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TRENDS

FEBRUARY 2019 20 Seventies style Curves, chrome and serious Studio 54 vibes – we discover why the interiors world is revisiting the age of Aquarius

20

25 ‘Mizumi’, Black Edition We are smitten by the calming beauty of this on-trend wallpaper

27 Chrome This classic, gleaming surface is back in the limelight this year

28 Hand-painted tiles Bring the creative touch into your home with tiling that champions craft

31 Lozenges We’re embracing curves with rounded, pill-like forms set to dominate interiors

32 Bella Freud & Maria Speake Trailblazing the 1970s trend with their joint design project, this duo are the crowned queens of cool

35 Rent it all Is this the year we stop buying things? Homeware rental firm Harth believes so

36 Woven works Stylish walls will be displaying weavings, as home galleries get textural

38 Solo Houses, Spain Building the future, this initiative creates truly innovative holiday homes

40 Casely-Hayford & Ashby This husbandand-wife team is a force to be reckoned with, combining fashion and interior design

42 Eco surfaces Countertops made from recycled waste are our new green obsession

45 100 years of Bauhaus A never-ending source of inspiration, the design movement’s centenary will be marked by a year of events

51 Margrethe Odgaard This designer and colour alchemist is firmly on our 2019 radar

52 Coal Drops Yard, London In an era of PICTURE: DEIRDRE DYSON ‘GOLDEN PHEASANT’ RUG

‘click to buy’, it takes something exciting to tempt shoppers. This new retail hotspot is it

LOOKS 73 The four interiors trends to try right now!

Introducing Coloured Stone, Graphic Illustration, Rust & Rose and Contemporary Timber

54 SEM, Milan Plan your trip to the showroom of this year’s hottest new furniture brand

57 Smarter homes By 2030, we’ll be living in tech-controlled co-living houses if predictions are correct. Until then, gadgets will continue to become more hidden and helpful

63 Softly sculpted Warm honeyed tones and natural textures lend this season’s striking furniture a calmer, more comforting feel FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 9


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EDIT

84

143 Spring/summer 2019 Your essential guide to the season’s most influential designs, featuring our pick of the top new looks from the world’s finest furniture brands

ESCAPE 154

Shanghai Edition Redefining urban luxury, this hotel is the one to book in 2019

159

Feasts for the eyes London restaurants pairing delicious food with great design

161

Joali, Maldives This year, dream of a trip to the resort that makes paradise more appealing

163

Airport lounges With top designers in command, the holiday now begins before take-off

164

HOMES 84 Mellow yellow Cheerful and soothing, turmeric-like hues are spicing up interiors. This London home showcases their power

FINALLY

Ljubljana The Slovenian capital is the place to visit, with a growing design scene

16 Subscribe Fantastic reader offer 167 Stockists Love something you’ve seen in this issue? Here’s where to buy it

178

Fine print The ‘Vallauris’ velvet by Manuel Canovas channels the 1970s trend

THE COVERS

96 Architectural dissonance Displaying an equal love for period features and modern design, this Melbourne home looks forward and back

106 The new jazz age 1920s style is back in fashion, with Art Deco-inspired details and brass adding glamour to this apartment in Normandy

114 Timber & sky Pairing wood with shades of blue brings out the depth of both. It’s a cuttingedge way to add heat to the coolest of palettes

122 Rekindled traditions Classic furnishings are having a renaissance. Crafted with an eye for the modern, they elevate this Carolina mansion

132 Wild abandon Nature is taking over this Cape Town home, as the trend for impressive greenery takes an architectural turn 10 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019

Our newsstand cover (left) features the ‘Togo’ sofa for Ligne Roset, as seen in one of our trendsetting homes (p96). Photography by Shannon McGrath. Featuring a quote by Maria Speake on her and Bella Freud’s collaboration (p32), our subscriber cover shows a shot by Michael Sinclair


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T A s H T ’70 O W H S

ILLUSTRATION: PAUL HOLLAND

As I’ve discussed here before, the twisty-turny nature of rapidly changing trends doesn’t always sit well with the carefully considered way we should interact with our homes. However, there’s no denying that change happens, and that moods take hold before going on to have an influence across the whole interiors sphere. In some seasons, the prevailing influence is much easier to spot than at other times. This spring/summer is one such moment. Whether it’s down to the uncertain period of history we are currently living through, or simply a progression from the chalky pastels and bold maximalism seen recently, the forecast for the start of 2019 takes us back 40 years or more to the equally turbulent and stylistically strong 1970s. I was born bang-smack in the middle of that decade, and have vivid memories of a childhood shaped by Space Hoppers, Star Wars, flared trousers and questionable haircuts, so I’m relishing the design world’s decision to revisit such a rich source of inspiration. In this issue, you’ll find our predictions for the people, places, colours and pieces that will shape interiors during the next six months. Many are united by the undeniable nods they make to the seventies – chrome, curves, saturated shades, coloured stones, warm woods, wicker and cane, to name just a few. We even speak to Ian Schrager, founder of the legendary New York nightclub Studio 54, which came into being in 1977, just as disco took dancefloors by storm. Plus, we celebrate the work of one of my favourite design studios, Retrouvius. From its penthouse apartment at the redeveloped BBC Television Centre, a collaboration with designer Bella Freud, to an exquisite home in west London filled with turmeric yellow shades, its style couldn’t be more wonderfully retro. As ever, we look back to look forward. Whatever 2019 brings, I hope it’s all you wish for…

Editor

Follow me on

Instagram: @mrbspriggs

Twitter: @ELLEDecoBen

Visit elledecoration.co.uk FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 13


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House of Hearst, 30 Panton Street, London SW1Y 4AJ Editorial enquiries elledecoration@hearst.co.uk (020 7312 4114) Homes submissions homes@elledecoration.co.uk EDITO R BEN SPRIGGS PRODUCTION Chief Sub Editors Clare Sartin, Michele Jameson, Helen Bonthrone Deputy Chief Sub Editor Julie Pannell-Rae Thanks to Julie-Anne Cosgrove

ART Art Director Philippe Blanchin Art Editors Roger Browning, Linsey Cannon Designer Jack Melrose Junior Designer Victoria Smith Art Intern Jade Stephens

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CHIEF BR AN D O FFICER, LIFEST YLE & H OM ES SHARON DOUGLAS PA to Chief Brand Officer Helen Hart GROUP EDITO RIAL H OM ES Group Editorial Director Susy Smith Group Editorial PA Sandra Tear Workf low Director Carly Levy Group Managing Editor Ingrid Eames CLIENT DIVISIO N Managing Director, Beauty Jacqui Cave Managing Director, Fashion & Luxury Jacqueline Euwe Managing Director, Fitness & Health Alun Williams Director of Endorsements & Food Laura Cohen Director of Travel Denise Degroot Director of Motors Jim Chaudry Client Director, Personal Finance Pete Cammidge Senior Client Manager Stephanie Tomlinson 020 7439 5462 Client Executive Maire Power 020 7439 5650 Head of Classified Lee Rimmer 020 3728 7707 AGEN CY DIVISIO N Chief Agency Officer Jane Wolfson Executive Assistant Tanya Stewart 020 7439 5532 Lifestyle Group Regional Director Lisa Bhatti 0161 962 9254 Lifestyle Group Agency Director Matthew Downs 020 7339 4583

BUSINESS ENQUIRIES Head of Business Management Lucy Porter 020 7439 5276 Business Manager Rose Sweetman BR AN D LICENSIN G Managing Director, Business Services Judith Secombe Brand Development Director, Lifestyle & Homes Alistair Wood CO NSUM ER SALES & M ARKETIN G Marketing & Circulation Director Reid Holland Head of Consumer Sales & Marketing James Hill Head of Marketing Promotions Aoibheann Foley Head of Subscriptions Karen Sharp Digital Marketing Director Seema Kumari COM MUNICATIONS Director of PR & Communications Effie Kanyua PR Manager Alice Taylor Journalist Enquiries media@hearst.co.uk PRODUCTION Production Manager Stephen Osborne Ad Production Coordinator Carl Latter

HEARST UK President & CEO James Wildman Chief Finance Officer/Chief Operating Officer Claire Blunt Director of Events & Sponsorship, Hearst Live Victoria Archbold Chief Operations Director Clare Gorman Chief Strategy Officer Robert Ffitch Chief People Officer Surinder Simmons HEARST M AGA ZINES INTERNATIONAL Senior Vice President/CFO & General Manager Simon Horne Senior Vice President/Editorial & Brand Director Kim St Clair Bodden L AGARDÈRE ACTIVE Chairman and CEO Lagardère Active Denis Olivennes CEO ELLE France & International Constance Benqué CEO ELLE International Media Licenses François Coruzzi Brand Management of ELLE Decoration Sylvie de Chirée SVP/International Director of ELLE Decoration Valéria Bessolo Llopiz SVP/Director of International Media Licenses, Digital Development & Syndication Mickaël Berret Editorial Executive of ELLE Decoration Linda Bergmark Marketing Executive of ELLE Decoration Morgane Rohee Syndication Coordinator Audrey Schneuwly

INTERNATIONAL AD SALES HOUSE Lagardère Global Advertising CEO François Coruzzi SVP/International Advertising Stéphanie Delattre stephanie.delattre@ lagardere-active.com Lagardère Global Advertising , 10 rue Thierry Le Luron 92300 Levallois-Perret, France BACK ISSUES & SUBSCRIP TIO NS Hearst Magazines UK, Tower House, Sovereign Park, Market Harborough, Leicestershire LE16 9EF To order or renew a subscription, call 01858 438846 For any other subscription enquiries, call 01858 438880 or email elledecoration@subscription.co.uk Lines open Mon–Fri 8am–9pm; Sat 8am–4pm Standard rates for 12 issues: UK £52.80; Eire & Europe Airmail £55; USA £65; Rest Of The World £75 PRINTED BY Wyndeham Roche Ltd, St Austell COVER PRINTED BY Westdale, Cardiff PAPER SUPPLIED BY Burgo Group DISTRIBUTION BY Frontline Ltd, Peterborough 01733 555161 TR ADEM ARK N OTICE ELLE® and ELLE Decoration™ are used under licence from the trademark owner, Hachette Filipacchi Presse ELLE Decoration is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation and abides by the Editors’ Code of Practice. We are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think that we have not met those standards and want to make a complaint, contact complaints@hearst.co.uk or visit hearst.co.uk/hearst-magazines-ukcomplaints-procedure. If we are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit ipso.co.uk

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TRENDS SPRING / SUMMER 2019

THE TH E THE TH E THE TH E THE TH E THE TH E THE TH E THE TH E THE TH E THE

BIG TREND WALLCOVERI N G FINISH D ECO RATIO N SHAPE CREATIVES WAY OF LIFE ART U PDATE ARCHITECTUR AL VISION POWER CO U PLE ETHICAL CHOICE CELEBRATIO N NA ME TO KNOW SH O PPI N G D ISTRICT SHOWROOM FUTU RE MOOD


:

M

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THE BIG TREND

SEVENTIES STYLE PICTURES: © THE PATTERNED INTERIOR BY GREG NATALE, RIZZOLI NEW YORK, 2018. ANSON SMART (PHOTOGRAPHY) /ALL IMAGES CONSENT FROM GREG NATALE PTY LTD. ARTWORK ©2018 THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC/ LICENSED BY DACS, LONDON. DEAN MARSH/2018 THE LITTLE DRUMMER GIRL DISTRIBUTION LIMITED

Editor Ben Spriggs on why now’s the moment to revisit the decade of chrome, curves and saturated colour

The so-called ‘Winter of Discontent’ hit the UK as it moved from 1978 to 1979. A time of political and social turmoil, it was marked by financial austerity, strikes, tensions with Europe and a steely (or should that be iron) lady taking up residence in 10 Downing Street. History has a knack of repeating itself and in 2019, forty years later, we find ourselves in an almost identical position. The similarities with that era go beyond the socio-political. Then, as now, the reaction of the British populus was to seek solace inside their homes. Staying in became the new norm, with Delia Smith leading a home-cooking revolution and people taking an increased interest in decorating and furnishing their living spaces. The avocado bathroom suite came to prominence and the work of renowned interior designer David Hicks shaped tastes for vibrant colours and eye-popping patterns. Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange (released in 1971) shocked not only with its violence, but also its forward-looking set designs. Later in the decade, the sheer glamour, exuberance and escapism of New York’s legendary Studio 54 nightclub added a layer of glitz as the age of disco took hold. Now, in 2019, we’re reinterpreting these same elements with a sophistication and polish not seen in the seventies. Whereas back in the day people may have been watching Mike Leigh’s Abigail’s Party on their new colour televisions, many of us have recently been enthralled by the interiors in the BBC’s recent adaptation of John Le Carré’s The Little Drummer Girl. Its production designer Maria Djurkovic pulls off quite a feat: sets (top right) that are completely period-appropriate for the 1979-set narrative, yet also achingly of the here and now. Curved furniture abounds, alongside chrome details, cane and wicker seating, Formica surfaces, low leather sofas and shagpile rugs. But it’s the show’s saturated palette that particularly resonates with modern design. ‘You unify everything with colour,’ says Djurkovic of the deep mustard, terracotta and teal shades that look both retro and fresh at the same time. Indeed, this considered, contemporary approach to the decade’s shades and shapely forms is now being seen across the board. Take the powdery, sand-like tones seen in Molteni & C’s latest imagery shot in architect Romeo Moretti’s iconic Villa Carminati (left), or the striking work of Australian interior designer Greg Natale, who puts strident colour, metallic finishes and artwork by Andy Warhol to good use in his latest interiors project (right) – the age that both reference is unmistakably that of Aquarius. When bringing this look into your own homes, I’d counsel you to be fearless rather than frivolous, brave rather than brash and, above all, to channel the words of perhaps the seventies’ coolest cultural icon, David Bowie: ‘I don’t know where I’m going from here, but I promise it won’t be boring.’ 21


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TRENDS

This page, clockwise from above The ‘Cross Leg’ chair by Magnus Long for The Conran Shop delivers seventies style with a modern twist. A Habitat catalogue from the decade. Low seating and a shagpile rug decorate this set from the BBC’s The Little Drummer Girl. 1970s staple corduroy is making a comeback – this sofa by Rose & Grey shows its contemporary appeal. Chrome detailing on USM’s ‘Haller’ storage. Diana Ross dancing at Studio 54


PICTURES: DEAN MARSH/2018 THE LITTLE DRUMMER GIRL DISTRIBUTION LIMITED CHARLIE CHUCK/HUMBERT & POYET, SONIA MOSKOWITZ/GETTY IMAGES

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Clockwise from left A Pucci patterned ‘Rive Droite’ chair by Patrick Norguet for Cappellini. 1970s colours on bedding from the ‘J by Jasper Conran’ range at Debenhams. ‘Sacco’ beanbag by Gatti, Paolini & Teodoro for Zanotta, available at Chaplins. Brass accents at Aquazurra’s New York showroom, designed by Humbert & Poyet. Deirdre Dyson’s ‘Golden Pheasant’ rug

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 23


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TRENDS

T H E WA L L C O V E R I N G

‘MIZUMI’, BLACK EDITION

WORDS: KIERA BUCKLEY-JONES

We are smitten by the calming, craft-led beauty of this most covetable of decorating buys

‘THE TRADITIONAL WOODCUT TECHNIQUE LENDS THIS PATTERN AN UNDENIABLE INTRICACY’

