits in a valley close to the castle of Orsini. Huge, stone monster-like sculptures are dotted throughout the park. Commissioned by Prince Pier Francesco Orsini, it’s believed the gardens were designed to help the prince cope with his grief after his wife’s death. The detail and scale in each sculpture is dramatic. It’s places like this that lend inspiration to many things, whether it’s jewellery collections, shapes, lines, anything. Località Giardino, 01020 Bomarzo Res Antiqva Just a hop and a skip from Pitigliano, this farmhouse estate is the birthplace of the Arte Povera movement of the early 20th century. It also produces 100 per cent organic extra virgin olive oil. We’ve never had olive oil as good as this. Unfiltered and single-origin, it’s best used raw to taste the richness. resantiqva.com/home-eng VL tamsinjohnson.com @tamsinjohnson lucyfolk.com @lucyfolk Jan/Feb 2019

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VList FROM R IG H T

Designers and friends Lucy Folk and Tamsin Johnson enjoy a long lunch in the gardens of Ex Convento di San Francesco. Dinner is made with local produce from the nearby village of Pitigliano.

T H I S PAGE , C LO C K W I S E F RO M ABOV E L E F T

pasta shopping in Pitigliano. A bathroom in the Ex Convento di San Francesco. Tamsin Johnson poolside with her family, including husband Patrick Johnson. Inside the holiday villa. Lucy in the Gardens of Bomarzo. OP PO S I T E PAG E Tamsin and Lucy share some downtime by the pool.


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“Tuscany is about spending quality time with dear friends and EATING OUR WAY through the day” LUCY FOLK

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By Anna Delprat

Having pioneered the ‘shop the home’ concept, the woman behind The Apartment has now turned her eye to a homestay in Copenhagen.

Danish delight

T R AV E L

In the central room, of Tina Seidenfaden Busck’s The Apartment accommodation in Copenhagen, Cassina Carimate chairs by Vico Magistretti; Long table by Muller Van Severen; vintage oriental kilim rug; vintage Picasso exhibition poster; CristaSeya aubergine sculpture by Giacomo Alessi; and patchwork elephant sculpture by Jessica Ogden and Lee Benjamin, all from The Apartment. Details, last pages.

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J

ust when you think you have Scandinavian style down pat, Tina Seidenfaden Busck comes along to change your perception. She imbues her own distinctive version of Danish design with bold colour, tactile pattern and a touch of folk sensibility. Her vision is a kaleidoscopic collection of juxtaposed design and her philosophy is intensely personal — a true curator if ever there was one. With a discerning eye and an illustrious career at galleries including Andersen’s Contemporary and auction house Sotheby’s behind her, Seidenfaden Busck founded The Apartment in Copenhagen in 2011. Her ‘shop the home’ concept of carefully curated art, design and furniture was a revolution in retail — much admired, and emulated, worldwide. Always innovating, Seidenfaden Busck’s most recent project, an accommodation concept two floors up from the store that started it all, offers two bedrooms, both complete with English 19th-century iron beds, a central sunny space overlooking the canal, drawing room with a selection of books to peruse, colourful kitchenette, and bathroom clad in swirly green Swedish marble. Seidenfaden Busck and her family reside on the level between the gallery store and accommodation in the 1750 building in the historic district of Christianshavn. “My husband’s family has been based in this building for two generations,” she says. “I like the diversity, from the infamous Freetown Christiania to top restaurants such as Noma, Christianshavn is like its own village within the city.” This diversity ››

“I believe that my aesthetic expression derives from mixing MATERIALS, tactility, colours, periods and places of origin” 156

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in daybed 755 b Aalto; vint Apartmen Seidenfaden Bu in Sweden. The the canal and TH IS PAGE


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VList TH IS PAG E vintage sideboard; Flos Snoopy lamp by Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni; Carl Auböck bookend; and vintage French vase, all from The Apartment; Untitled (2017) artwork by Nathalie du Pasquier from Pace Gallery. OP PO SITE PAG E in the kitchenette, vintage painted Alvar Aalto chairs; Københavns Møbelsnedkeri shelving; vintage table lamp and vintage Beni Ourain rug from The Apartment; Green Light (2017) sculpture by Olafur Eliasson.