There has been a plethora of exceedingly decorative wallpaper designs of late – bold, maximalist patterns full of clashing colours – and while we love the sense of joie de vivre they add to homes, we’re currently craving something a little more peaceful. This ‘Mizumi’ wallcovering from Black Edition still makes a strong visual statement, but its subject matter – a Japanese woodland reflected onto the surface of a calm lake – speaks to our desire for quietude. The result of a collaboration between Black Edition and woodcut artist Katsutoshi Yuasa, this soothing design began life as a series of haunting digital photographs, which were then translated into woodcut prints. The images were painstakingly carved by hand into wooden blocks, with Yuasa then printing them onto delicate washi paper – it’s this original artwork that was digitally transformed into a large-scale mural worthy of decorating a whole wall. As Black Edition’s design director Emily Mould explains: ‘The traditional woodcut technique lends this pattern an undeniable intricacy.’ You can still make out the subtle imperfections of Yuasa’s print, and it’s these signs of its handcrafted origins that bring an impressionistic quality that is irresistibly of the moment. £370 for two rolls, which form the mural (blackedition.com). FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 25


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TRENDS

THE FINISH

CHROME

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURE: CHAPLINS.CO.UK

The classic, gleaming surface is back in the limelight this year In recent years many metallic finishes have captured the zeitgeist. Copper has coated everything from lighting and accessories to furniture, and we’ve since moved through golds – both brushed and high-shine – which brought a soft sense of luxury into the home, pairing beautifully with velvet upholstery and gentle neutrals. Now, it’s the turn of chrome to shine, speaking, as it does, to the recent revival of the 1970s interiors in which it featured heavily. ‘Chrome has a kind of magic liquidity,’ says Ludovic Aublanc, creative director at furniture retailer Chaplins. ‘There’s something irresistible about it – it offers a very pure kind of design language. Our clients are reinvesting in the classics that feature this finish – think Le Corbusier’s iconic “LC” series for Cassina, the “Platner” and “Barcelona” collections from Knoll or Gubi’s stunning “Multi-Lite” by Louis Weisdorf (pictured).’ Kate Butler, head of product design at Habitat, agrees: ‘Chrome is cooler and sharper than the brass and gold accents of recent seasons. It’s a contemporary progression for interiors, moving towards a sleeker aesthetic. Style it with warm colours, rich walnut, or pale oak and ash for an elegant, confident look.’

‘CHROME HAS A KIND OF MAGIC LIQUIDITY. IT OFFERS A VERY PURE DESIGN LANGUAGE’

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 27


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T H E D E C O R AT I O N

HAND-PAINTED TILES

Bring the creative touch into your home this year with tiling that champions craft Handmade and hand-decorated tiles are having a bit of a renaissance – particularly pieces that look like they have been lovingly produced, with the hand of the maker evident. Now this trend is set to make a bigger impact on your home – think irregular layers of glaze and obvious, bold brushstrokes. Ceramicist Reiko Kaneko’s ‘Tile Murals’ (top right) are among our favourite examples. Developed when she became infuriated by the impossibility of finding tiles she liked enough to decorate her entire bathroom with, the designs are experiments with coloured glaze. Inspired by the work of modern Japanese shodo (calligraphy) artists, she sourced white metro tiles and created patterns by applying a blue glaze with a Japanese broom – a household tool that provided the most characterful strokes. Design studio Glithero looked further into the past for its artisanal inspiration. For the ‘Botanical’ tile mural (this page), it used a 400-year-old traditional Dutch technique, drawing the design on cloth using charcoal before pressing the design onto the tile’s surface. The method may be charmingly historical, but the pattern has a more modern, urban subject matter: London weeds. Designer Michelle van Ool explains their particular appeal: ‘They are wild and unruly – an opposite to common notions of design.’ Whether you choose intricate or more graphic designs, it’s impossible to ignore the artistic quality of this season’s sought-after tiles. But be cautious – the key to keeping this look contemporary is sticking to a limited palette. The beauty is in the simplicity.

‘Botanical’ tile mural, from £900 per square metre, Glithero (glithero.com)


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TRENDS

SHOP THE TREND MORE ARTISANAL TILES TO TRY

IT’S IMPOSSIBLE TO IGNORE THE ARTISTIC QUALITY OF THIS YEAR’S SOUGHT-AFTER TILES

WORDS: NAME PICTURES: NAME

WORDS: KIERA BUCKLEY-JONES PICTURE: MAARTEN WILLEMSTEIN

‘Tile Mural’, from £300 per square metre, Reiko Kaneko (reikokaneko.co.uk)

‘Buisson Bleu’ tiles, £27 each, Emery & Cie (emeryetcie.com)

From top ‘Cannes’ tile in ‘Florence’, £13.45 each, Claybrook (claybrookstudio.co.uk). ‘Infinity’ tile in ‘Navy’, £3.48 each, Tile Desire (tiledesire.com). ‘London Life Tiles: City Patterns’ by Laura Carlin, £90 for a set of six, The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). ‘Series S’ tile, from £9.46 each, Balineum (balineum.co.uk)

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 29


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TRENDS

THE SHAPE

LOZENGES We’re embracing curves this year, with rounded, pill-like forms set to dominate interiors

SHOP THE TREND OUR PRESCRIBED PILLS

1

‘Audrey’ mirror by Emmanuel Gallina, £4,102, Poliform (poliformuk.com)

2

‘Cantala’ wallcovering,£39 per metre, Arte (artewalls.com)

3 New shape du jour the lozenge shares similarities in form with the archway, which was so prevalent in interior architecture and product design last year. Soft and gentle, its lack of angles and sharpness lends it a friendly air. Its simplicity works beautifully with brighter tones. Case in point is the Breadway Bakery (above) in Ukrainian capital Odessa, designed by architects Lera Brumina and Artem Trigubchak. Inspired by the work of French interior designer India Mahdavi, and realised in a palette straight from the stylised sets of film director Wes Anderson, the repetitive buoyant forms make for an energetic feel.

‘Wings’ bed by Jaime Hayón, from £15,869, Wittman (wittmann.at)

SOFT AND GENTLE, THIS SHAPE’S LACK OF ANGLES LENDS IT A FRIENDLY AIR THAT WORKS BEAUTIFULLY WITH BRIGHTER TONES A plethora of products have adopted the shape, taking full advantage of its playful edge. Wittmann’s ‘Wings’ bed by Jaime Hayón is bookended by two of the squashed circles in rich velvets, and the cushioned seat of Australian duo Daniel To and Emma Aiston’s ‘Soft Love’ bench asserts its simple shapeliness in vibrant blue. Mirrors seem to hold the format especially well – Poliform’s ‘Audrey’ by Emmanuel Gallina is a beautiful example, with its shape framed by an outline of black elm. Circular designs have always felt somewhat indulgent, their curves meaning they can’t be positioned flush against a wall or surface, but, with these happy forms on the scene, we’re all for abandoning the angles.

‘POV’ candleholder by Menu, £64.95, Connox (connox.co.uk)

4

‘Soft Love’ bench, £900, Daniel - Emma (daniel-emma.com)

5

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 31


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TRENDS

T H E C R E AT I V E S

BELLA FREUD & MARIA SPEAKE Trailblazing the 1970s revival with their new joint interiors project, this duo are the crowned queens of cool While some designers may still be courting curves, brass and velvet, Bella Freud had different ideas for the interior design of the penthouse apartment that she masterminded at London’s recently redeveloped Television Centre. A collaboration with Maria Speake, co-founder of reclamation and design studio Retrouvius, the three-bedroom, 204-squaremetre duplex at the White City location leans heavily towards a retro aesthetic, or, as Speake cheerfully puts it: ‘Not some hippy chic thing. It’s more seventies porn.’ Having first met almost a decade ago via a Ladbroke Grove antiques dealer, the pair have since worked on two of Freud’s own properties, as well as her flagship store on London’s Chiltern Street. They have also been making their mark over at the Grade II-listed former BBC headquarters, where the walls are lined with suede, hessian and cork, the sofas are covered in corduroy and the carpets come in a lipstick red, angelica green and marigold palette that’s reminiscent of Bella’s iconic knitwear. Bespoke wall-hung rugs by The Rug Company feature Freud’s

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE PICTURES: MICHAEL SINCLAIR

‘NOT SOME HIPPY CHIC THING. IT’S MORE SEVENTIES PORN’ instantly recognisable motifs, while the artwork comes courtesy of Canadian-British photographer Lorena Lohr and feminist ceramicist Eliza Hopewell. There’s lacquered seating, a Willy Rizzo table and a collection of iconic Marcel Breuer ‘Cesca’ chairs sit beside a beaded curtain, originally destined for Freud’s own home. ‘It reminded me of my dad [the renowned figurative painter Lucian Freud] when I’d visit him as a child,’ she says. ‘He always had these crummy, small studios, but he’d take the door off and have a beaded curtain instead. It was a perfect fit for here.’ The result of this bold style and cleverly edited collection of furniture and accessories is a modern homage to 1970s style that is as brilliantly cool as one would anticipate of this duo. Expect the hip kids to follow suit soon (bellafreud.com; retrouvius.com). FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 33


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T H E WAY O F L I F E

RENT IT ALL

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG

Is this the year that we stop owning things?

In an era of streaming entertainment, clocking in to collaborative workspaces, collecting your hire car in the street and with clothes rental predicted to be the next big fashion trend, is the interiors world behind the curve with its traditional buy, take home and keep for ever model? Not anymore… Interiors enthusiasts can now ride the wave of the rental zeitgeist with Harth, the first furniture-rental platform. It’s the saving grace of the style-indecisive, frequent movers and those coveting an extravagant piece. You can loan everything from sofas, chandeliers, sculptures and coffee tables from iconic brands and designers in

just a few clicks. ‘Currently, people tend to make big interior design statements with wallpaper, art and brightly painted walls rather than with furniture, simply because that’s perceived to be easier to change,’ says founder Henrietta Thompson. ‘When you know something is only going to be temporary, it takes away a lot of the stress from the decision-making process. Will you still love it in five years? It doesn’t matter. Will it fit in with everything else? It doesn’t matter. If you can change everything easily, you can have a lot more fun and be much more experimental and creative.’ So set your inner stylist free. It’s time to have your interiors cake and eat it too (harth.space). FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 35


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T H E A R T U P D AT E

WOVEN WORKS Stylish walls will display weavings this year, as home galleries become tactile

Weaving is being placed in the spotlight in 2019 thanks to the centenary of the Bauhaus (more about that on p45), which lends weight to the craft’s growing revival. A recent Tate Modern retrospective of Bauhaus alumni Anni Albers showed how her woven works transcended the boundaries between art, architecture and utility, and, almost 100 years later, those distinctions are being challenged again by new designers. ‘Elevating textiles from the everyday objects we wear and live with at home to artworks shifts our perception of what fabric is for and what is involved in its creation,’ says designer and maker Jo Elbourne. ‘There’s something exciting about that.’ One of mankind’s oldest crafts, weaving involves interlacing two sets of threads (the warp and the weft) at right angles to one another to produce fabrics – a seemingly simple process, yet one that yields endless possibilities. ‘I use geometric forms as a vehicle for exploring colour, proportion and perspective,’ says textile designer Margo Selby. ‘I like the crisp precision of weaving with fine yarns to get sharp lines.’ In contrast, textile artist Judit Just’s fat, noodle-like wools and ribbons create a riot of texture that cries out to be touched. And it’s that tactility that really makes this art form stand out.

WORDS: KATIE TREGIDDEN

‘Diversity’ woven artwork by Fault Lines at Yarn Collective (yarncollective.co.uk)


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SHOP THE TREND W E AV E M A G I C O N Y O U R WA L L S ‘Strawberry Fields Forever No.2’ by Judit Just, £1,128, Etsy (etsy.com)

‘ELEVATING TEXTILES FROM THE EVERYDAY TO ART SHIFTS PERCEPTIONS OF WHAT FABRIC IS FOR’ ‘Interrupted Pattern II’ by Catarina Riccabona, £1,900, The New Craftsmen (thenewcrafts men.com)

‘Viewpoint series 15’, £120, Jo Elbourne (jorobynelbourne.com)

‘Art Work 7.5’, £1,950 framed, Margo Selby (margoselby.com)

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THE ARCHITECTURAL VISION

SOLO HOUSES, SPAIN

Building the future, this initiative creates holiday homes that push the boundaries of design

38 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: BAS

von Ellrichshausen, is a beautiful cantilevered concrete abode with an open-air internal pool. The second, ‘Circular House’ (below) by the Brussels practice Office Kersten Geers David Van Severen, was completed just last year and camouflages itself in the surrounding landscape using a series of clever screens and reflective materials. The next set of houses, due for completion in 2020, is set to be equally inspiring. Spanish architecture firm Barozzi Veiga has envisioned an Acropolis-like scheme with dramatic concrete triangular columns, while Japanese architect Go Hasegawa plans to produce a playful concrete bunker of a home set into the side of a mountain, offering stunning views and a cave-like infinity pool. Support progressive architecture by booking a stay in one of the Solo Houses, from £450 a night (solo-houses.com).

WORDS: NAME PICTURES: NAME

Set within the wild, rocky terrain of Spain’s Matarraña region in eastern Aragon, a collection of 12 holiday homes, designed by an incredible roster of international architects, is being built. Set up in 2010 by French developer Christian Bourdais, the Solo Houses initiative is inspired by the iconic Case Study Houses movement, which developed in American residential architecture during the 1940s, 50s and 60s, with the likes of Richard Neutra, Eero Saarinen and Charles and Ray Eames creating unique modern houses. Gifting its own architects free rein to design whatever they please, Solo Houses – like the Case Study Houses of the past – are an opportunity to push the boundaries of people’s expectations. The first house, the ‘Right-Angled Mushroom’(above), which was completed in 2013 by Chilean couple Mauricio Pezo and Sofia


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THE POWER COUPLE

CASELYHAYFORD & ASHBY

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PHOTOGRAPHS: TOM DUNKLEY; ALEXANDER JAMES

This husband-and-wife team is a force to be reckoned with, combining the worlds of fashion and interior design in their first joint project


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Tasked with overhauling the Casely-Hayford fashion store on London’s Chiltern Street, Sophie Ashby, who is married to Charlie Casely-Hayford and founded her interior design practice Studio Ashby in 2014, turned to their own home for inspiration. ‘It sounds disgustingly perfect, but we do have the same style,’ she laughs. ‘It was actually a very normal designer-client process, but if Charlie wasn’t sure – “are we really going to do a fitting room in mustard yellow?” – I could just tell him to trust me.’ With antique and flea-market-found furniture, accessories picked up on their travels, an eclectic mix of artwork and said changing rooms painted ina rich, inviting tone, the

‘A LOT OF THE ART IS FROM OUR PERSONAL COLLECTION – SOME OF IT WE’VE LITERALLY YANKED OFF THE WALLS’ space feels like somewhere you could happily spend the day. ‘It’s as if you’re walking into our world,’ says CaselyHayford. ‘Some of the furniture is from our home, and the mustard colour comes from my parents’ living room.’ ‘A lot of the art is from our personal collection – we’ve literally yanked some of it off the walls,’ says Ashby. ‘It’s a mix that is representative of what we both love and how we like to live.’ The collaboration has somewhat evolved the brand into that of a lifestyle store rather than just the contemporary fashion tailoring it’s known for. Will the pair team up again? ‘We do keep talking about it,’ they say, cryptically (casely-hayford.com; studioashby.com).

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THE ETHICAL CHOICE

ECO SURFACES The design world continues its green mission, developing an obsession for countertops made from recycled waste As the appetite for sustainable design builds, companies are turning to waste materials to create innovative surfaces. One brand quietly dominating the field is Smile Plastics, run by South Wales-based duo Adam Fairweather and Rosalie McMillan. Its expertise has been enlisted by brands including Selfridges, Liberty, Heal’s, Stella McCartney, Christian Dior and the National Trust for projects which range from small products to large installations. ‘Our mission is to change people’s perceptions around waste via innovation,’ says McMillan. ‘To use art and technology to unlock the potential in recycling, and open eyes to the unexpected beauty of scrap.’ Smile Plastic’s often brightly coloured sheets are made mostly from food packaging and can be used in many creative ways. Alongside the ‘classic panels’ and limited-edition runs, the brand can also be commissioned for bespoke surfaces (below, from £420 per sheet; smile-plastics.com). For non-plastic options, Silestone’s ‘Eco Line’ range is created from at least 50 per cent recycled materials, including post-industrial and post-consumer porcelain, glass and mirror, mixed with natural stones to create stain- and scratch-resistant surfaces. Alternatively, try Richlite, which is making its way into homes after years of use in the aerospace and marine industries. Its waterproof surfaces are made from resin-infused recycled paper.

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WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG

WORDS: NAME PICTURES: NAME

‘OUR MISSION IS TO CHANGE PEOPLE’S PERCEPTIONS AROUND WASTE VIA INNOVATION’


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bauhaus T H E C E L E B R AT I O N

WORDS: NAME PICTURES: NAME

PICTURE: PHILIPPE HALSMAN/MAGNUM PHOTOS

10 0 YEARS OF

A never-ending source of inspiration, this design school, founded by Walter Gropius, is still influencing our world. Here, we explore its legacy and the year of events planned to mark its centenary Words AMY BRADFORD

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auhaus

is one of design’s most radical and influential concepts and this year marks the 100th anniversary of its founding. Established in 1919 by architect Walter Gropius, the experimental design school symbolised the avant-garde spirit of 1920s Germany. It flowered only briefly – closing its doors in 1933, the year Hitler came to power – yet its legacy continues to be felt, not just in the design world but also in many aspects of everyday life. The centenary is being marked with a year-long programme of events, which will culminate in September with the opening of the new Bauhaus Museum in Dessau, the location of the school’s home from 1925. The venue, designed by Barcelona-based architects González Hinz Zabala, will house a 49,000-strong collection of artefacts. The museum is not only a tribute to the Bauhaus legacy, but also a reflection of what made it so influential in the first place. A ‘black box’ gallery housed within a glazed framework, it honours the school’s Functionalist aesthetic, which stripped away decoration and exposed structural details. In this respect, it’s similar to the earliest ‘curtain-walled’, or glass-fronted buildings designed by Mies van der Rohe in 1950s America. The architect was one of several Bauhaus luminaries to emigrate to the United States from Nazi Germany. His groundbreaking Seagram Building in New York (1958) was a slice of the Bauhaus in exile; it also heralded the era of the glass skyscraper, which changed urban skylines forever. Ironically, when the Bauhaus opened, it didn’t have an architecture department – even though its name means House of Building. Gropius saw the school as a kind of commune, populated by masters and apprentices (or Bauhauslers) and based on medieval crafts guilds. The Bauhauslers’ task, he believed, was to remedy post-war Germany’s housing shortage. They would create a gesamtkunstwerk (total work of art), a domestic landscape reinvented from the ground up. Technology and mass production would be crucial weapons. ‘We want an architecture adapted to our world of machines, radios and fast cars,’ declared Gropius. Accordingly, the Bauhaus produced innovative furniture, homeware and textiles, all destined for modern homes and pioneered by the architecture faculty that opened in 1927. Pieces included such enduring classics as Marcel Breuer’s tubular steel-and-leather ‘Wassily’ chair (now produced by Knoll), named after artist Wassily Kandinsky, who taught colour theory at the school. Breuer also produced a whole series of steel furniture inspired by his bicycle handlebars, which is now made by German manufacturer Thonet. There were geometric patterned rugs by Gunta Stölzl (now produced by Christopher Farr) in the signature primary colours of the Bauhaus, glass-andchrome lamps by Wilhelm Wagenfeld (produced by Tecnolumen and sold at Aram) and metalware by Marianne Brandt, including lighting and teapots (now also made by Tecnolumen). That so many of these designs are still in production is testament to their supreme functionality. Bauhaus architecture was equally influential. After Bauhaus moved from Weimar to Dessau in 1925, Gropius designed a Modernist school building surrounded by a series of white, cube-shaped homes for its masters. In a more democratic spirit, he also created a model housing estate in the city’s Törten district. Each modern, terraced dwelling had a kitchen garden that encouraged self-sufficiency. Partly inspired by Britain’s garden cities, Dessau-Törten would later influence our own social housing schemes in the 1950s.

When the Nazis forced the Bauhaus to close in 1933, viewing it as a bastion of Jewishness and communism, many of its masters left for the safety of Britain and the United States, and there helped to shape Modernism’s ‘International Style’. But, happily, Germany’s own Bauhaus spirit was revived in 1953, when former student Max Bill set up the Ulm School of Design. One of its main achievements was the system of pictograms created by Otl Aicher for the 1972 Munich Olympics. Intended to allow athletes to find their way around, regardless of what language they spoke, Aicher’s stick figures have been a feature of public signage ever since. Today, you can still see the Bauhaus legacy at work in myriad ways. It’s there in the design of high-rise buildings, particularly those in the Post-Modernist mould built since the 1980s, and present in the aesthetic of contemporary designers such as Konstantin Grcic (look at his ‘Traffic’ furniture for Magis) and Muller Van Severen (whose designs are sold at Viaduct). Heal’s, one of the original retailers to sell Bauhaus pieces in the 1930s, has partnered with Knoll to showcase some of the most iconic designs – from Mies van der Rohe’s ‘Barcelona’ chair to the ‘Cesca’ seat by Marcel Breuer – as part of its ‘Bauhaus 100’ campaign, which also sees a roster of up-and-coming designers interpret the style. It inspires fashion, most recently in the form of Roksanda Ilincic’s colour blocking and Mary Katrantzou’s innovations with pattern (she emblazoned her AW18 collection with symbols from Bauhaus poster designs). Then, of course, there’s graphic design. Study Peter Saville’s album covers for the likes of Joy Division and New Order, or the logos of Facebook and Adidas (the Bauhaus pioneered the use of simple, lower-case fonts). Given the Bauhauslers’ eagerness to embrace a brave new world, it’s appropriate that their influence should be felt in the digisphere, too. Pick up one of Jonathan Ive’s pared-back devices for Apple – undoubtedly Bauhausesque in their simplicity – and log on to The Guardian’s website. Its recent redesign, complete with graphic circles, lines and primary colours, harks back to the Bauhaus. Alternatively, open the typeface menu on any computer: you’ll spot a ‘Bauhaus 93’ font, almost identical to the one Herbert Bayer designed for the school in 1926. The Bauhaus is everywhere – you just need to know where to look (bauhaus-dessau.de; bauhaus100.com). ➤

Top row, from left The new Bauhaus Museum in Dessau, designed by architects González Hinz Zabala.Gunta Stölzl’s ‘Homage to the Square – Red and Blue’ rug. Interior of the Bauhaus Museum Second row, from left Bauhaus Museum centenary artwork. Marcel Breuer steel chair, produced by Thonet. The original Bauhaus school in Dessau, home to the movement from 1925 Third row, from left Metal teapot by Marianne Brandt. Walter Gropius’ masters’ house in Dessau. Peter Saville’s cover for the 2015 New Order album Music Complete Bottom row, from left Muller Van Severen table and light. The ‘Bauhaus 93’ font. Mies van der Rohe’s Seagram Building, New York

PICTURES: ADDENDA ARCHITECTS, TILLMAN FRANZEN (TILLMANNFRANZEN.COM, VG BILD-KUNST, BONN 2018), GRANGER/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK, GETTY IMAGES

b

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bauhaus

from originals to new interpretations

1 2 3 4 5 6

‘Wagenfeld 25’ table lamp by Wilhelm Wagenfeld for Tecnolumen, £447, Aram (aram.co.uk) Designed in 1925, this glass-and-nickel classic is often known simply as ‘the Bauhaus lamp’. It’s made exactly as it was in the 1920s, using the same materials and stamped with the Bauhaus logo.

‘Wassily’ armchair by Marcel Breuer for Knoll, £1,908, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com) Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky taught colour theory at the Bauhaus. He admired Breuer’s minimalist take on the club chair, created in 1925, and had one in his home on the school campus, but it wasn’t named after him until several decades later.

‘Neues Sehen’ wallpaper, from £36 per square metre, Murals Wallpaper (muralswallpaper.co.uk) This is one of six new murals launched to mark the Bauhaus centenary, inspired by the colour theory of masters Josef Albers and László Moholy-Nagy. It references archive posters, reinterpreting the school’s signature colours.

48 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019

‘Plate 111’ rug by Gunta Stölzl, £1,440, Editions by Christopher Farr (christopherfarr.eu) Stölzl was the Bauhaus’ only female master and played a crucial role in developing its weaving workshop. This is one of three re-editions to be released by rug specialist Christopher Farr to mark the Bauhaus centenary.

‘S 533 F’ chair by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, re-interpreted by Besau-Marguerre, £1,919, Aram (aram.co.uk) Design duo Marcel Besau and Eva Marguerre have overseen this new twist on Mies van der Rohe’s 1927 chair, adding armrests and two new shades of leather.

PICTURE: CONSTANTIN MEYER

‘Tac’ teapot by Walter Gropius for Rosenthal, from £178, David Mellor (davidmellordesign.com) Although it wasn’t designed until 1969, this teapot by Bauhaus founder Gropius has all the hallmarks of the school’s style – simplicity, functionality and geometric precision. It comes in black and white.


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THE NAME TO KNOW

MARGRETHE ODGAARD Continually looking for fresh ways to combine tones, this colour alchemist is firmly on our 2019 radar

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: LINE THIT KLEIN, ANDREAS OMVIK-KOPI

‘After decades of grey, black and white, I’m happy to see warm and nurturing tones coming back to our lives – they make our bodies feel rooted and stimulate our senses in a nourishing way.’ So says the Danish textile and colour designer Margrethe Odgaard, illustrating the understanding of hues that has led an array of iconic design brands to collaborate with her. First discovered by Hay, which launched her ‘Fold Unfold’ tablecloth, Odgaard has since worked with Muuto on a range of rugs, throws and cushions, created textiles for Georg Jensen Damask and developed a new palette for Montana furniture, launching in May. With every product she works on, an in-depth study of colour is paramount, the starting point of which is often her ‘colour diaries’. Originally a personal project to record the mix of shades she spotted around the world, Odgaard’s painted and drawn observations form visual travel journals so beautiful that those from Japan, Morocco and Iceland have been put into print by design studio A. Petersen. ‘I’m fascinated by the colour combinations created by humans in architecture and objects,’ she tells us. ‘These schemes express design choices, behind which are traces of tradition and culture.’ Other influences in her work include abstract painters Agnes Martin, Ellsworth Kelly and Donald Judd. This year will see her release two books on colour – including a diary of the Nordic countries, which has been three years in the making – and the launch of curtains and upholstery fabric with Kvadrat, as well as two solo exhibitions in Danish galleries. As she says, the future’s looking bright (margretheodgaard.com).

Clockwise from top right An excerpt from Margrethe’s Japanese colour diary. ‘Pebble’ rug for Muuto. ‘Reykjavik’ daybed by Included Middle (Odgaard and furniture designer Chris L Halstrøm’s studio) for Skagerak. Fabric for Kvadrat

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COAL DROPS YARD, LONDON In an era of ‘click to buy’, it takes something exciting to tempt shoppers out onto the streets. Coal Drops Yard, London’s newest retail hotspot, is it

When you step into London’s Coal Drops Yard in King’s Cross, you’re greeted with a rather wonderful sight. Against a backdrop of Victorian cast-iron gasholders – which now contain high-spec apartments – emerge two curved roofs, meeting in the middle of the buildings they cover, as if pulled together by an invisible force. The force is that of architect and designer Thomas Heatherwick (below right), and his studio, which has woven its contemporary style into the existing fabric of the properties. The two modernised coal drop structures reach out and touch each other after 168 years of separation, covering a central area around which sits a curated edit of shops – from iconic brands to emerging names – as well as enticing restaurants, cafés and bars. ‘My studio has been based in King’s Cross for nearly 20 years and I’ve lived here for almost 17 – regenerating this location was an enormous responsibility,’ Heatherwick says. With the initial brief envisaging something more akin to a shopping mall, the discussion then turned to the idea of bridges to connect the buildings. ‘We had these two sticks like broken KitKat fingers that didn’t necessarily have any centrality,’ he continues. ‘The challenge was to create a heart that would glue everything together.’ The buzz phrase here is ‘industrial luxury’. The redevelopment of King’s Cross is in its 18th year, led by developer Argent, which is transforming the 67 acres (big enough to warrant a new postcode: N1C) into a hip hotspot, with a bill so far totalling £3 billion. Built in 1851 and 1860, the original coal drops structures were the end of the line for the expanse of railway that had just started spreading across the country – trains carrying coal from the north

WORDS: AMY MOOREA WONG PICTURES: LUKE HAYES, HEATHERWICK STUDIO

THE SHOPPING DISTRICT


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of England would be driven into the upper level of the buildings, dropping their cargo to ground level where it would be collected and delivered by horse and cart across the capital. ‘There’s a magic in these buildings,’ says Heatherwick. ‘You’ve got to hand it to the Victorians – this is their version of an Ikea warehouse.’ Falling into disrepair after being used for storing goods from the late 1800s, the site became home to legendary nightclubs Bagley’s and The Cross, popular venues for ravers of the 1990s – traces of the clubs’ brightly painted interior bricks have been preserved on the new site. A big chunk of the eastern coal drop had been burned out, meaning that the roof needed to be replaced.

been a really unique project – hundreds of people have contributed, and the artisanal work has been extraordinary,’ continues Hall. ‘Coal Drops Yard is about enriching, delighting and uniting,’ explains Craig White, senior project director at Argent. ‘It’s not about consumption, it’s about offering a lovely experience.’ The team met more than 1,200 brands in its bid to create an innovative shopping experience, and the result is a joyous mix of old favourites and new discoveries, the luxury as well as the affordable. Lower Stable Street, situated off the main yard, will house 11 smaller stores with shorter leases, and students from neighbouring Central Saint Martins will be encouraged to host pop-ups there.