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T HIS PAG E in the bedroom, rattan armchair 311 by Josef Frank from Svenskt Tenn; stool by Piet Hein Eek; Azucena Monchella floor lamp from The Apartment; Willow wallpaper by Marthe Armitage. O P P O SI T E PAGE in the living room, patchwork armchair from The Apartment; Polka Square wallpaper by Farrow & Ball; rug by Märta MååsFjetterström; artworks by Karin Mamma Andersson and Georg Baselitz; masks by Jan S Hansen.

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‹‹ is also reflected in the designer’s covetable collection, which mainly features European design from the 1920s to ’70s. From Danish classics to ’60s Italian to current-day pieces by Ilse Crawford, it’s all skillfully arranged to feel effortlessly cohesive. Regulations make it challenging to renovate and modernise in a building of this heritage, but such charms are what Seidenfaden Busck is drawn to. The floor slopes somewhat — fitting, given the houseboats that line the canal below — and each window is a slightly different size. This deeply personal style of accommodation offers the intimacy and exclusivity that a hotel chain cannot match. Every design choice is considered to

create an aesthetic nirvana — “by mixing differing mediums of art, colour, tapestries and textiles, as well as contemporary and vintage design pieces, I have strived for luxurious at-home comfort to create a restorative stay,” Seidenfaden Busck says. From a green Flos Snoopy lamp to a candy-striped daybed, every element is vibrant and soulful but meticulously edited. “I believe that my aesthetic expression derives from mixing materials, tactility, colours, periods and places of origin,” she says. “At the end of the day that’s what I find interesting to create.” With much of her inspiration from the art world, not surprising given her former career, her private art collection is on display, from ››


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F ROM R I GH T in the bedroom, Old Man’s Beard wallpaper by Marthe Armitage; vintage Moroccan runner from The Apartment. In the smaller bathroom, vintage brass mirror and Japanese Kokeshi dolls from The Apartment; Tapet-Cafe Painted Stripe wallpaper in Orange/Noir by Helene Blanche. Details, last pages.

‹‹ contemporary artists such as Tómas Saraceno and Nathalie du Pasquier to Mexican, Japanese and African folk art — a true maximalist mix. Seidenfaden Busck’s passion is for textiles and pattern. It’s her signature and is evident everywhere you look. “I like the idea of wrapping rooms with colours and patterns, and the warmth and character that this creates before even placing any furniture,” she says. “I’m fascinated by the techniques and craftsmanship behind them.” Wallpapers are varied. There’s the striped paper by Helene Blanche in the smaller bathroom — “it’s one of my favourite rooms… It feels like a jewellery box”. There’s also the dotted pattern in the living area by Farrow & Ball as well as traditional wallcovering in both bedrooms by Marthe Armitage. “The British designer is in her 80s and creates the most elegant hand-drawn designs,” says Seidenfaden Busck. “Such meticulous craftsmanship adds personality.” Textiles used as wall decorations are a trademark technique— her vintage American patchwork quilt collection lines the walls and covers the beds, while an Asafo flag with cotton appliqué, created by the Fante communities of Ghana to represent military groups, features in one of the bedrooms. Seidenfaden Busck also has a soft spot for Japanese textiles: noren curtains made of banana fibre from Okinawa hangs on a wall in the bathroom. The Apartment accommodation is so immaculately appointed it’s almost unbearable to leave. The only solace is that if you do fall in love with something during your stay, you can take it home as a keepsake, as almost everything is available for purchase. VL theapartment.dk @theapartmentdk 162