‘COAL DROPS YARD IS ABOUT ENRICHING, DELIGHTING AND UNITING. IT’S NOT ABOUT CONSUMPTION, IT’S ABOUT THE EXPERIENCE’ It was this necessity that prompted the idea of using the roof itself to form a central element, as well as adding a third level. With the eastern coal drop the same length as St Paul’s Cathedral, this was a colossal project. ‘We put the equivalent of a stadium roof onto the existing buildings,’ says Morwenna Hall, chief operating officer and director at Argent, who has overseen the project for the past seven years. The team inserted columns through the buildings to support the weight of the enlarged roof, which was covered with 80,000 Welsh slate tiles, taken from the same quarry the originals were sourced from in the 1850s. Lefthanded slaters were employed especially to do one half of it. ‘It’s

‘It’s an incubator for young businesses,’ says Frederique Jungman, senior project manager at Argent. The starting line-up includes Honest Jon’s record store and fashion label Ally Capellino. Far from being a sterile, enclosed shopping centre, the progressive architecture of Coal Drops Yard is a sight to behold, a bona fide new shopping district with a unique offering – the combination of which is surely the future of retail. ‘Our interest was in making an amazing space – to us the shopping was simply an excuse for that place to exist,’ admits Heatherwick. ‘It’s really the human experience that is the critical thing – to be with your fellow humans is now more precious than ever’ (coaldropsyard.com).

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THE SHOWROOM

SEM, MILAN

The brainchild of Claudio and Mauro Spotti, founders of much-loved interiors boutique Spotti Milano, SEM (Spotti Edizioni Milano) is this year’s most exciting new furniture company. And now you can see its first collections for yourself. At its Milan showroom, pieces by Giacomo Moor, Marcante-Testa, Elisa Ossino and Paolo Rizzo – all selected for the way they reflect what Claudio describes as SEM’s ‘common concept of elegance, functionality and passionate, playful irony’ – are on display. Highlights include Ossino’s Bauhaus-inspired ‘Check’ table (above). Launching a new brand is always a brave move, but, encouraged by Spotti Milano’s 30 years of experience, Claudio and Mauro were confident in their own, fresh perspective. ‘Our desire is to measure ourselves differently; to be more dedicated and take more risks,’ says Claudio. ‘We are speaking to inspired contemporary collectors’ (sem-milano.com). 54 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019

‘SEM’S PIECES SHARE A CONCEPT OF ELEGANCE, FUNCTIONALITY AND PASSIONATE, PLAYFUL IRONY’

WORDS: CLARE SARTIN PICTURE: DELFINO SISTO LEGNANI

Plan your pilgrimage to the first space dedicated to this year’s hottest new furniture brand


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TRENDS

THE FUTURE

By 2030, we’ll be living in tech-controlled co-living houses, if Ikea’s innovation lab Space10 is correct. Until then, gadgets will become more hidden and helpful Words SOPHIE CHARARA Illustrations MATT NEEDLE

UPGRADE FROM THE OUTSIDE

energy efficient home, look no further than Tesla’s ‘Solar Roof’ and ‘Powerwall 2’ smart battery setup (from £5,970; tesla.com). The clever solar panel tiles come in a choice of four finishes that mimic the look of regular roof tiles and, with its powerful lithium-ion battery, this upgrade could provide up to 100 per cent of your home’s power. Alternatively, for those wanting an instant smart home, there’s Kasita’s ‘move-in-ready’, stackable, prefabricated apartments. The company plans to begin building ready-torent homes, which will come with a wealth of connected technology installed. ➤

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One spot destined for a tech makeover is the front door. There’s already a range of smart security cameras to deter burglars, such as the Nest ‘Cam IQ Outdoor’ (£329; nest.com/uk), but you’ll soon be able to take complete control with Nest’s ‘Secure’ alarm system. Due to arrive in the UK later this year, it connects to the brand’s ‘Hello’ video doorbell (£229) and the, currently US-only, ‘Nest x Yale’ smart lock. Plus, if Amazon’s new ‘Key’ service comes to fruition, letting couriers and guests into our homes when we’re not there will become the norm. If, for you, a smarter home means a more

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VOICE-CONTROLLED SOUND AND VISION

Future living room technology will do three key things: look super-stylish, work with everything and obey voice commands. The ‘Sonos One’ speaker (£199; sonos.com), available in limited-edition colours thanks to the brand’s collaboration with Hay, will get Google Assistant voice controls, as well as Amazon’s Alexa, this year. Sonos is also working with Ikea on the ‘Symfonisk’ speaker – billed as the ‘future of sound’, it will be designed to slot into Ikea’s ‘Billy’ bookcases. Statement TVs, such as Bodo Sperlein’s Bauhaus-inspired ‘Bild X’ for Loewe, will turn televisions into works of art. Or, in the case of Samsung’s ‘The Frame’ (from £1,299; samsung.com/uk), make them all but invisible, mimicking your wallpaper with the clever ‘Ambient Mode’. Of course, Apple will also be staking a claim on your home. ‘As well as the inevitable “HomePod 2” smart speaker upgrade, it’s thought to be working on a new streaming service and an affordable smart TV streaming stick,’ says James Stables, co-founder of smart home site The Ambient (the-ambient.com). What will you relax in while you enjoy this new living room tech? Perhaps LG and Natuzzi’s ‘Colosseo’ smart sofa by Mauro Lipparini, which will customise its cushion placement to suit whoever’s sitting on it. Or maybe the ‘Ori’ furniture designed by Yves Béhar and MIT, which will reconfigure itself at the touch of a button. K I T C H E N S T H AT W I L L D O THE WORK FOR YOU

Samsung has vowed that by 2020 every one of its devices will be connected to the internet via its ‘Bixby’ and ‘SmartThings’ systems. Considering the Alexa microwave is already available in the US, we think the tech giant could get there a year early. ‘In the kitchen, we’ve been seeing a rise in appliances integrating Google Assistant and Alexa, so automation will become more prevalent,’ says Katrina Mills, smart home buyer at John Lewis & Partners. ‘Customers will be able to control their oven or coffee machine with a simple voice command.’ Intelligent food storage, such as Ovie’s ‘Smarterware’ (due to launch in March) and the ‘Java Smart Container’ by WePlenish (£32; weplenish.com), will cut food waste and place shopping orders for you. Even more intriguing is Electrolux’s plan for, in the words of Simon Bradford, VP of design, ‘appliances that feel your presence’. This includes the ‘SenseOven 2.0’ that will turn its tinted door clear as you approach. ➤


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TRENDS

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TRENDS

DISCREET TECH FOR THE BEDROOM AND BEYOND

As our homes get ever more connected, the bedroom is becoming a sacred space for tech timeouts, and that trend appears set to continue. Still, a few gadgets designed with the aim of increasing our wellbeing might make the cut, including Awair’s smart air quality monitor (£169; getawair.com). Upgrades to the Amazon ‘Echo Spot’ (£119.99; amazon.co.uk) and Google’s ‘Home Hub’ (£139; store.google.com) will become bedroom essentials, providing weather and diary updates, plus much more. We can also make space for Japanese firm Mui’s beautiful wooden home controller (£388; mui.jp). The energy-saving Nest ‘Thermostat E’ (£199; nest.com/uk) will find a place on our bedside table, but the jury’s still out on the ‘Moodo’ fragrance diffuser (£80; moodo.co), and there’s understandable reticence from some people about the Facebook videocalling device ‘Portal’ (available in the US) – privacy and trust will be more important than ever in the connected home.

A FAR CRY FROM THE FLASHY GADGETS OF THE PAST, THE LATEST SMART HOME DEVICES ARE SUBTLE, STYLISH AND INCREASINGLY GREEN T H E E C O - F R I E N D LY S M A R T B AT H R O O M

The future of the bathroom is water saving, sustainable and built to serve your morning routines. Infrared-controlled hands-free taps have long been a feature in public bathrooms, but attractive designs like Grohe’s ‘Eurocube E’ (£839; grohe.co.uk) are bringing them into homes. Meanwhile, Hydrao’s ‘Shower Aloe’ showerhead (£63; hydrao.com) helps you go green by changing colour to show your water consumption. Philips Hue now caters to the bathroom, with spotlights and its ‘Adore’ illuminated make-up mirror (£229; meethue.com), which can be adjusted by the app or voice. The ‘Adore’ isn’t the only mirror coming to the market with increased intelligence. Smart mirrors that will keep you up to date on the news and weather as you brush your teeth will be big this year.

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THE MOOD

SOFTLY SCULPTED Warm honeyed tones and natural textures lend this season’s striking furniture a calmer feel Photography CARLFRIED VERWAAYEN Styling MONIQUE VAN DER REIJDEN

From left ‘Big Hexagon’ vinyl flooring, £48.94 per square metre, Moduleo (moduleo.co.uk). ‘#4’ candleholders, price on application, Sophie Dries (sophiedries.com). ‘Blumenampel’ hanging planter by Zascho Petkow for Atelier Haussmann, £268, Pamono (pamono.co.uk). ‘Toptun’ armchair by Victoria Yakusha, from £985, Maïno (maino-design.com). ‘Ripple’ fruit bowl by Dan Yeffet, £840, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Lito’ porcelain vessel with candle by L’Objet, £135, Trouva (trouva.com). ‘#1B’ vessel, price on application, Sophie Dries (sophiedries.com) ➤


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Above, from left Semi-circle sculptures (on stairs), price on application, Studio Thinking Hand (studiothinkinghand.com). ‘Roly Poly’ chair by Faye Toogood for Driade, £515, Panik (panik-design.com). Three part sculpture, price on application, Studio Thinking Hand (studiothinkinghand.com) Opposite, from left ‘Oko’ side table by Christophe Delcourt, £1,235, GMR Interiors (gmr-interiors.com). ‘1.04’ table light, £757, Haos (haos.fr). ‘Botolo’ chair by Cini Boeri for Arflex, from £1,255, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). ‘Motherboard’ mirror by David/Nicolas, £3,120, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Marbled Salts’ table by Roxane Lahidji, £600, Mint (mintshop.co.uk). ‘Lito’ paperweight by L’Objet, £250, Liberty (libertylondon.com). ‘Commiato Di Venere’ rug by Alessandra Baldereschi, £4,312, Nodus (nodusrug.it). ‘Modular’ sofa by Erik Rasmussen, from £3,915, Paustian (paustian.com). ‘Mirror’ coffee table by Kristina Dam Studio, £690, Pad Lifestyle (padlifestyle.com). ‘Stone’ candleholders by Tom Dixon, from £100 each, Heal’s (heals.com). Candles by Ester and Erik, £6.25 each, Trouva (trouva.com). Semi-circle sculptures, as before ➤

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Opposite, from left ‘Te5229’ linoleum flooring, from £48 per square metre, Forbo (forbo.com). ‘Moby’ pouf by Tej Chauhan, £419, Artifort (artifort.com). ‘Talisman’ mirror by Studio Pepe, £2,529, CC-Tapis (cc-tapis.com). Marble candleholder by Lyra Paonazzo, £711; ‘Orion’ tall candleholder, £1,334; ‘Orion’ wide candleholder, £1,423, all Ooumm (ooumm.com). Decorative circle, £107, Kristina Dam Studio (kristinadam.dk). ‘Bos’ vase by Christophe Delcourt, from £2,137, Collection Particulière (collection-particuliere.fr). Ceramic vase, stylist’s own. ‘Maket’ black vase by RSW for Pulpo, from £145, Mohd (shop.mohd.it) Below, from left ‘Terra Incognita – Tulpar’ rug by Faberhama, £19,355, Nodus (nodusrug.it). ‘Selene’ dining table, £14,773, Emmemobili (emmemobili.it). ‘Nappe’ pendant light by Marco Zito, £989, Masiero (masierogroup.com). ‘Tank’ carafe, £110; ‘Tank’ decanter, £90; ‘Etch’ tealight holder, £40, all by Tom Dixon, Heal’s (heals.com). ‘Lunar’ chair, £2,700, Bohinc Studio (bohincstudio.com) ➤


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Below, from left ‘Atlas 10756’ fabric, £143 per metre, Zimmer + Rohde (zimmer-rohde.com). ‘Neolit’ bowl by Studio Furthermore for Pulpo, £163, Mohd (shop.mohd.it). ‘Palazzo Valet’ tray by Giobagnara, £740, Artemest (artemest.com). ‘Ripple’ carafe, £30; ‘Ripple’ glass (sold as set of four), £48, both Ferm Living (fermliving.com). ‘Palazzo Triple’ candleholder by Giobagnara, £2,090, Artemest (artemest.com) Opposite, from left ‘Sense of Marble’ carpet in ‘Mocca Crema’, £44.45 per square metre, Desso (desso.co.uk). ‘Scala’ white stool by Stéphane Parmentier, £1,267, Giobagnara (giobagnara.com). ‘Terp’ pouf by Mike & Maaike, from £318, Artifort (artifort.com). ‘Buzzi Mirage XL’ mirror by Alain Gilles, £2,310, BuzziSpace (buzzi.space). ‘Inciso’ tap by David Rockwell, £1,606, Gessi (gessi.com). ‘Celestial’ bowl by L’Objet, £860, Amara (amara.com). ‘Tonbo’ towel rack by Junpei & Iori Tamaki Design Studio, £1,526, Living Divani (livingdivani.it). ‘Vanni’ towel by Missoni Home, £202, Amara (amara.com). ‘Scala’ brown stool by Stéphane Parmentier, £1,411, Giobagnara (giobagnara.com). Sculptures, price on application, Studio Thinking Hand (studiothinkinghand.com)

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LOOKS SPRING / SUMMER 2019

Edited by KIER A BUCKLEY-JONES

COLOURED STONE G RAPH IC I LLUSTRATIO N RUST AND ROSE CO NTEM PO RARY TI M BER


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THE LOOK

Coloured stone

The design world is looking beyond classic white marble, embracing and celebrating the world’s wealth of naturally occurring shades

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1 ‘Medianera’ floor lamp by Matteo Fogale and Studio Claro, £1,170, Matteo Fogale (matteofogale.com) 2 ‘QBIC’ side table in Breccia Pernice, from £1,150, Draenert (draenert.de) 3 ‘Versi’ carafe by Patricia Urquiola, £357, Editions Milano (editionsmilano.com) 4 ‘Amadora’ occasional tables, from £270 each, Ligne Roset (ligne-roset.com) 5 ‘Gravity’ table lamp by Space Copenhagen for Gubi, from £544, Skandium (skandium.com) 6 ‘Marinace Rosso’ granite, from £280 per square metre, Gerald Culliford (geraldculliford.co.uk) 7 ‘Hunter Dunn’ paint, £53.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com)


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S/S L O O K S

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8 ‘Calacatta Candy’ honed marble tile, £138 each, Artisans of Devizes (artisansofdevizes.com) 9 ‘Carrara Grande’ wallpaper, £75 per roll, Designers Guild (designersguild.com) 10 ‘Saarinen’ dining table by Eero Saarinen with Rosso Rubino top, £8,760, Knoll (knoll.com) 11 ‘Classico’ bookend by Studiocharlie, £115, Monologue (monologuelondon.com) 12 Rock candleholder, £130 for a set of two, Tom Dixon (tomdixon.net) 13 ‘Omaggio a Morandi’ object by Elisa Ossino, £360, Salvatori (salvatori.it) 14 ‘Niemeyer’ bowl, £740, Greg Natale (gregnatale.com) ➤

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THE LOOK

Graphic illustration Combining fine black outlines and loose, expressive brushstrokes, these cutting-edge pieces evoke the creativity of illustrative art

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1 ‘Marselis’ floor lamp by Kaschkasch, £225, Hay (hay.dk) 2 ‘Cross Leg Counter Stool’ by Magnus Long, upholstered in ‘Cadet’ cotton, £1,145, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk) 3 Oak ‘Day Bed One’, £3,055, Another Country (anothercountry.com); ‘Contour’ embroidered mattress and bolsters, £1,050, Custhom (custhom.co.uk) 4 ‘Body Positive’ cushion, £22, Debenhams (debenhams.com) 5 ‘Stacks’ unframed print by Gayle Mansfield Designs, £20, White Black Grey (whiteblackgrey.co.uk) 6 Throw by Jaime Hayón, £253, Fritz Hansen (fritzhansen.com) 7 ‘Cook’s Blue’ paint, £45 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball


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(farrow-ball.com) 8 ‘Kagoshima’ rug by Thomas Heatherwick, £1,555, Aram (aram.co.uk) 9 ‘Zen’ wallpaper from the ‘Nippon’ collection, £76 per roll, Sandberg Wallpaper (sandbergwallpaper.com) 10 ‘Bodies’ wallpaper by BaTabasTa, £60 per roll, Mad Atelier (mad-atelier.com) 11 ‘Carlo’ sideboard by Matthew Long, £550, Habitat (habitat.co.uk) 12 ‘Square’ vases (three pictured), from £55 each, Myer Halliday Design (myerhalliday.co.uk) 13 ‘Rocket’ small vase by Sophie Alda, £65, Trouva (trouva.com) ➤

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THE LOOK

Rust and rose

The hottest shades in interiors both come from the warmer end of the spectrum – perfect when combined, they add a glow to any room

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1 ‘Casa Modernista’ sofa by Doshi Levien, £6,996, Moroso (moroso.it) 2 Velvet cushion in ‘Rust Red’, £40; 3 Velvet cushion in ‘Dusty Pink’, £35, both Raj Tent Club (rajtentclub.com) 4 ‘Trays’ by Jasper Morrison, £89 for a set of three, Vitra (vitra.com) 5 ‘Benjamin’ pendant light in ‘Rust’, from £159, Heal’s (heals.com) 6 ‘Bliss’ rug by Mae Engelgeer, £7,668, CC-Tapis (cc-tapis.com) 7 ‘Pittorica’ tiles by Studiopepe, £81 per square metre, Ceramica Bardelli (ceramicabardelli.com) 8 ‘Cochineal’ paint, from £13.50 for 2.5 litres, Bauwerk Colour (bauwerkcolour.co.uk) 9 ‘Circus’ pouf in ‘Blush’, £580, Normann


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Copenhagen (normann-copenhagen.com) 10 ‘Lampe Gras No 206’ desk lamp by Bernard-Albin Gras, £406, Mad Atelier (mad-atelier.com) 11 ‘Tulou’ coffee table by GamFratesi for Hay, £165, Nest (nest.co.uk) 12 ‘Mist’ vase by Tamer Nakisçi, from £80, Nude (nudeglass.com) 13 ‘Clark’ bottle vase, £25, Habitat (habitat.co.uk) 14 ‘Tearoom’ chair by Nick Ross, £1,320, Menu (menu.as) ➤

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THE LOOK

Contemporary timber Stylish homes are going against the grain, layering tones of wood, from palest ash to darkest ebony, to create a distinctive aesthetic

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1 ‘Sibast No 8’ chair in natural oak by Helge Sibast, £848, Aram (aram.co.uk) 2 ‘R40’ mirror by Sebastian Wrong for OWL, from £249, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com) 3 ‘Range Life II - Cog’ side table in ash by Jonah Takagi, £2,500, Monologue (monologuelondon.com) 4 ‘Patria’ cabinet in European beech and cane, £7,850, Byron & Gómez (byronandgomez.co.uk) 5 ‘Insert’ side table by Mario Tsai, £489, Ferm Living (fermliving.com) 6 ‘Venture Plank’ engineered oak flooring, £103.14 per square metre, Havwoods (havwoods.co.uk) 7 ‘Dusk Oak Herringbone’ parquet flooring, from £155 per square metre, Root (root-london.com)


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8 ‘3D layered wooden surface’ in birch, £3,000, Atelier Anthony Roussel (anthonyroussel.com) 9 ‘CH23’ chair in black oak by Hans J Wegner, from £746, Carl Hansen & Søn (carlhansen.com) 10 Standing vessel in sweet chestnut wood by Max Bainbridge, price on application, Forest + Found (forest-and-found.com) 11 ‘Airisto’ bench/table by Joanna Laajisto, £623, Made by Choice (madebychoice.com) 12 ‘Carved Ellipse’ bowl, £35, French Connection (frenchconnection.com)

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HOMES SPRING / SUMMER 2019

M ELLOW YELLOW ARCH ITECTU RAL D ISSO NAN CE THE NEW AGE OF JA Z Z TI M BER & SKY REKINDLED TR ADITIONS WI LD ABAN D O N


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ME

HOME TREND

Words AMY BRADFORD Photography MICHAEL SINCLAIR

LL

Cheerful and soothing, turmeric-like hues are spicing up interiors. This London home showcases their power to create a heartening glow

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THE TREND Of all colours, yellow is the brightest and most noticeable to the human eye. According to the principles of colour psychology, it represents energy, idealism and looking to the future. Perhaps that’s why it’s one of this year’s biggest trends as optimism and reassurance are what we crave right now. Yellow’s influence has certainly spread far and wide. Tones from acid lemon through to banana and sunflower were plentiful on the spring/summer 2019 catwalks, while Heckfield Place, Hampshire’s award-winning country house hotel, boasts the saffron-hued Ochre Room, created by interior designer Ben Thompson. The hottest yellows, though, are arguably the spicy turmeric shades seen in this London home, designed by creative studio and reclamation specialist Retrouvius. With their slight 1970s feel (see more about this larger trend on p20), they look great with warm woods and earthy tones.

THE HOME This four-bedroom terraced house in west London is home to a full-time mum, her advertising executive husband and their three young children. They’d lived here for a few years before bringing in Retrouvius to refresh its white colour palette and tired layout. ‘There were lots of long corridors, and the side return felt very dislocated from the rest of the house,’ explains Retrouvius co-founder Maria Speake. The team opened up the space by knocking down some walls, reconfiguring the entrances to certain rooms so they flowed more easily, and adding a full-width extension to the back of the house, which contains an impressive openplan dining and living room.

WITH THEIR 1970S FEEL, SPICY SHADES OF YELLOW WORK WELL WITH WARM WOODS AND EARTHY TONES

Living room A vintage linen sofa is surrounded by tropical greenery, which helps to balance the warmer colours on the walls. The coffee table is one of the many antique finds in this home Stockist details on p167 ➤


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‘FROM THE OUTSIDE, VICTORIAN HOUSES LIKE THESE ALL LOOK QUITE SIMILAR, BUT YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO GET WHEN YOU STEP INSIDE. THAT’S WHAT MAKES THEM MAGICAL’

Dining area Vintage pendant lights and iroko dining table (made from reclaimed laboratory desks) complement the turmeric colour of Emery & Cie’s ‘Jaune Trop Cuit’ Kitchen A splashback made from onyx (McMarmilloyd sells similar stones) adds interest behind bespoke iroko cabinets Stockist details on p167 ➤

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T H E PA L E T T E A russet shade in the front sitting room, that the homeowners had fallen in love with and Maria describes as a ‘burnt rose’, was the inspiration for the house’s colour scheme. After a day spent looking through the Retrouvius archive, they chose a turmeric tint to go with it. ‘They wanted the house to feel cosy and moody, but these two colours are a strong contrast, so we had to find some inbetween shades to link them,’ says Maria. The chalky mauve walls in the hallway, the cream furnishings in the living room and the ‘bruised apricot’ shades in the upstairs bedrooms all create calm pause points. This balance of warm and cool hues was echoed in other ways. Woods – including reclaimed iroko furniture and mahogany parquet flooring – make the spicier colours glow, while lots of tropical plants act as a palate cleanser and a further nod to the 1970s trend. ‘The greenery helps to balance everything out,’ explains Maria, ‘so the house feels rich without being cluttered.’ retrouvius.com

THE OWNERS CHOSE A COLOUR SCHEME THAT COMBINES CHALKY MAUVE, RUSSET AND RICH YELLOW

HallwayThe colours in this vintage French tapestry from Retrouvius helped to inspire the home’s palette, which includes the walls painted in Emery & Cie’s ‘Terre de Sienne’. The French antique sofa is covered in ochre velvet – try Designers Guild – and the reclaimed mahogany parquet is from Retrouvius Stockist details on p167 ➤

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Sitting room The velvet sofas are by George Smith, with velvet cushions from Kirsten Hecktermann and patterned cushions covered in fabrics by Tissus d’Hélène. For a similar pleated floorlamp, try the ‘Akari’ range by Isamu Noguchi for Vitra Stockist details on p167 ➤

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‘IN A HOME WHERE YOU HAVE LOTS OF FEATURES SUCH AS CORNICES, USING THE SAME COLOUR EVERYWHERE MODERNISES THE SPACE AND CALMS IT DOWN’

Bathroom Oak benches from Retrouvius have been fitted in the shower, which is clad in a honey-toned onyx. The brass showerhead and fittings are from Waterworks Main bedroom Emery & Cie’s ‘Lamelle de Champignon’ paint is a contrast to the richer palette downstairs. The headboard is covered in velvet and vintage embroideries – Nest Design can create one like this – and paired with linen bedding and cushions by Libeco Stockist details on p167


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HOME TREND

ARCHITECTURAL


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DISSONANCE Displaying an equal love for period features and modern design, this unique Melbourne home looks forward and back Words TESSA PEARSON Photography SHANNON MCGRATH


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‘WE’RE LUCKY TO BE SURROUNDED BY INSPIRING ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIORS’


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Dining room Marc Krusin’s ‘Clay’ table by for Desalto is teamed with ‘TV’ chairs by Pierre Paulin for Ligne Roset and a pendant light by Delightfull. Artwork by Patrick Dagg is placed against the wall behind and a custom-made sofa by Simone Haag can be seen in the living room Stockist details on p167 ➤


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THE TREND

THE HOUSE

THE DESIGN

With the issue of sustainability now rightfully at the forefront of any design conversation, architects have begun thinking about whether they can improve existing buildings in even more inventive ways rather than starting from scratch. Taking the best bits of heritage properties and adding to them, working with historic bricks-and-mortar to create something that’s both old and excitingly new is the way forward. We’ve seen it in the way British architecture firms such as Paper House Project and Nimtim lovingly breathe life into warehouses and Georgian homes, keeping the façades but opening them up inside. It’s a trend that shows respect, but not deference, to period details, and means that buildings that have been around for decades will stay for decades more.

This approach to reinvention is highlighted in Australia, where Josh Sgro and Carrie Davies had long admired the fretworked façade of this three-bedroom Victorian house in Melbourne. ‘We wanted a forever home that we could grow into,’ say the couple, who decided that a contemporary extension would make the property more suitable for family life with their five-year-old son Max. They tasked local firm Andrew Simpson Architects with building the new structure, which accommodates an eat-in kitchen, living area and laundry room, plus a study on the second floor. ‘We wanted the new part of the home to be distinct from the original ones,’ explain Carrie and Josh. ‘But it still reflects elements of the old house, which we felt was a way of respecting the architecture.’

Inspired by the gabled roof of the late-19thcentury façade, Andrew Simpson Architects devised a striking new structure with an angular geometry that defines the look of many of the rooms. ‘The landscape was key to knitting together the heritage building and the new extension,’ say the architects, who worked closely with garden designer Renata Fairhall to create overlapping spaces and stepped courtyards. Three of its glazed walls slide back to open up the new living space to the garden, while a palette of natural materials continues the indoor-outdoor theme. For the interiors, Carrie and Josh turned to designer Simone Haag, who focused her energies on the original parts of the Victorian house. ‘The new architecture required very little decoration, but the front rooms needed to look much warmer and more welcoming,’ explains Haag. The owners’ main concern was the lack of natural light, but rather than trying to brighten things, Haag embraced the darkness with a moody scheme that’s a counterpoint to the extension’s airy feel. As the latter is designed for family living, she had the freedom to choose more luxurious pieces for the ‘grown-up’ rooms. ‘We’re lucky to be surrounded by inspiring architecture and interiors,’ say Carrie and Josh. ‘It feels like home.’ asimpson.com.au; simonehaag.com.au

WORKING TO CREATE BUILDINGS THAT ARE BOTH OLD AND EXCITINGLY NEW IS THE WAY FORWARD 100 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019


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Opposite ‘Togo’ sofas by Michel Ducaroy for Ligne Roset sit on a custom-designed rug by Simone Haag Above A ‘Glove-Up’ chair by Patricia Urquiola for Molteni & C is placed beside a ‘Tama’ coffee table by EOOS for Walter Knoll. The pendant light is the ‘Model 2065’ by Gino Sarfatti for Astep Stockist details on p167 ➤


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‘WE WANTED THE NEW PART OF THE HOME TO BE DISTINCT FROM THE ORIGINAL’

Opposite The opulently dark colours of the dining room create a pleasing contrast with the airy aesthetic of the new extension Kitchen Concrete was used for the countertops and ‘Block-L’ stools by Giannis Topizopoulos from local brand Hub sit by the peninsula. The dining table and chairs are by Stellar Works Stockist details on p167 ➤

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 103


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THIS TREND SHOWS RESPECT FOR , BUT NOT DEFERENCE TO, PERIOD DETAILS

New living area The ceiling and walls are lined with cedar, while the floors is American oak. A sofa from Melbournebased Jardan, ‘Calin’ chair by Pascal Morgue for Ligne Roset and floor light by E15 perfectly suit the modern look Stockist details on p167

104 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019


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HOME TREND

THE NEW JA ZZ AGE

1920s style is back in fashion, with Art Decoinspired windows and brass accents adding glamour to this apartment in Normandy Words EMMA LOVE Photography MONICA SPEZIA/LIVING INSIDE

Anyone who has an eye for cutting-edge interior design can’t fail to have noticed the revival of Art Deco opulence. From the prevalence of polished brass accessories on the high street to a renewed affection for architectural details reminiscent of the famous façade of New York’s Chrysler building, it’s clear that Poirot-era beauty is going through a style re-emergence. The exciting revelation with this trend is that you don’t have to be the proud owner of a 1920s building dripping with period features to get the look. This three-bedroom weekend home that Laure Marie shares with husband Thomas and two daughters, Louise, nine, and Jeanne, eight, in the city of Cabourg on the Normandy coast has Art Deco references at every turn. ‘The exterior of the villa-style building is simple, with big windows and geometric details; it’s like an architectural manifesto for Art Deco in its purest form,’ says Laure, who has her own interior design studio, Stiletta, in Paris. However, not all of the features are original, and it’s these that offer the most inspiration. When the couple bought the apartment five years ago, they reconfigured the layout,

combining the living room with a partitioned kitchen and dining area to create a semiopen-plan family space. ‘The living area was too big in comparison to the other rooms, so we added the kitchen into it and turned that space into a third bedroom,’ Laure says. To make the most of the impressive height of the apartment, each bedroom includes a mezzanine level (two are framed with decorative ironwork, a typical Art Deco touch) with extra beds for guests. ‘For me, it was important for the interior of my home to reflect the building, so I kept the majority of the walls white and decided to focus on using graphic patterns that are easy to identify with the era – such as scales, hexagons and zigzags – on furniture and accessories. I recreated the look of stainedglass windows using a pattern that I printed onto vinyl stickers, and designed furniture, such as the bathroom vanity unit, which is very Art Deco in its shape,’ explains Laure. She buys small vintage 1920s accessories, such as hexagonal bookends and decorative marble boxes, from flea markets and Ebay. ‘I wanted to mimic Art Deco style but with a contemporary touch,’ she adds. stiletta.fr