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A place past the horizon, over the reef. Where clownfish hide, mermaids dive and tequila sunrises are more than just a drink. Daydream Island, reopening April 2019. Book your stay at daydreamisland.com.

reservations@daydreamisland.com | daydreamisland.com


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VISIT magsonline.com.au/vl/m1901vli CALL 1300 656 933 and quote m1901vli


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SOCIAL

HP launch Global tech giant HP is leading a renaissance in 21st-century laptop design with the launch of the world’s first leather-bound convertible PC, the HP Spectre Folio. Sydney’s stylish Beta Bar provided the backdrop for the Australian debut of HP’s newest laptop innovation. Blending luxurious handcrafted leather finishes with the latest smart technology, a key feature of the HP Spectre Folio is its clever, seamless convertible design that allows users to maneuver the ultra-thin, super-lightweight laptop between three different positions. Guests at the launch in Sydney hosted by Vogue Living editorial director Edwina McCann included Harvey Norman CEO Katie Page and HP’s global head of design Stacy Wolff. A three-course menu by Vue de Monde creative director Shannon Bennett featured dishes celebrating seasonal Australian produce, from wagyu beef with beetroot and muntries served with roasted potatoes dotted with prawns and herbs to a delicate sheep’s yoghurt dessert with zesty orange and sweet pumpkin. VL hp.com.au

C LO C K W IS E F RO M TOP L E F T Katie Page, CEO, Harvey Norman, and Edwina McCann, editorial director, Vogue Living. Inside the launch at Beta Bar, Sydney. Makenzie Vega. David Abela and Rose McEvoy. Jonathan and Gennera Banks. Stacy Wolff, global head of design, HP. The HP Spectre Folio. Nicholas Gray, CEO, The Australian and publisher of the News Prestige Network. A further look inside the launch venue. Jordan and Zac Stenmark. A trio of chocolate stones.

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F RO M A BOV E Sydney restaurant Chin Chin’s private dining space, Chii Town. Vogue Living editor Rebecca Caratti (left) with guest speakers, Caroline Choker, Kirsten Stanisich, Sarah-Jane Pyke and Juliette Arent.

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Celebrating women

FROM TO P Vogue Living editor and host for the evening, Rebecca Caratti. BMW X4 cars were custom-wrapped for the event in artwork by Kitty Callaghan.

The inaugural Vogue Living Women of Excellence speaker series, in partnership with BMW, launched in Sydney this spring over a bespoke three-course dinner and panel discussion at leading restaurant Chin Chin. Respected interior designers Caroline Choker of Acme, Kirsten Stanisich, director of Richards Stanisich, and Juliette Arent and Sarah-Jane Pyke of Arent & Pyke joined Vogue Living editor and host Rebecca Caratti to discuss the challenges of their journeys to success, as well as share words of business wisdom with a design-savvy audience of Vogue Living readers. From new innovations in materials and technology to the shifting nature of business towards a more dynamic, diverse and collaborative way of working, the discussion was a masterclass in the many facets of building a career in Australia’s thriving design industry. “It’s important that we support each other,” said Vogue Living editor Rebecca Caratti. “Seeing women supporting women in the design community, it’s really very powerful.” VL #vlwomenofexcellence #bmwau C LOC KWI S E FROM ABOV E The floral table settings for the bespoke dinner event. Artist Kitty Callaghan (left) with BMW’s Jessica Shomar and Alina Yakovlieva. Guests at the event.

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Table settings at the Richard Meier-designed Perry St restaurant in New York’s West Village.

Daniel Arsham, Larry Warsh and Douglas Baxter. The Richard Meier-designed building.

NGV in New York

Sarah Sze, Louise Neri, Jeff Koons, Tony Ellwood, Cai Guo-Qiang and Andrew Clark.

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Hong Hong, Brian Donnelly, Anna Karina Hofbauer and Dieter Buchhart.