Living room Interior architect Laure sits on an Ercol sofa from the ‘Originals’ collection. The monochrome rug is from La Redoute and the coffee table is a design by Gubi Stockist details on p167 ➤


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Living room The black frame of the Ercol sofa complements the Scandinavian leather chairs, which were handed down from one of Laure’s aunts. The floor lamp is by Original BTC and the windows are decorated with Art Deco-style patterns that Laure created using vinyl stickers Stockist details on p167 ➤


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‘THE BUILDING ITSELF IS LIKE AN ARCHITECTURAL MANIFESTO FOR ART DECO IN ITS PUREST FORM’ Above, clockwise from top left Marble coffee table by Gubi. A trio of bolster cushions designed by Laure. The ‘Hang It All’ coat rack by Charles & Ray Eames for Vitra decorates the hallway. Brass accents on the walls, from artworks to framed mirrors, add further Art Deco style Kitchen Laure has customised Ikea cupboards with leather handles from Superfront and marble-effect vinyls on the doors Stockist details on p167 ➤

110 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019


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‘I’VE FOCUSED ON USING GRAPHIC PATTERNS THAT ARE EASY TO IDENTIFY WITH THE ART DECO ERA’ Opposite Art Deco-inspired iron railings delineate the raised sleeping area (designed for guests) in one of the bedrooms Above, clockwise from top left ‘Plane’ brass pendant lights by Tom Dixon. A ‘Butterfly Stool’ by Yori Yanagi for Vitra decorates the bedroom. Monochrome tiles by Beauregard Studio. Green tiles by Beauregard Studio and an Ikea vanity unit adapted with a faux wood veneer vinyl coating Stockist details on p167

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 113


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HOME TREND

TIMBER

& SKY

Pairing wood with shades of cerulean blue brings out the depth of both. It’s a cutting-edge way to add heat to the coolest of palettes Words HANNAH BOOTH Photography MADS MOGENSEN


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Living area A black swinging ‘Monkey’ lamp by Seletti, a vintage sofa and pouf by Fischnaller and copper side tables by Versmissen complement the blue of this double-height space Stockist details on p167 ➤


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THE TREND

T H E PA L E T T E

THE HOME

Comfort is important in the home, but it is bold decorating choices that define your living space. Today, natural wood, with its Scandinavian aesthetic, is being teamed with uplifting colours to elevate it beyond the neutral and make a strong, contemporary statement. This combination of timber and brights isn’t just on display in this dreamy home in northern Italy. It can also be seen at the new Market Hall in London’s Victoria – a beguiling mix of wooden tables and emerald and sapphire hued tiles – and Casa Pastor, a restaurant in the new Coal Drops Yard retail development at King’s Cross (see p52), where an indoor tree has been paired with neon chairs. Confidence and warmth: it’s the perfect combination for 2019.

Stefan Rier, architect and owner of this spectacular home in Siusi, northern Italy, elected to mix natural wood with a single colour: blue. This restricted palette anchors his home in its natural surroundings. The pairing is as fresh as the clear mountain air of the Dolomites. Teal – classic and refined – gives weight to the pale timber tones and offsets metallic accents, such as copper side tables in the living area and a polished brass countertop and fittings in the kitchen. The choice of colour and material also has personal resonance. Stefan grew up in this village, and by using timber and the local farmhouse vernacular – the structure is designed to reflect the hay barns that dot this landscape – he is paying homage to his roots. He spent decades living on the coast in southern Italy, too, and the blues also reflect the sea, the sky and the effect of ‘sunlight on tiles,’ he recalls from his time there. ‘Blue is traditionally thought of as a cold colour but here, the reddish-toned wood and the fabric walls warm it up.’ The trick to working a concise scheme like this, he says, is not to rush: ‘The build took four years, so I had time to create moodboards, do mock-ups of the rooms, and find exactly the right shades.’

The house that Stefan shares with his wife Stefanie and baby daughter Tilda consists of a timber frame that contains a ten-metrehigh, open-plan living/dining/kitchen space. With a woodburning stove at its heart, this is the social hub of the home. ‘I designed it to be an outward-looking space, like a town square,’ explains Stefan. Two cubes containing bedrooms are clad in geometric-patterned blue fabric by Arte and suspended at first-floor level, and another at the top of the building houses a sauna. These spaces are connected by a decorative, laser-cut metal staircase that winds its way through the property like a ribbon. Only the bedrooms and en-suite bathrooms have doors, lending the building an airy feel. Three sides of the house are clad entirely in wood. The fourth façade is floor-to-ceiling glass, decorated with a slender crossbeam lattice – the effect is especially striking in the sauna, where the timbers frame the views of the nearby mountains. There are playful touches throughout: white mice – in the form of Seletti lights – scuttle along beams, and a ‘Monkey’ pendant light hangs in the living area. ‘I tried to create a playful space,’ says Stefan. ‘Life is fun – it isn’t just for work.’

TEAMING WOOD WITH BRIGHT COLOUR ELEVATES IT BEYOND THE NEUTRAL TO MAKE A STATEMENT

Kitchen Glazed terracotta tiles by Domenico Mori decorate the island, which is topped with brass. ‘Sahara’ pendant lights by Karman hang above and sliding Formica panels on the back wall hide storage cupboards Dining room A table by homeowner Stefan, velvet-upholstered chairs by Versmissen and ‘Domenica’ pendant lights by Karman suit the views Stockist details on p167 ➤

116 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019


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‘BLUE IS TRADITIONALLY THOUGHT OF AS A COLD COLOUR BUT HERE, THE WOOD AND THE FABRICS WARM IT UP’

Above The main bedroom features a bed designed by Stefan. For a similar bedside table, try Orchid. The ‘Soap’ light is by Bomma Opposite Suspended above the living area, this guest bedroom is clad in fabric by Arte Stockist details on p167 ➤

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 119


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Exterior Three sides of the house are clad entirely in timber and mimic the local crossbeam style Bathroom Perfectly placed for enjoying the views, this tub is by Teuco. Find similar brass candleholders at Skultuna Stockist details on p167

120 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019


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THE HOUSE IS DESIGNED TO REFLECT THE HAY BARNS THAT DOT THE TYROLEAN LANDSCAPE


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HOME TREND

Rekindled

traditions Classic-style furnishings are having a renaissance. Crafted with an eye for the modern, they elevate this Carolina mansion Words KARA O’REILLY Photography MATTHEW WILLIAMS

Drawing room Situated opposite the main bedroom, this private living space features a ‘Lodge Chandelier Three’ by Workstead, a brass floorlamp by Jim Bindman for the Rainbow Lamp Company and a vintage Adrian Pearsall sofa for Craft Associates. The ‘Sling Chair II’ chairs and ‘Spool’ side table are also by Workstead, while the rug is from Fine Rugs of Charleston Stockist details on p167 ➤


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Living room ‘The public face of the house,’ as Robert describes it, this space features original fireplaces, panelling, flooring, doors and windows. The lights are by Workstead and the ‘Moreno’ sofa and chairs are by Los Angelesbased Lawson-Fenning Stockist details on p167


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Trad’s not bad. In fact, in the right hands, it can be a very good thing indeed

This year, we are seeing a resurgence in the use of cane and wicker, as well as furniture crafted from warm, honey-hued woods. These pieces nod to the traditional crafts of the past, showing a deep respect for skill and the artisan touch, but with a new aesthetic that is much more sleek and contemporary. This reappraisal of classic furnishings is a signature of Brooklyn-based design company Workstead, with its on-trend style exemplified in its revival of this terraced mansion in Charleston, South Carolina. Now owned by a couple from New York City, the four-storey, five-bedroom house was built in 1853 and over the years served as a warehouse for contraband goods during the American Civil War, as well as being home to politician George A Trenholm, rumoured to be Margaret Mitchell’s inspiration for Rhett Butler in Gone With The Wind. Prior to Workstead taking on the property’s redesign, it had been extensively smoke damaged in a fire and the careful renovation process took a full two years to complete. ‘Our approach was more meticulous and sensitive than overbearing,’ says Robert Highsmith, one of the company’s three co-founders. ‘We feel we achieved a beautiful balance between the modern amenities we added, while retaining the spirit of the 19th-century structure.’ That careful balancing act is key to Workstead’s approach to such projects and applies as much to selecting furniture and fittings as to structure and materials. ‘We like to avoid the idea of an “instant house”, where everything is uniform, sourced at the same time,’ explains Robert. ‘As well as partnering with several contemporary furniture companies, we spent the renovation taking trips to source antique items, to make sure that the result is collected, rather than overly composed.’ Aspiring traditionalists, take note. workstead.com ➤ FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 125


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Dining room High-backed vintage cane chairs by Milo Baughman (try 1st Dibs) look incredibly contemporary when paired with the ‘Rough Dining Table’ by Sam Accocceberry for Collection Particulière. A ‘Signal Globe’ pendant light by Workstead hangs above Stockist details on p167 ➤


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Key modern pieces nod to traditional crafts of the past, showing a respect for skill and the artisan touch FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 127


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‘We like to avoid the idea of an “instant house”, where everything is uniform’ Kitchen Workstead designed the striking round island, with its marble top and curved cane doors. ‘In many ways it’s the centrepiece of the ground floor,’ says Workstead’s Robert Highsmith. The ‘Orsini’ bar stools are by Lawson-Fenning. The kitchen and dining areas are connected by a double-fronted glass and mahogany vitrine – designed by Workstead, it was inspired by 19th-century originals and is made from mahogany and glass Opposite The leather console and mirror are both by BDDW. The ‘Kensington’ pendant light is by The Urban Electric Company Stockist details on p167 ➤

128 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019


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‘We achieved a beautiful balance between the modern and the spirit of this historic structure’


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Bathroom With cabinets designed by Workstead and made by local cabinetmakers, Meadors, as well as a freestanding bath from Aston Matthews, this room has a traditional feel. The unlacquered brass fittings are by Waterworks and the artwork is by Charleston-based Tim Hussey Bedroom The four-poster bed is an antique piece and the mid-century ‘Havana’ lounge chairs are by Adrian Pearsall for Craft Associates Stockist details on p167

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 131


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Nature is taking over this Cape Town home, as the trend for impressive greenery takes an architectural turn Words KERRYN FISCHER Production LUANNE TOMS Photography ELSA YOUNG/FRANK FEATURES

HOME TREND

WILD


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W

A BA NDON


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Living room A ‘Pop’ sofa by Piero Lissoni for Kartell, as well as an ‘Uncle Jim’ armchair and ‘Uncle Jack’ sofa, both by Philippe Starck for Kartell, make a statement in this open-plan room. The ‘Arco’ floorlamp is by Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni for Flos. Echoing the trees in the garden outside, the concrete ceiling is imprinted with the pattern of wood Stockist details on p167 ➤


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‘I’ve always had a desire to keep things simple so that I can notice the myriad shades of sunrise and sunset, the starry skies at night and the many textures of greenery that exist right on our doorstep,’ explains designer Anke Stegmann, owner of this house on the slopes of Table Mountain. Here, nature reigns supreme, with Anke’s home designed to allow the garden to grow into it and around it. It’s no coincidence that as the trend for plants in interiors has blossomed over the past few years, back in the UK, organisations such as Rewilding Britain and Rewilding Scotland (both of which focus on expanding wild habitats and reconnecting people with the natural world) have come into existence. The next step for Anke (right) was to make greenery an integral part of her home – not just something to be displayed. When she and her husband Johnny Cullum, a civil engineer, bought this piece of land 30 years ago, they were taken by its great location – situated in a valley between two rivers, it has amazing natural biodiversity. For Anke, who spent her childhood in Namibia, the area’s wildness struck a chord. ‘A connection to nature has always been hugely important to me,’ she says. ‘Here, the river runs next to our kitchen. We have installed sliding doors that open onto it and placed stepping stones across it to allow access to the rest of the garden.’

THIS HOME IS DESIGNED TO ALLOW THE GARDEN TO GROW INTO IT

‘WE WANTED TO CREATE A FEELING OF SPACE AND OF BEING IN NATURE’

The home in Glen Crescent was originally a simple box of a house, and its main feature was its amazing terraced garden. However, as Cape Town became more populated and demand for this area’s views and proximity to the city grew, its grounds were chopped up to make way for more homes. So, when the opportunity arose for Anke and Johnny to buy the neighbouring property five years ago, they jumped at the chance, choosing to demolish the building to make way for their garden to return to its original wildness. ‘We wanted to restore the land to what it once was; to create a generosity of space and a feeling of being in nature,’ Anke explains passionately. The first thing they did was build a pool, which looks more like a lake, along the bottom boundary of the property. This was then followed by the laying of two slabs, that house the home’s new living room, bedroom and roof deck, all of which are designed to provide the best views. ‘We feel incredibly privileged to have had the opportunity to do this,’ says Anke. ‘It’s now a tranquil and magical place to live, and I look forward to watching the garden claim it further.’

Garden A river runs past the entrance to the kitchen, with carefully placed stepping stones providing access to the wild greenery beyond ➤

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 137


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Dining room The dining table is a five-metre-long pine design found at an antiques dealer’s shop in Port Elizabeth, while the ‘Papyrus’ chairs are by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Kartell Stockist details on p167 ➤


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SITUATED IN A VALLEY BETWEEN TWO RIVERS, THE LOCATION HAS AMAZING BIODIVERSITY

Bathroom Faux marble porcelain tiles line the walls in the walk-in shower. Anke had planned to use real marble, but the slabs were too thick to accommodate her chosen Vola taps and showerhead Garden A pool resembling a lake marks the property’s boundary Stockist details on p167


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EDIT SPRING / SUMMER 2019

Edited by A MY MOOREA WONG

B &B ITALIA CALLIGARIS CARL HANSEN & SØN ETH I M O FLEXFOR M FRITZ HANSEN GIORGET TI KETTAL KNOLL LEMA LONGHI M ERI D IAN I M INOT TI M O LTEN I & C MONTANA NATUZZI POLIFOR M PO LTRO NA FRAU POR ADA


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TH E

EDIT

Our pick of the world’s best new designs

B & B I TA L I A Enticing pieces reinterpreting traditional shapes in truly innovative ways (bebitalia.com)

‘ATOLL’ SOFA BY ANTONIO CITTERIO, FROM £8,830

‘TOBI-ISHI’ OUTDOOR TABLE BY EDWARD BARBER & JAY OSGERBY, £3,101

CALLIGARIS Opulent materials are combined with the sleekest of design touches (calligaris.co.uk)

‘COCO’ CHAIR IN ‘OCEAN BLUE’, £838

‘ICARO’ WHITE MARBLE TABLE, £3,594

‘BIBLIO’ DESK, £1,443


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CARL HANSEN & SØN Our love of Danish design is kept alive with reissued gems and future classics (carlhansen.com)

‘AJ52 SOCIETY DESK’ BY ARNE JACOBSEN, £5,695, ARAM (ARAM.CO.UK)

‘CH71’ LOUNGE CHAIR BY HANS J WEGNER, £1,934, ARAM (ARAM.CO.UK)

‘CONFETTI’ PENDANT LIGHTS BY THORUP BONDERUP, £380 FOR TWO

ETHIMO Preparing us for warmer days ahead, this brand’s outdoor furnishings have a pale, neutral beauty (ethimo.com)

‘GRAND LIFE’ SOFA BY CHRISTOPHE PILLET, £4,102

‘KILT’ CHAIR BY MARCELLO ZILIANI, FROM £482

‘LUCERNA’ OUTDOOR LAMP BY LUCA NICHETTO, FROM £525

FLEXFORM Grown-up elegance is key for this season’s designs, with a refined mix of materials (flexform.it)

‘TAYLOR’ CABINET BY CARLO COLOMBO, FROM £8,512

‘ADDA’ BED BY ANTONIO CITTERIO, FROM £5,691 ➤

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 145


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TH E

EDIT

FRITZ HANSEN Enveloping shapes and indulgent comfort (fritzhansen.com)

Our pick of the world’s best new designs

‘LITTLE GIRAFFE’ CHAIR BY ARNE JACOBSEN, FROM £2,509

‘PLENUM’ SOFA BY JAIME HAYÓN, £4,473

GIORGETTI Crisp angles are the style of the moment at this historic Italian furniture house (giorgetti.eu)

‘FIT’ COFFEE TABLE BY GIANCARLO BOSIO AND CENTRO RICERCHE, FROM £5,832

‘ALEXA’ CHAIR BY UMBERTO ASNAGO, FROM £1,230

‘JULIET’ DESK BY ROBERTO LAZZERONI, FROM £11,779

K E T TA L Turn your garden into a paradise this season with outdoor pieces in tropical shades (kettal.com)

‘ROLL’ SIDE TABLE BY PATRICIA URQUIOLA, FROM £609

‘BITTA’ ARMCHAIR BY RODOLFO DORDONI, FROM £2,486

‘BITTA’ STOOL/DECKCHAIR MODULE BY RODOLFO DORDONI, £2,671


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KNOLL Architectural forms are the definitive look at this brand, which remains true to Bauhaus philosophy (knolleurope.com)

‘GRASSHOPPER’ TABLE BY PIERO LISSONI, FROM £3,660

‘NEWSON’ CHAIR BY MARC NEWSON, £1,692

LEMA The Art Deco spirit is alive, reimagined with a simple, pared-back sophistication (lemamobili.com)

‘ALAMO’ TABLE BY DAVID LOPEZ QUINCOCES, FROM £4,508

‘TAIKI’ ARMCHAIR BY CHIARA ANDREATTI, £3,195

‘AREIA’ CHEST OF DRAWERS BY DAVID LOPEZ QUINCOCES, £7,556

LONGHI Luxury is taken to new levels, with lavish marble, gold and leather finishes (longhi.it)

‘COURBET’ SIDEBOARD BY GIUSEPPE VIGANÒ, FROM £35,328

‘KATHRYN’ ARMCHAIR BY GIUSEPPE VIGANÒ, FROM £5,504 ➤

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 147


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EDIT

Our pick of the world’s best new designs

MERIDIANI Curved forms and communal seating chime with the design world’s current 1970s vibe (meridiani.it)

‘HAROLD’ MODULAR SOFA BY ANDREA PARISIO, FROM £5,600

‘JO – JILL’ POUF BY ANDREA PARISIO, FROM £1,400

MINOTTI This season’s most coveted pieces exude an air of refined, timeless grace (minottilondon.com)

‘LOU’ SIDEBOARD BY CHRISTOPHE DELCOURT, FROM £19,568

‘RUSSELL’ SOFA BY RODOLFO DORDONI, £9,045


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M O LT E N I & C Soft edges bring an approachable, comforting quality to the Italian powerhouse’s latest looks (molteni.it)

‘EUSTON’ POUF BY RODOLFO DORDONI, £2,526

‘HUGO’ COFFEE TABLE BY VINCENT VAN DUYSEN, £2,151

‘ELAIN’ ARMCHAIR BY VINCENT VAN DUYSEN, £2,448

M O N TA N A Functional but fun designs, available in the Danish brand’s covetable colour range (montanafurniture.com)

‘COAT’ STORAGE UNIT BY PETER J LASSEN, £342

‘PANTON ONE’ CHAIR BY VERNER PANTON, £378

‘MONTANA FREE’ SHELVING BY JAKOB WAGNER, £858

N AT U Z Z I Contemporary Italian luxury with details inspired by the landscape and lifestyle of Puglia (natuzzi.co.uk)

‘CASSIA’ ARMCHAIR BY MAURO LIPPARINI, FROM £2,300

‘FURROW’ SOFA BY MARCEL WANDERS, FROM £2,370

‘CRATE’ SIDEBOARD BY MARCEL WANDERS, £6,150 ➤

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 149


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POLIFORM Rounded yet streamlined silhouettes (poliformuk.com)

Our pick of the world’s best new designs

‘CREEK’ COFFEE TABLE BY JEAN MARIE MASSAUD, £10,967

‘KELLY’ BED BY EMMANUEL GALLINA, £5,698

P O LT R O N A F R A U This season sees the brand take an original approach to functional style (poltronafrau.com)

‘CERCLE PRESIDENT’ CHAIR BY LIEVORE ALTHERR PARK, £3,552

‘VERTIGO’ SOFA BED BY EOOS, £8,868

‘TRUST’ CABINET BY LIEVORE ALTHERR PARK, £7,092

PORADA Known for its love of walnut, this Italian firm continues to use it in ever more inventive ways (porada.it)

‘QUADRIFOGLIO’ DINING TABLE BY CARLO BALLABIO, FROM £4,139

150 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019

‘JOK’ SIDE TABLE BY GABRIELE & OSCAR BURATTI, FROM £1,151

‘EMMA’ CHAIR BY PATRICK JOUIN, FROM £1,609


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T H E U LT I M AT E WI N T ER RE A D N E W I S S U E ON S A L E N OW Step inside contemporar y rural ret reat s with the latest issue of ELLE Decorat ion Count r y. From a moder n Nor wegian hyt te to a 50 0 -year- old far mhouse, there’s inspirat ion for all

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ESCAPE SPRING / SUMMER 2019 Edited by PIP MCCOR M AC

THE TH E THE TH E THE

HOTEL RESTAU RANTS RESORT TRAVEL U PDATE DESTINATION

Interior of the Shanghai Edition hotel’s restaurant. Read more about this new hotspot overleaf


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THE HOTEL

SHANGHAI EDITION Described by hotelier Ian Schrager as ‘a new generation of urban luxury retreat’, this is the place we’ll be clamouring to stay at in 2019


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The Shanghai Edition, which opened in the Chinese metropolis last October, offers guests a new level of hospitality. Designed by local studio Neri & Hu and overseen by hotel guru Ian Schrager, the venue is an intimate yet cosmopolitan hotel – which Schrager describes as ‘a city within the city’. A complex of interconnecting structures and environments, it is a place to meet and work, as well as an oasis of relaxation and entertainment. The stylish communal areas, including the main lobby, Shanghai Tavern restaurant (headed up by Michelin-starred chef Jason Atherton), the spa, Electric Circus nightclub and roof garden, are all located within the lovingly restored confines of an Art Deco building, built in 1929. The hotel’s 145 elegant bedrooms can be found in the adjoining Postmodern tower – along with the Hiya fusion restaurant, outdoor lounge and sky bar with panoramic views. The sophisticated but informal look of the rooms, as well as the designer furnishings and painstaking attention to detail, is aimed at making the experience of every guest authentic and personalised. In fact, this was the vision shared by both Schrager and Neri & Hu when dreaming up this ambitious project. ‘In all of our interventions, we love to associate the memory of the place with its momentum in the future,’ explain the designers. The calm, relaxing mood allows guests to feel that the focus is on them. However, with design and architecture this exquisite and timely, we believe all eyes will be trained on the building. After all, the Shanghai Edition is more than a hotel – it’s a brand-new landmark for China’s largest city (editionhotels.com).

WORDS: FRANCESCA BENEDETTO PICTURES: ALBERTO STRADA

THE AIM OF THE DESIGN IS TO MAKE THE EXPERIENCE OF EVERY GUEST AUTHENTIC AND PERSONALISED

Left Shanghai’s skyline from the Hiya restaurant This page The elegant and relaxed surroundings of Hiya restaurant, with its strikingly modern, brass helical staircase ➤

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 155


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This page The lobby, with its suspended garden, is located where the old Art Deco building meets the Postmodern high-rise Right, from top Clad in oak, the bedroom walls feature photos by Wing Shya, made famous by Wong Kar-Wai, the director of In the Mood for Love. Marble bathrooms offer tubs with outstanding views


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EXPERT INSIGHT HOTELIER IAN SCHRAGER ON THE F U T U R E O F H O S P I TA L I T Y

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE PICTURES: ALBERTO STRADA, CAMERA PRESS/CIRCE

Schrager had a busy 2018, and it looks like 2019 will be much the same. Following the success of his original Edition hotels in London, Miami, New York’s Flatiron District and later in Sanya, China, the legendary hotelier launched a raft of new properties including this one in Shanghai and others in Abu Dhabi Bodrum, Barcelona and New York’s Times Square – an outpost in West Hollywood is imminent, too. With over four decades in the business and plans for nine more hotels to open across five continents by 2020, he has no intention of slowing down soon. Here, he shares his thoughts and predictions on where the luxury hotel industry is headed. What do people want from a hotel in 2019, and how are those demands continuing to evolve? Hotels have become more than just somewhere to sleep, and the public perception of luxury has changed. Today it’s about how something makes you feel, not how much it costs or whether it has a visible logo on it. Wealth used to be a real status symbol, but now it’s about being in the know. People want to go to a place that elevates their spirit and gives them a unique experience. How is hotel design adapting to current fashions? It needs to manifest the people and the culture of the city that it’s in. You can’t have identical hotels in Shanghai, Boston and London, but, by the same token, the differences have to have subtlety. Finding the DNA of a city doesn’t mean you have to hit people over the head with it – you might use furniture and art from the region or country that the hotel is based in, although those choices may not be immediately obvious to guests. At the same time, though, things change so quickly, and you have to stay true to yourself and your aesthetic. We like sophisticated, simple design, and our customers respond to that. Are there certain things that people expect as standard? Everyone wants to be treated with courtesy and respect, and guests need to feel welcomed and at home in a very personalised, non-pretentious way – one size does not fit all. It’s something that’s going to become more and more important, and it’s one of the ways you can really distinguish yourself in this industry. Of course, the basics are still important: the beds need to be great, and the sheets and pillowcases terrific, so that everyone gets a good night’s sleep. Public spaces are a lot easier to design, as they’re very receptive to flamboyant gestures, but rooms are more difficult. Intimate things go on in there – if you bang your elbow on a shelf while shaving, or if you put your make-up on and the light isn’t right, people don’t excuse that. What do you think hotels need to do to stay competitive? They need to be exciting and glamorous. A hotel lobby should appeal to the people who actually live in the city, because visitors want to go where those in the know hang out. You should get the feeling of the town without having to leave the premises, which should be a microcosm of the best of what’s on offer – somewhere to eat, drink, work and socialise. I like to think we had something to do with starting this new breed of hotel.

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 157


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T H E R E S TA U R A N T S

FEASTS FOR THE EYES Grab a table at these London launches, pairing delicious food with great design

BRASSERIE OF LIGHT As part of the £300 million refurbishment of London’s Selfridges, the don of modern restaurant design Martin Brudnizki has upped the opulence ante to extremes. Reflective gold panels line the Brasserie of Light’s ceiling and walls, bouncing sparkles off the chrome countertops and around the dining room, creating a spectacle that is as uplifting as it is over the top. The main attraction, though, is the sevenmetre-high crystal-encrusted Pegasus designed by Damien Hirst – suspended dramatically above diners, its nine-metre wingspan dazzles. The restaurant is run by Caprice Holdings and, like its megabrand The Ivy, focuses on British classics with an international twist – the flat-iron chicken served with truffle mashed potatoes is a real treat (brasserie-of-light.co.uk).

MAISON BAB Designer Angus Buchanan laid the brightly coloured oak parquet flooring of this ultra-hip kebab house at random, resulting in an exhilarating weave of pink, grey, white and natural tiles – a dancefloor on which to dine. Its pattern sets the tone for this restaurant that fizzes with energy, the Turkish-inspired menu singing with scents and spice. For a more ironically traditional kebab experience, head downstairs to Kebab Queen, a night-time drop-in hall where the walls are decorated with murals of high-street kebab shops, nodding knowingly to the ones that feature at the end of many a big night out. The idea shows an irreverence that suits the elbows-on-the-table vibe and Covent Garden’s transformation into the new Soho (see other new launches SushiSamba, Jidori and Bancone for further proof ), where dinner is fast, fun and full of flavour (maisonbab.com).

WORDS: PIP MCCORMAC

BERENJAK The latest restaurant from the owners of Trishna, Gymkhana and Brigadiers opened in November, and has already been receiving stellar reviews. Less starry than its sister eateries – it doesn’t take bookings, so securing a table is a more egalitarian process – it is designed by Samuel Hosker and features artfully crumbling walls, well-worn Persian rugs, ikat-printed cushions and trailing indoor vines. That homeliness is matched by incredibly moreish Iranian comfort food, charcoal-grilled with an impressive intensity. Try the gloriously blackened minced goat shoulder or the pyramid of hummus, flecked with walnuts and a sprinkling of sumac. Be sure to accompany your meal with one of the zesty sharbats (a traditional drink of sugar syrup and water), which cement the venue’s appeal (berenjaklondon.com). FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 159


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THE RESORT

JOALI, MALDIVES

This year, dream of a trip to the new destination that makes paradise even more appealing While there are some things you’d expect from an exotic archipelago in the Indian Ocean – talcum-powder beaches, crystalline waters, fiery sunsets and, fingers crossed, a healthy dose of vitamin D – others at Joali, the Maldives’ newest and most forward-thinking resort, might be more of a surprise. Innovative architecture by Istanbul-based multidisciplinary design studio Autoban, for example, or an immersive art trail complete with a woven sculpture of a manta ray (below right) perched five metres above the ground. Both the villas on land and the ones on stilts in the sea have interiors conceived by the Turkish designers and feature bathrooms clad in emerald-green Norwegian marble, intricate bamboo dividers and 3D-printed bronze door handles, while carved wooden panels come courtesy of renowned South African studio and Hermès collaborator Ardmore Ceramic Art. Other highlights include work

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE

WITH ONE-OF-A-KIND ARTWORKS, INVENTIVE RESTAURANTS AND LAVISH SPA TREATMENTS, THIS RESORT REDEFINES PARADISE by north London conceptual design studio Glithero – which used an X-ray technique to transfer plant shapes from the island’s foliage onto vases and tiles – rope-stitched light sculptures by Brooklynbased artist Doug Johnston, and other one-of-a-kind pieces created by the Joali Art Studio. The lofty manta ray, which also doubles as a treehouse used for hosting experimental dinners, is the work of Porky Hefer, a South African designer. Add to this Japanese-, Italian-, Asian- and Middle Eastern-style restaurants, plus the requisite lavish spa treatments, and you’ve a destination fit for any design-lover’s bucket list. Rooms from £1,502 per night based on two people sharing a beach villa with a pool ( joali.com). FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 161


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T H E T R AV E L U P D AT E

AIRPORT LOUNGES With three international creatives in command, the holiday feeling now begins before takeoff C AT H AY PA C I F I C ’ S T H E P I E R F I R S T- C L A S S L O U N G E H O N G K O N G I N T E R N AT I O N A L A I R P O R T

FEATURING DESIGNER FURNITURE AND LUXURIOUS, RELAXING TOUCHES, THESE LOUNGES HAVE US CRAVING A DELAY

Ilse Crawford’s Studioilse is known for its pared-back palette, use of natural materials and an aesthetic that invites the quiet contemplation ideal before a long flight, so it’s perhaps surprising the studio hasn’t designed an airport lounge before now. With the aim of encouraging a soporific state, the sprawling 2,000-square-metre space comes with a wellbeing area, signature fragrance and carefully chosen soundtrack. Comfort is key here and you’ll find yourself embraced by enveloping ‘Diz’ armchairs by Sergio Rodrigues or Verner Panton’s cocooning ‘Clover Leaf’ sofas (studioilse.com).