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Sources CONDÉ NAST INTERNATIONAL Chairman and Chief Executive: Jonathan Newhouse President: Wolfgang Blau Executive Vice President: James Woolhouse THE CONDÉ NAST INTERNATIONAL GROUP OF BRANDS INCLUDES: UK Vogue, House & Garden, Brides, Tatler, The World of Interiors, GQ, Vanity Fair, Condé Nast Traveller, Glamour, Condé Nast Johansens, GQ Style, Love, Wired, Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design, Ars Technica FRANCE Vogue, Vogue Hommes, AD, Glamour, Vogue Collections, GQ, AD Collector, Vanity Fair, GQ Le Manuel du Style, Glamour Style ITALY Vogue, Glamour, AD, Condé Nast Traveller, GQ, Vanity Fair, Wired, La Cucina Italiana GERMANY Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Wired SPAIN Vogue, GQ, Vogue Novias, Vogue Niños, Condé Nast Traveler, Vogue Colecciones, Vogue Belleza, Glamour, AD, Vanity Fair JAPAN Vogue, GQ, Vogue Girl, Wired, Vogue Wedding TAIWAN Vogue, GQ, Interculture MEXICO AND LATIN AMERICA Vogue Mexico and Latin America, Glamour Mexico, AD Mexico, GQ Mexico and Latin America, Vanity Fair Mexico INDIA Vogue, GQ, Condé Nast Traveller, AD

Detail of the living area in Karl Wissler and Kim McKay’s Sydney home, designed by Arent & Pyke (page 124).

PUBLISHED UNDER JOINT VENTURE: BRAZIL Vogue, Casa Vogue, GQ, Glamour RUSSIA Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Tatler, Glamour Style Book PUBLISHED UNDER LICENSE OR COPYRIGHT COOPERATION: AUSTRALIA Vogue, Vogue Living, GQ BULGARIA Glamour CHINA Vogue, AD, Condé Nast Traveler, GQ, GQ Style, Brides, Condé Nast Center of Fashion & Design, Vogue Me CZECH REPUBLIC AND SLOVAKIA La Cucina Italiana HUNGARY Glamour ICELAND Glamour KOREA Vogue, GQ, Allure, W MIDDLE EAST Vogue, Condé Nast Traveller, AD, Vogue Café at The Dubai Mall POLAND Glamour PORTUGAL Vogue, GQ ROMANIA Glamour RUSSIA Vogue Café Moscow, Tatler Club Moscow SOUTH AFRICA House & Garden, GQ, Glamour, House & Garden Gourmet, GQ Style, Glamour Hair THE NETHERLANDS Vogue, Glamour, Vogue The Book, Vogue Man, Vogue Living THAILAND Vogue, GQ, Vogue Lounge Bangkok TURKEY Vogue, GQ UKRAINE Vogue, Vogue Café Kiev CONDÉ NAST USA President and Chief Executive Officer: Robert A Sauerberg, Jr Artistic Director: Anna Wintour Vogue, Vanity Fair, Glamour, Brides, Self, GQ, GQ Style, The New Yorker, Condé Nast Traveler, Allure, AD, Bon Appétit, Epicurious, Wired, W, Golf Digest, Golf World, Teen Vogue, Ars Technica, The Scene, Pitchfork, Backchannel VOGUE LIVING subscription rate for 6 issues (1 year) post-paid is $49.95 (within Australia). Copyright © 2018. Published by NewsLifeMedia. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is strictly prohibited. NewsLifeMedia is a licensed user in Australia of the registered trademarks VOGUE, VOGUE LIVING and GQ and has been granted the exclusive right to use those trademarks in relation to magazines published by NewsLifeMedia by the proprietor of the trademarks. Printed in Australia by PMP Limited. Distributed by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd, call 1300 650 666.

Alex and Trahanas alexandtrahanas.com Alm studioalm.com Art2Muse Gallery art2muse.com.au Artemest artemest.com Artemide artemide.com B&B Italia bebitalia.com Boffi boffi.com Bonacina bonacina1889.it Bonnie Young bonnieyoung.com BottegaNove botteganove. it Cadrys cadrys.com.au Cameron Stead cameronstead.com Cassina cassina.com Chet Mitrani cmitraniplastering.com CK Upholsterers ckupholstery.com.au Coco Republic cocorepublic.com.au Cult cultdesign. com.au David Aaron Angeli enquiries to Cella Contemporary; cellarcontemporary.com David Hamilton enquiries to Alm; studioalm.com Dedece dedece.com Dedon dedonliving.com.au Dive Centre Bondi divebondi.com.au Domo domo.com.au Donald Baechler enquiries to McClain Gallery; mcclaingallery.com Dulux dulux.com.au Eco Outdoor ecooutdoor.com.au Elena Monorchio enquiries to Deliver Home; deliverhome.org Èlu elubycn.com Fanuli fanuli.com.au Flos flos.com Fontana Arte fontanaarte.com Gabriele Corni gabrielecorni.com Giacomo Totti giacomototti.com Graff graff-faucets.com Gubi gubi.com Hale Mercantile Co halemercantilecolinen.com Hermès hermes.com Holland & Sherry hollandandsherry.com Horne shophorne.com Hub hubfurniture.com.au IKEA ikea.com Jakos jakos-art.com James Perse Furniture jamesperse.com Janus et Cie janusetcie.com Jardan jardan.com.au Jessica Ogden jessicaogden.com Jürgen Lingl-Rebetez lingl-sculpture.com Kelly Wearstler kellywearstler.com Kiko Lopez kikolopez.com LaGuardia Design Group laguardiadesigngroup.com Louis Poulsen louispoulsen.com Lucy Folk lucyfolk.com Manuel Gazzola Design @manuel_gazzola Marina Home Interiors marinahomeinteriors. com Matches Fashion matchesfashion.com Matteo Pala matteopala.it McLean Edwards enquiries to Olsen Gallery; olsengallery.com Medina Oriental Design medinaorientaldesign.com Moises Esquenazi moisesesquenazi.com Montmartre Store montmartre-store.business.site Nanda Vigo nandavigo.com Nathalie du Pasquier nathaliedupasquier.com Olafur Eliasson olafureliasson.net Ondene ondene.com.au Ovando ovandony.com Pace Gallery pacegallery.com Parlour X parlourx.com Planet Furniture planetfurniture.com.au Renzo Buttazzo renzobuttazzo. com Rogan Gregory enquiries to R & Company; r-and-company.com Scavolini USA scavoliniusa.com Seletti seletti.com.au Space Furniture spacefurniture.com.au Spence & Lyda spenceandlyda.com.au Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects stelleco.com Svenskt Tenn svenskttenn.se Sylvester and Co sylvesterandco.com Tagliabue Fratelli tagliabuefratelli.it Tait madebytait.com.au Tamar Mogendorff tamarmogendorff.com Tech Lighting techlighting.com The Apartment theapartment.dk The Art of Tiles artoftiles.com.au The Vault thevaultsydney.com Tina Frey Designs tinafreydesigns.com Tongue N Groove tngflooring. com.au Upholstery of the Hamptons upholsteryofthehamptons.com Vanessa Stockard vanessastockard.com.au Wedgwood wedgwood.com.au E DI TO RI AL


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ART & INTERIORS

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POSTSCRIPT From the living room to the kitchen, dress your home in supreme style with these must-haves.