C A S A A L I TA L I A R O M A L O U N G E PIER E, LEONARDO DA VINCI-FIUMICINO A I R P O R T, R O M E

There is a strong emphasis on the big Italian design brands in this 1,000-square-metre lounge, where you’ll find pieces by the likes of Poltrona Frau, Flos, Ceramica Cielo, Lapalma, Marazzi and Martini Light. One of several new airport spaces by Studio Marco Piva, which has created lounges for Milan-Malpensa and New York’s JFK, this Roman outpost opened last June and is full of decorative items chosen to help flyers relax. The towering bookcases are stocked with inspiring reads, as well as ceramics by Bitossi and Richard Ginori, and the idea is to provide ‘a break and a rest, conveying the true Italian lifestyle through design, and offering excellent levels of welcome and comfort,’ says Piva (studiomarcopiva.com).

E

WORDS: PIP MCCORMAC PICTURE: LIT MA

AIR FRANCE’S LE BALCON BUSINESS LOUNGE TERMINAL 2E, CHARLES DE GAULLE A I R P O R T, PA R I S

The French designer Mathieu Lehanneur’s career is characterised by being difficult to characterise. He has designed products as diverse as a plant-based air purifier and iridescent clothes rails for the boutique Maison Kitsuné and now Le Balcon, a shimmering airport lounge. The curved structure stretches over 160 square metres, with the central bar surrounded by velvet booth seating – all dazzling under a golden mirrored ceiling. Mixing wood, marble, glass and light, the installation has an LED screen at the very centre. Integrated into the parquet floor, it depicts images of the sky. ‘Flying,’ Lehanneur says of the inspiration behind his calm and uplifting space, ‘is to remain motionless and feel the clouds slide under one’s feet’ (mathieulehanneur.fr). FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 163


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T H E D E S T I N AT I O N

LJUBLJANA

With a wealth of up-and-coming design talent and exciting new landmarks under construction – including the country’s first mosque by local architect Bevk Perović – now is the time to visit the Slovenian capital the city centre, and on the banks near the famous castle, hidden down a cobbled street, is Vander Urbani Resort (from £93 per night; vanderhotel.com). Here, old town charm meets contemporary style, as four traditional townhouses have been amalgamated into one minimalist boutique hotel, where occasional flashes of purple and yellow furniture almost glow in front of brushed concrete walls. Part of the Design Hotels group, it has a beautiful rooftop infinity pool and ground-floor restaurant and cocktail bar. Over near Tivoli Park, the ornate gardens designed in 1813 by French engineer Jean Blanchard, is the InterContinental Ljubljana hotel, a luxe blend of dark wood, marble and Mediterranean stone (from £109 per night; ihg.com). Its fantastic B-Restaurant, managed by Michelin-starred chef Alfredo Russo, is one to book in advance.

SEE

Ljubljana’s architecture underwent a revolution in the early 20th century, as Art Nouveau buildings began to define the city’s style. Influenced by new industrial methods and an appreciation of the Viennese arts scene, their elegant gildings are just as impressive today. Start a stroll at Dragon Bridge, constructed in 1901 by Jurij Zaninović, who studied under Viennese architect Otto Wagner. Then amble along nearby Miklošičeva ulica street, flanked by buildings in gelato colours with elegant baroque flourishes. In good weather, head to Tivoli Park, where a free exhibition, ‘Park Dinarides’, celebrates nature and the benefits of spending time outdoors (until 14 January). On a rainy afternoon, take shelter in the MG+ museum, which is showing a retrospective of Slovenian photographer Stojan Kerbler’s portraits of ‘everyday people’ (until 13 January; mg-lj.si). Spanning his 70-year career,

164 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019

it’s a fascinating glimpse into the country’s social history. You’ll then need sustenance from Ljubljana’s Central Market – located along the river’s edge, this is where locals go to feast on Prekmurje, a layered cake with poppy seeds, cottage cheese, walnuts and apple.

DRINK AND EAT

Slovenian food traditionally centres around sausages, meats and honeyed breads, but while you’ll easily find them all here, Ljubljana’s exciting restaurant scene has embraced modern cuisines, too. Just a short distance from Congress Square is Monstera Bistro, a pared-back, whitewashed dining room where all the colour comes from what’s on the plate (monsterabistro.si). Its ever-changing menu of local and seasonal ingredients is presented with artistic sprinklings of herbs and edible flowers. Meanwhile Gostilnica 5-6kg, situated beside the city’s Tivoli Park, offers local takes on international dishes – pizza with Slovenian ham and carbonara with local cheese are highlights (facebook.com/gostilnica56kg). It’s fast, fun and buzzy, just like Kucha in the north, a vegan restaurant selling poke bowls and tacos (@kuchamadre). Still craving traditional sausage? Gostilna Sokol, a tavern in the cathedral’s shadow, serves them alongside its rich and enticing mushroom soup (gostilna-sokol.com).

SHOP

Karl Lagerfeld meets Alice in Wonderland at Pentlja Concept Store (pentljaconceptstore.com), a trove of local fashion. Inside you’ll find jewellery by in-house designer Goga, handcrafted Croatian hats and Slovenian homeware. Formadoma sells curated collectibles from Scandinavian brands such as House of Rym and House Doctor (formadoma.eu), while Gud Shop has ceramics that would make perfect gifts (gud-shop.com).

WORDS: PIP MCCORMAC PICTURES: GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO

STAY Head down to where the Ljubljanica river bends through


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Clockwise from top left Poolside views of the city skyline from the 18th floor of the InterContinental. Chic homewares at Gud Shop. Ljubljana’s picturesque Triple Bridge. The pared-back interior of top-notch lunch spot Monstera Bistro. Vurnic house’s façade, decorated in the traditional national style. Slovenia’s first mosque, with a modern design by architect Bevk Perović. One of the sleek bedrooms at Vander Urbani Resort. A stunning dish at the hotel’s restaurant


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ST YLISH INTERIORS Create your dream living space with our inspiring collection

BERGMAN INTERIORS Award winning Luxury Interior Design and Architecture studio, Bergman Interiors, are behind the aesthetically inspired Penthouse at 98 Portland Place. Located in Park Crescent, Marylebone, the development from Amazon property developers featured stunning vistas of Regent's Park, making this one of the most exclusive addresses in London. Marie Soliman of Bergman Interiors continues to use her background as an artist throughout the design process, most notably in the passion and bespoke nature that she brings to this project, creating a narrative that brings the iconic London space to life. Every piece of furniture has been bespoke designed by Marie and co-founder Albin to suit the sleek nature of the property. From curved and organic furnishings, to the use of exotic stones as table tops, Soliman, a natural story teller is also extremely conscious about remaining ethical when it comes to sourcing her materials and has utilised her love of craftmanship and textures throughout the project. Key elements throughout are; the liquid metal mural, inspired by Marylebone itself, made of liquid bronze and leaves in resin by water gilders. The hand tufted rug developed from an original Soliman ink painting that embraces the salmon tones to add a softer touch to the grey palette inspired by London’s beautiful sunset. A chess board made solely of marquetry and hand sculptured bronze, with the use of stone lapis for the pawns. Available to buy from Bergman Interiors and Harrods. £6,250. 168 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019

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Photo: The Creators Collective

The much sought after Marylebone address of a Grade II listed converted church has been transformed by Bergman Interiors to become The Engine Room – London’s first rowing studio where the design enhances performance. Veiled behind ornamental architecture, this state-of-the-art fitness studio hosts a revolutionary space that takes inspiration from the movement of oars and light on water to create an interior that emboldens performers to push their limits. From the exposed hammer beams and original stained-glass windows, to the refashioned church pews and suspending light installations, The Engine Rooms is a collective of unique contemporary schemes and traditional character – a true form of spatial innovation that showcases Bergman Interiors' diversity. Engine room is a another iconic fitness landmark after the smashing success of BXR. www.bergmaninteriors.com FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 169


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ST YLISH INTERIORS Create your dream living space with our inspiring collection SERIP INSPIRED BY NATURE Serip, an expert brand in organic lighting, is inspired by uneven forms found in nature. The designs are handmade with time-honoured craft techniques, luxurious materials and unrivalled quality. Inspired by the winter water drops with an association inherent in the brand’s identity, it expresses a strong connection to the main source of inspiration, nature. The bronze structure expands into interlocking twigs that lead to floating pieces of glass, a feature that allows an airy feel along with its delicate and elegant appearance, concepts visible in the smallest details of the glass drops. Through its various colour choices and design options, the Aqua Collection presents itself as an exquisite piece inspired by nature, perfect for any concept, a versatile collection, adaptable to all spaces. For a customised design, please contact: info@serip.com.pt Lighting: Bespoke Aqua chandelier by Serip. Interior design by Hill House Interiors. Visit: www.serip.com.pt Photography by Laura Kelly.

DAVID STUDWELL THE ORIGINAL CUSHION CO

LIFE SIZE WILDLIFE SCULPTURE Worldwide shipping www.andrewkaysculpture.co.uk (+44) 07740 306412 170 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019

The Original Cushion Co is the Web’s favourite place for fabric lovers to find luxury cushions and throws. They cleverly source the world’s finest materials to create their in-house designs, from South African hand-printed velvets and hand-loomed Indian silks to Venetian Fortuny cottons and French Jaspé silk. View their exquisite range in their online store: www.originalcushionco.com or follow @originalcushioncompany on Instagram.

David Studwell often uses figures that are synonymous with certain eras, in particular the swinging sixties. Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor and Steve McQueen all crop up in his prints, evoking a strong sense of nostalgia. His work has been exhibited in London and the USA. David’s work hangs in private collections worldwide and has been collected by Kate Moss, Sheryl Crow and Nile Rogers. Title: ‘Frank Sinatra I.' Screen print. Edition of 30. 58 x 36cm. £300. Visit: www.davidstudwellgallery.co.uk or email davidstudwell@gmail.com


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15% OFF DESIGN YOUR OWN SOFAS, SOFA BEDS AND BEDS & UP TO 55% OFF CLEARANCE The Willow & Hall January sale is now on with 10% off all design your own sofas, sofa beds and beds and up to 50% off clearance items. As a reader of Elle Deco they’re also offering you an exclusive 5% discount; saving you 15% on all design your own sale items, up to 55% on clearance items and 5% on all other non-sale items. All you need to do is use the code ELLE29119 at the checkout by 29 January. Choose from Willow & Hall’s range of handmade living and bedroom furniture, all made by skilled craftsmen in Britain with over 35 years’ experience. If choosing a design your own item, customising your item is easy. Simply choose from 259 beautiful fabrics, pick your perfect seat cushions and, if ordering a sofa bed, you can select from three luxury 14cm deep mattress options: open sprung, pocket sprung and memory foam. All items come with a 25-year wood frame guarantee; are delivered for free nationwide within 4-5 weeks for design your own items and from three working days for clearance items; and Willow & Hall offer a no quibbles 30-day free returns policy. Explore the entire range at willowandhall.co.uk, call on 020 8939 3800 or visit the London showroom.

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 171


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INTERIOR DESIGN

OUTDOOR SCULPTURES, ART & PHOTOGRAPHY

Explore interior design and transform your life Rosie Armstrong transformed her career from fashion to interiors on our two year evening programme and now works with leading London designers McCrum Interiors on high end residential interiors. “The evening programme at The Interior Design School allowed me to continue working whilst pursuing a career change. Over the two year course I honed skills in concept development, space planning, technical drawing and sourcing, alongside developing an understanding of my own aesthetic and producing a professional portfolio of work. The standard of teaching at the IDS has been an incredible asset to my journey.” Rosie Armstrong

www.theinteriordesignschool.co.uk

Interior design courses from one day to two years

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Classifieds | A – Z INTERIOR DESIGN & ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES

JANEY BUTLER INTERIORS & LLAMA ARCHITECTS FORM PART OF THE LLAMA GROUP.

Creating award winning residential and commercial projects in the UK and abroad.

INTERNATIONAL AWARD WINNING ARCHITECTS & INTERIOR DESIGNERS.

The Coach House, Capesthorne Hall, nr Alderley Edge, Cheshire. SK11 9JY.

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BATHROOMS, DOORS & CERAMICS

What’s missing from an Albion bath? Excessive Weight.

Our unique material is strong and durable, yet weighs around 1/3 of the cast iron equivalent. Request your brochure on: 01255 831605 or go to: www.albionbathco.com

NORTH4.COM DORGLAZE® VISION PANELS FOR DOORS

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Unique, organic, ceramic sculptures. Bespoke commissions www.kiramics.com

174 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019

Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour samuel-heath.co.uk Made in England

Björk Haraldsdóttir Contemporary Handbuilt Ceramics

www.ceramicsbybjork.com


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Classifieds | A – Z WINDOWS

Experts in steel windows.

We design, manufacture and install bespoke frames throughout the world.

Visit us at: www.fabcosanctuary.com

01903 718808 enquiries@fabcosanctuary.com

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 175


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Classifieds | A – Z DANISH FURNITURE & RUG REPAIR

176 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019

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Classifieds | A – Z FURNITURE, FLOORING & KITCHENS

Winter It’s your story. So it’s tailored to you.

SALE

Featured: Haresfield Snuggler in Portland Velvet Brass £1,852, Camden Bed in Portland Brass & Pampas Saffron £1,156

BESP OK E SOFA S | CH A I R S | BE DS | M AT T R ES SES West Sussex | Hampshire | Kent | Berkshire | London | Gloucestershire | Hertfordshire | Manchester | West Yorkshire | North Yorkshire | Scotland

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The finest new, antique and reclaimed wood floors

www.woodworksbytedtodd.com

FEBRUARY 2019 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 177


WORDS: KIERA BUCKLEY-JONES PICTURE: LUCKY IF SHARP

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THE FINE PRINT

‘VALLAURIS’ VELVET BY MANUEL CANOVAS

The new Manuel Canovas collection is inspired by artist Henri Matisse’s use of colour and pattern – ‘Vallauris’ is even named after an area of the Côte d’Azur near his home in Nice – but it is this particular design’s distinctly 1970s feel that has won our hearts. The luxurious texture of velvet and the soft sheen of its Lurex gold threads tap directly into the current mood in interiors. ‘Vallauris’ velvet in ‘Rose’ from the ‘Opio’ collection, £120 per metre, Manuel Canovas (manuelcanovas.com)

178 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FEBRUARY 2019


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