GAUDION French fashion designer Christian Lacroix never disappoints with his extravagant creations, which enhance rather than dominate a space. His exotic Bagatelle Réglisse wallpaper is a work of art that represents the Parc de Bagatelle, a gathering place for popular festivities in the Directoire era on the outskirts of Paris. gaudions.com.au

JENNY JONES RUGS International award-winning rug designer Jenny Jones masterfully captures the extraordinary natural beauty and earthy hues of Australia’s North West with the Kimberley rug. Hand-knotted in the finest pure silk and Tibetan wool, this work of floor art reflects the stunning landscape with lustrous silk, tactile highand low-pile heights and unique colour combinations. jennyjonesrugs.com

SMEG The Mediterranean is coming to a kitchen near you, thanks to a collaboration between couture designers Dolce & Gabbana and Smeg. Sicily Is My Love is a covetable collection of small appliances, adorned with Dolce & Gabbana’s signature decorative Sicilian motifs. Add a splash of vivid colour with a kettle, juicer, toaster or blender from the range — or one of each! sicilyismylove.com.au

HARROLDS Though its shape was inspired by Ancient Egypt’s pyramids, Valextra’s Iside bag is quintessentially Italian. The Iside features an adjustable and detachable shoulder strap and is lined with supple leather. Each Valextra piece is handcrafted by one of 60 master artisans. Available at Harrolds in Melbourne, Sydney and the Gold Coast. harrolds.com.au

MILANO FURNITURE The generous dimensions of the contemporary Sunset sofa are ideal for a home theatre or to handsomely anchor an open living space. Adjustable backrests mean seat depth can be modified to accommodate individual comfort requirements. Choose from a range of leather and fabric finishes and colours. milanofurniture.com.au


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VOGUE LIVING PROMOTION

VBO AUSTRALIA Harking back to an era of distinguished style, the Royal Suspension light fitting was designed by David Chipperfield Architects for the restoration of the historical Hotel Café Royal, one of the most prestigious hotels in London. Available in copper/bronze and black and white, the Royal Suspension light fitting is a scene-stealer in any space. vboaustralia.com

ARTIFEX INTERIORS With increased awareness of sustainability, it’s comforting to know that master craftsmen are upholding the quality and artistry of fine pieces that are made to last. Formed by Anthony Sergas and Scott Lander, Artifex Interiors has been designing and crafting fine furniture in Sydney’s Northern Beaches for 20 years. artifex.com.au

MINOTTI Inspired by classic teak duckboard used in the yachting PORTER’S PAINTS Neutral and white tones infuse a space with a sense of calm and balance. Porter’s Paints Premium Acrylics range is available in the full spectrum of Porter’s colours, from pure whites to smoky neutrals and everything in between. Talk to a colourist instore to find just the right shade for your project from the comprehensive collection of superior quality finishes for interiors and exteriors. porterspaints.com

industry, Quadrado is a modular sofa system consisting of suspended square platforms that furnish outdoor spaces with exceptional lightness and flexibility. The wooden bases combine with comfortable padded cushions with backrests in a special open wicker-effect woven fibre — available in Mud colour or plain Licorice. minotti.com

ROBYN COSGROVE Robyn Cosgrove is Australia’s leading specialist

MAX SPARROW When tailored sophistication and defined elegance

dealer in fine handwoven rugs and carpets for more than three decades. Her passion for creating exquisite designs with distinctive palettes and textures is manifested in the modern appeal of the Marelle rug. Finely hand-knotted in Nepal from Himalayan wool and pure linen, the Marelle can be custom-made to suit your requirements. robyncosgrove.com

is called for, the Jacques collection is an impeccable choice. Shiny metal detailing adds reflective glamour and pairs beautifully with the muted tones of charcoal velvet or natural linen. Join in the Art Deco revival and opt for the silver and charcoal suite, or go for gold with a natural linen and gold metal finish. maxsparrow.com.au


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VLast look

Brass oil burners by Henry Wilson, $195 each, from Aesop; aesop.com.

SHOP

Top brass This oil burner is like no other, offering not only a vessel to cast an aromatic glow but also a sculptural and tactile object that will patina over time. Photographed by Victoria Zschommler Styled by Joseph Gardner

176

vogueliving.com.au


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